Amaranthus spinosus L
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NO. 39290

Survival of Pseudomonas solanacearum E.F. Smith in the rhizosphere of some weed and economic plant species


Quimio, AJ; Chan, HH
Philippine Phytopathological Society; c/o Dept. of Plant Pathology; Institute of Biological Sciences; UP Los Baños; College; Laguna; Philippines

Philippine Phytopathology 15 (2): 108-121 (1979)

Abstract:
The population of Pseudomonas solanacearum gradually declined in both rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils of jungle rice Echinochloa colonum, goose-grass (Eleusine indica) spiny amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus), corn (Zea mays), mungbean (Vigna radiata) and rice (Oryza sativa) but not in the rhizosphere soils of common purslane (Portulaca oleracea) where it gradually but distinctly increased. The rate of population decline was lowest in Portulaca oleracea, Echinochloa colonum, and Eleusine indica, while relatively greater suppression of the population occurred in rice and corn. Latent infection by the bacterium was found in Portulaca oleracea but not in other plant species. The population of Pseudomonas solanacearum was also higher in the rhizosphere soils than in non-rhizosphere soils of the weeds. On the other hand, both corn and rice had relatively higher population in non-rhizosphere soils. In bare fallow soils, population decline was slow and comparable to that in the weeds. In bioassays with wilt susceptible tomato cv. "Yellow Plum", the highest level of wilting occurred in soil previously planted with corn and rice. Compared to previously fallowed soil, significant lowering in degree of wilting was detected in soils previously planted with corn, rice and spiny amaranth, but not in those previously planted with goose-grass, jungle rice and common purslane.

Availability :
Main Library; University of the Philippines Los Baños; College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 39059

Clinical evaluation of NIST-produced allergenic extracts. II. Hyposensitization injection treatment with pollen extracts


Dacanay, EP; Laurel, O; Manalo, JB
Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP)

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 101 (1-2): 15-30 (1972)

Abstract:
Hyposensitasion injection treatment for at least a year with yard grass (Eleusine indica), amorsecos (Chrysopogon aciculatus, syn.: Andropogon aciculatus), alabang X (Dichanthium aristatum), bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon) and urai weed (Amaranthus spinosus) was undertaken in 22 patients with allergic perennial or non-seasonal rhinitis and/or seasonal asthma. Significant improvement was noted in 74% rhinitis patients and in 69% asthmatic patients. Except for a few unpleasant symptoms due to intolerance to the dose concentration in a few patients, no further untoward reactions were noted from the prolonged use of these NIST prepared allergenic extracts.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of the Philippines Los Baños, College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 50331

Amaranthus spinosus L.


Lemmens, RHMJ; Bunyapraphatsara, N
Prosea Publication Office, Department of Plant Taxonomy, Wageningen Agricultural University, P.O. Box 341, 6700 AH Wageningen, the Netherlands

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 110-113

Abstract:
A brief information on Amaranthus spinosus , reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 109599

Activities of soil phosphatase in the root zones of some tropical weeds contaminated with Pb
Aktivitas fosfatase di daerah perakaran beberapa gulma tropika yang tercemar timah hitam

Salam, AK; Sriyani, N; Heradilla, M; Septiana, A
Faculty of Agriculture, Lampung University, Jl. Prof. Sumantri Brojonegoro No.1, Bandar Lampung 35145, Indonesia

Agrivita 20 (1): 12-16 (1997)

Abstract:
Activities of soil phosphatase was assumed to be governed by plant species and other factors such as pH and heavy metal contents. A study was carried out in the root zones of some tropical weeds contaminated with Pb and treated with lime. The weeds were grown in 200-g-potted soil samples for 4 weeks in a glass house. The results showed that the soil was dominated by acid phosphatase. The activities of acid and alkaline phosphatases in the root zones of sedge grass were higher than those in the root zones of green kyllinga, pigweed and amaranth, while those in the root zone of pigweed was the lowest. Lime at 4 ton CaCO3/ha significantly decreased the activity of acid phosphatase and increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase. The effect of Pb at 20 mg/kg was not observed.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library
Email: dir-riv@indo.net.id




NO. 14921

A preliminary study on the edible forage of sambar deer


Srikhao, A
Zoology Department, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand

The 34th Kasetsart University Annual Conference, 30 January-1 Febuary 1996, Bangkok; p ?

Abstract:
Nine sambar deer (Cervus unicolor) were employed in this experiment and penned in 2 paddocks of 10 m x 10 m and 20 m x 30 m at the Lopburi Research Station, Kasetsart University, Kook Jareon district, Lopburi province, Thailand. Forage of 29 species were edible for sambar deer i.e.: Acacia sp., Amaranthus spinosus, Azadirachta indica, Brachiaria mutica, Brassica chinensia, Broussonetia papyrifera, Cassia siamea, Cyperus sp., Eupatorium odoratum, Ficus sp., Ficus vasculosa, Garuga pinnata, Imperata cylindrica, Ipomoea sp., Leucaena leucocephala, Manihot exculenta, Millingtonia hortensis, Oryza sativa, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Pithecellobium dulce, Pterocapus macrocarpus, Saccharum officinarum, Samanea saman, Setaria italica, Shorea obtusa, Shorea siamensis, Solanum sp., Sorghum vulgare, Zea mays. Average values of dry matter intake on a hemp, corn plants and cassava chips were 2.57, 2.80 and 1.32 kg/head/day, respectively. The hemp contained per 100 g dry matter: water 8.07%, protein 17.28 %, NDF 33.62, ADF 26.56, Ca 0.92 % and P 1.10%.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 90099

Assay on the fungicidal properties of some medicinal plants


Quebral, FC
NCPC Research Abstracts (1978-1990); 1990; p 57-58

Abstract:
Twenty-three (23) plant materials were evaluated for their fungicidal value to nine (9) common fungal pathogens. On the eighth day, only red onion and oray materials maintained their inhibitory activity. Red onion maintained its inhibitory effect to Pestalotia sp. and oray to Alternaria sp., Cercospora sp., and Coletotrichum sp. Other plant materials showed decrease in the zone of inhibition with an increase in time. Decrease in the zone of inhibition of some plant materials suggested that the active principle of the extracts is volatile, photo-unstable or transformed in to in active form. Increase in inhibitory activity of some plant materials, on the other hand, was suggestive of slow diffusion of the active component into the medium affecting a slower action on the organism. The presence of antimicrobial principle in plants could also be influenced by such factors as age of plant, plant parts, methods of extraction, and time of harvesting.

Availability :
Library; National Crop Protection Center; U.P. Los Ba¤os; College; Laguna




NO. 90126

Host range and virulence of selected biovar isolates of Pseudomonas solanacearum E.F. Smith


Fandialan, MVC; Valdez, RB
Department of Plant Pathology, U.P. Los Baños; College, Laguna, Philippines

Philippine Phytopathology 25 (1&2): 59-60 (1989)

Abstract:
The host range and relative virulence of 9 selected biovar isolates of Pseudomonas solanacearum obtained from tomato (B3, 4), pepper (B3, 4), white potato (B2,3,4) and eggplant (B3,4) were studied in cross-inoculation tests to 7 crops and 9 weed species. The most virulent, in terms of percent mortality and infection were, in decreasing order: the biovar 4 isolates T6, P10 and E5 followed by biovar 3 isolates E18, T151, WP12 and P15. Among the 3 white potato isolates, WP12 (B3) was the most virulent followed by WP14 (B4) and the least virulent was the biovar 2 isolate WP112 which was highly specific to white potato and tomato. Among the 9 weed species cross-inoculated with the 9 isolates of Pseudomonas solanacearum, Vernonia cinerea, Emilia sonchifolia and Portulaca oleracea were the most susceptible hosts to all isolates, except to isolate WP112. Synedrella nodiflora, Ageratum conyzoides and Amaranthus spinosus were infected at a low degree only by T6 (B4), P10 (B4) and E18 (B3). Cleome rutidosperma was infected at a very low degree by WP12 (B3) only with no mortality. Okra, cassava, sweet potato, Trianthema portulacastrum and Commelina benghalensis were not infected by any of the isolates. All the test isolates were highly virulent to their original hosts. % infection was often higher than % mortality and some infected plants did not manifest the wilt symptoms.

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines Los Baños; College, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 68102

Effect of Azotobacter sp. on reducing Cd availability to be added into dried liquid industrial waste of the Rungkut area in Surabaya for amarant on regosol
Pengaruh Azotobacter sp. dalam mengurangi ketersediaan kadmium yang ditambahkan pada sari kering limbah cair kawasan industri Rungkut Surabaya bagi tanaman bayam (Amaranthus sp.) pada tanah regosol

Putri, AI
Thesis; Yogyakarta, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University, 1992; 80 p

Abstract:
Azotobacter sp. strain that produces slime layers is quite resistant to 32 ppm Cd. This strain is isolated from Rungkut industrial area in Surabaya. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of Azotobacter sp. in reducing Cd availability to be added into dried liquid industrial waste of the Rungkut area in Surabaya for amaranth on regosol. Azotobacter sp. was able to absorb Cd metal about 39.1% from the total Cd in regosol at pH 6.89. Azotobacter sp. was able to reduce Cd absorption by amaranth from regosol soil at Rungkut 25.83%.

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 67775

Effect of the application of tanning industrial waste product as organic fertilizer on growth of spiny amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus L.) and chromium absorption on vertisol and regosol soil
Pengaruh penggunaan sari limbah industri penyamakan kulit sebagai pupuk organik terhadap pertumbuhan bayam (Amaranthus spinosus L.) dan penyerapan chromium pada tanah vertisol dan regosol

Supriyambodo, P
Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Thesis; Yogyakarta, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University, 1994; 82 p

Abstract:
A greenhouse experiment was conducted at the Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of tanning industrial waste product as organic fertilizer on chromium (Cr) absorption and growth of spiny amaranth. The plant was grown on vertisol and regosol soils which differ in the CEC (Cation Exchange Capacity). The experiment was performed in Completely Randomized Design with two factors. Each treatment was soil types consisted of Vertisol and Regosol. The second factor was waste product rate, i.e.: 0.00; 20.30; 41.80; 62.70; 83.60 g/pot (equal to 0; 10; 20; 30; 40 t/ha). The result showed that chromium absorbtion by spiny amaranth increased with the increasing rate of the waste product applied. The absorption of chromium still increased with the application of waste product up to the rate of 83.60 g/pot, both on Vertisol and Regosol. The plant production still increased with the application of waste product up to the rate of 83.60 g/pot, both on Vertisol and Regosol. Generally, chromium absorbtion by spiny amaranth on Vertisol was lower than on Entisol, but the plant production was higher on Vertisol than on Regosol.

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 68155

Absorption of P from ammonium phosphate and TSP by amaranth (Amaranthus sp.) grown on regosol
Penyerapan P dari pupuk ammonium fosfat dan TSP oleh tanaman bayam (Amaranthus sp.) pada tanah regosol

Setiawan, H
Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Thesis S1; Yogyakarta, Fakultas Pertanian, Universitas Gadjah Mada, 1992; 90 p

Abstract:
An experiment was carried out to compare the efficiencies of ammonium phosphate and TSP as P fertilizers in spinach, grown in regosol for 1 month at the greenhouse of Kalitirto, Berbah, Sleman, Yogyakarta. Factorial Completely Randomized Design was used with two treatment factors and three replications. The first was kind of fertilizers and the second was fertilizer's dosage. The parameters measured were plant height, dry weight of root, dry weight of shoot, phosphorus concentration in plant tissue, phosphorus uptake and phosphorus efficiency index. The dosage of fertilizers were applied at 0, 75, 150, 225, and 300 kg/ha P2O5. The phosphorus uptake was measured after 1 month of plant age. The data were subjected to analysis of variance, Duncan's Multiple Range Test (DMRT) and regression analysis. The results showed that the P fertilizer application with ammonium phosphate was better than the TSP and urea fertilizers application at various dosages of fertilizer. Phosphorus fertilizer application at 75 kg/ha P2O5 gave the highest results in dry weight of shoot, plant height, and phosphorus efficiency index.

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 39959

Effect of herbicides on the pathogenicity of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) on soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and Amaranthus spinosus L.


Vega, JJ; Talatala-Sanico, RL; Gapasin, RM
Philippine Phytopathology 29 (1 & 2): 42-53 (1993)

Abstract:
Glyphosate and pendimethalin herbicides at 400 and 600 ppm reduced gall and egg mass indices, and nematode population in the roots of soybean and Amaranthus spinosus. Glyphosate appeared to be more potent than pendimethalin against the nematode in soybean but not in Amaranthus spinosus. The herbage and root weights of Amaranthus spinosus were considerably decreased at herbicide concentrations of 400 and 600 ppm. Glyphosate at the same concentrations produced more and heavier productive soybean pods than the other treatments. At 7 days after application, very slight to no phytotoxicity of glyphosate and pendimethalin to soybean and Amaranthus spinosus was observed at all concentrations.

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines Los Baños; College, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 72453

Amaranthus spinosus
Den gai

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Thuoc tri benh tu cac cay hoang dai [The medicines from wild plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1995; p 132-133

Abstract:
Amaranthus spinosus grows naturally everywhere in Vietnam. All parts of this plant can be used for medicine that can treat dysentery, diarrhoea, bowel inflammation, itches and scabies, poisonous snake bites, haemorrhage.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 94833

Indigenous medicinal plants and practices of ten ethnic tribes in Mindanao


Ayuban, JM; Togon, AS
Southeastern Philippine Journal of R and D 4 (2)-5 (1): 57-79 (1997-1998)

Abstract:
A study was conducted on the identification of indigenous medicinal plants and on how these are used by the identified tribes for curative and other related purposes. Ten ethnic tribes constituting nine in Southern Mindanao and one in Northern Mindanao were identified as samples of the study. The ten tribes were chosen based on ethnicity of the populace in the community, the accessibility of the area, security and other situation on the way to the area and in the community itself, the availability of key informants in the community. A total of 87 medicinal plants have been identified by the key informants and selected respondents in the ten tribes. It has been observed that the ten tribes hardly have the same indigenous plants for treatment of one kind of ailment. Eighty seven medicinal plants were identified as cures for different types of illness and in different manners by respondents in the ten ethnic tribes.

Availability :
Library; University of Southeastern Philippines (USEP); Davao City




NO. 73820

Amaranthus spinosus
Den gai

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Cay thuoc quanh ta [Popular medicinal plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1998; p 130-131

Abstract:
Amaranthus spinosus grows popularly in the waste lands in Vietnam. All parts of the plant are harvested all year-around to treat dysentery, diarrhoea, chronic inflammation of large intestine, urethra problem, scabies, pimples, haemorrhoid and snake bites.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 103432

Analysis of cadmium (Cd) heavy metal content in Amaranthus sp. cultivated on the ex-landfill compost
Analisis kadar logam berat kadmium (Cd) pada tanaman bayam (Amaranthus sp.) yang dibudidayakan pada kompos bekas TPA sampah

Sudibyaningsih, Th; Suwarso; Hernayanti
Faculty of Biology, Jenderal Soedirman University, Purwokerto, Central Java, Indonesia

Research Report; Purwokerto; Faculty of Biology; Jenderal Soedirman University; 1994; 79 p

Abstract:
An investigation was carried out from July to August 1994 with the aim to study the content of heavy metal Cadmium (Cd) in soil of landfill site and in Amaranth grown there. As much as 0.29% fraction of compost produced in Jakarta is flash light refuse which is suspected to contain cadmium. Using this fraction no fertilized amaranth might cause biotransformation of this heavy metal in plant. Soil and amaranth samples taken from five locations, i.e. North Jakarta, South Jakarta, East Jakarta, West Jakarta and Central Jakarta were analysed. Soil and amaranth from region not being used as landfill were used as control. All samples were analysed by Atomic Adsorption Spectrophotometer. The result indicated that cadmium content in soil was 1.69-3.50 ppm and in control was below 0.15 ppm. The cadmium content in amaranth was 0.48-1.41 ppm. From statistical analysis it was shown that heavy metal content varied due to location and time of decomposition. Heavy metal content in amaranth was correlated to heavy metal content in soils.

Availability :
General Soedirman University, Central Library




NO. 106598

Analysis of folacin content in various vegetable species
Analisis kandungan folasin pada berbagai jenis sayuran

Manullang, M; Sutrisno, L
Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia

Buletin Teknologi dan Industri Pangan [Food Technology and Industry Bulletin] 5 (3): 7-12 (1994)

Abstract:
Various commercial fresh vegetables were analyzed for their principal folacin derivatives by using a reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method. The vegetables used in the analysis were cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kailan, mustard leaves, pok-chay, lettuce, spinach, red spinach, katuk, genjer, and leaves of cassava, melinjo and lobak. Folic acid (FA), 8-dihydrofolic acid (DHF) and 5-formyltetrahydrofolic acid (5-CHO-THF) were separated by using TSK GEL ODS-80TM column and an acidic phosphate-acetonitrile as a mobile phase. Detection was performed by monitoring ultraviolet absorption at 280 nm. Folacin content ranged from 2.00 ug/g for red spinach to 45.50 ug/g for melinjo. Cassava leaves contained the highest amount of dihydrofolic acid (DHF) 13.65 ug/g, followed by folinic acid 8.40 ug/g. Melinjo leaves were rich in folic acid 11.5 ug/g, dihidrofolic acid 9.8 and folinic acid 24.20 ug/g.

Availability :
Research Centre for Biology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences




NO. 95365

Low-cost nutritious food products from weed


Bernardo, CQ
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights '99; Los Baños, Laguna, PCARRD, 2000; Belen, EH (ed); p 70-71

Abstract:
The author found value in weeds by developing them into nutritious and economical food products. Findings: Weeds such as purslane (Portulaca oleracea) busi-busi (Synedrella nodiflora), cassava (Manihot esculenta), cucharita (Alternanthera ficoidea var. bettzikiana, synonym: Alternanthera amonea) and kolitis (Amaranthus spinosus) were found suitable as alternative sources of needed nutrients that satisfy the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for selected vitamins and minerals per day. Food composition of raw and boiled leaves was also determined.

Availability :
Library; Crops Research Division; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, Los Baños, Laguna




NO. 109593

The response of tomato cv. Kingkong on different soil water contents and population of spiny pigweed (Amaranthus spinosus L.)
Respon tanaman tomat var. Kingkong terhadap perbedaan kadar air tanah dan populasi bayam duri (Amaranthus spinosus L.)

Nugroho, A; Soekartomo, S; Ismail, B
Faculty of Agriculture, Brawijaya University, Malang 65145, East Java, Indonesia

Agrivita 20 (1): 51-56 (1997)

Abstract:
Production of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cv. Kingkong in the field during a single wet or dry season in East Java increased rapidly during the past few years. However, research on the cultivation of this tomato in the region with different soil moistures and weed infestation has not been conducted yet. One of the most critical period in growing tomato is the time between transplanting and flowering of the crop. To evaluate the effects of soil moisture and spiny amaranth as a weed infestation on the yield of tomato, using latosol soil, in pots under plastic house, a study was conducted for 5 months in Merjosari, Malang. Soil moisture (40, 60, 80 and 100%) and spiny amaranth population (0, 1 and 2/pot) were applied immediately after the crop was transplanted. Parameters used to determine the effect of the treatments were plant height, leaf area, number of flower and fruit, fruit set percentage, root length, and weight of fresh fruit. The results showed that total weight of fresh fruit increased with increasing soil moisture and decreasing weed population rates. Fruit yield did not obtain from all treatments in the 40% and 60% soil moisture. Without amaranth infestation, average weight of fresh fruit per plant from three harvesting times in the 80 and 100% soil moisture were 1048.33 g/plant and 1223.33 g/plant, respectively. Total weight of fresh fruit per plant cultivated in 80% soil moisture condition with amaranth infestation decreased from 51.73% to 68.20%, whereas, in the 100% soil moisture, the yield decreased from 40.6% to 54.9%.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library
Email: dir-riv@indo.net.id




NO. 111338

Environmental factor affected the degradation or halosulfuron-methyl in the soil
Faktor lingkungan yang mempengaruhi degradasi halosulfuron-methyl di tanah

Dermiyati
Jurnal Penelitian Pengembangan Wilayah Lahan Kering [Journal of Dryland Development Research] (22/23): 24-31 (1998)

Abstract:
Halosulfuron-methyl (NC-319) is a novel sulfonylurea herbicide, containing a pyrazole ring in the structure, which is currently being developed for selective weed control in upland fields. Under controlled environment of soil moisture, pH and temperature regimes, a laboratory experiment was conducted to study the degradation of halosulfuron-methyl (NC-319) in two Japanese soils (Anjo, a soil with kaolin clay mineral; and Nagano, a soil with montmorillonite clay mineral). To study the effects of soil pH on the degradation of halosulfuron-methyl, the soils were adjusted to the pH in the range of 5 to 9 by addition of HCl or Ca(OH)2. In a separate experiment, five levels of moisture contents (10% to 200% of maximum water holding capacity (MWHC) and flooded conditions) and four temperature levels (4 to 30 °C) were applied. The soils were incubated in the dark at 25 °C with the moisture content maintained at 50% MWHC throughout the studies. The residual amounts of the herbicide in the soils were analysed by high perfomance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Halosulfuron-methyl was generally dissipated faster with the increase of temperature and decrease of soil pH. Not-with-standing, increasing moisture contents increased the dissipation rate of halosulfuron- methyl in Anjo soil and not likely in Nagano soil. The degradation of halosulfuron-methyl in soil followed first-order kinetics in all cases.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library
Email: dir-riv@indo.net.id




NO. 30701

Effect of phosphorus and nitrogen fertilization and weed control method on weed incidence and mungbean production


Agarcio, BC, Jr
Annals of Tropical Research 7: 1-11(1985)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31286

Studies on a virus-like mosaic diseases of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)


Palomar, MK
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1982; 54p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 63175

Effect of application of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus L.) and 'gletak' (Borrenia latifolia Schem.) on biological aspects of common cutworm (Spodopten litura Fabricus)
Pengaruh pemberian kedelai (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), bayam duri (Amaranthus spinosus L.) dan gletak (Borrenia latifolia Schem.) terhadap biologi ulat grayak (Spodopten litura Fabricus)

Desmawati
Thesis S1; Padang; Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; 1988; p.1-72

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 64239

Effect of the turning up canopy of sweet potato on growth and yield of sweet potato
Pengaruh pembalikan kanopi ubi jalar terhadap pertumbuhan dan produksi ubi jalar

Marsandi; Sarjito, A.
Faculty of Agriculture; Jendral Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia

Prosiding I Konperensi X HIGI [Proceedings of the Tenth Conference of Indonesian Weed Science Society, Vol.1]; Malang March 13-15, 1990; p343-349

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 474

Response of Amaranthus spp. to various light intensities
Tanggapan bayam (Amaranthus spp.) terhadap intensitas cahaya

Simbolon, H; Sutarno, H
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Buletin Penelitian Hortikultura [Horticultural Research Bulletin] 13 (3): 33-42 (1986)

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 1814

Amaranthaceae: Amaranthus


Backer, CA
Flora Malesiana I, 4 (2): 75-80 (1949); Steenis, CGGJ van (ed); Djakarta; Noordhoff-Kolff

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3759

Amaranth as a source of vegetable protein and its relation to genetic resources
Bayam sebagai sumber protein nabati dan hubungannya dengan plasma nutfah

Abidin, Z
Lembang Research Institute for Horticulture; Bandung; Indonesia

Majalah Pertanian [Agricultural Journal] 27 (4): 42-45 (1979-1980)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Commmunication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 9542

Testing on some cultivars of amaranth (Amaranthus) on the Beta carotene content
Uji beberapa varietas bayam (Amaranthus) terhadap kandungan beta karoten

Lestario, N
Thesis; Salatiga; Satya Wacana Christian University; 1987; 35p

Availability :
Satya Wacana Christian University; Salatiga; Central Java; Indonesia




NO. 61798

Popular agricultural series for amaranth
Seri pertanian populer bayam

Soedijanto; Warsito,DP.
Bumirestu Press; Jakarta; 1977; 19p

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 93070

Evaluation of forage quality in the laboratory: III. Proximate analysis, detergent fibber analysis and in vitro technique for dry matter digestibility


Lopez, RR; Lopez, PL; Chavez, MA; Magpantay, TO
Philippine Journal of Veterinary and Animal Science 2 (3): 129-141 (1976)

Abstract:
A total of forty-seven (47) herbage samples of grasses, legumes and other crops were analyzed for proximate composition, cell wall components and in vitro dry matter digestibility. The re-growths (30,60,90 days) during the wet and dry season. The NFE was than the value for CF in all forage samples analyzed. This more digestible component of the plant varies from 34.72 to 51.28% in grasses, 28.28 to 44.75% in legumes and 29.61 to 44.71% in other crops. The sum of NFE which is equal to the total carbohydrate in the herbage than the corresponding NDF, the total cell wall in the sample. In grasses, the CF ranged from 22.40 to 34.52%; 15.63 to 35.13% in legumes, and 16.77 to 30.76% in other crops. Species with highest CF did not correspondingly show low NFE values, but all five introduced grass species indicated an increase in CF with maturity, with a corresponding decreases in NFE. No district differences in NFE values between seasons were noted. NDF value ranged from 52.02 to 69.88% in grasses; 42.12 to 60.96% in legumes, and 42.50 to 60.54% in other crops. Species indicating highest CF values except Amaranthus spinosus ('uray babae'). The CF as determined by proximate analysis can be used in the estimation of total cell wall (NDF) or the cellulose content of herbage; but these three components cannot be used to estimate IVDMD. However, IVDMD of grasses can be estimated from their lignin content with the regression equation Y= 81.18-3.85X. The correlation coefficient for 35 grasses is 0.75 with a standard error of the estimate of 5.86. The legumes and other crops forage samples were in-adequate for analysis of lignin.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 96463

Seed research and development program


Juico, CR; Quilantang, JR; dela Cruz, QD; Abou, CC Jr; Santiago, DR; Gajete, LB
Abstract of Completed and On-going R&D Projects (no pagination) 2001

Abstract:
Evaluation of different weed management systems for off-season tomato production|This study was conducted to evaluate the different weed management systems against weed associated to tomato and to determine the cost and return analysis of using this strategies was compared to Farmer's Practice and CLSU Practice.|The predominant weed species in the area were Trianthema portulacastrum L., Cyperus rotundus L., Eleusine indica L., and Amaranthus spinosus L. Significant differences existed among treatments in terms of weed density at 15, 30 and 45 days after transplanting (DAT). Low weed density was observed on conservation tillage with Glyphosate, farmer's weed density while at 45 DAT the same treatment 1 (hilling-up at 30 DAT and application of pre-mixed herbicide at 45 DAT) obtained significantly low weed density.|Percent weed control was found significantly higher at 30 DAT with farmer's practice and CLSU practice garnering 80.6 and 79.25, respectively. At 45 DAT, farmer's practice and CLSU practice exhibited low fresh and dry weight of weeds.|Treatment 1, CLSU practice amd farmer's practice obtained the highest yield of 6,773.33, 8840 amd 8333.33 kg/ha, respectively. The weed management cost was found higher using farmer's practice and CLSU practice which amounted to 13.50 and 8.97% of the total expenses. In terms of profit, CLSU practice got the highest return on investment (ROI) of 351.76% followed by farmer's practice (321.85%) and treatment 1 (263.42%).

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 96570

Evaluation of different weed management systems for off-season tomato production


Juico, CR; Quilantang, JR; Dela Cruz, QD; Abon Jr. CC; Santiago, DR; Gajete, LB
Abstracts of Completed and On-Going R and D Projects 2001. Research Extension and Training; Central Luzon State University (CLSU); Science City of Mu¤oz, Nueva Ecija; Philippines; (no pagination)

Abstract:
This study was conducted to evaluate the different weed management systems against weeds associated to tomato and to determine the cost and return analysis of using this strategies was compared to Farmer's Practice and CLSU Practice.|The predominant weed species in the area were Trianthema portulacastrum L., Cyperus rotundus L., Eleusine indica L., and Amaranthus spinosus L. Significant differences existed among treatments in terms of weed density at 15, 30 and 45 days after transplanting (DAT). Low weed density was observed on conservation tillage with Glyphosate, farmer's practice and CLSU practice. At 30 DAT, farmer's practice and CLSU practice exhibited low weed density while at 45 DAT the same treatments and treatment 1 (hilling-up at 30 DAT and application of pre-mixed herbicide at 45 DAT) obtained significantly low weed density.|Percent weed control was found significantly higher at 30 DAT with farmer's practice and CLSU practice garnering 80.6 and 79.25 respectively. AT 45 DAT, farmer's practice and CLSU practice exhibited low fresh and dry weight of weeds.|Treatment 1, CLSU practice and farmer's practice obtained the highest yield of 6,773.33, 8840 and 8333.33 kg/ha, respectively. The weed management cost was found higher using farmer's practice and CLSU practice which amounted to 13.50 and 8.97% of the total expenses. In terms of profit, CLSU practice got the highest return on investment (ROI) of 351.76% followed by farmer's practice (321.85%) and treatment 1 (263.42%).

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 16564

Screening of Thai medicinal plants for cosmetic purpose


Atawong, A.; Boonpokkrong, S.; Paramapojn, S.; Pamutha, P.; Deachodomphan, S.; Thongsiri, C.; Itsaeng, R.; Pontan, S.; Sritabtim, P. and Theerasilp, S.
Dr.Saroj's Research Lab Co., Ltd. Bhosamtoan, Bang Pa Han, Ayutthaya, Thailand 13220. (neeno50@hotmail.com)

The 3rd World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare : 110. (2003)

Abstract:
Eight Thai medicinal plants namely Ludwigia adscendens (L.) H.Hara, Cissus quadrangularis L., Uncaria gambir Roxb., Amaranthus spinosus Linn., Trianthema portulacastrum Linn., Acalypha hispida Burm. f., Barleria lupulina Lindl. and Eclipta prostrate (L.)L. were examined for antibacterial, antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activity for using in cosmetic preparation. Dried leave powder of Barleria lupulina Lindl. was extracted with ethanol while dried aerial part of Ludwigia adscendens (L.) H.Hara, Cissus quadrangularis L., Uncaria gambir Roxb., Amaranthus spinosus Linn., Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. and Eclipta prostrata (L.)L. was used for ethanol extraction. For Acalypha hispida Burm. f., stem was used. Crude extracts were concentrated and tested for antibacterial, antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activity. The antibacterial activity was tested against S. aureus, S. epidermis and A. faecalis by disc method, antioxidant activity was done by DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) method and tyrosinase inhibitory activity was tested against mushroom tyrosinase by method of Kobayashi et al. It was found that Eclipta prostrata (L.)L. showed the high potential for using as an ingredient in cosmetic preparation. Its tyrosinase inhibitory activity was highest among the studied plants which is 31% compared to vitamin C, having IC50 value at 290 ppm for antioxidant activity and was effective against A. faecalis at 2.5 mg/disc. For Ludwigia adscendens (L.) H.Hara, Uncaria gambir Roxb. and Acalypha hispida Burm. f., antioxidant and antimicrobial activity against A. faecalis were observed. Whereas Barleria lupulina Lindl. and Cissus quadrangularis L. had only antioxidant activity. However, no activity was found in the crude extract of Amaranthus spinosus Linn. and Trianthema portulacastrum Linn.

Availability :
Chiang Mai University Library




NO. 71287

The family Amaranthaceae
Ho rau ren

Le Kha Ke; Vo Van Chi; Vu Van Chuyen; Phan Nguyen Hong; Do Tat Loi; Thai Van Trung
Cay co thuong thay o Vietnam [Popular plants in Vietnam]; Vol. 1; Hanoi, Scientific Publishing House, 1970; p 39-51

Abstract:
This section describes some species of Amaranthaceae. They are used as vegetables and medicinaes, e.g. Achyranthes aspera, Achyranthes bidentata, and Amaranthus viridis; some of them are used as ornamental.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam