Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp
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NO. 69926

A study on the production of weaning food flour from rice and soybean supplemented with pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan)
Studi pembuatan makanan sapihan dari beras dan kedelai dengan suplementasi kacang gude (Cajanus cajan)

Soejadi; Damardjati, DS; Soelistjo, KA
Sukamandi Research Institute for Food Crops (SURIF); Cikampek; West Java; Indonesia

Media Penelitian Sukamandi [Sukamandi Research Media] 14: 11-17 (1993)

Abstract:
Experiment to evaluate the effect of using pigeonpea on weaning food product has been done at Sukamandi Research Institute for Food Crops in 1989. The rice flour of Cisadane variety, soybean flour of Lokon variety, pigeonpea flour of black and yellow seed coat cultivars and coconut milk flour were used in this experiment. A total of 15% and 30% of the pigeonpea were incorporated into the weaning food. As control was the weaning food without pigeonpea. The weaning food flour was processed by roasting. The experiment was conducted in two factorials of a Completely Randomized Design. The results indicated that the utilization of pigeonpea increased the protein content of the weaning food by 0.29% to 0.67% and 0.96% to 2.14% for the yellow and black seed coat pigeonpeas, respectively. On the other hand the utilization of flour would decrease the appearance of the product, the protein digestibility and organoleptic value. The weaning food supplemented with the yellow pigeonpea flour showed a better organoleptic quality, higher protein in vitro digestibility and a whiter colour but lower in protein content compared to that using the black pigeonpea flour. The microbes content in the weaning food flour did not exceed the PAG No.11 (1972). The weaning food product containing 15% pigeonpea flour was observed to be the best by the panelists.

Availability :
Library; Pusat Penelitian Tanah dan Agroklimat [Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR)]; Jl. Ir. H. Juanda 98, Bogor 16123; Indonesia; phone: (62) (251) 323 012; fax: (62) (251) 311 256; telex: 48 572 1A




NO. 108929

Efficiency of macro- and micro-fertilizer applications on pigeon pea in the drylands
Efisiensi penggunaan pupuk makro dan mikro kacang gude di lahan kering

Karsono, S
Malang Research Institute for Pulses and Tuber Crops; Malang; East Java; Indonesia

Edisi Khusus Balitkabi (Balai Penelitian Kacang-kacangan dan Umbi-umbian) [Special Edition of the Research Institute for Pulses and Tuber Crops]: Komponen Teknologi Peningkatan Produksi Tanaman Kacang-kacangan dan Umbi-umbian (9): 333-343 (1997)

Abstract:
Pigeon pea is well adapted to soil of moderate to poor fertility. However, the yields may be low if the nutrient availability in the soil is low. Experiments to study the efficiency of macro- and micro- fertilizer applications on yield of pigeon pea were conducted at Muneng and Jakenan Research Stations in the dry and wet seasons of 1995/1996. The treatments were arranged in a Completely Randomized Block Design with 3 replications. The treatments comprised applications of N, P, K, Zn and Co, namely by broadcasting (N, P, K, Zn), spraying (Zn), and band placement as deep as 15 cm (N, P, K, Zn). Co was mixed with pigeon pea seeds immediately before sowing. Lime was broadcasted one month before sowing (only at Jakenan). Mega cultivar was planted at 50 cm x 10 cm spacing. The results indicated that both at Muneng and Jakenan the application methods for macro- and micro-fertilizers did not significantly increase the yield, either in the dry season or in the wet season. In the wet season seed yield was affected by rainfall distribution. To get a high yield it was suggested that the flowering and pod filling stages should be coincide with the dry months of less than 100 mm rainfall/month.

Availability :
Library; Research Institute for Vegetables; Jl. Tangkuban Perahu No. 517; P.O. Box 8413 Lembang; Bandung 40391; Indonesia; phone: (62) (22) 2786 245; fax: (62) (22) 2786 416, 2786 025




NO. 68704

Performance of pigeonpea intercropped with maize and lablab bean
Keragaman kacang gude pada pola tanam dasar jagung dan komak

Karsono, S; Karep S; Prajitno
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops; Malang; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan tahun 1992, Malang, 26-27 Februari 1992; Kasno, A; Hendroatmodjo, KH & Winarto, A (eds); Malang, Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Malang, 1993; p 139-146

Abstract:
Pigeonpea grown in Indonesia is a long-duration cultivar (7-8 months) and planted in limited areas, mainly on field boundaries. Now there are short-duration pigeonpea (3.5-4 months), which together with production technology, developed by research institutes, should be transferred to farmers. A Randomized Block Design experiment with 3 replications and 3 locations, namely at Probolinggo and Ngawi, both in East Java, and at Mataram in West Lombok, were conducted from May to December 1991. Plot size used was 8 m x 3.5 m, and maize was planted 50 cm between rows and 40 cm within rows. Pigeonpea was planted 50 cm between rows and 10 cm within rows. Lablab bean was planted in the maize rows. All maize plants were given fertilizer treatments, 200 kg/ha urea + 100 kg/ha TSP and 100 kg/ha KCl. Pigeonpea was fertilized with 50 kg/ha urea + 100 kg/ha TSP. The planting systems were as follows: 1) One row of maize + lablab bean and one row of pigeonpea, 2) Two rows of maize + lablab bean and one row pigeonpea, 3) Three rows of maize + lablab bean and one row of pigeonpea, 4) Four rows of maize + lablab bean and one row of pigeonpea, 5) One row of maize + lablab bean and two rows of pigeonpea, 6) One row of maize + lablab bean and three rows of pigeonpea, 7) One row of maize + lablab bean and four rows of pigeonpea, 8) Two rows of maize + lablab bean and two rows of pigeonpea, 9) Three rows of maize + lablab bean and three rows of pigeonpea, 10) Four rows of maize + lablab bean and four rows of pigeonpea, 11) Maize + lablab bean only and 12) Pigeonpea monoculture. Lablab bean was grown within the row of maize. The results showed that if pigeonpea was the main crop 3 rows of pigeonpea and 1 row of maize + lablab bean gave a higher yield of pigeonpea, i.e. 1.45 t/ha in Probolinggo and 1.15 t/ha in West Lombok. Economically 2 rows of maize + lablab bean and 2 rows of pigeonpea gave a gross return more consistent among two locations, i.e. Rp 1,180,000.00 in Probolinggo and Rp 1,150,000.00 per ha in West Lombok, where the pigeonpea price per kg was Rp 600.00, for maize Rp 250.00, and for lablab bean Rp 450.00.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office
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NO. 70796

Planting pigeon pea to breed Tachardia lacca
Trong Dau thieu de tha Canh kien do

Ngoc Uyen
Company of Special products of Vietnam

Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] 1: 37-38 (1964)

Abstract:
'Dau thieu' (Cajanus cajan) has various usages, especially as the main feed plant to breed Tachardia lacca. On this plant, Tachardia's nest is thicker and nicer, and Tachardia hatches 2-5 days faster in comparison with other plants. A propagation method of the plant for large areas was introduced.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam; 31 Trang Thi street; Hoan Kiem district; Hanoi; Vietnam; phone: (84) (4) 824 465, 825 5397; fax: (84) (4) 825 3357




NO. 108758

Test on growth and productivity of pigeon pea in monoculture and intercropping planting systems
Uji pertumbuhan serta daya hasil kacang gude pada sistem pertanaman monokultur dan tumpangsari

Salmeto; Hendra, J; Hayani
Natar Service of Agricultural Technological Study; P.O. Box 16; Bandar Lampung 35144; Sumatera; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Nasional Biologi XV [Proceedings of the 15th National Seminar on Biology], Bandar Lampung, 24-26 Juli 1997; Karyanto, A et al (eds); Perhimpunan Biologi Indonesia (PBI) Bandar Lampung - Unila, 1997; Book III; 1997; p 1484-1486

Abstract:
A trial had been conducted to test the growth and productivity of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) lines by using monoculture and intercropping planting systems at Natar from April to August 1996. Treatments were designed by using a Completely Randomized Block Design. The treatments were eleven pigeon pea lines and cv. Mega as control. The parameters observed were growth parameters (number of plants, plant height, number of good pods, number of broken pods, number of primary branches) and yield parameters (dry weight of 100 pods, yield of dry pods per plot). The results showed that ICPL 87 (C) has the best productivity (561 g/plot) in monoculture system, but ICPL 92038 showed the best productivity (1.683 g/plot) in intercropping system.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 39236

A study on the host range of soybean mosaic virus


Lorenzo, TS; Soria, JA
Abstract Bibliography of Research in the Department of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture, University of South Mindanao (USM), Kabacan, North Cotabato (1988-89); 1988; p 59

Abstract:
Results of this study showed that 5 plant species: Glycine max, Vigna unguiculata cv. group Unguiculata (synonym Vigna sinensis), Vigna unguiculata cv. group Sesquipedalis (synonym Vigna sesquipedalis), Vigna radiata, and Centrosema pubescens gave positive reactions to SMV (soybean mosaic virus). The plants mentioned exhibited both local and systemic symptoms. Test plant species that did not show any detectable symptoms were Arachis hypogaea, Phaseolus vulgaris, Phaseolus lunatus, Cajanus cajan, Vigna umbellata (synonym Phaseolus calcaratus), Psophocarphus tetragonolobus, Zea mays, Oryza sativa, and 'maria-maria' (unknown scientific name).

Availability :
Main Library; University of the Philippines Los Baños; College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 296

The potential of several species of Leguminosae as fuel plants
Potensi beberapa jenis suku Leguminosae sebagai kayu bakar

Roemantyo
Bogor Botanical Gardens; Bogor; Indonesia

Buletin Kebun Raya [Botanical Gardens of Indonesia Bulletin] 5 (6): 149-152 (1982)

Abstract:
With 690 genera and 18,000 species, the legume family is one of the largest family among the angiosperms. Many of them are known to have economic potential which can be exploited for various purposes, such as food, timber, feed and firewoods. The potential of 8 species of legumes belonging to 6 genera (Acacia, Albizia, Cajanus, Calliandra, Gliricidia and Leucaena) as sources of energy was explained.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 50029

Plant Resources of South-East Asia No 1. Pulses


van der Maesen, LJG (ed); Sadikin Somaatmadja (ed)
Department of Plant Taxonomy; Wageningen Agricultural University; Wageningen; the Netherlands

Low-price, paperback edition; Bogor; PROSEA Foundation; 1992; 105 p

Abstract:
This volumes deals with pulses currently used and those that could be expanded in South-East Asia. Pulses are here defined as dry edible seeds of legumes. Legumes are members of the family Leguminosae. Among the crops included are groundnut, pigeon pea, chickpea, soya bean, lablab, grass pea, lentil, horse gram, tepary bean, runner bean, Lima bean, common bean, pea, faba bean, moth bean, adzuki bean, black gram, mung bean, bambara groundnut, rice bean and cowpea. A list is presented on 69 legume species that are only occasionally used as a pulse. The introductory chapter deals with general aspects of pulses. A glossary is included to explain the terms used. Two indexes, of scientific and vernacular plant names, are provided.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 37397

On-farm trial of promising pigeon pea varieties in Quirino


Lasdacan, ET
Quirino State College; Diffun; Philippines

Report; Quirino State College; Diffun; 1993; 20 p

Abstract:
The result of the study showed that the different varieties of pigeon pea tested in every site had a highly significant yield difference. During the first priming in Cajel, Diffun., ICPL 8327 obtained the highest yield of 3,297.08 kg/ha. When the yield for the first and second priming is polled, ICPL 6 produced the highest mean yield of 6,238.44 kg/ha followed by ICPL 8327 at 5559.69 kg/ha. Meanwhile, in San Isidro, the highest yielder is FCPL slate 815.01 kg/ha and in Ricarte Sur, ICPL 161 at 356.38 kg/ha. The great disparity in the yield obtained could be attributed to the differences in the soil pH and nutrient content in every city. In Cajel, the pH is 5.8 and the soil has a medium amount of nitrogen, high phosphorus and sufficient potassium. In Ricarte Sur, the soil pH is 4.0 with a low amount of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. The high pest (pod borer) infestation is Ricarte, Diffun aggravated the cause of the very poor yield of the varieties tested.

Availability :
College Library; Quirino State College; Diffun; Philippines; phone: (63) (912) 3379 483




NO. 38649

Protein quality of flours from germinated legumes


Mabesa, LB; Atutubo, EO; Castro-Sandoval, ME
The Philippine Agriculturist 65 (3): 245-251 (1982)

Abstract:
Soybean (Glycine max), rice bean (Vigna umbellata, syn. Phaseolus calcaratus), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata ssp. Unguiculata), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), yard-long beans red variety (Vigna unguiculata cv. group Sequipedalis, syn. Vigna sinensis ssp. Sesquipedalis) and white beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) were germinated at room temperature and 30 ºC at different periods. Flours were prepared from the germinated legumes and then analyzed for moisture, protein and relative nutritive value (RNV). RNV of germinated legumes was significantly higher than that of ungerminated legumes. Maximum RNV was achieved after germinating some of the legumes for 48 hr at room temperature except for rice bean where highest RNV was obtained at 30 ºC after 24 hr and for white bean at room temperature after 24 hr. RNV increased from 23 to 167% after germination. The protein content of germinated legumes tended to be higher than that of ungerminated legumes.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of the Philippines Los Baños, College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 14962

Tree leaves as a feed resource in northeast Thailand


Meulen, UT; Fischer, W; Vearasilp, T
Institute for Animal Physiology and Nutrition, Georg-August University, 37077 Goettingen, Germany

Thai Journal of Agricultural Science 29 (1): 11-21 (1996)

Abstract:
This literature review described some tree and shrub species which were adapted to the climatic conditions in northeast Thailand and which could more or less be utilized as fodder trees for ruminants. The individual species were briefly discussed from a nutritional aspect, some examples were given and total rations of leaves and supplemental rations were described. It was emphasized that leaves in general were not suitable as production feed but rather they could be utilized as feeds to bridge nutritional gaps. Other species listed (other than those in TA field) were Melia azedarach, Bauhinia variegata, Dendrocalamus strictus, Bambusa arundinacea, Syzygium cumini, Ficus bengalensis, Milletia auriculata, Ficus infectoria, Ficus religiosa, Mallotus philippensis, Ziziphus mauritiana.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14149

Bean and pea weevils in Thailand
Duang thua thi phop nai prathetthai

Phromsathit, B
Entomology and Zoology Division, Department of Agriculture, Bangkok, Thailand

Warasan Kita Lae Sattawawithaya [Journal of Entomology and Zoology] 9 (1): 22-26 (1987)

Abstract:
Morphology and characteristics of 6 genera of bean and pea weevils found in Thailand were described.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14200

Cajanus cajan, a multi-purpose plant
Thua mahae kin ko dai sang ban ko dai

Anonymous
Warasan Songsoem Kan Kaset [Journal of Agricultural Extension] 21 (42): 31 (1991)

Abstract:
The use of pigeon pea was reviewed.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14679

Yield trial of pigeon pea at Kamphaengsaen
Kan thotsop phan thua-mahae thi witthayakhet Kamphaengsaen

Swasdiphanich, S
Faculty of Agriculture, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand

Kan prachum thang wichakan khong maha witthayalai Kasetsart khrangthi 32: botkhatyo [The 32nd Kasetsart University Annual Conference; abstract], 3-5 February 1994; Kasetsart University; Bangkok; p 55

Abstract:
A yield trial of 19 lines of pigeon pea was conducted at the Kasetsart University Kamphaengsaen Campus. The results showed that plant age at 50% flowering and seed yield components were different from line to line. Four flowering habits were grouped: very early (<61 days), early (61-66 days), late (67-72 days), and very late (>72 days). QPL 207, ICPL 87, QPL 58, ICPL 312, and QPL 37 gave highest seed yields whereas QPL 42, and ICPL 312 were the lowest. Days to flowering was not correlated with seed weight/ plant. The lines which gave the maximum and minimum 1000-seed weight were QPL 58 and QPL 95, respectively. QPL 88, QPL 207 and cv. Royes gave the highest seed number, whilst QPL 95 was the lowest. Earlier flowering did not enhance the seed yield, but the late and very late flowering groups gave high seed yield. It could be an exception for the early-flowering line, QPL 58 which gave higher yield. It was obvious that high-yielding lines were characterized by fast-growing habit and higher number of pods/plant.

Availability :
Library; Kasetsart University; 50 Phahon Yothin Road; Chatuchak; Bangkok; Thailand; phone: (66) (2) 579 0840, 579 0113; fax: (66) (2) 942 8127, 942 8491




NO. 69302

Study on the pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) growth in the regosol, latosol and grumusol
Kajian pertumbuhan kacang gude (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) pada tanah regosol, latosol dan grumusol

Suryana, N
Faculty of Agriculture, Agricultural Institute STIPER, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Thesis; Yogyakarta, Faculty of Agriculture, Agricultural Institute STIPER, 1992; 47p

Abstract:
The purpose of the study is to know the relationships between soil type and water supply to the growth and nodulation of pigeon pea Cajanus cajan. The experiment was carried out in the greenhouse of 'STIPER' Agricultural Institute, between November 7, 1991 until January 15, 1992. The experiment was conducted using a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) and consisted of 2 factors. The first factor was level of water supply: W1 = 100% field capacity, W2 = 80% field capacity, W3 = 60% field capacity. The second factor was soil types namely: N1 = Regosol, N2 = Latosol, N3 = Grumosol. The soil was manured at 5 t/ha. The conclusions of the study are as follows: 1. No interaction between soil moisture content and soils type, 2. The influence of soil moisture content and soil type was significant on the growth and nodulation of pigeon pea, 3. The 80% field water capacity in all soil types with manure at 5 t/ha gave optimum growth and nodulation of pigeon pea. 4. Growth and nodulation performance on the three types of soil with 80% field capacity was Latosol > Grumosol > Regosol.

Availability :
Agricultural Institute STIPER




NO. 80005

Perennials in reforestation: the economic aspects of some alternative agroforestry systems


van Dijk, MP
Working Paper No. 15, Kali Konto Project, 1987; 34p

Abstract:
A large number of species is treated individually describing yield, prices, processing, problems and prospects, and recommendations. Data are mainly from literature with occasional information from the Konto river area.

Availability :
Library; International Agricultural Centre (IAC); Lawickse Allee 11, P. O. Box 88, 6700 AB Wageningen, the Netherlands; phone: (31) (0) 317 495 495; fax: (31) (0) 317 495 395
Email: iac@iac.agro.nl




NO. 67974

The effect of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and Rhizobium sp (HUP+/HUP-) on symbiotic parameter of Cajanus cajan L.


Sekhon, GK; Gupta, RP; Gupta, SK; Kaul, VK
Department of Microbiology, P.A.U., Ludhiana, India

BIOTROP Special Publication 42: 153-156 (1993)

Abstract:
The objective of this experiment was to study the response of dual inoculation of VA mycorrhizae (Glomus fasciculatum) and hydrogen uptake of positive strain and deficient mutants of Rhizobium sp. in comparison to single inoculation. The experiments were designed in order to study nodulation, nodular activity, N and P contents in shoots and root colonization of Cajanus cajan which were grown in pots under greenhouse condition. The results of dual inoculation of VAM fungi and Hup+/ Hup- mutants showed greater VAM colonization and nodule formation in the roots of Cajanus cajan. VAM colonized plants accumulated higher levels of nitrogenase activity as compared to non-VAM plants. The presence of Hup character has been found to be desirable for enchanching plant yield and nitrogen fixation. Hup+ strains interacted better with VA mycorrhizal fungi for all the symbiotic parameters.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office
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NO. 67978

The host and cultural practices that affected mycorrhizal responses


Daft, MJ
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland, UK

BIOTROP Special Publication 42: 197-208 (1993)

Abstract:
In the field endomycorrhizas, optimum spacing of the crop plants should be maintained to maximise the benefits of inoculation. Both mycorrhizal cereals and nodulated-plus-mycorrhizal legumes have optimum densities for growth. In chickpea and peanut the differences were found in their responses to inoculation depending on the genotype investigated. Responses to rock phosphates varied with respect to source of origin and the application to the host plant. Other microbes that inhibited the growth in medium could affect the development of dually-inoculated legumes. A species of Streptomyces was found to interact positively with nodulated and mycorrhizal cowpeas. Urea, a major source of nitrogen, was utilised more efficiently by mycorrhizal than non mycorrhizal maize. The combination of urea, straw and mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased dry matter and grain yields of millet in field trials which was carried out in India.

Availability :
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NO. 67964

The occurence of Rhizoctonia sp. as an endophyte in roots co-existing with VAM fungus association


Singh, BR; Gouda, GR; Reddy, CN
Department of Botany, Gulbarga University, India

BIOTROP Special Publication 42: 67-72 (1993)

Abstract:
The purpose of the present study is to enumerate the endophytic associations of Rhizoctonia sp. with various crops and weeds in the Gulbarga region. In the investigation, the VAM associated with septate endophyte Rhizoctonia sp. was isolated and its interaction with VA mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus aggregatum) was studied. The endomycotrophy was assessed by using root clearing and staining technique. Rhizoctonia sp. was isolated on Meyer's CC medium. A pot culture experiment was designed to study the infectivity and growth response of dual inocula on pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) under the moisture stress conditions. The results showed that nearly 90% of the screened plants were mycorrhizal in nature with vesicles and/or arbuscules characters and about half of them were also often found to harbour septate fungi as endophytes along with VAM fungal structures in their root systems. Cultivated crop plants exhibited more abundant septate endophytic associations than weeds. The pigeon pea plants did not respond to Rhizoctonia inocula (on plant dry weight basis) though sufficient endophytic association was observed, while the growth response was significantly higher than VAM fungus alone. Only intermediate response was observed from dual inocula. The competitive ability of Rhizoctonia sp. forwards VAM fungus was discussed in the light of the present knowledge on septate endophytes.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office
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NO. 68044

Trials on pigeon pea cultivation techniques on rainfed drylands
Uji paket teknologi kacang gude di lahan kering tadah hujan

Karsono, S; Prayitno
Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Malang [Malang Research Institute for Food Crops], Indonesia

Teknologi untuk menunjang peningkatan produksi tanaman pangan [Technology to support food crops production]; Malang, Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, 1993; p 233-239

Abstract:
Pigeon pea cultivation techniques were evaluated on rainfed drylands at the farmers' fields in Pasuruan (East Java) and in Alas (Sumbawa, West Nusa Tengara) during wet season from December 1992 to June 1993. A split-plot design with three replications was used in this experiment. The main plot was the three cultivars of pigeon pea, i.e. cvs. QPI-42, QPL-17 and Mega. The subplots were the kind of technology, namely (A) zero tillage monoculture pigeon pea with plant spacing of 40 cm x 20 cm, fertilized with 25 kg urea, 50 kg TSP, 50 kg KCl/ha, weeded once and without plant protection; (B) one times of intercropping cultivation, i.e. pigeon pea and corn, with plant spacing of 40 cm x 10 cm for pigeon pea and 160 cm x 20 cm for corn, fertilized with 25 kg urea, 50 kg TSP, 50 kg KCl/ha for pigeon pea and 100 kg Urea, 100 kg TSP, 100 kg KCl/ha for corn, weeded two times, and four times pesticide spraying; (C) two times pigeon pea-corn intercropping, with the plant spacing of 40 cm x 10 cm for pigeon pea and 200 cm x 20 cm for corn, fertilized with 50 kg urea, 100 kg TSP, 100 kg KCl for pigeon pea, and 200 kg urea, 100 kg TSP, 100 kg KCl/ha for corn, weeded two times and the pesticide spraying depending on insect population observed; and (D) two times pigeon pea monoculture planting with plant spacing of 40 cm x 10 cm, fertilized with 50 kg urea, 100 kg TSP, 100 kg KCl/ha, weeded three times and pesticide spraying depending on insects population observed. The result showed that in Sumbawa the D cultivation technique produced the highest yield of pigeon pea, achieving 1.83 t/ha dry seeds. The B cultivation yielded a balance yield between pigeon pea (1.15 t/ha) and corn (1.54 t/ha) which might be suitable to the local needs. Production of corn, however, was low, due to the effect of intercropping with pigeon pea. In Pasuruan the yield of pigeon pea was very low, due to the attack of Mylabris pustulata. In general cv. QPL-17 yielded better than cvs. QPL-42 and Mega either in Sumbawa or in Pasuruan.

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office
Email: hadi@proseanet.org; rochani@proseanet.org




NO. 68705

Effects of planting density and weeding rates on the yield of pigeon pea
Pengaruh kerapatan tanaman dan tingkat penyiangan terhadap produksi kacang gude

Moedjiono; Karsono, S
Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Malang [Malang Research Institute for Food Crops], Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Tahun 1992 [Proceedings of the Seminar on Food Crops Research Funding in 1992]; Malang, 26-27 Februari 1992; Kasno, A; Hendroatmodjo, KH; Winarto, A (eds); Malang; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Malang; 1993; p 147-152

Abstract:
Important factors affecting the increase of plant yield per unit area are: the number of plants, planting distance and weed management. The effect of weeds were varies, depending on competition ability among plants. The objective of this experiment was to study the effect of plant density and weeding rates on the growth of early maturity pigeonpea. The field experiment was conducted at the Muneng Experimental Station during the dry season of 1988. The experiment was designed in a Randomized Block Design with three replications. The First factor was plant density (P1=400.000 plants/ha; P2=500.000 plants/ha; P3=666.666 plants/ha; P4=1.000.000 plants/ha). The Second factor was weeding rates (S0=control without weeding, S1=one time weeding, S2=two times weeding, S3=weed freely). The average of yields were varied from 1.58 to 1.90 t/ha of dry grains. Plant densities did not significantly affect the total weed growth as well as the increasing of grain yield of pigeonpea. Plant population above 400.000 plants/ha decreased grain weight per plant and increased the number of sterile plants. The more frequent of weeding, reducing weed growth, however, it did not increase grain yield significantly. Weeding once increased grain yield 1,81 t/ha or it was 14,5% higher than that of no weeding and it did not significantly different to either twice weeding or continuously weeding. (Revised authors' abstract)

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NO. 68730

Cookies made of mixture of maize, pigeonpea and soybean flours
Kue kering dari bahan tepung campuran jagung, gude dan kedelai

Antarlina, SS; Utomo, JS
Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Malang [Malang Research Institute for Food Crops], Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Tahun 1992 [Proceedings of the Seminar on Food Crops Research Funding in 1992]; Malang, 26-27 Februari 1992; Kasno, A; Hendroatmodjo, KH; Winarto, A (eds); Malang; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Malang; 1993; p 330-331

Abstract:
The experiment was carried out at the Post Harvest Laboratory of MARIF [Malang Research Institute for Food Crops] to study the quality of cookies made of the mixed of maize, pigeonpea and soybean flours, from October to November 1991. Addition of pigeon pea and soybean flours, into maize flour product a high nutritive value flour that be able to substitute and decrease the amount of wheat flour consumtion. The experiment was aimed to study the nutritive value of the mixed flour, and the acceptability of the cookies. Five different formulas of mixed flour made from maize (cv. Arjuna), pigeonpea (cv. Mega) and soybean (cv. Wilis). Formula I: 40%+50%+10%; formula II: 40%+40%+20%; formula III: 40%+30%+30%; formula IV: 40%+20%+40%; formula V: 40%+10%+50% of maize, pigeonpea and soybean flour, respectively. Each formula was used to make cookies. Analyses of water, ash, protein, fat and carbohydrate contents of each flour were done as well as of the mixed flour. Organoleptic tests on colour, flavour, taste and crispiness were done using the Hedonic Scale Scoring. The panelists were 46 persons. The results showed that each kind of flour has different chemical composition. Soybean flour has the highest content of ash (6%), protein (32%) and fat (18%). Maize flour has the highest carbohydrate content (76%). Among the mixed flour, formula V contained the highest protein (27%) and fat (11%). Addition of pigeon pea and soybean flour had a significant effect on the crispiness of the cookies. The cookies made using formula II had the highest score and it was the most crispy. Improvement of the nutritive value of the mixed flour by adding pigeon pea or soybean flours in various compositions had no significant effect on colour, flavour, taste or production of the cookies.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office
Email: info@proseanet.org|prosea@indo.net.id




NO. 80003

Agroforestry trials on forest land: experiences and options


Bekkering, TD
Working paper No. 20, Kali Konto Project; 1988, 23 p

Abstract:
Two agroforestry systems, the strip rotation system and the fuelwood plantation system are discussed. Transfer of authority of these trials from the project to the State Forest Authority is proposed and necessary adjustments suggested.

Availability :
Library; International Agricultural Centre (IAC); Lawickse Allee 11, P. O. Box 88, 6700 AB Wageningen, the Netherlands; phone: (31) (0) 317 495 495; fax: (31) (0) 317 495 395
Email: iac@iac.agro.nl




NO. 80015

Agroforestry on forest land - Experiences in the Konto River Watershed


Bekkering, TD
Konto River Project; Malang, Indonesia

Social Forestry in Indonesia; Workshop report. Field Document No. 25, Regional Wood Energy Development Programme in Asia; Bangkok, FAO, 1990; p 111-122

Abstract:
The design, species and issues of a strip rotation system, a fuelwood system and an intercropping system are described and compared.

Availability :
Library; International Agricultural Centre (IAC); Lawickse Allee 11, P. O. Box 88, 6700 AB Wageningen, the Netherlands; phone: (31) (0) 317 495 495; fax: (31) (0) 317 495 395
Email: iac@iac.agro.nl




NO. 72034

Pests and diseases of pigeon pea
Ket qua nghien cuu sau benh dau trieu

Luong Minh Khoi; Nguyen Thi Thuy; Nguyen Thi Nguyen; Le Thi Dai
Thong tin Bao ve Thuc vat [Plant Protection Bulletin] (6): 5-9 (1991)

Abstract:
There are 20 pest species and 3 diseases infesting on pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). Among them, Melangromyza obtusa is a new pest of leguminous crops in Vietnam. They cause significant yield loss. In this paper were presented preliminary assessments of damages by main pests and diseases. This paper introduces some agronomical characters of 18 cultivars of pigeon pea.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 66907

Development and utilization of food crops in Indonesia
Pengembangan dan pemanfaatan tanaman pangan di Indonesia

Moeljoprawiro, S; Ibrahim, M
Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani [Proceedings of National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany], Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 February 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Perpustakaan Nasional R.I., 1992; p 288-299

Abstract:
In Indonesia, based on their production and utilization, food crops were classified into the following groups: (i) major commodities: rice, corn, soybean, peanut, mungbean, cassava and sweet potato: (ii) potential commodities: sorghum, wheat, cowpea, pigeonpea, taro and yam; and (iii) introduced commodities: pearl millet, sesame, arrowroot and lablab. The rapid spread of modern agriculture and technology such as variety had replaced the old mixed population of plant races. As a consequence it is getting more difficult to find traits such as resistance to emerging pests and diseases. Therefore, an extensive exploration and collection programme devoted to assembling as much of the germplasm as possible and its maintenance, once it is obtained, is a must.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 69928

Physical and chemical properties of corn-pigeon pea-wheat composite flour and their product nutritional properties
Sifat fisik dan kimia tepung campuran jagung-gude-terigu dan gizi produk olahannya

Munarso, SJ; Indrasari, SD; Damarjati, DS
Sukamandi Research Institute for Food Crops (SURIF), Cikampek, West Java, Indonesia

Media Penelitian Sukamandi [Sukamandi Research Media] 14: 24-28 (1993)

Abstract:
An experiment to evaluate the physical and chemical properties of corn-based composite flour and their product nutritional properties was conducted in 1990 at Sukamandi Research Institute for Food Crops (SURIF). Three formulas of composite flour were produced by mixing up the flours of corn, pigeon pea and wheat in a different ratio, i.e. (0:0:100), (30:10:60) and (60:20:20). Each formula was used as raw material in cake processing. The cakes, as well as non-protein formula and skim milk, were fed to the 31 days old experimental rats from the strain of LMR. Observations were made on flour whiteness, density, proximate analysis and their cake's nutritional status. The results indicated that the level of corn and pigeon pea flour significantly affect whiteness of the composite flour. As compared to that of wheat flour, the whiteness of the composite flour was reduced by approximately 17 and 27% when a mixture of corn and pigeon pea flour was added into the wheat flour, with the ratio of 30:10 and 60:20, respectively. The corn and pigeon pea flours also significantly affect the physico-chemical of the composite and its products. In the mixture of 30:10:60 of corn, pigeon pea, and wheat the protein, fat, and ash of the composite were increased by 1.4, 1.6 and 0.85%, respectively, while of the products were increased by 0.4, 0.8 and 0.5%, respectively. While in the mixture of 60:20:20, the increase of protein, fat and ash was as much as 2.20, 3.4 and 1.7%, respectively, for the composite flour, while for its products was 2.07, 3.17 and 0.88%, respectively. The addition of corn and pigeon pea flours reduced the carbohydrate of both the composite flour and its products.

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research, Library
Email: csar@bogor.wasantara.net.id




NO. 103073

Effect of host plants on the growth of sandalwood (Santalum album) seedlings
Pengaruh jenis inang terhadap pertumbuhan semai cendana (Santalum album)

Surata, IK
Santalum (9): 1-9 (1992)

Abstract:
An experiment was undertaken to evaluate the performance of sandalwood seedlings under the influence of Desmanthes virgatus, Alternanthera sp., Crotalaria juncea, Sesbania grandiflora, Cajanus cajan, Capsicum frutescens, Breynia cerna, Lycopersicon esculentum, Acacia oraria, Duranta repens, Erigeron linifolius, Acacia holocericea, Acacia auriculiformis, Elephantopus scaber, Desmodium trifolium and Andropogon subtilis as the host plants of the seedlings. Each seedling of sandalwood and the host plant were grown in a polybag filled with soil and sand (3:1) for seven months. The experiment was laid out following a Completely Randomized Design with 50 replications (each treatment consisted of 50 pots). Measurements were taken monthly for stem height, stem diameter, and dry weight. The result showed that the seedling growth of Santalum album was considerably enhanced with host. The best host in terms of dry weight, height, stem diameter of seedling was Althernanthera sp., Desmanthes virgatus and Crotalaria juncea. (Author's abstract)

Availability :
Institute for Information Resources, Bogor Agricultural University




NO. 92955

Increase ginger yield through minimum fertilization and mulching


Abaquita, MB
The Philippine Journal of Plant Industry 57 (1-2): 30-43 (1992)

Abstract:
Effects of shade, mulch and different fertilizer levels on ginger (Hawaiian variety) grown on soil with pH of 5.4, organic matter of 1.5%, available P of 36 ppm and available K of 496 ppm, were evaluated at the La Granja National Crop Research and Development Centre, La Carlota City, Negros Occidental for two cropping periods. It aimed to determine a low input technology for ginger production and to assess yield performance of ginger at differed input levels. The experiment was laid out in a 2x2x4 split-split plot design in three replications. Shade and fertilizer significantly affected rhizome yield, plant height and number of shoots per hill of ginger. On the other hand, mulching statistically influenced only the ginger yield in crop year 1991-1992. Shading ginger with pigeon pea caused decline on rhizome yield both in fertilized and unfertilized plots as well as in mulched plots. It also retarded shoot production but enhanced growth in height. Shade and fertilizer had interaction effect both in crop years 1990-1991 and 1991-1992. Likewise, interaction between mulch and fertilizer was also significant. Interaction effect of the three factors; shade, mulch and fertilizer was observed in crop year 1991- 1992. Highest significant yield of 17.20 t/ha was observed from treatment 200-50-50 kg/ha NPK + mulch followed by treatment 150-50-50 kg/ha NPK + mulch with a mean yield of 16.20 t/ha. Lowest rhizome yield was obtained from treatment 0-0-0 kg/ha NPK + shade with a mean yield of only 5.52 t/ha. The economic analysis reveals treatment 150-50-50 kg NPK + mulch as the moss profitable with Marginal Benefit Cost Ratio (MBCR) at 3.92 and 3.94, respectively. (Author's abstrct)

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 94058

Oxalic acid content and its relation to the calcium present in some Philippine plant foods


Pilac, LM; Abdon, IC; Mandap, EP
Abstract Bibliography of FNRI Researches: 65 (1947-1997); Philippine Journal of Nutrition 24 (1): 21-36 (1971)

Abstract:
This paper reports both the oxalic acid and calcium contents of 129 plant foods of local origin. Only 21 foods were found to have a calcium to oxalate ratio of 2 and above with a corresponding available calcium of 80% and above, namely celery, petsay, repolyo, abitswelas berde, kamansi, langka, hilaw, patola, sitsaro, ubod ng niog, tahure, tofu, abitswelas puti, kadyos, munggo and tapilan. Oxalic acid in excess of calcium was obtained for 59 foods, 24 of which were leafy vegetables. The remaining foods had calcium to oxalate ratio below 2 but some of them had over 50% available calcium which could still be utilized.

Availability :
Food and Nutrition Research Institute; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 7630

Effect of intercropping of pigeon pea, yard-long bean and winged bean on the growth and yield of cassava
Pengaruh tumpang sari kacang hiris, kacang panjang dan kecipir terhadap pertumbuhan dan produksi ubi kayu

Effendi, MS
Thesis; Bogor; Department of Agronomy; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1980; 36p

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia




NO. 40519

Production and processing of food crops at village level - a study of a community project in the Western Highlands


Stephenson, RA; Kemelfield, GJ; Wood, AW; Power, AP; Khan, TN; Parfitt, R
Agriculture in the tropics; Tenth Waigani Seminar, Lae, PNG University of Technology, May 2-8, 1976; Port Moresby; University of Papua New Guinea; 1977; p76-87

Availability :
Matheson Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40535

Intensification of subsistence agriculture on the Nembi plateau, Papua New Guinea 3. Sweet potato cultivar trials, crop rotation trials, and crop introduction


D'Sonza, E; Bourke, RM; Akers, WL
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Department of Primary Industry; Aiyura; Kainantu; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 34(1-4): 41-48(1986)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 67151

Description of superior cultivars of "palawija" (corn, sorghum, pulses and tuber crops), 1918-1992
Deskripsi varietas unggul palawija (jagung, sorgum, kacang-kacangan dan ubi-ubian), 1918-1992

Kasim, H.; Djunainah
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Bogor; Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Pangan; 1993; 155 p.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100269

Study on the processing of crispy crackers from several kinds of flour, i.e. cassava and cowpea or soybean
Penelitian pembuatan krupuk dari beberapa macam tepung asal ubi kayu dan kacang tunggak/kedelai

Richana, Nur; Kamba, Nasti
Maros Research Institute for Food Crops (MORIF); Ujung Pandang; South Sulawesi; Indonesia

Hasil Penelitian Pasca Panen dan Mekanisasi 1992/1993, Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Maros [Research Results of Post Harvest 1992/1993, Maros Research Institute for Food Crops (MORIF)]; Tahun 12: 103-108(1994)

Abstract:
The research was conducted at the Food Technology Laboratory of MORIF in 1993. Several flours were made as composites crispy cracker fluor. Ratio of composite flour was 100 gram of source flours; 50 gr of added flours. The source flours were sour and sweet fermented cassava fluor, cassava strach, and milled cassava. While, soybean and pigeonpea flours were used as added flour. Spices were added as cracker flavour. Objectives of the research are the following; (1) to study cracker processing from flour composite; (2) to study the physico-chemical contents of the cracker; and (3) to conduct organoleptic test of the crackers product. Data showed that there were no different between moisture and ash contents of the crackers product. Crackers product was made of source flours achieved the highest carbohydrate content with the average of 82.83%, however, the flours had the lowest average percentage content of proteins (1.96%), fats (1.07%) and fibers (1.78%), in that order. The composites of source flour and pigeonpea flour had the average percentage content of 71.27% (carbohydrates), 2.97% (fibers), 1.23% (fats), 5.70% (proteins) respectively. The composite of source flours and soybean flours had the highest average proteins content (9.6%), fibers (4.29%) and fats (3.78%) among the others, but low of average percentage carbohydrate content (57.22%). The organoleptic test showed that crackers product from the composite of source flours and soybean flours was accepted by the panelists, followed by crackers was made of source flours.

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 50123

Food + forage intercropping under upland condition


Topark-Ngarm, A; Armada, EC; Tengco, PL; Carangal, VR
Rice Farming Systems Program; IRRI; P.O.Box 933; Manila; Philippines

Proceedings of the Crop-Animal Systems Research Workshop, Serdang, Malaysia, August 15-19, 1988; Serdang; MARDI/IDRC/Asian Rice Farming Systems Network; 1988; p453-471

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 997

Research on some species of green manure to replace Crotalaria juncea as fertilizer for lowland rice
Penjelidikan dengan berbagai djenis pupuk hidjau untuk menggantikan Crotalaria juncea sebagai pupuk padi sawah

Yo, KS
Research Institute for Agricultural Techniques; Bogor; Indonesia

Tehnik Pertanian [Agricultural Techniques] 4: 293-327 (1955)

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 11638

Manual for utilization and quality inspection of 52 vegetable oils
Khumue kan chai prayot lae truat sop khunnaphap khong phuet namman lae namman phuet 52 chanit

Chathawong, P
Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand

Bangkok; Agricultural Chemistry Division; Department of Agriculture; 1987; p28-42

Availability :
Agricultural Chemistry Division; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 20100

Notes on current investigations (Agronomy), July to September 1954


Anonymous
Agricultural Division; Kuala Lumpur; Malaya

The Malayan Agricultural Journal 37 (4): 233-237 (1954)

Abstract:
Mostly common names used

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 30434

Effects of pigeon pea biomass incorporation on transplanted rice in a rice-legume system


Rebancos, ET; Pargas, AA; Pandey, RK
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 13 (Supp.1): S10 (1988)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 80001

The agroforestry trials in the Konto river project: experiences and issues


Nibbering, W
Project Communication No. 1, Kali Konto Project; 1987; 135p

Abstract:
The report discusses agroforestry trial in the highlands of East Java. These experiments are a forest-grassland trial (Agathis and elephant grass), a strip rotation trial, a goat schere, no tillage and minimum tillage trials and fuelwood trials.

Availability :
International Agrarian Centre (IAC); Lawickse Allee 11, 6701 AN Wageningen; the Netherlands




NO. 102498

Effect of intercropping of pigeonpea with corn on the growth and yield of pigeonpea
Pengaruh tumpangsari kacang gude dengan jagung terhadap pertumbuhan dan hasil kacang gude

Karsono, Suwasik
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops (MARIF); Malang; East Java; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan [Proceedings of the Seminar on the Research Result of Food Crops] th.1994; 1995; p104-114

Abstract:
Pigeonpea grown in dryland area usually are long duration cultivars and they are planted in mixed cropping with corn, cowpea, sorghum, peanut or cassava. Pigeonpea-corn intercropped experiment was conducted at farmers fields in Pasuruan, Banyuwangi both in East Java, Lombok Barat (West Nusatenggara), and Sikka (East Nusatenggara) during the wet season of 1992- 1993 (November 1992 until May 1993), using a Split-Plot Design with three replications. The main plots were dosage of Nitrogen (Urea) fertilizer on corn, namely (A) without fertilizer, (B) 67.5 kg/ha N and (C) 135 kg/ha N. The sub plots were the arrangement of pigeonpea-corn intercropped, namely (1) two rows of pigeonpea intercropped with one row of corn (2:1), (2) the arrangement of 3:1, (3) the arrangement of 2:2, (4) The arrangement of 3:2 and (5) the arrangement of 1:2. The cultivar of pigeonpea was planted with 50 cm, 100 cm, or 150 cm between rows and 10 cm within row. Corn was planted with 50 cm, 100 cm or 150 cm between rows, and 40 cm within row. The results showed that if pigeonpea was considered as the main crop, growing three rows of pigeonpea and one row of corn will give the optimum yield of pigeonpea. If corn was considered as the main crop, one row of pigeonpea and two rows of corn will give a optimum yield of corn. Three rows of pigeonpea intercropped with two rows of corn gave a balance yields both for pigeonpea and corn compared to the other treatments. The dosage of Nitrogen fertilizer on corn did not affect the yield of pigeonpea in the pigeonpea-corn intercropped. Nevertheless the dosage of 67.5 kg/ha N was already adequate.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 50007

Opportunities for grain legumes in Nusa Tenggara Timur


Field,S
Agency for Agricultural Research and Development Nusa Tenggara Agricultural Support Project;Indonesia

Palawija News 6(3):2-4(1989)

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre;Bogor;Indonesia




NO. 104997

Characteristics of extrusion food from rice and pigeonpea mixture
Karakteristik makanan ekstrusi dari campuran beras dan kacang gude

Azman; Marzempi
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Pemberitaan Penelitian Sukarami [Sukarami Research Media] (24): 23-26(1995)

Abstract:
An experiment was conducted at the laboratory Bogor Agricultural University in 1987. The objective of this eperiment was to study characteristics of extrusion food from mixture of rice and pigeonpea. The experiment was designed due to factorial arrangement in a Randomized Completely Block Design with three factors. The first factor was rice cultivars (Cisadane and IR36). The second was type of rice (brown rice and milled rice). And the third was the composition of rice and pigeonpea presented in percent (100:0, 80:20 and 70:30). The result showed that the best quality of the extrusion food was obtained by milled rice IR36 with the formula of 80:20. Higher percentage of pigeonpea seemed to increase the loaf volume, water absorption, and water solubility of the product. Compared to Cisadane, cv. IR36 had higher amylose content as well as its higher loaf volume, water absorption, and water solubility.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 102218

Effect of crown pruning time of corn (Zea mays L.) and phosphorus fertilizer application on the growth and yield of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp) as the intercrop
Pengaruh saat pemangkasan tajuk jagung (Zea mays L.) dan pemupukan fosfor terhadap pertumbuhan dan hasil kacang gude (Cajanus cajan (L.)Millsp) sebagai tanaman sisipan

Oematan,Shirly Seahan
Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Thesis (S2), Bogor, Bogor Agricultural University; 1993; 74p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 50122

Food and forage crop intercropping under rainfed lowland conditions


Carangal,VR;Tengco,PL;Miah,NI;Topark-Ngarm,A
Rice Farming Systems Program;IRRI;P.O.Box 933;Manila;Philippines

Proceedings of the Crop-Animal Systems Research Workshop,Serdang,Malaysia,August 15-19,1988;Serdang;MARDI/IDRC/Asian Rice Farming Systems Network;1988;p435-451

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops;Bogor;Indonesia




NO. 92023

Soil conservation and agroforestry in sloping ares of Bukidnon


Pava, H.M
Greenfields __ (2): 32-33 (1995)

Abstract:
The article recommends a pattern of planting various crops and forest trees to prevent soil erosion on maximize use of sloping farm lands.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library; Los Ba¤os; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 2547

Host requirement of sandal (Santalum album L.)


Ananthapadmanabha,HS;Rangaswamy,CR;Sarma,CR;Nagaveni,HC;Jain,SH; Ventkatesan,KR;Krishnappa,HP
Sandal Research Centre; Bangalore; India

Indian Forester 110(3):264-268(1984)

Availability :
UPSEA;Herbarium Bogoriense;Indonesia




NO. 8111

Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) as an associate plant of sandalwood (Santalum album) seedlings
Gude (Cajanus cajan) sebagai tanaman pendamping bibit cendana (Santalum album)

Roedjito, SW; Rumawas, F
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Simposium dan Seminar Nasional Hortikultura Indonesia [Proceedings of the National Symposium and Seminar on Horticulture in Indonesia]; Bintoro, MH et al.(eds); Perhorti; Bogor; 1990; p. 278-287

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 39271

Identification of fungi associated with the root system of legumes


Paca, DS; Tangonan, NG
Abstract Bibliography of Research in the Department of Plant Pathology; College of Agriculture; USM; Kabacan; North Cotabato (1988-89); 1978; p 48

Abstract:
Fourteen legume plants namely: cowpea (Vigna radiata), string bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), peanut (Arachis hypogea), mungbean (Phaseolus aureus), winged bean (Psoph °Carpus tetragonolobus), lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus), soybean (Glycine max), kadios (Cajanus cajan), kentucky bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), taures (Phaseolus aureus), bush sitao (Phaseolus vulgaris LB-I), red bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) with roots and rhizosphere soils were used in this study. It was found that Fusarium sp., Colletotrichum sp., Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., Rhizopus sp., and Macrophoma sp., were present in rhizosphere soils in legumes. Pathogenicity tests showed that among the seven genera identified, Fusarium sp. and Colletotrichum sp. were found pathogenic while the rest were non-pathogenic.

Availability :
Department of Plant Pathology; College of Agriculture; University of Southern Mindanao
Email: cemarrdec@itdp.usm.edu.ph




NO. 39960

Screening of 46 pigeonpea germplasms against wilt at SMARC-USM from August to October 1987


Sumangil, AB; Dionio, BT
Dept. of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture, University of Southern Mindanao, Kabacan, North Cotabato

Abstract Bibliography of Research, Department of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture, USM, Kabacan, North Cotabato (1988-89): 57; 1988

Abstract:
A study on the screening of 46 pigeonpea germplasm against wilt showed that there were two pathogens causing the disease, namely: Fusarium udum Butler and Rhizoctonia sp. Of the 46 entries screened, ten were rated resistant (0 infection), 29 moderately resistant 1.96 to 9.67% infection, and seven tolerant (11.11 to 14.81 infection).

Availability :
Department of Plant Pathology; College of Agriculture; University of Southern Mindanao
Email: cemarrdec@itdp.usm.edu.ph




NO. 91831

Tobacco aqueous extract: control against vegetable insect


Riazonda, CR
Philippine Tobacco News 10 (1): 20 (1996)

Abstract:
Tobacco aqueous spray and tobacco dust were found effective in controlling bean fly, bean aphids, thrips and leafhoppers. It was tested on okra, tomato, munggo, eggplant and pepper.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 91641

Adaptability of different field crops under lahar-laden soils


Suyat, MN; Lacson, RT; Bayot, AJ
Central Luzon State University (CLSU), Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, 3120 Philippines

Adaptability of different field crops under lahar-laden soils; Proceedings 1993; Research, Extension and Traiining; Central Luzon State University; 279 p

Abstract:
Among the tested crops, sweet potato, cassava, mungbean, peanut, cowpea, pigeon pea, corn, sorghum, soybean, sesame, and leguminous cover crops appear to be the most suitable for lahar. Although the growth and yield of these entries are not as superior as when grown under normal conditions, these crops showed better seedling vigour, uniform emergence, high percentage of survival, uniform crop and reasonable yield. These characteristics of the crops under strange environment made them suitable or adaptable to the prevailing situation in the lahar-laden areas.

Availability :
Research, Extension and Training; Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium
Email: clarrdec@ne_link.net




NO. 39291

Selection of mycorrhizal strains for biological control of Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli (Burkh.) Snyder and Hansen on cowpea [Vigna sinensis (Torner) Savi]


Baradas, SN; Halos, PM
Philippine Phytopathological Society, c/o Dept. of Plant Pathology, Institute of Biological Sciences, UP Los Baños, College, Laguna, Philippines

Philippine Phytopathology 14 (1-2): 14 (1978)

Abstract:
Strains of mycorrhizal fungi were assayed for stimulatory influence on growth and protective effect against Fusarium dry root rot of cowpea. These strains were collected from fifty different roots and rhizosphere soils of leguminous, solanaceous, orchard and plantation crops, and pasture grasses. The effect on growth rates and incidence of infection were analyzed using the two-factor factorial in CRD analysis of variance. It was difficult to select significantly promising strains due to the effect of soils and strain interclose interaction on growth increment and infection. However, on close analysis of the results using Duncan's multiple range test revealed the eleven promising mycorrhizal strains, namely, those derived from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum), rice (Oryza sativa), soybean (Glycine max), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), coffee (Coffea robusta), ginger (Zingiber officinale), guinea grass (Panicum maximum), jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus), lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus). and mungbean (Phaseolus radiatus).

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 90831

Yield performance of newly introduced medium-maturing varieties of pigeon pea


Perito Jr, ST; Santos, AB
The ISU Research Journal 15 (1 & 2): 20; 1986

Abstract:
The diferent varieties used in this study were as follows: V1-WB 20 (105) check; V2-ICPL-270; V3-ICPL 85060; V5-ICPL 227; V6-ICPL 304; V7-8863. The results showed that the different varieties revealed insignificant differences on plant height at maturity and on the number of branches. The weight of 100 seeds per variety showed a highly significant result. Variety 1 gave the heaviest weight while V3 gave the lightest. Highly significant differen ces were observed among treatments as to the number of seeds per pod. Variety WB 20 (105) significantly gave the highest number of seed per pod all other varieties. As to seed yield per sampling area, the result showed an insignificant mean difference varieties.

Availability :
Isabela State University




NO. 90832

Adaptability trial of four ICRISAT early pigeon pea varieties


Santos, AB
The ISU Research Journal 18 (3 & 4): 61-65; 1987

Abstract:
The experiment was aimed primarily to find out which of the four ICRISAT (International Crop Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics) pigeonpea varieties obtained from a semi-arid region is/are adapted to the local climatic conditions. The varieties used were: T1-ICPL 132, T2-ICPL 87, T3-ICPL 138 and T4-ICPL 270 which were all obtained from the ICRISAT, Patancheru, Andhra, Pradesh, India. Results obtained showed significant differences at P=0.01 in almost all parameters observed. The grain yield per 8 square meters sampling area showed that T1 and T2 were significantly higher than T3 and T4 where their mean grain yield were 1181.07, 1131.05, 432.78 and 379.63 /grams following the order as they were enumerated. Other parameters with the same trend were: days from seeding + 0.50% bloom, number of pods per plant and a reversed order with regards to plant height at maturity. The data obtained showed that T1 and T2 were early maturity varieties while T3 and T4 were medium maturing. Due to their differences in their maturity, the spacing which was followed antagonized the medium maturing varieties resulting to the low pod yield. The gain yield from treatments 1 and 2 indicate that they could be grown under local conditions profitably.

Availability :
Isabela State University




NO. 91221

Adaptation trial of pigeonpea varieties in the Ilocos


Cudapas, LO; Sugui, FP; Obien, SR
Ilocos Research Abstracts (1986-1987); Batac; Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 28; 1987

Abstract:
Sixteen early pigeonpea varieties were evaluated for their adaptability, yield and agronomic characters under Ilocos conditions. The study was conducted at MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte from October 1986 to February 1987. The different varieties were arranged in RCBD replicated four times. Out tof the 15 entries evaluated, seven entries, i.e., ICPL 146, ICPL 1, ICPL 312, ICPL 840045, ICPL 8324, ICPL 288, and ICPL 161, were promising with seed yields rangeing from 3.1 to 3.4 t/ha. Days to emergence, 50% flowering and maturity varied significantly among entries. The different entries emerged after seven days from the date of seeding ICPL 8304 and ICPL 840019 flowered and matured the earliest (49 and 97 days, respectively). Mean seed count per pod ranged from 3.8 to 5.51. ICPL 8321 had the most number of seeds per pod (5.5) while ICPL 840019 had the lowest (3.8 seeds). The number of pods per plant varied significantly among entries. Three entries, i.e., ICPL 8342, ICPL 151 and ICPL 269, had fewer pods but with heavier seeds.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Mariano Marcos State University
Email: ilarrdec@laoag.amanet.net




NO. 91222

Early vegetable pigeonpea international trial in the Ilocos


Cudapas, LO; Sugui, FP; Obien, SR
Ilocos Research Abstracts (1986-1987); Batac, Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 28; 1987

Abstract:
This study was conducted at MMSU during the dry season of crop year 1986-87 to evaluate the adaptability, yield and agronomic characters of eight early vegetable pigeonpea under Ilocos conditions. The different entries laid out in RCBD replicated three times. All the varieties produced high seed yield (2.8 to 4.0 t/ha). ICPL 84837 produced the highest weed yield of 4.0 t/ha followed by ICPL 27 and ICPL 151 (3.7 and 3.7 t/ha) while the lowest seed yield (2.8 t.ha) was obtained from ICPL 269 entry. Number of days to flower and to mature differed significantly among varieties. Days to flower and to mature ranged from 49 to 69 days and 184 to 120 days, respectively. Seed count per pod ranged from 4 to 5. Among the eight entries, ICPL 8324 had the heaviest seeds (16.9 g) per 100 seeds followed by ICPL 83034 and ICPL 84037 (13.1 and 11.8 g), respectively.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Mariano Marcos State University
Email: ilarrdec@laoag.amanet.net




NO. 91223

Early pigeonpea adaptation trial in the Ilocos


Cudapas, LO; Sugui, FP; Obien, SR
Ilocos Research Abstracts (1986-1987); Batac; Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 29; 1987

Abstract:
The adaptability, yield and agronomic characteristics of 16 early maturing pigeonpea varieties from ICRISAT were evaluated under Ilocos conditions. The study was conducted at the experimental fields of MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte from October 1986 to February 1987 dry season. The different varieties were laid out in RCBD replicated four times. All recommended cultural practices were employed throughout the duration of the study. Results indicated that all the entries were adaptable to Ilocos condition. The promising entries were ICPL 85016, ICPL 85014 and ICPL 151 with high seed yields of 3.7, 3.3 and 3.1 t/ha, respectively. Number of days to flower and to mature and height of plants differed significantly among varieties. ICPL 4, ICPL 84019 and ICPL 84023 flowered and matured the earliest and were the shortest. Most number of pods were produced by H-77 216 while ICPL 85012 had the heaviest seeds.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Mariano Marcos State University
Email: ilarrdec@laoag.amanet.net




NO. 91224

Performance of Queensland varieties of pigeonpea in the Ilocos


Cudapas, LO; Sugui, FP; Obien, SR
Ilocos Research Abstracts (1986-1987); Batac; Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 29; 1987

Abstract:
Five promising Queensland pigeonpea varieties were evaluated for their adaptability and yield performance under Ilocos conditions. The experiment was conducted at Cabanasan, MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte from December 1986 to March 1987 dry season. The different varieties were laid out in RCBD replicated four times. Data on various characters like plant height, pod count/plant, number of seeds per pod and weight of 100 seeds indicated significant differences among entries. QPL 67 significantly produced more pod per plant (40.6) and more seeds per pods (4.2). However, it had lighter seeds (10.9 g) compared to ICPL 702 (17.1 g). Number of pods produced had a market effect on the weight of 100 seeds. As the number of pods per plant increased, the weight of seeds also decreased. Weight of 100 seeds ranged from 10.9 g to 17.19, QPL 702 had the heaviest. Comparable number of seeds was observed among QPL 67, QPL 503, QPL 702 while Quantum had significantly fewer seeds per pod (3.5). Differences in seed yield among the promising varieties were not statistically significant. Seed yield ranged from 1.12 to 1.75 t/ha.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Mariano Marcos State University
Email: ilarrdec@laoag.amanet.net




NO. 91225

Varietal response of pigeonpea to dates of sowing


Cudapas, LO; Sugui, FP; Obien, SR
Ilocos Research Abstracts (1986-1987); Batac; Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 33-34; 1987

Abstract:
The study aimed to determine the effect of sowing date (month) on the growth and yield components of pigeonpea and to identify the optimum date of sowing for each variety. The project started October 1986 and is being conducted to the present at the Mariano Marcos State University, Batac, Ilocos Norte. The dates of sowing were treated as the independent variable. Six early pigeonpea varieties within each sowing date were laid out in RCBD replicated three times. Date of sowing significantly affected the growth and yield of pigeonpea. Days to flower and mature, pod count per plant and weight of 100 seeds were significantly reduced when pigeonpea varieties were sown in November. Apparently, height of plants was significantly decreased with date of sowing. Entries sown in November were generally shorter than those sown in October. Of the eight entries evaluated, HY 3 C and ICPL 7035 had the heaviest seeds for both dates of sowing. ICPL 84060 produced the most number of pods per plant (126.6 and 45.4). No significant differences on seed yield were observed among entries for October planting. However, ICPL 151 outyielded all other entries (2.0 t/ha) when planted in November.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Mariano Marcos State University
Email: ilarrdec@laoag.amanet.net




NO. 91226

Performance of ICRISAT pigeonpea varieties in the Ilocos


Cudapas, LO,; Pascua, SR, Jr; Layaoen, TZ; Garcia, JR, Jr; Calpito, C
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Mariano Marcos State University, Batac, Ilocos Norte

6th PCARRD-ILARRC Integrated Regional Research Review and Development Planning Workshop: Proceedings; Batac, Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 61; 1987

Abstract:
Twenty-two varieties of ICRISAT pigeon were evaluated on their yield and other agronomic characteristics under Ilocos conditions. Of the 22 entries, 17 varieties flowered (Hy-3C, ICPL 265, Red gram TTB-7, Red gram HY-3-C) including the check variety. Days to 50% flowering was from 62 and 98 days.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Mariano Marcos State University
Email: ilarrdec@laoag.amanet.net




NO. 91522

Protein quality of flours from germinated legumes


Mabesa, LB; Atutubo, EO; Castro-Sandoval, ME
The Philippine Agriculturist 65 (3): 245-251; 1982

Abstract:
Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], rice bean (Phaseolus calcaratus Roxb.), cowpea (Vigna sinensis Linn.), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan Linn.), yard long beans, red variety (Vigna sinensis sequipedalis Fruw.) and white beans () were germinated at room temperature and 30 C at different periods. Flours were prepared from the germinated legumes and then analyzed for moisture, protein and relative nutritive value (RNV). RNV of germinated legumes was significantly higher than that of ungerminated legumes. Maximum RNV was achieved after germinating some of the legumes for 48 hr at room temperature except for rice bean where highest RNV was obtained at 30 C after 24 hr and for white bean at room temperature after 24 hr. RNV increased from 23 to 167% after germination. The protein content of germinated legumes tended to be higher than that of ungerminated legumes.

Availability :
Institute of Plant Breeding, Library; University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 92068

Lets plant trees for firewood


Catanaoan, CC
Manila Bulletin, December ?: ? (1997)

Abstract:
In degraded forest, people harvest the branches of trees for firewood. To conserve energy, we must replenish our supply of firewood and make use of other sources of energy such as cow manure.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Library
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 94316

Glycaemic response in normal subjects to five different legumes commonly used in the Philippines


Panlasigui, LN; Panlilio, LM; Madrid, JC
HERDIN Database 023090-PC70050;International Journal of food Science and Nutrition 46(2): 155-160(1995)

Abstract:
Five legumes including chick pea (Cicer arietinum Linn.), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan Linn. Huth.), black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris Linn), mungbean (Phaseolus areus Roxb) and white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris Linn.) were cooked and tested for blood glucose response among healthy human volunteers. The blood glucose response to all legumes was significantly lower compared to bread. The glycaemic response to chick pea was significantly lower.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Resources and Development; UST-RCNS; UST España




NO. 94453

Evaluation of the in-vitro anti-bacterial activity of Cajanus cajan(Linn.) Mil sp.(Leguminosae)


Chua, NM
Inventory of Health Researches: 136(1994-1996)

Abstract:
Cajanus cajan (Linn.) Millsp., commonly known as kadios/kagyos or pigeon pea is found throughout the Philippines, and pantropic in distribution. The crude extracts of Cajanus cajan (Linn.) Milssp. were subjected to the following:(1)antimicrobial test against Staphylocococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Saccharomyoes cerevisiae ATCC 2601 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231; (2) comparative antibacterial assays of the different plant parts(fresh and dried) collected from Pangasinan, Batangas, and Manila;(3)stability test of the active plant part and(4)the minimum inhibitory concentration of the leaf extract against the gram positive test organisms. The hydroalcoholic extract of the fresh and dried leaves of Cajanus cajans(Linn.) Millsp. exhibited an antibacterial activity against the following S.aureus ATCC 25923 at 15,000 ug/ml, B.subtilis ATCC 6633 at 10,000 ug/m. The minimum inhibitory concentrations against the same test organisms and determined using the ug/ml, respectively. Stability tests of the crude extract were also done using the agar cup method and exhibited decrease in activity with the length of storage. An increase in temperature(30 degreeC to 120 degreeC) and pH(4.0 to 12.0) caused a slight decrease in the activity of the extract.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 94504

Alkaloids of several Philippine indigenous food legumes: determination and removal


Rodriguez, FM; Tecson-Mendoza, EM
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 23(2): 121-125(1998)

Abstract:
Eight legumes indigenous to the Philippines namely, batao or hyacinth Bean (Dolichos lablab), jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis), sword Bean (C.gladiata), sam-samping (Mucuna prunens or conchichinensis), sabawel (Clitoria ternatea) pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and rice bean (Vigna umbellata) were screened for the presence of alkaloids. Alkaloids were not detected in mature and immature leaves of pigeon pea, jack bean and sword bean and none in batao, lima bean, rice bean and sabawel. Soaking at 60C for 60 min reduced completely the alkaloids. Soaking at 30C for 30 min to 45C for 30 minutes did not remove the alkaloids while soaking at 45C for 60 minutes and 60C for 30 minutes partially removed the alkaloids.

Availability :
Crops Science Society of the Philippines Secretariat, Institute of Plant Breeding, University of Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 94062

Anti-nutritional factors in some meal beans


Beltran, PG; Hernando, RD; Alberto, SP
Abstract Bibliography of FNRI Researches : 173(1947-1997);Abstracts of Food and Nutrition Researches(Seminar Report Series No.(6): 5(1980)

Abstract:
Raw and cooked seguidillas, tapilan, black and white paayap, red and white abitchuelas and kadyos were fed to rats for a 28-day period. The test material was incorporated in the test diet to reach a 10% protein level with an additional 10% protein supplied by casein. The control group was given the casein as the sole source of protein at a 20% level. Generally, rats fed with cooked beans showed a higher efficiency of food utilization (EFU) value than those given raw beans. EFU values of cooked seguidillas and cooked white paayap approximate the values of the control group. The trypsin inhibitory activities (TIA) of raw and cooked beans were analyzed by the chemical method. Raw seguidillas gave the highest TIA but showed the highest percent destruction of anti-tryptic activity after cooking for three (3) hours. Cooking time depended upon the beans used and ranged from 30 minutes to three hours. Destruction of inhibitor activity of beans by cooking ranged from 65.35% to 96.62%. Animal feeding tests showed that cooked tapilan, black paayap, red and white abitchuelas did not improve in nutritional quality. This finding indicates that there are some toxic factors present in these beans not destroyed by the cooking methods.

Availability :
Food and Nutrition Research Institute; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 94068

Isolation, purification and characterization of ureane from pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan)


Yu, GFV; Reyes, AG
Abstract of Bibliography of FNRI Researches;311(1947-1997);Bulletin of the Philippine Biochemical Society 11&12: 4-11(1992-93)

Abstract:
Urease was isolated and purified by a series of citrate buffer extractions and chromatography through Sephadex G-200 chromatography, was estimated at 540,000 daltons, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis set the molecular weights of the sub-units at 90,000,46,000 and 31,000 daltons respectively. The isoelectric point, determined by isoelectric focusing, was about 5.8. Thiosemicarbazide was slight acted upon, while urea was completely hydrolyzed by this enzyme. The km value obtained from the Lineweaver-Burk plot was 9.9 x 10 mM and V value of 189 units/mg protein. The Eadie Hofstee diagnostic plot rendered values of 10.4 x 10 mM and 193 units/mg protein for Km and V respectively. The low Km value of this enzyme for urea indicates its high affinity for the said substrate. The optimum conditions for the assay, with urea as substrate, were at pH 7.0 and temperature at 40 degrees centigrade. The crude enzyme was stable when suspended in 50% glycerol and stored at O degrees centigrade for 6 months. These properties are comparable to the commercially available Sigma jackbean urease.

Availability :
Food and Nutrition Research Institute; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 95232

Pigeon pea Cajanus cajan (L.) Merr.


Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau Department of Environment and Natural Resources;College,Laguna;Philippines

RISE Research Information Series on Ecosystems 3(6): 1-6(1991)

Abstract:
Pigeon pea Cajanus cajan, is a shrubby plant with erect hairy branches, angular stems, trifoliate and spirally arranged leaves, yellow flowers and each pod contains 2 to 8 seeds. It can be tall, dwarf, open-upright or compact. It is found around the world between 30§S with India as the highest producer of Pigeon pea (90%) seed. Pigeon pea is used as food/vegetable(seeds), fuel wood (dired stalks or branches), feeds for silkworms and windbreaks and soil erosion controller. Pigeon pea requires full sunlight, good rainfall for 2 months after planting follwed by dry period (during flowering and harvesting), sandy or deep loam with pH 7 and an average temperature of 35§C for best optimum production. It is propagated by seeds handpicked from seed pods. Pigeon pea is planted like other crops however, in areas where there too much water ridge planting is advised. It can be sown directly with spacing of 30-45 cm between hills and 40-60cm between rows. It can either be planted with other crops or intercropped. Pigeon pea must be fertilized during planting and weeded for the first two monthss. Prodera litura (cutworm) feeds on leaves and buds of pigeon pea while Heliothis armigera and Melanegromyza obtusa (pod borer and pod fly) damages thepods. Spraying of Malathion, Lannate and Application of Sevin85A, can be done to control the pests. Disease such as Rootknot and wilt caused by Meloidegyne javanica and Fusarium oxysporum can be controlled by crop rotation.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau; Forestry Campus




NO. 95199

Composition and in vitro digestibility of residues from selected pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) varieties


Roxas, DB; Lapitan, RM; Momongan, VG
Abstracts of Water Buffalo Researches in the Philippines 1981-1995; Palacpac, EP and Battad, ZM(eds) Philippine Carabao Center, National Irrigation Administration Compound, EDSA, Quezon City; 142 p; 1996; p.29

Abstract:
Three pigeon pea varieties were evaluated and their leaves and stems were analyzed separately for dry matter and organic matter digestibilities. The nutrient content of leaves from the three varieties of pigeon pea did not vary significantly among cultivars. Except for lignin, the different fiber components of the leaves were significantly higher than the stems. No significant differences among cultivars were observed on the in vitro dry matter and organic matter digestibility of leaves and stems. However, the leaves had significantly higher digestibility than the stems. The higher the leaf to stems ration among cultivars, the higher the in vitro organic matter digestibility. Conversely, the lower the leaf stem ratio, the higher the neutral detergent fiber and cellulose content of pigeon pea. Results of the analysis showed that the leaves can be used not only as substitute for other leguminous ingredients but also as a supplement to rice straw feeding. However, there is a need to determine the in vitro digestibility of the nutrients.

Availability :
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 26238

Effects of extraction conditions and altered solvent environment on the functionality of the food macromolecules of Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) and Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.)


Mwanjala Alfred Mwasaru
University Putra Malaysia [UPM]; Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

MSc Thesis; University Putra Malaysia; 1996; p270

Abstract:
The extractability of the proteins from pigeonpea and cowpea seeds was influenced by extraction techniques and conditions; the micellization technique extracted 40.2 and 36.7% of the total seed protein, respectively. The isoelectric precipitation technique extracted 35.1 to 58.1% and 36.4 to 53.5% of the seed protein, respectively at extraction pH 8.5-12.5. The purity of the isolates was in the range of 78.1 to 92.9%, and for the isoelectric isolates, it was inversely correlated to extraction pH. The isolates were free of the antinutrients associated with the legume seeds, however, extraction technique had no effect on the subunit composition and electrical mobility. An inverse relationship was evident between the lightness colour value (L) of the isoelectric isolates and the pH of extraction for pigeonpea (R(2)=0.76) and cowpea (R(2)=0.77), and the micelle isolates were lighter in colour than the isoelectric isolates. All the isolates presented typical solubility profiles, however, significant quantitative differences were observed; the micelle isolates exhibited superior solubility characteristics to the isoelectric isolates and for the latter an inverse relationship between solubility and extraction pH was apparent. The reduction in solubility with increasing extraction pH was attributed to the increased degree of denaturation as determined by differential scanning calorimetry .Micelle isolates exhibited better emulsifying, whipping and gelation functionalities than the isoelectrically precipitated isolates. Regression analysis indicated that the emulsion stability and whipping properties of the isolates were best predicted by solubility and exposed hydrophobicity, and the gelation properties by In(solubility x exposed hydrophobicity). All the isolates, except those extracted at pH 12.5 exhibited emulsifying, whipping, and gelation functionalities that were similar or superior to those of a commercial soy isolate. Altering the solvent environment in terms of pH and NaCl concentration generally resulted in an improvement in the emulsifying and whipping properties of the pigeonpea isolate but the reverse was observed for cowpea isolate. All combinations of pH (2-8) and salt concentration (0.1-0.5M) improved the emulsifying activity of pigeonpea isolate but had no effect on cowpea isolate. They also improved the emulsion stability for both isolates except at pH 2 and low salt, and at pH 8 and high salt concentrations. Improved foam expansion but reduced foam stability for both isolates were observed under all combinations of pH and salt concentration. Increasing the pH and salt concentration up to 0.3M impaired the gelation properties of the isolates. Pigeonpea and cowpea starches presented mixed size and shape granule population with diameters in the 6-36um range, cowpea starch was higher in total amylose (31.0%) than pigeonpea starch (29.6%), the latter exhibited higher swelling power and lower solubility than the former, and both exhibited the restricted Brabender pasting pattern C. Cowpea starch, however, exhibited higher paste consistencies at characteristic reference points than pigeonpea starch. Incorporation of surfactants increased the initial pasting temperatures of the starches and the increase paralleled the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) of the surfactants, reduced the paste consistency of pigeonpea starch, reduced the strength, elastic modulus and stickiness of the starch gels. Surfactants of HLB 1.8-11.0 significantly increased the freeze-thaw stability of cowpea starch gels but decreased it for pigeonpea starch. Addition of corn oil and protein increased the initial pasting temperature of pigeonpea starch, as did pH 2 and 10-40% sucrose for cowpea starch. Corn oil increased the cold paste consistency of cowpea starch, and pH 2 caused hydrolysis but the starches were stable to acid conditions at pH 4. It was concluded that extraction technique and conditions had significant influence on protein extractability, the emulsification, whipping, and gelation functionalities of pigeonpea and cowpea protein isolates and that these functional properties can be manipulated by altering the solvent environment. Surfactant incorporation and chemical additives had significant effects on the rheological properties and related phenomena of legume starch gels.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 96189

Promising pigeonpea lines


Sugui, FP; Rasalan, RE; Tadena, DA
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights '98; PCARRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; 1999; 120p.; Joven, JEA(ed); p.56

Abstract:
Pigeonpea, locally known as kardis or kadios is popular in Northern Luzon as an essential ingredient in 'pinakbet'. However, cultivation is limited to home gardens, backyards or hilly areas. Recognizing its regional importance, MMSU collaborated with ICRISAT in the conduct of R & D on pigeopea to select the most promising lines/varieties for increased production, and to demonstrate the potential of pigeonpea production in Ilocos NOrte.Sugui, Rasalan, and Tandena (MMSU) evaluated the field performance of eight pigeon pea lines in Ilocos Norte from 1996-1997.|IC PL93015 had the highest yield of 8,214 kg/ha (green pods) and 2,085 kg/ha (grain) followed by ICLP93064 with mean green pod and grain yields of 6,883 kg/ha and 1,489 kg/ha, respectively. (Table 11).|ICPL 87 (check) flowered and matured earlier than the other entries at 58 DAP and 124 DAP, respectively. The rest flowered at 62 DAP, and matured at 130 DAP.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 15065

Calibration of rusle with Vetiver grass as life sediment filter in the hills of Puerto Rico


Pdrez-Alegria, LR; Cruz, L
Agricultural Engineering Department, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico

Symposium on Vetiver: A miracle grass; The Chaipattana Foundation, the Mae Fah Luang Foundation and the Royal Development Projects Board; 4-8 February 1996; Chiang Rai; Thailand; p 90

Abstract:
Vetiver is being evaluated and considered, along with other conservation practices, as a viable alternative for erosion control and reforestation of large clear areas. Research to calibrate the performance of vetiver as a live sediment filter is in progress; the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) is being used as the prediction model in very steep slopes subject to several management practices including denuded areas. Vetiver barriers had been planted at 30 foot intervals in a 100 % slope planted in an intercrop of pigeon pea and celery in the town of Jayuya, Puerto Rico. A sediment collection equipment was designed, built and installed before and after each vetiver barrier. Sediment accumulation behind the barrier was measured after every rain event with surveying equipment. The farmer had collaborated in all aspects of the work from planning contouring, planting to data collection. The results of this experimental work will be used to develop guidelines for use of vetiver in the hills of Puerto Rico and other tropical islands with similar ecosystems and under agriculture and in construction sites and along road banks to reduce the high level of sediment yields from most agricultural watersheds in tropical environments.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15574

Effects of plant density and pand fertilizers on the yield of pigeon pea CAJANUS CAJAN AT PA KIA.


Andrews, A.C.; Manajuti, D.
Thai Abstracts Science and Technology. 10: 106(1985)

Abstract:
The local Lahu (Musoe) variety of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) was grown at Pa Kia (elev. 1,400 m, Lat. 19(N) in the highlands of northern Thailand. Treatments included a range of plant densities from 1 to 8 plants/m2 and combinations of sulphur (gypsum) and phosphorus (rock phosphate) fertilizers. Yields per plant declined gradually with increasing plant density, but this was more than compensated for by the higher plant population, so that maximum yields in each year were recorded at the highest plant density (4 or 8 plants/m2). An arrangement with 4 plants/hill, hills planted in a l m x l m spacing produced less than half that of a treatment with single plants 50 cm x 50 cm apart. Phosphorus and sulphur fertilizers increased yields by 83 and 73% respectively and fertilizers had a larger effect at the higher plant densities. Both fertilizer and planting arrangement influenced pods per plant but neither treatment had any effect on seed size or seeds per pod. The practical implications of the results are discussed.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15919

Genotypic evaluation of pigeonpea at Hat Yai.
Kan thotsop phan thua mahae ti hat yai

Eksomtramage, T.
Thai Abstracts Science and Technology. 14: 132(1989)

Abstract:
Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) research at Prince of Songkla University was started in 1983, involving two yield trials. The first trial was planted in the mid rainy season (September) and the second trial in the dry season (December). Results of initial testing indicated significant differences in agronimic characters of pigeonpea. In the dry season, they were shorter, and earlier in flowering and maturing than those planted in the mid rainy season. In the dry season, they were shorter, and earlier in flowering and maturing than those planted in the mid rainy season. Only six cultivars of lines showed satisfactory performance in terms grain yield. These were lines 1605, QPL 207, QPL 130, Line 412, Royes and QPL 102. These lines or varieties had high number of pods and high seed yield per plant. The correlation between seed yield per plant and grain yield was high and positive in the both season. Correlation between other characters were stronger in the dry season than in the mid rainy season.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 78768

Appropriate sowing-time for pegeonpeas in Quang Tri and Thua Thien-Hue provinces.
Xac dinh thoi vu gieo trong dau trieu thich hop o Quang Tri va Thua Thien Hue.

Nguyen Quang Pho; Tran Thi Ngan
Nong nghiep cong nghiep thuc pham – [Agriculture and food industry] N0 5 – pag. 168-169 (1994).

Abstract:
The results of study showed that growth and yield of pigeonpeas is different in different everent events; On the hill soil and merine sandy soil: from late January to early February; on the degraded alluvial soil from late February to early April.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam