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NO. 100830

Knowledge and utilization of medicinal and poisonous plants by Malay ethnic group in Tayan Hilir subdistrict, Sanggau district, West Kalimantan
Pengetahuan dan pemanfaatan tumbuhan obat dan racun oleh suku Melayu di Kecamatan Tayan Hilir, Kab.Sanggau, Kalimantan Barat

Susiarti, S; Sambas, EN; Waluyo, EB
Research and Development Institute for Botany; Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Hasil Penelitian dan Pengembangan Sumber Daya Hayati Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI, Bogor, 4 April 1994; Farida, WR (eds); Proyek Litbang SDH, Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI, 1994; p 321-330

Abstract:
Interaction between people and biodiversity of peat land areas in West Kalimantan needs be studied, especially on indigenous knowledge and uses of medicinal and poisonous plants. A research was conducted at Selatai-Lalang, Saur-Subah, Tayan Hilir subdistrict, Sanggau district, West Kalimantan province by interview and observation methods. Interviews were done especially with medical people, heads of villages and persons who are very familiar with medicinal plants. The results indicated that there were 85 species of 70 genera and 40 families used for this purpose, two of them are endangered species (Cinnamomum culitlawan and Arcangelisia flava). The plants were used to prevent about 45 kinds of disease, such as that following childbirth, fever and itches.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 20221

Lectins in selected Malaysian legumes


Lee, DW; Yao, VH; Lew, FY
School of Biological Sciences; University of Malaya; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

The Malaysian Journal of Science 3 (A): 89-93 (1975)

Abstract:
Lectin activity was examined in 14 Malaysian legumes. Seed extracts of 12 species agglutinated mammalian red blood cells. Hemagglutination was specific to human being. Three species with hemolytic activity were also detected. These activities were further characterised under different reaction conditions; serial dilutions of lectin extracts, and sugar inhibition studies were also used to identify the stereochemical specificity of the saccharide binding sites. Lectin activity correlating with certain pharmacological properties reported for Pithecellobium was also observed.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM); Jalan FRIM; Kepong; Karung Berkunci 201; 52109 Kuala Lumpur; Selangor;- Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 14913

Germination test of some medicinal plants


Hanchanlert, OA; Babpraserth, C; Paisooksantivatana, Y
Pakchong Research Station; Inseechandrustitya Institute of Crops Research and Development; Kasetsart University; Pakchong; Nakhon Ratchasima 30310; Thailand

The 34th Kasetsart University Annual Conference, 30 January-1 Febuary 1996, Bangkok, Thailand; p 47

Abstract:
Seeds of 18 species of medicinal plants were germinated, from June 5 to July 5, 1955 in germinating media composed of 1 part of cocopeat and 1 part of sand by volume. Only the seeds of Abrus percatorius and Afzelia xylocarpa were scarified by clipping before sowing. All seeds were sown directly without soaking in water. The species that gave 100% germination in 30 days included Zollingeria dongnaiensis and Sterculia foetida. The species that gave 60-90% germination were Buchanania siamensis, Amorphophallus campanulatatus, Wrightia tomentosa, Abrus precatorius and Arfeuillea arborescens. Forty to fifty-five percentages of germination were obtained from Acacia catechu, Lophopetalum wallichii, Basella alba, Oroxylum indicum, Telosma minor, Feroniella lucida and Cassia surattensis. Seeds of Afzelia xylocarpa and Strychnos krabiensis were all decayed. Information on number of seeds per 100 gram, number of days and germination percentage at first observation and colour of seeds, seedlings and plant habit were also provided.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre; TISTR; 196 Phahonyothin Road; Bangkok; Thailand; phone: (66) (2) 579 112 130; fax: (66) (2) 561 4771




NO. 14291

Research and development on medicinal plants for modern pharmaceutical products
Kan wichai lae phattana phut samun phrai phua chai phen ya phaen patchuban

Phutakhom, K
Department of Pharmacognosy; Faculty of Pharmacy; Chiang Mai University; Bangkok; Thailand

Kan sammana rung kan fun fu phut samun phrai phua sangkhom Thai [Conference Papers on Resuscitation of Medicinal Plants for Thai Society], 13-14 January 1994; Bangkok, National Research Council; p 32-39

Abstract:
The recommendation of research and development on medicinal plants suggested the steps to be taken in developing new pharmaceutical products, i.e. starting with selection of medicinal plants, followed by phytochemical/ pharmacognostical study, pharmacological study, toxicity study, dosage forms and clinical trial.

Availability :
PROSEA Thailand Country Office; Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research (TISTR); 196 Phahonyothin Road; Bangkok; Thailand; phone: (66) (2) 579 112 130; fax: (66) (2) 561 4771
Email: daranp@mozart.inet.co.th




NO. 101946

A note on the ethnobotany of Baduy ethnic group in Banten, West Java
Sekilas tentang etnobotani suku Baduy di Banten, Jawa Barat

Hilamn, I
Faculty of Forestry; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Yogyakarta, 24-25 Januari 1995; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia, 1995; Buku 2; p 286-295

Abstract:
The life of Baduy people cannot be separated from plants, either from cultivated or wild plants in the forests. Plants play important roles in providing foods, shelters, medicines, art equipments, handicrafts, and material for ritual ceremonies. Baduy tribe has a tradition and belief which regulate the interaction between people and their forests. Based on the type of vegetation and utilization pattern, the vegetation is categorized into six types: (1) "Leuweung kolot" (old forests), (2) "Leuweung ngora" (young forests), (3) "Leuweung reuma" (dense bushy vegetation lands for farmers to cultivate crops), (4) "Jami" (bush vegetation), (5) "Huma" (rice cultivation areas) and (6) Kebun (gardens). Because of this regulation, the utilization and conservation of biological diversity of plants in the Baduy areas, can be assured.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 102663

The prospects of local multipurpose tree species development in supporting local agroforestry in Timor (East Nusa Tenggara)
Prospek pengembangan jenis pohon serbaguna lokal dalam mendukung agroforestry lokal di Timor (Nusa Tenggara Timur)

Rachmawati, I
Kupang Research Institute for Forestry; Kupang; Timor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Nasional Penelitian dan Pengembangan Jenis-Jenis Pohon Serbaguna [Proceedings of the National Seminar on the Research and Development of Multipurpose Tree Species]; Bogor, 12-13 Mei 1993; Mile, MY et al (Eds); Bogor, Badan Litbang Kehutanan; Vol. 3, p 234-248

Abstract:
Local multipurpose tree species have significant roles in the life of rural people of Timor for many years. Some products were harvested from cultivated trees, but many others were gathered from natural stocks. In general, the trees were cultivated using traditional systems, depending on people's ability and knowledge. Furthermore, the local agroforestry system in Timor was one of the benefit system to increase soil and water conservations. Many local tree species proved to be highly adaptable and well known to the farmers of Timor. Therefore cultivation in local agroforestry system should consider several factors, such as climate, cropping techniques, socio-economic problems, and benefit. Other constraint in developing local multipurpose tree species in local agroforestry system is a limited knowledge of the local people. Therefore several alternative ways are necessary to develope.

Availability :
Library; Forest and Nature Conservation Research and Development Centre (FRDC); Jl. Gunung Batu No. 5; Bogor 16001; West Java; Indonesia; P.O. Box 165; phone: (62) (251) 315 234, 315 567; fax: (62) (251) 325 111
Email: slitbang@indo.net.id >




NO. 14222

Specification of Thai medicinal plants Vol. I


Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University
Mahidol University; Bangkok; Thailand

Bangkok, Faculty of Pharmacy Mahidol University, 1986; 125 p

Abstract:
A review of information on botanical description, plant parts used, pharmacognostic characters, chemical identification, and ethnomedical uses.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre; TISTR; 196 Phahonyothin Road; Bangkok; Thailand; phone: (66) (2) 579 112 130; fax: (66) (2) 561 4771




NO. 22186

Treatment of drug addiction by Malay traditional medicine


Radin, NS
Persatuan Perubatan Melayu Kebangsaan; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

Proceeding of the Seminar on Malaysian Traditional Medicine, Kuala Lumpur, June 10-11 1988; Kuala Lumpur, Institute of Advance Studies, University of Malaya, 1989; p 49-53

Abstract:
The world-wide detrimental impact of drug abuse on human society is so great that urgent attention must be paid to every method which helps to combat this social malaise. The present paper highlighted various aspects pertaining to the combined spiritual and herbal treatment of drug addiction as practised by Malay traditional medicine man ("bomoh/dukun"), with a particular emphasis on: the diagnostic procedures followed by the medicine man, principles of combined treatment using psychotherapy and herbal medicines, inscription on the bodies of Muslim and non Muslim patients, anti-narcotic herbal medicines, symptoms and reaction to treatment, prohibited food and fluid during treatment, spiritual bath, and statistics.

Availability :
Institute of Advance Studies; University of Malaya; Jalan Lembah Pantai, 59100 Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 795 55 466, 795 94 208; fax: (60) (3) 795 73 661




NO. 20287

Tree planting campaigns


Singham, SS
State Forest Officer of Kedah/Perlis/Penang; Malaysia

The Malayan Forester 28 (2): 129-142 (1965)

Abstract:
This article attempted to give an account of the Tree Plant ing Campaign in Penang and it was hoped that the ideas expressed here would be of use to State governments and other local authorities in Malaysia.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Jalan FRIM, Kepong Karung Berkunci 201, 52109 Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 20516

Occurrence of lettuce mosaic virus in Malaysia


Ong, CA
Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute; Serdang; Selangor; Malaysia

MARDI Research Bulletin 1 (1): 10-14 (1973)

Abstract:
A mosaic disease was observed on lettuce in Cameron Highlands, Malaysia. The virus was readily sap-transmitted to Chenopodium amaranticolor, Gomphrena globosa, Lactuca sativa and Lathyrus odoratus. The following plants, i.e. Brassica juncea, Cassia occidentalis, Nicotiana glutinosa, Nicotiana rustica, Nicotiana tabacum and Plantago major were not susceptible to the virus. Systemic symptoms were produced on Chenopodium amaranticolor, Lactuca sativa, and Lathyrus odoratus. Local lesions were produced on leaves of Gomphrena globosa. Myzus persicae readily transmitted the virus in a non- persistent manner. From host range, symptomatology and aphid transmission studies, the disease was found to be caused by lettuce mosaic virus.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Jalan FRIM, Kepong Karung Berkunci 201, 52109 Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 22170

Screening for tumour - promoting activity of medicinal plants from Malaysia


Ilham, AM; Norhanom, W; Yadav, MS
Institute of Advance Studies; University of Malaya; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

Proceeding of the Seminar on Malaysian Traditional Medicine, Kuala Lumpur, June 10-11 1988; Kuala Lumpur, Institute of Advance Studies, University of Malaya, 1989; p 74-79

Abstract:
Although there is a great interest in the analysis of the active ingredients of medicinal plants in relation to their curative properties, there is as yet no local studies on their secondary and long term tumour promoting effects. For instance, chemical extracts of some plants especially those belonging to the families of Euphorbiaceae and Thymelaeaceae posses tumour- promoting activity. Interestingly many medicinal plants from Malaysia belong to this family. The present report discussed preliminary results of research on twenty plants (Phyllanthus sp., Coriandrum sp., Orthosiphon aristatus, Catharanthus roseus, Euphorbia tirucalli, etc.) which were presently used for the treatment of various ailments. The technique of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) activation of Raji Cells was used for the detection of tumour promoter activity in these plants. Of the 20 plants screened, two (Euphorbia tirucalli and Jatropha podagrica) were found to have a considerable level of tumour promoter activity. This preliminary observation indicated the possibility of finding greater number of plants with tumour promoter activity, among those used for traditional medicines. The results of this study could help caution medicinal plant users in their choice of plants for regular treatment.

Availability :
Institute of Advance Studies; University of Malaya; Jalan Lembah Pantai, 59100 Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 795 55 466, 795 94 208; fax: (60) (3) 795 73 661




NO. 38792

Proximate analyses and in vitro dry matter digestibility of several Philippine indigenous forage legumes


Rodriguez, FM; Ocampo, EM; Mendoza, EMT
Crop Science Society of the Philippines; c/o Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 16 (2): 75-79 (1991)

Abstract:
The proximate composition of mature and immature leaves, mature and immature pods and mature seeds of nine forage legumes was determined. These legumes include Aeschynomene, Cassia occidentalis, Centrosema, Calopogonium, Crotolaria, Desmodium, Pueraria, Phaseolus lathyroides, and Polypogon. In vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) ranged from 16 - 38% for immature leaves, 16 - 32% for mature leaves 11 - 29% for immature pods and 24 - 38% for mature pods. Seeds of two samples had IVDMD of 8% and 21%, respectively. Metabolize energy (ME) predicted from crude fiber contents ranged from 3.60 - 4.30 kcal/g for leaves, 3.50 - 4.25 kcal/g for pods and 3.42 - 4.29 kcal/g for seeds. Correlation and path coefficient analyses among six characters (dry matter, fat, protein, ash, fiber and IVDMD) of accessions and parts with IVDMD values were presented and discussed.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of the Philippines Los Baños, College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 14325

Some pesticidal plants
Phut bang chanit thi mi khunnasombat pen kan pong kan kamchat malaeng

Chamroenma, K
Entomology and Zoology Division; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand

Warasan Kita Lae Sattawawithaya [Journal of Entomology and Zoology] 15 (3): 167-171 (1993)

Abstract:
From 80 plants tested in Thailand, 12 plants had pesticidal properties i.e. Abrus precatorius, Acorus calamus, Aglaia odorata, Andrographis paniculata, Annona squamosa, Bixa orellana, Cassia spectabilis, Cymbopogon nardus, Duranta repens, Lantana camara, Mimosa invisa, and Schefflera venulosa. The half life cycle of each plant was indicated.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre; TISTR; 196 Phahonyothin Road; Bangkok; Thailand; phone: (66) (2) 579 112 130; fax: (66) (2) 561 4771




NO. 66802

Biomass production and root distribution of eight trees and their potential for hedgerow intercropping on an ultisol in Southern Sumatra


Hairiah, K; van Noordwijk, M; Santoso, B; Syekhfani, MS
Faculty of Agriculture; Brawijaya University; Malang; Indonesia

Agrivita 15 (1): 54-68 (1992)

Abstract:
Long term productivity of upland soils for food crops may be improved by using a 'hedgerow intercropping' or 'alley cropping' system. However, information on trees suitable for hedgerow intercropping on acid soils is scarce. Suitability of trees for hedgerow cropping depends on a number of above and below ground characteristics of the trees, such as pruning tolerance, biomass production, N-content of the prunings, decomposition rate of prunings, rooting depth, presence of horizontal branch roots, nodulation, mycorrhizal infection. Desirable tree characteristics further include the production of useful products such as firewood, browse for goats and/or edible pods. Trees which provide a sufficiently dense cover, when left unpruned, to shade out weeds may help to save labour. Pruning of trees affects their growth in many ways. Based on preliminary observations the hypothesis was formulated that a lower pruning height leads to more, but smaller branch roots originating from the stem base. In an experiment with five tree species this hypothesis was confirmed. Eight trees were evaluated for the characteristics mentioned on an acid soil; six relatively well known agroforestry trees: Leucaena leucocephala, Gliricidia sepium, Calliandra calothyrsus, Cassia siamea, Erythrina orientalis, Albizia falcataria, and two local tree species: Peronema canescens and Peltophorum pterocarpum. Averaged over the first three years of pruning, the highest biomass production and N-yield was found for Calliandra (12 Mg/ha and 360 kg/ha, respectively). Calliandra requires regular pruning, however, to avoid excessive shading of intercropped food crops. Over all, the best results in hedgerow intercropping on this acid soil may be expected from the relatively deep-rooted Peltophorum, or from alternating hedgerows of Gliricidia and Peltophorum, with a biomass of around 8 Mg/ha and an N-yield of about 200 kg/ha. Peltophorum forms the densest canopy in a small hedge volume when pruned in a 3-months cycle.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 50371

Cassia L.


Toruan-Purba, AV
Puslitbang Farmasi, Badan Litbangkes, Jl. Percetakan Negara 29, P.O. Box 1226, Jakarta 10560, Indonesia

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 181-185

Abstract:
A brief information on Cassia , reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50372

Cassia fistula L.


Toruan-Purba, AV
Puslitbang Farmasi, Badan Litbangkes, Jl. Percetakan Negara 29, P.O. Box 1226, Jakarta 10560, Indonesia

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 183-184

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Cassia fistula , reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50373

Cassia grandis L.f.


Toruan-Purba, AV
Puslitbang Farmasi, Badan Litbangkes, Jl. Percetakan Negara 29, P.O. Box 1226, Jakarta 10560, Indonesia

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 184-185

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Cassia grandis (Synonyms: Cassia pachycarpa), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50374

Cassia javanica L.


Toruan-Purba, AV
Puslitbang Farmasi, Badan Litbangkes, Jl. Percetakan Negara 29, P.O. Box 1226, Jakarta 10560, Indonesia

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 185

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Cassia javanica (Synonyms: Cassia nodosa, Cassia bartonii, Cassia agnes), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 71209

The host plants used to rear red winged ants in North Vietnam
Cay chu tha canh kien do

Vu Duc Minh
Scientific Publishing House, Hanoi, 1966; 142 p

Abstract:
Economic value of red ant flies, properties and role of host plants used to rear red winged ant in North Vietnam, groups of host plants and their morphologies were discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 70805

Reconstruction of Cassia forests
Tu bo rung Rang rang

Nguyen Duc Thanh
Cau Hai forest farm of Ha Giang province, Vietnam

Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] 5: 32-33 (1963)

Abstract:
Based on the advantages of 'rang rang' (Cassia) as fast growing-trees, the trees flower at the age of 5 years old, bear good seeds when they are 10 years old; they regenerate strongly by seeds and their buds regenerate quickly. The trees grow densely and do not require high quality of sites. The author proposes a constructive method for 'rang rang' forests.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71241

Cinnamon trees
Cay que

Nguyen Van Lan; Trinh An Vinh
Ky thuat trong mot so cay duoc lieu [Farming techniques of some materia medica plants]; Vol. 1; Agriculture Publishing House, Hanoi, 1976; p 43-82

Abstract:
The cinnamons are medicinal plants with high economic value. The authors explain botanical properties, and distribution of the plants in Vietnam. There are four species of cinnamons planted in Vietnam and their farming techniques are discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71298

Developing cultivation of cinnamon in Vietnam
Phat trien nghe trong que o Vietnam.

Pham Anh Tuan
Agriculture Publishing House, Hanoi; 1982; 155p

Abstract:
Situation of cinnamon products in the world market and in Vietnam were discussed. Vietnam has the ability to develop cinnamon cultivation. Methods of propagating, planting and the industry of cinnamon products and the state policy for this plant were discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71158

Cinnamon trees
Cay que

Nguyen Van Nhuong
So tay ky thuat trong cay cong nghiep [ handbook of planting industrial plants] Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi, Vietnam: 1978; p308-324

Abstract:
The ecology, botany, phenology, economic aspect, distribution, methods of propagation, planting, stand management, harvesting and yield of Cinnamomum cassia, Cinnamomum loureiri and Cinnamomum verum are discussed. The main areas of cinnamon in Vietnam are: Yen Bai, Quang Ninh, Thanh Hoa, Nghe An, Quang Nam and Quang Ngai. Planting is done in February - March and August - September, with a spacing of 3 m x 3 m.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 70834

Reallotment of ecological zones and extension of Cinnamomum cassia plantations in our country
Phan vung sinh thai va mo rong vung trong Que o nuoc ta

Hoang Cau
Institute of Forestry of Vietnam

Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] 4: 9-14 (1993)

Abstract:
In recent years, many regions in our country have expanded the plantations of Cinnamomum cassia for export purposes. Initialy some regions obtained good results, the que grew and developed fastly with high quality product, but in other regions the results were not satisfying. Ecological study in four large regions in Vietnam prior to planting que outside its natural habitat is an inevitable work. Based on this study the author points out some issues to be considered and set forth research on planting que outside its natural distribution in order to obtain high-grade production.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 70842

The ecologicy of the cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) at Van Yen
Ve moi truong sinh thai cua cay Que tai Van Yen

Pham Chi Thanh; Le Thanh Ha
Faculty of Agro-forestry of Yen Bai province, Vietnam

Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] 8: 4-5 (1993)

Abstract:
From the results of research on the Cinnamomum cassia at Van Yen, the authors concluded that the plant prefers to grow under shade when it is still young, but later on it also prefers light. The plant was adaptive to feralitic soils that developed from schistose gneiss, also to sandy soils with deep solum, high moisture content and containing abundant humus. The plant has been cultivated alternately with 're '(Lauraceae) and talauma which could give stable yield. It grew well at over 500 m altitude, on light slope.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 14238

Chemical constituents of Cassia bakeriana Craib
San khemi nai bai dok lae pluak phon khong kanlapaphruk

Chaochumnum, C; Hensaenghong, P
Warasan Witthayasat Mo Kho [The Journal of Science Khon Kaen University] 14 (5): 289-299 (1986)

Abstract:
Medicinal herbs are generally used in northeast Thailand which include a number of plants belonging to Leguminosae in Caesalpinioideae. A study was carried out on chemical constituents of leaves, flowers and pods of Cassia bakeriana. Alkaloid substances found in all plant parts were indicated to be quaternary alkaloid and amineoxide. Triterpenoid sapogenin and anthraquinone were also found, especially in flowers and outer part of the pods.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14142

Predator bug (Eocanthecona furcellata) for controlling insect pests of 6 forest tree species
Kan ploi muan phikhat phua kamchat non kin bai phut pamai chanit tang tang

Chondamrongkun, S; Chondamrongkun, A; Hutacharoen, C
Silviculture Division, Royal Forest Department, Bangkok, Thailand

Warasan Kita Lae Sattawawithaya [Journal of Entomology and Zoology] 9 (3): 142-147 (1987)

Abstract:
Study on releasing predator bugs to control insect pests of 6 forest tree species indicated that the most effective time was at 9.00-14.00 hrs.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14224

Make it in Thailand-medicinal plant products


Office of the Prime Minister
Bangkok, Office of the Prime Minister, 1988; 27 p

Abstract:
Brief information on medicinal plants with export statistics was reviewed.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 14246

Growing fast-growing trees
Mai to riu chanit nai nae thi khuan pluk

Anonymous
Kaset Uttasahakam [Agro-Industry Magazine] 1 (5): 71-75 (1985)

Abstract:
Criteria were given for growing 3 fast-growing tree species. Detailed information on economic evaluation of the trees was presented.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14303

Preliminary investigation on the cultivation of Cassia angustifolia
Kan suksa buangton nai kan pluk makham-khaek

Phutsadi, W; Sathiensawat, W
Kan sammana rung kan fun fu phut samun phrai phua sangkhom Thai [Conference Papers on Resuscitation of Medicinal Plants for Thai Society], 13-14 January 1994, National Research Council, Bangkok; p K1-K7

Abstract:
Preliminary investigation on the cultivation of Cassia senna (syn.: Cassia angustifolia) for its leaves and pods as cathartic had been carried out with 3 treatments, i.e. manure + chemical fertilizer 15-15-15, manure, and control. The results showed that the treatment of manure mixed with chemical fertilizer formula 15-15-15 gave the highest yield of 449.4 kg/rai; that of manure gave 415.8 kg/rai, and the control gave the lowest yield of 390.6 kg/rai.

Availability :
PROSEA Thailand Country Office, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research
Email: daranp@mozart.inet.co.th




NO. 14264

A clinical trial of calcium senoside in elderly post-operation patients
Kan chai calcium senoside nai phupuai sung ayu

Muangman, W; Rattana-olan, K; Charoenbun, S; Khotchaseni, P
Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

Kan sammana ruang kan phatthana kan chai ya samunphrai thang clinic lae kan wichai thang witthayasat lae technology khong samunphrai thi chai raksa rok khet ron [Proceedings of Research and Development of Medicinal Drug for Tropical Diseases], 26-27 February 1987; Salaya, Mahidol University; p 45-50

Abstract:
Calcium senoside, a calcium form of senoside was clinically tested as laxative in 61 elderly patients at the Department of Surgery, Ramathibodi Hospital. Thirty-one patients were served as control. The treated patients received calcium senoside tablets (15 mg/tablet), at the dosage of 2 tablets daily before retiring, starting on the first post-operation day for the surgery of the prostrate gland or bladder tumor, for the duration of 2-7 days. Results revealed that evacuation of bowel movement after calcium senoside within 4 days was 90%, an average of 1.23 bowel movement daily per person, comparing to the control of 19% which showed significance statistically with p/0.0001. Therefore calcium senoside can be used as irritant cathartics in post-operation patients.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 14290

Quality of medicinal plants and spices of Thailand
Khunnaphap khong samun phrai lae khuang thet khong thai

Dieknammakun, W
Faculty of Pharmacy, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Kan sammana rung kan fun fu phut samun phrai phua sangkhom Thai [Conference Papers on Resuscitation of Medicinal Plants for Thai Society], 13-14 January 1994, National Research Council, Bangkok; p 24-31

Abstract:
A study was carried out on the quality comparison of medical constituents such as piperine, curcuminoid, capsaicin, plaunotol, sennoside, colchicine and glucomannan from various plant varieties.

Availability :
PROSEA Thailand Country Office, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research
Email: daranp@mozart.inet.co.th




NO. 14346

Indian senna
Kanpluk makham-khaek

Anonymous
Technology Chaoban [Appropriate Technology Magazine] 6 (90): 10-11 (1994)

Abstract:
A review article on Indian senna was made. This plant was commercially grown for young leaves and pods used as laxative.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14515

Testing of Chaetomium and some plant extracts for controlling fusarium wilt of tomato (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici)
Kan thotsop kan chai san sakat chak ra Chaetomium lae san sakat chak phut bang chanit nai kan khuapkhum chua ra Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici sahet tham hai koet rok hieo khong makhua-thet

Kanokmedhakul, K; Kanokmedhakul, S; Soythong, K
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Thailand

Warasan Wichai lae Songsoem Wichakan Kaset [Journal of Agricultural Research and Extension] 10 (2): 5- 10 (1993)

Abstract:
Research results showed that extract from star anise (Illicium verum) at 1% concentration could highly inhibited the spore production of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. (99.40%), followed by the fungal extract of Chaetomium cupreum KMIT-N-4320 grown in rice bran and the leaf extract of Cassia fistula, 97.61% and 97.73%, respectively. Meanwhile the extracts of stems and flowers of Cassia javanica inhibited spore production of 90.94% and 94.33%, respectively. Chaetomium extracted with CH2Cl2 and the plant extract from flowers of Cassia siamea inhibited the spore production of 85.14 and 87.33%, respectively. The plant extracts from stem and flowers of Cassia fistula inhibited the spore production of 78.45 and 76.32%, respectively. Tannic acid which was extracted from the pericarps of Anacardium occidentale inhibited 77.98% of spore production. Moreover, the condensed tannin I and II inhibited the spore production of 70.67 and 56.78%, respectively.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14921

A preliminary study on the edible forage of sambar deer


Srikhao, A
Zoology Department, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand

The 34th Kasetsart University Annual Conference, 30 January-1 Febuary 1996, Bangkok; p ?

Abstract:
Nine sambar deer (Cervus unicolor) were employed in this experiment and penned in 2 paddocks of 10 m x 10 m and 20 m x 30 m at the Lopburi Research Station, Kasetsart University, Kook Jareon district, Lopburi province, Thailand. Forage of 29 species were edible for sambar deer i.e.: Acacia sp., Amaranthus spinosus, Azadirachta indica, Brachiaria mutica, Brassica chinensia, Broussonetia papyrifera, Cassia siamea, Cyperus sp., Eupatorium odoratum, Ficus sp., Ficus vasculosa, Garuga pinnata, Imperata cylindrica, Ipomoea sp., Leucaena leucocephala, Manihot exculenta, Millingtonia hortensis, Oryza sativa, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Pithecellobium dulce, Pterocapus macrocarpus, Saccharum officinarum, Samanea saman, Setaria italica, Shorea obtusa, Shorea siamensis, Solanum sp., Sorghum vulgare, Zea mays. Average values of dry matter intake on a hemp, corn plants and cassava chips were 2.57, 2.80 and 1.32 kg/head/day, respectively. The hemp contained per 100 g dry matter: water 8.07%, protein 17.28 %, NDF 33.62, ADF 26.56, Ca 0.92 % and P 1.10%.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 71711

Cinnamomum cassia
Que Trung quoc

Do Tat Loi
Nhung cay thuoc va vi thuoc Viet nam [Medicinal plants and medicaments in Vietnam]; Vol. 2; Hanoi, Scientific and Technical Publishing House, 1970; p 1260-1262

Abstract:
Cinnamomum cassia is planted everywhere in Vietnam and China. The bark (cortex cinnamomum cassiae) is used as spice and condiment. Its also used as medicinal plant to stimulate respiratory, circulatory and digestive systems.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71864

Cinnamomum
Que

Training Medicinal Cadres Committee of China

Planting, fertilizing and processing techniques of medicinal plants; Hanoi, Agricultural Publishing House, 1965; p 763-781

Abstract:
This section discusses the growth and development of Cinnamomum, gives out the methods of planting, harvesting and processing after harvest, and the uses such as for medicines and oil distillation.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71546

Cinnamon
Que

DoTat Loi
Association for Scientific and Technical Diffusion of Vietnam,

Nhung cay thuoc va vi thuoc Viet nam [Medicinal plants and medicaments in Vietnam]; Vol 3; Hanoi, Sciences Publishing House, 1963; p 115-126

Abstract:
Three species of cinnamon - trees with different origins including those, from Thanh Hoa, Nghe An (Provinces of Vietnam), China and New Zealand are accounted for their botanical description, geographical distribution, harvesting, handling after harvest, international trade, medicinal properties and other uses.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 14301

Primary investigation on cultivation of Cassia angustifolia


Phutsadi, W; Sathiensawat, W; Bunyaphraphatsara, N
Kan sammana rung kan fun fu phut samun phrai phua sangkhom Thai [Paper presented at the Conference on Resuscitation of Medicinal Plants for Thai Society], 13-14 January 1994, National Research Council, Bangkok; p 11-16

Abstract:
Preliminary study on senna (Cassia senna, Synonym: Cassia angustifolia) growing for leaves and pods were designed at 3 treatments: manure+fertilizer 15-15-15, manure, and control. No significant difference among treatments, but fertilizer application tends to better production compared with control.

Availability :
PROSEA Thailand Country Office, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15512

Thai crude drugs; their preparations and specifications no. 4. Cassia alata Linn.


Silapa-Archa, W; Werawattanametin, K
Thai Abstracts: Science and Technology 9: 31-32 (1984)

Abstract:
Pharmacognostic and botanical identity of Cassia alata were described, as well as their chemical identification, purity, total ash and ancient usage.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 101987

Potencial of forest plants as traditional medicine resources
Potensi tumbuhan hutan penghasil obat tradisional

Komaryati, S; Ismanto, A; Anggraeni, I
Forest Products and Forestry Socio-Economics Research and Development Centre; Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Yogyakarta, 24-25 Januari 1995; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia, 1995; Buku 1; p 52-54

Abstract:
Utilization of plants for traditional medicine has been increasing recently. Some of these plants grow well in teak forests of Java and are widely used by the Javanese such as pulai pandak (Rauwolfia serpentina), kesambi (Schleichera oleosa), maja (Aegle marmelos) and kedawung (Parkia javanica).

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 100824

Examination of antibacterial effect of trengguli (Cassia fistula L.) extract on some species of bacteria
Uji efek anti bakterial ekstrak trengguli (Cassia fistula L.) terhadap beberapa jenis bakteri

Chairul; Harapini, M; Rahyu, RD
Research and Development Institute for Botany, Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB), Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Hasil Penelitian dan Pengembangan Sumber Daya Hayati Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI [Proceedings of a Seminar on Research Findings and Development Centre for Biology - LIPI], Bogor, 4 April 1994; Farida, WR et al. (eds); Bogor, Proyek Litbang SDH, Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI, 1994; p 98-103

Abstract:
Trengguli or Cassia fistula has been used for long in Indonesia as traditional medicine to cure various diseases. One of them was used for infection and antibacterial, but the antibacterial activity has not been studied yet. The antibacterial effects of hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts with various dosages of 12,500; 25,000; 50,000; 75,000 and 10,000 ppm were studied by in vitro assay on Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas sp. and Salmonella parathypi A and B. The results showed that chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts indicated antibacterial effects on Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Salmonella parathypi A and B, and chloroform extract gave remarkable effect on Pseudomonas sp. All bacteria were resistant to the extract, as the control antibiotics penicillin and streptomycin were used.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 101033

Utilization of cogon grrass land for timber estate
Pemanfaatan lahan alang-alang untuk hutan tanaman industri

Gintings, AN; Purwanto, Ign
Forest Research and Development Centre (FRDC), Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding seminar lahan alang-alang [Proceedings of a Seminar on cogon grrass Land], Bogor, September 1992; Sukmana, S et al. (eds.); Bogor, Pusat Penelitian Tanah dan Agroklimat, 1993; p 137-147

Abstract:
Total area of critical lands in Indonesia is about 13.2 million ha, of which about 5.9 millions ha are in the forest area and 7.3 million ha outside forest area. The widespread of critical lands are mainly caused by shifting cultivation activities and forest fires. These activities usually made the lands become more critical, indicated by the domination of cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica) vegetation. The establishment of timber estate (HTI) programmes by the government of Indonesia was expected to reduce the widespread of critical lands. This assumption was based on the rule that the lands to be used for timber estate are critical lands inside the unproductive production forest areas which are usually found as cogon grass land, bush fallow lands, and sparsely stand forests. Forest tree species that are feasible to be grown on cogon grass lands are: Paraserianthes falcataria, Gmelina arborea, Cassia siamea, Fagraea fragrans, Macadamia sp., Acacia mangium, Peronema canescens, Pinus merkusii, Schima bancana, and Swietenia macrophylla. Basically, implementation of the timber estate activities considers 3 aspects, namely: usefulness, sustainability of land resources and business. Therefore, the success of timber estate programmes would have positive impacts on: water regime of adjacent areas, improvement of micro-climates, soil fertility maintenance, soil erosion and flood control. Besides, the most important roles of timber estate in the future are: the use of lands that are currently often less useful for agriculture, provide new employments, create flexible natural resource development, and serve as a development agent for isolated areas.

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research, Library
Email: csar@bogor.wasantara.net.id




NO. 104700

Effect of composting process of sugarcane bagasse on the growth of seedlings of some plant species in the nursery
Pengaruh proses pengomposan ampas tebu terhadap pertumbuhan bibit beberapa jenis tanaman di persemaian

Suhartati; Lempang, M
Jurnal Penelitian Kehutanan [Forestry Research Journal] 9 (2): 36-43 (1995)

Abstract:
An experiment was conducted using sugarcane bagasse, a waste of sugarcane mills, as a medium to grow tree seedlings in a nursery. The cane bagasse was composted in three ways, namely natural, accelerated and artificial. Seedlings of four tree species including Calliandra calothyrsus, Cassia fistula, Paraserianthes falcataria, and Vitex cofassus were used in this experiment. Although all treatments gave no significant difference on height and diameter increments of the seedlings, however, cane bagasse could be used as a medium to raise tree seedlings. Accelerated compost of cane bagasse gave somewhat higher fresh weight and ovendried weight of the seedlings.

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Bogor Agricultural University




NO. 72362

Cassia occidentalis
Muong Tay

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Thuoc tri benh tu cac cay hoang dai [Medicines from wild plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1995; p 270-271

Abstract:
Cassia occidentalis grows wildly in the mountains, on the sides of streams. Its roots, leaves and seeds are used as medicine to treat large intestine inflammation, asthma, fever and poisonous snack-bites.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 70723

Preliminary study on tannin-producing trees growing in Taynguyen
Buoc dau khao sat tannin trong cay go o Tay nguyen

Phan Ke Loc
Hanoi University; 90 Gnuyen Trai, Dong Da, Hanoi, Vietnam

Tap chi Sinh vat [Journal of Biology] 5 (4): 26-32 (1983)

Abstract:
A study on tannin-producing trees in Taynguyen revealed that there are 7 species rich in tannin, i.e. Adenanthera pavonina, Aglaia rubescens, Anogeissus acuminata, Cassia fistula, Hopea odorata, Lagerstroemia calyculata, and Sindora siamensis.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 72605

Cassia mimosoides
Muong trinh nu

Le Tran Duc
Trong hai va dung cay thuoc [Planting, harvesting and using the medicinal plants]; Hanoi, Agricultural Publishing House, 1987; Vol. 3; p 234-235

Abstract:
Cassia mimosoides grows on critical land and littoral dune is 30 - 50 m tall, flowering in summer (July - August) and fruiting in winter. The seeds are used as medicine. Decoction of the leaves and branches is used as diuretic and to treat oedema. The leaves and roots are used as aperient, and for dysentery.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 72870

Cassia occidentalis
Cot khi

The Hospital of National Medicine Thanh Hoa
Nhung cay con va khoang vat lam thuoc [Plants, animals and minerals to be used as medicine]; Thanh Hoa, Thanh Hoa Publishing House, 1987; pp. 74-75

Abstract:
Cassia occidentalis is used to treat rheumatism and regulate menses. It is harvested all year around.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 73948

Cassia occidentalis
Muong tay

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Cay thuoc quanh ta [Popular medicinal plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1998; p 268-269

Abstract:
Cassia occidentalis grows wildly in the mountain regions. Its roots, leaves and seeds are used as medicine to treat chronic inflammation of large intestine, constipation, indigestion, asthma and, insect-bites. The leaves are harvested in summer-autumn.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 101221

Collection, conservation, characterization and evaluation of cinnamomum germplasms
Koleksi, konservasi, karakterisasi dan evaluasi plasma nutfah kayu manis

Nuryani, Y
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC), Bogor, Indonesia

Koleksi dan karakterisasi plasma nutfah pertanian [Collection and Characterization of Agricultural Germplasms]; Review hasil dan program penelitian plasma nutfah pertanian, Bogor, 26-27 Juli 1994; Sunihardi, Musaddad, A & Ruhendi (eds); Jakarta, Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Pertanian, 1994; p 237-245

Abstract:
Collection, conservation, characterization and evaluation have been conducted on several types of three Cinnamomum species namely Cinnamomum burmanni, Cinnamomum cassia and Cinnamomum verum in some Experimental Gardens. Characters that could be used to differentiate the 3 species were leaf shape, leaf size, flush colour and oil content. Evaluation shows that the bark oil content of green flush of Cinnamomum burmanni was higher than the red flush type.

Availability :
Indonesian Biotechnology Research Institute for Estate Crops, Library
Email: briec@indo.net.id




NO. 108527

The characteristics of oils from the leaves of three species of cinnamon
Karakteristik minyak dari daun tiga jenis kayu manis

Ma'mun; Hidayat, T
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Simposium Nasional I; Tumbuhan Obat dan Aromatik [Proceedings of the 1st National Symposium on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants], Bogor, 10-12 Oktober 1995; Gandawidjaja, D et al (eds), Bogor, Simpul Nasional APINMAP, Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI & UNESCO, 1996; p 126-130

Abstract:
Cinnamomum burmanni, Cinnamomum cassia and Cinnamomum verum contained 1%, 0.70% and 3.20% essential oils, respectively. The physical and biochemical characteristics of the oils contained in the leaves of the three species are different. The primary component of the oils of Cinnamomum burmanni and Cinnamomum cassia leaves was cynnamaldehyde which occur 15% and 75% in the species, respectively. The essential oils contains 65% eugenol.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 72754

Cinnamomum
Cay que

Tran Van Chinh; Le Trung Chinhetal
The Hospital of National Medicine; Quang Nam-Da Nang, Vietnam

Cay thuoc nam va cac phuong phap phong chua benh don gian tai nha [Traditional medicinal plants and methods of preventing and treating diseases at home]; Danang, 1995; p 184-194

Abstract:
The Cinnamomum trees are planted for spice and medicine. They are propagated by seeds and branch grafting. The dried barks can be used for treating bad digestion, belly-ache and diarrhoea.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 72825

Cinnamomum cassia
Que

The Department for Forest Survey and Planning; Vietnam
Cay go rung mien Bac Viet Nam [The timber trees in the forest of North Vietnam]; Hanoi, The Rural Publishing House, 1971; Vol. 1; p 146-147

Abstract:
Morphological characters of Cinnamomum cassia is presented. In North Vietnam it is distributed in Nghe An, Thanh Hoa, Yen bai and Hoa Binh provinces below 500 m altitude. Its wood is used for furniture, house poles. The bark and root can be used as medicine and spices. They give fragrant oil used in medicine, and in industry.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 72939

Cinnamomum cassia
Que

The Hospital of National Medicine Thanh Hoa
Nhung cay con va khoang vat lam thuoc [Plants, animals and minerals to be used as medicine]; Thanh Hoa, Thanh Hoa Publishing House, 1987; pp. 191-195

Abstract:
Cinnamomum cassia grows wildly and planted in Quan Hoa, Lang Chanh and Nhu Xuan. The leaves are used as material for preparing essential oil, the bark is used as a tonic. Cinnamomum cassia can also be used to treat belly-ache, sore eyes, asthma, dysentery, cholera and cold.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 73263

Cinnamomum cassia
Que

Bich Ngoc Lam; Vu Van Chuyen; Nguyen Tien Bich; Ngo Van Thong
Mot so cay thuoc va duoc lieu o Viet Nam, Lao, Campuchia [Some medicinal plants and materia medica in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia]; Hanoi, Agricultural Publishing House, 1987; Vol. 1; p 138-149

Abstract:
Suitable soils for Cinnamomum cassia are granite and riolite soils. This tree grows well in cool climates (average temperature of 20-25 °C). It is propagated by seeds in January-February. After 15-20 years the barks of the trees can be harvested and used as medicine to treat cough, belly-ache caused by cold, rheumatism and flu.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 25409

Antimicrobial activity of Senna alata and Cassia javanica subsp. nodosa extracts against micro-organisms related to skin infections


Mastura, M; Khozirah, S
Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kepong, Selangor, Malaysia

Journal of Tropical Forest Products 6 (2): 218-221 (2000)

Abstract:
A comparison study on the antimicrobial activity of Senna alata and Cassia javanica is reported. The antibacterial activity shown by some of the extracts especially those of Senna alata lends some support for its traditional use as an antiseptic.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 25292

Effect of Cassia alata and C. nodosa on clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylcoccus aureus (MRSA)


Khozirah, S; Mastura, M; Nuziah, H
Medicinal Plants Division, Forest Research Institute Malaysia, Kepong, Kuala Lumpur

Natural Products Research in Malaysia 1999, A compilation of papers presented at the 15th. National Natural Products Seminar, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 2-3 November 1999

Abstract:
The anti-bacterial activities of various parts of two common roadside shrubs, Senna alata (Synonym: Cassia alata) and Cassia javanica (Synonym: Cassia nodosa), against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been investigated. Methanolic extracts prepared from leaves, twigs/stems, flowers and fruits of the two species were assayed against a panel of 15 clinical isolates of MRSA sources from four sources of infections. Whereas all the extracts of Cassia javanica were rather weakly active against the isolates, the leaf and flower extracts of Senna alata were observed to be notably active towards the isolates. Some initial progress in the bioassay-guided isolation of the active constituents of the extracts is briefly reported.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 94355

The watershed of Bais city


Cadelina, AM
Silliman Journal 37 (3-4): 51-59 (1997)

Abstract:
The report presents a narrative description of the activities during the first year of the project, the strategies used and their underpinnings, and finally the reflections about the project goals and strategies used. On the whole, an efficient water management system is imperative for the equitable allocation of water to various end-users. But the efficiency of such system hinges on the reliability of the water supply which in turn depends on the stability and sustainability of the water-absorbing capacity of the rooting-system of the forest in the watershed.

Availability :
Rizal Library; Ateneo de Manila University; Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 76407

Cassia alata
Muong trau

Le Tran Duc
Trong hai va dung cay thuoc [Planting, harvesting and using medicinal plants]; Hanoi, Agr. Publishing House, 1984; Vol. 1; p 187- 188

Abstract:
This plant grows wildly in many provinces of central Nghe An Tinh and Quang Tri. It is propagated by seeds in spring and harvested in October-December. The plant is used as medicine to treat pimples, scabies, inflammation of the bones.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 76631

Cassia occidentalis
Cot khi muong

Vo Van Chi
Tu dien cay thuoc Vietnam [Dictionary of the medicinal plants in Vietnam]; Hanoi., Medicinal Publishing House, 1997; p 312-313

Abstract:
Cassia occidentalis grows along road sides in many places of Vietnam. This plant is propagated by seed. The roots, leaves and seeds of the plant are used as medicine to treat high blood pressure, sore eyes, dysentery, stomach-ache, snake bites. Its chemical composition consits of physcion, physcion-1-glucocid, and 1.8-dihydroxy.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 94531

Biophysical assessment of existing tree species in the urban centers of Cebu


Sumabon, JM; Tura, CM
Ecosystems Research Digest 8 (1): 1-20 (1998)

Abstract:
Assessment of existing species in the metropolis was conducted to monitor their survival, growth tolerance in the area and their capacity to abate dust pollution and modify urban climate. Three areas were selected based on species diversity and proximity to polluted industrial centers or heavy traffic areas, namely: Cebu Plaza Independencia, Fuente Osmeña Rotonda and Pier area. A total of 22 tree species were identified and selected for the study. Cebu Plaza has 15,while Fuente Osmeña rotonda and Pier Area have 12 and 9 species, respectively, of the 22 species six are common in all sites. It was found out that temperature under experimental trees in all sites differs by a few degrees slightly lower than in open areas. Bigger denser crown and trees with broader leaves are more efficient in ameliorating the microclimate. The capability to remove particulate pollutants from the air also differs from species to species depending on its morphology.

Availability :
Library; Technology Transfer and Information Division; Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region 7; Mandaue City; Philippines




NO. 95265

Identification of indigenous mycorrhizae from selected trees in Mt. Pangasugan and their utilization for tree improvement


Gapasin, RM; Lim, JL; Ranchez, CV
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights ' 96; Los Baños, Laguna, PCARRD, 1997; 154 p; Lorica, MV & Cabangbang, MVDF (eds); p 31

Abstract:
Trap crops were assessed for the culture and mass production of potential mycorrhizae, different delivery systems were evaluated for these mycorrhizae, their ability to infect trees was tested, and indigenous mycorrhizae infecting trees in Mt. Pangasugan were identified. Findings: 1. Of the 14 tree species samples, only seven were identified through root samples to have mycorrhizal association. These are Calliandra calothyrsus, Cassia javanica, Cratoxylum sumatranum, Delonix regia, Gmelina arborea, Leucaena leucocephala, Pterocarpus indicus, and Swietenia macrophylla. However, all the soil samples from these trees contain VAM (vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza) spores. 2. Inoculation of VAM fungi (mycorrhizal roots), regardless of inoculum level, increased of both plant height and stem diameter of narra (Pterocarpus indicus) and mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) seedlings. 3. Four major genera of VAM fungi, namely Glomus, Gigaspora, Acaulospora, and Sclerocystis are associated with trees in Mt. Pangasugan.

Availability :
Library; Crops Research Division; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Baños, Laguna




NO. 76351

Cassia fistula
Bo cap nuoc

Vo Van Chi
Tu dien cay thuoc Vietnam [Dictionary of the medicinal plants in Vietnam]; Hanoi, Medicinal Publishing House, 1997; p 97-98

Abstract:
Cassia fistula grows in many places in mixed forests in South Vietnam. The leaves and branches are harvested all year round, the seeds in autumn-winter. The medicine made from the plant is used to treat inflammation of bone joints, snake bites, pain in bone, legs and dysentery. The chemical composition of the plant consists of anthraquinon, tannin, phlobaphen, and rhein.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 72714

Preservation of natural medicinal plants
Bao ve nguon cay thuoc thien nhien

Nguyen Tap
Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] 9: 9-11 (1990)

Abstract:
A review on medicinal plant resources in Vietnam is made. There are many precious medicinal plants such as: Morinda officinalis, Cinnamomum cassia, Illicium verum, Amomum sp., Melaleuca leucadendra. There are main agents causing reduction of natural medicinal plants. Measures are suggested to protect medicinal plant resources.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 94833

Indigenous medicinal plants and practices of ten ethnic tribes in Mindanao


Ayuban, JM; Togon, AS
Southeastern Philippine Journal of R and D 4 (2)-5 (1): 57-79 (1997-1998)

Abstract:
A study was conducted on the identification of indigenous medicinal plants and on how these are used by the identified tribes for curative and other related purposes. Ten ethnic tribes constituting nine in Southern Mindanao and one in Northern Mindanao were identified as samples of the study. The ten tribes were chosen based on ethnicity of the populace in the community, the accessibility of the area, security and other situation on the way to the area and in the community itself, the availability of key informants in the community. A total of 87 medicinal plants have been identified by the key informants and selected respondents in the ten tribes. It has been observed that the ten tribes hardly have the same indigenous plants for treatment of one kind of ailment. Eighty seven medicinal plants were identified as cures for different types of illness and in different manners by respondents in the ten ethnic tribes.

Availability :
Library; University of Southeastern Philippines (USEP); Davao City




NO. 91589

Antimutagenic effects of eighteen Philippine plants


Lim-Sylianco, CY; Concha, JA; Jocano, AP; Lim, CM
The Philippine Journal of Science 114 (4): 293-305 (1986)

Abstract:
Expressions from Cassia alata, Annona squamosa, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Allium sativum, Psidium guajava, Capsicum annuum, Allamanda cathartica, Symphytum officinale, Leucaena leucocephala Lamk., Plumeria acutifolia, Garcinia mangostana, Vigna radiata (Synonym: Phaseolus aureus), Quisqualis indica, Blumea balsamifera, Allium cepa, Spondias purpurea, Carmona retusa and Mentha cordifolia, reduced the induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes by mitomycin C. dimethylnitrosamine and tetracycline showing that these plants have antimutagenic effects. Heating did not affect the antimutagenic property of the plants. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
PROSEA Philippine Country Office
Email: prosea@ultra.pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 95789

Butterfly species and host plants in selected areas in Region XI


Balmocena; BJ; Guadalupe, A; Marquita, MA; Maningas, RC
Abstracts of Researches on Environment and Natural Resources in Region XI; Ecosystems Research and Development Service, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region XI, Davao City; 1999, p 19-20

Abstract:
A survey of endemic butterflies and host plants were conducted in: 1) Marilog District, Davao City, 2) Toril District, Davao City, 3) Tugbok District, Davao City, 4) ERDS-Nabunturan, Campostela Valley Province, 5) ERDS-Bislig Experiment Station, Maharlika, Bislig Surigao del Sur and 6) Marbel South Cotabato, to determine the species of butterfly that can be reared and mass-produced as livelihood in the upland farms of Region XI. Graphium agamemnon, Papilio rumanzovia (Papilioninae: Papilionidae, are existing in Region XI. These butterfly species with large wings can be reared and mass-produced (captive breeding) as livelihood in the upland farms in the region. Other beautiful butterfly species found in the region which can also be reared and mass produced are the following: Appias albina pancheia, Delias diphana diaphana, Paperonia boeboera (Pierinae, Pieridae), Catopsilia pyranthe pyranthe, Catopsilia scylla asaema, Catopsilia pomona pomona, Eurema alitha alitha (Coliadinae, Pieridae); Danaus (Anosia) chrysippus, Euploca mulciber, Parantica luzonensis luzonensis (Danaidae); Elymnias bezabeza, Mycalesis traedawayi, Pytcandra sp., Europa spp. (Satyrinae, Satyridae); Fauenis mindanaoansis (Amathusiinae, Satyridae); Precis orithya leucasia, Precis almana, Hypolimnas bolina philippinensis, Rhinopalpa polynice validice (Nymphalinae, Nymphalidae); Neptis spp. Lexias panopus (Limenitidinae, Nymphalidae) and Erionatha thrax (Hesperiinae, Hesperiidae). Buttefly nectar host includes santan (Ixora chinensis), bougainville (Bougainville sp.), makahiya (Mimosa pudica), kanding-kanding (Starchytapheta jamaicensis), baho-baho (Ageratum conyzoides), Doña aurora (Mussaenda philippica), gumamela (Hibiscus rosasinensis), rubia (Rubia cardifolia), atis (Annona squamosa), margarita flower, manila palm, lantana (Lantana camara), calopogonium (Calopogonium mocunoides), cosmos (Cosmos caudatus), marigold (Tagetes erecta), dahlia (Dahlia imperialis), camote (Ipomoea batatas), golden shower (Cassia fistula), ipil-ipil (Leucaena leucocephala), Ficus, banana (Musa xparadisiaca), kasopangil (Clerodendrum inerme) and two unidentified plant species found in the second growth forest, while adelfa (Nerium oleander) and calamansi (Citrus maxima) were observed as larval host plants.

Availability :
Library; Technology Transfer and Information Division; Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region 7; Mandaue City; Philippines




NO. 95834

Mycorrhizal from selected tree species in Mt. Pangasugan, Leyte, Philippines and their effect on tree


Gapasin, RM; Lim, JL; Ranchez, CV
Proceedings; International Conference on Reforestation with Philippine Species for Biodiversity Protection and Economic Progress, Palo Leyte, 3-6 March 1997; Leyte, Visayas State College of Agriculture & Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit Applied Tropical Ecology Program, 1997; p 238-243

Abstract:
A study was conducted to determine and identify indigenous mycorrhizae associated with selected tree species growing in Mt. Pangasugan, evaluate grass as trap crop for their culture and mass production, test their efficacy for tree growth improvement and evaluate the most efficient delivery system for the mycorrhizae. There were 14 tree species sampled and based on root sample assay seven (7) were found positive for mycorrhizal association. These were kaliandra (Calliandra calothyrsus), antoso-an (Cassia javanica), paguringon (Cratoxylum celebicum), fire tree (Delonix regia), yemane (Gmelina arborea), ipil-ipil (Leucaena leucocephala) and narra (Pterocarpus indicus). However, all the soil samples collected from these 14 tree species contained various vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) spores with paguringon having the highest spore count of 359 spores while the soil sample from dao had the lowest count of 65 spores. Four major genera of VAM fungi were identified associated with the tree species namely: Glomus, Gigaspora, Acaulospora and Sclerocystis. All the three grasses evaluated as trap crops supported the build up of mycorrhizal fungi with napier grass producing the heaviest roots (21.57 g) and containing the highest mycorrhizal spores (476). In terms of inoculum produced in the soil there was an increase of 61.6%, 48.1% and 39.8% for paragrass, napier grass and Guinea grass, respectively after 3 months. Mycorrhizal roots and soil containing mycorrhizae as inoculum increased both the height (cm) and stem diameter of tree seedlings tested in the greenhouse and field. The general observation was that the soil with mycorrhizae had greater effect on seedling growth.

Availability :
Library; Technology Transfer and Information Division; Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region 7; Mandaue City; Philippines




NO. 67966

The incidence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) in coal wastes


Ravi, DBR; Ragupathy, S; Mahadevan, A
Center for Advanced Studies in Botany, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Madras 600 025, India

BIOTROP Special Publication 42: 77-80 (1993)

Abstract:
We screened coal mine waste soils for mycorrhizae. Out of 18 plant species growing on coal mine soils, 12 displayed vegetative structure of VAM fungi. Their quantum of colonization ranged from 10-86%. The spores of Acaulospora foveata, Entrophosphora colombiana, Glomus aggregatum, Glomus ambisporum, Glomus botryoides, Glomus citricolum, Glomus claroideum, Glomus fasciculatum, Glomus heterosporum, Glomus mosseae, Sclerocystis microcarpus and Sclerocystis rubiformis were isolated from coal wastes.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office
Email: info@proseanet.org|prosea@indo.net.id




NO. 68280

Effect of soaking duration on seed germination of 'johar' (Cassia siamea Lamk)
Pengaruh lama perendaman terhadap perkecambahan benih johar (Cassia siamea Lamk)

Sapulete, E
Pematang Siantar Research Institute for Forestry, Pematang Siantar, North Sumatra, Indonesia

Buletin Penelitian Kehutanan [Forestry Research Bulletin]; Pematang Siantar Research Institute for Forestry; 8 (2): 77-86 (1992)

Abstract:
Cassia siamea a species of Leguminosae - Caesalpinioideae, grows widely in North Sumatra. The objective of this experiment was to study the effect of soaking period on seed germination of Cassia siamea. Completely Randomized Design with six treatments of soaking duration is used in this experiment, i.e. no soaking (control), soaking in hot water for two minutes, soaking in cold water for 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours. The effect of soaking duration on the percentage of seed germination was significant, but its effect on germination value was not significant. The best germination percentage of Cassia siamea seeds was obtained by soaking in hot water for two minutes or soaking in cold water for 24 hours.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 67955

Small notes on the nodules-bearing legumes nodulation in the Bogor Botanic Gardens
Catatan kecil mengenai Leguminosa berbintil di Kebun Raya Bogor

Abdulkadir, S
Research and Development Institute for Botany, Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB), Bogor, Indonesia

Buletin Kebun Raya Indonesia [Indonesian Botanic Garden Bulletin] 7 (4): 105-112 (1993)

Abstract:
Nodulation in the root systems of 230 species of Legumes were examined in the Bogor Botanical Gardens. Fifteen species were measured for their nitrogen fixation activities by using acetylene reduction method. The results showed that 127 species of them have nodules, 56 species of them have not been reported to produce nodules. There are 18 species have been reported by Lim (1992) and Allen & Allen (1981) to have nodules but observation to same species in the garden showed that they did not produced any nodules. The ability of genus Erythrina in nitrogen fixation is higher than that of the others, while genus Calliandra is the lowest. Most of the legumes grown in Bogor Botanical Garden produced nodules, although in acid condition.

Availability :
Bogor Botanical Gardens, Library
Email: inetpc@indo.net.id




NO. 95540

Laboratory evaluation of plant extracts for the control of Diplodia maydis (Birk.) Sacc.


Blancaver, MEA, Josue, AR
CMU (Central Mindanao University) Journal of Science 7 (1): 120 (1994)

Abstract:
A study was conducted to determine which of the plant extracts obtained (Cassia alata, Payena acuminata, Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale) have fungicidal properties against Diplodia maydis, and to determine which of them is the most promising. The study was laid out following a Completely Randomized Design using seven crude plant extracts with three replications. Extracts-impregnated sterile paper discs were placed in petridishes seeded with the fungus. The data showed that among the seven plant extracts tested, Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale and Alocasia macrorrhiza had fungicidal properties against Diplodia maydis but among these, Zingiber officinale and Allium sativum were the most promising.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 51422

Fungi associated with forest tree seeds in Thailand


Pongpanich, K
Division of Silviculture, Royal Forest Department; Bangkok, Thailand

Proceedings of the IUFRO Workshop on Pests and Diseases of Forest Plantations; Hutacharern, C et al. (eds); Bangkok, FAO/RAPA, 1990; RAPA Publication 1990/9; p 114-121.

Abstract:
Sixty samples of tree seeds belonging to 15 families were examined using the blotter and agar methods of seed health testing. About 49 genera and 92 species of fungi were identified, with saprophytic fungi predominant. About 11 genera were pathogenic fungi. Seed-borne pathogens detected were Alternaria longissima on Bambusa bambos, Botryodiplodia sp. on Melia azedarach, Corynespora sp. on Cassia siamea, Macrophomina sp. on Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Shorea obtusa and Shorea siamensis, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on Dalbergia cultrata and Pterocarpus macrocarpus. (Modified author's abstract)

Availability :
SEAMEO BIOTROP Library




NO. 53750

Antibacterial activity of crude extracts of medicinal plants used in Thailand against pathogenic bacteria


Voravuthikunchai, S; Popaya, V; Supawita, T
The University of New South Wales, Australia School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences

Enthnoparmacologia No 33: 60-70 (2004)

Abstract:
Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of medicinal plants commonly used in Thailand to cure infections were tested for their antibacterial activity against important pathogenic bacteria. Inhibition of growth was primarily tested by the paper disc agar diffusion method. Among 19 medicinal plants tested, 100% showed antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with 15 (79%) against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923). Only 7 (37%) of the medicinal plants exhibited activity against Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Shigella sonnei. Punica granatum, Quercus infectoria, Terminalia chebula, and Walsura robusta exhibited the broadest spectra of activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by the agar microdilution method and agar dilution method in petri dishes with Millipore filter. Punica granatum and Quercus infectoria possessed the broadest spectra of activity against all the tested pathogenic bacteria. Walsura robusta also had broad activity, except ethanol extract that showed no activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana was the most effective against MRSA and Staphylococcus aureus with the MIC and MBC values of 0.02 mg/ml. This study provides evidence to justify the use of these medicinal plants as alternative medicines for many kinds of infections. (Authors' abstract)

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 70308

Some leguminous herbs providing livestock feed with a wealth of protein in northern Vietnam
Mot so cay bo Dau than thao lam thuc an giau protein cho gia suc cua mien Bac Vietnam

Nguyen Dang Khoi; Nguyen Van Phu
Department of Botany, National Committee for Science and Technology of Vietnam

Tap chi Sinh vat - Dia hoc [Journal of Biology and Geography] 13 (2): 63-70 (1970)

Abstract:
Some leguminous herbs that are used as feed with a wealth of protein for livestock in Northern Vietnam consist of Cassia mimosoides, Alysicarpus vaginalis, Arachis hypogaea, Canavalia ensiformis, Glycine max, Kummerowia strata, Phaseolus vulgaris, Trifolium repens, Vicia faba and Vigna. Nutritional value, chemical composition of seed and leaves are presented.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 70007

Alteration of the qualities of 'Thao quyet minh' (Cassia tora)
Bien doi tinh chat cua Thao Quyet Minh (Cassia tora) qua phuong phap bao che

Vu Ngoc Lo
College of Pharmacy of Hanoi; Hanoi, Vietnam

Tap chi Duoc hoc [Journal of Pharmacy] (4): 18-25 (1985)

Abstract:
Preliminary survey of biological effects of different preparations of 'Thao quyet minh' (Cassia tora) showed that 3 preparations had the action on function of net structure and great brain of rabbit. The well roasted form of 'Thao quyet minh' had more clear effect on the function of nervous system and had stronger effect in reducing blood pressure than the fresh form. The seeds in well roasted form had disinfection action.

Availability :
National Information and Documentation Center for Science and Technology, Library




NO. 70535

Results of a study on species containing tannin that belong to Caesalpiniaceae in Vietnam
Ket qua dieu tra phat hien nhung loai cay co chua tanin trong ho Vang o Viet Nam

Phan Ke Loc; Hoang Thi San
Hanoi University; Hanoi, Vietnam

Tap chi Sinh vat ho [Journal of Biology] 1 (3): 1-10 (1979)

Abstract:
Among the 440 species of Caesalpiniaceae (in the world, 120 species occur in Vietnam, and among them there are 33 species containing tannin. The condensed tannin group distributed more widely than the hydrolysable tannin group (88.3% of the investigated samples, compared with 46.9%). The rich in tannin are the stem bark of Cassia fistula, Senna surattensis, Erythrophleum fordii, Peltophorum pterocarpum. Peltophorum tonkinensis, Sindora cochinchinensis (use Sindora siamensis) and Sindora maritima; the root bark of Cassia fistula, Erythrophleum fordii, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Peltophorum tonkinensis and Sindora cochinchinensis and pod bark of Erythrophleum fordii.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 70302

Contribution to the study of large-leaf and small-leaf Cinnamon in Hoang Lien Son
Gop phan nghien cuu Que la lon va Que la nho o Hoang Lien Son

Pham Van Vinh; Bui Thi Bang; Do Viet Trung; Nguyen Van Dan
Institute of Materia Medica; 3B Quang Trung, Hoan Kiem, Hanoi, Vietnam

Thong bao Duoc lieu [Bulletin of Materia Medica] 18 (1): 19-23 (1986)

Abstract:
All parts of Cinnamon plant contain essential oil. Small leaves of Cinnamon contain more oil than large leaves. Essential oils of whole plant of May harvest correspond to the standart of Vietnamese pharmacopea; Their yield and quantity of September harvest is higher than of May harvest.

Availability :
Institute of Materia Medica, Library
Email: imm@fpt.vn




NO. 70322

Chemical composition of some medicinal essential oils
Thanh phan hoa hoc mot so tinh dau lam thuoc

Le Tungchau; Le Van Hong
Institute of Materia Medica; 3B Quang Trung, Hoan Kiem, Hanoi, Vietnam

Thong bao Duoc lieu [Bulletin of Materia Medica] 22 (2): 12-20 (1981)

Abstract:
The main constituents of the essential oil from Corymbia citriodora (synonym Eucalytus citriodora) are 32.1% citronellol, 8.6% citronellyl acetate and 16.3% citronellal; from Baeckea frutescens are 31.0% 1-8cineol, 16.4% -pinene, 23.8% -pinene; from Litsea cubeba are 27.1% trans citral, 14.1% cis-citral; from Cinnamomum cassia barks are 93% cinnamic aldehyde; from Murraya glabra are 85-95% isomenton, menthol; From Kaempferia galanga are 20.5% methoxyethyl cinamat, 31.6% n-pentadecan; from Adenosma glutinosum are 72.25% P-cymene; from Adenosma bracteosum are 27% carvacrol, 28% carvacrol methyl ester, 30.4% -bisabolene and from Adenosma indiana are fenchon and limonene.

Availability :
Institute of Materia Medica, Library
Email: imm@fpt.vn




NO. 70559

The study on propagation of 'que' (Cinnamomum cassia) through branch cuttings
Nghien cuu nhan giong cay que (Cinnamomum cassia) bang phuong phap giam canh

Hoang Minh Tan; Nguyen Quang Thach; Tran Van Pham
College of Argriculture No. 1, Vietnam

Ky yeu Cong trinh Hoi thao quoc gia ve Cong nghe Tinh dau [The working conspectus of National conference of Essential oil Technology] 1988; p 202-208

Abstract:
Based on the results of study, the authors set up a technical process of the propagation of "que" by cutting treated with chemical substances.

Availability :
National Information and Documentation Center for Science and Technology, Library




NO. 67548

Utilization of forest resources for Talang Mamak tribe in Seberida, Riau
Pendayagunaan sumber daya hutan bagi suku Talang Mamak di daerah Seberida, Riau

Saim, A; Maryanto, I; Danielson, F
Research and Development Centre for Biology, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani [Proceedings of National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany], Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 February 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Perpustakaan Nasional R.I., 1992; p 381-389

Abstract:
Talang Mamak tribe is native to Seberida district, Riau Province who wholly depends upon gathering, hunting, and cultivation by shifting cultivation. An interview followed by sampling of 36 plant species indicated that the plants are used for treating human as well as animal diseases, for hunting material and so on.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 67357

Processing of cinnamon
Pengolahan kayumanis

Nurdjanah, N
Balai Penelitian Tanaman Rempah dan Obat; Bogor, Indonesia

Perkembangan Penelitian Tanaman Pala dan Kayumanis [Development of Research on Nutmeg and Cinnamon] 8 (1): 55-66 (1992)

Abstract:
Most of the cinnamon bark oil usually traded comes from Cinnamomum burmanni, Cinnamomum verum (synonym Cinnamomum zeylanicum) and Cinnamomum cassia type. The main producer of Cinnamomum burmanni is Indonesia, Cinnamomum verum is Ceylon and Cinnamomum cassia is China and the products are dried cinnamon bark, cinnamon oil and cinnamon oleoresin. Most of the dried bark is used as a flavouring agent in food, beverages and convectionary industries. The cinnamon oil and oleoresin is used in food, beverages, convectionary, cigarette and cosmetic industries. The dried bark produced by farmers are usually reprocessed by the middlemen and exporters to get cleaner product and lower water content of up to 5-10%. The oil and oleoresin processing in Indonesia could be developed to be exported and used in the country to support the development of food, beverages and cosmetic industries. (Author's abstract)

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University
Email: admin@lib.ugm.ac.id




NO. 67361

Cinnamon
Kayumanis

Nuryani, Y; Nasrun
Balai Penelitian Tanaman Rempah dan Obat; Bogor, Indonesia

Perkembangan Penelitian Plasma Nuftah Tanaman Rempah dan Obat [Advances in Research on Spice and Medicinal Plant Germplasms] 8 (2): 39-53 (1992)

Abstract:
Among the 28 species of Cinnamomum found in Indonesia, Cinnamomum burmanni, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, and Cinnamomum cassia are commonly cultivated by the farmers as an important export commodity. Those three species can be distinguished each other through their morphology and physico-chemical characteristics of the oil. Besides the three species used as sources of flavour, there are some species that are used for medicinal purposes, such as Cinnamomum sintok, Cinnamomum culitlawan, Cinnamomum masoia, Cinnamomum camphora. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University
Email: admin@lib.ugm.ac.id




NO. 93765

Nitrogen fixation by Calliandra calothyrsus in the field


Purwantari, ND; Peoples, MB; Dart, PJ; Date, RA
Proceedings; International Workshop on the Genus Calliandra, Bogor, Indonesia; 23-27 January, 1996; Evans, DO (ed); Marrilton, Arkansas, Winrock International, 1996; p 83-88

Abstract:
An experiment was conducted to measure nitrogen fixation of Calliandra calothyrsus inoculated with strain INA4b. Cassia spectabilis and Panicum maximum cv. Petrie were used as non-N2 -fixing reference plants. Plants were initially grown in field soil in the glasshouse and then transplanted to a friale krasnozem soil, a heavy clay with pH 5.5-6.2. The proportion of plant nitrogen fixed by calliandra was assessed using a 15N natural abundance method. N2 fixation occurred in calliandra, but there were no significant differences between uninoculated and inoculated plants. The proportion of N derived from fixation significantly increased over time and at 40 weeks after outplanting was significantly greater than in the earlier two harvests, with the equivalent of 76 kg/ha N fixed with calliandra. Cassia as a non-N2-fixing reference plant had o15N values ranging from 7.36 to 8.63 ‰. This did not change with time and was relatively uniform across the experimental site. Values of o15N for Panicum maximum cv. Petrie ranged from 7.91 to 10.40 ‰, were significantly different with time, and were not uniform across the experimental site. Cassia spectabilis was therefore indicated as an appropriate non-N2-fixing reference plant in this study.

Availability :
College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños, College




NO. 11880

Herbicides from plants
Kan chai phut pen san kamchat sattru phut pen pai dai phiangrai

Assawaruchikunchai, A
Kheha Karn Kaset [House Agriculture Magazine]14(2): 126-129(1990)

Availability :
Horticulture Research Institute; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 12122

Trends in the utilization of plant extracts as insecticides
Naeonom kan nam sanphit thi sakat dai chak phut tam thammachat ma totthan san khemi

Wisetsan, S
Agricultural Toxicology Division; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand

[Toxic Substances News and Report] 12(2): 58-67(1985)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 12445

Some insecticidal plants
Kan suksa phut ya kha malaeng nai kan pong kan kam chat non krathu-phak

Phathumchatphan, W
[Thesis Abstracts 1977; Kasetsart University]; Bangkok; 1980; p5

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 13091

Medicinal plants for agriculture
Samunphrai thi chai thang kan kaset

Surai, S
Northeast Regional Agricultural Extension Office; Khon Kaen; Thailand

Khaosan Kaset Phak Tawan Ok Chiangnua [NEROA Newsletter] 17(4): 9-13(1988)

Availability :
Horticultural Research Institute; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 13796

Agroforestry in Thailand
Rabop wanakaset nai prathetthai

Phothai, M
Workshops on Forest Land Management in Agroforestry System, 18-20 October 1985, Royal Forest Department, Bangkok, Thailand; p56-78

Availability :
Library; Royal Forest Department; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 21444

A guide to the planting and maintenance of ornamental trees


Roth, T
Department of Forestry; Kuching; Sarawak; Malaysia

Kuching; Department of Forestry; 1983; 25p

Availability :
Timber Research and Technical Training Centre; Kuching; Sarawak; Malaysia




NO. 35136

Major practice in nursery management and production of ornamental plants


Arrastia, GDC
BSc thesis; College; Laguna; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; 1979; 36p

Availability :
Library; Department of Horticulture; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 63455

Palm trees of ceylon
Tanaman palem di Srilanka

Popham, S.
The Bulletin (2): 33-38(1985)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68605

Conservation of the medicinal plant germplasms by the Indonesian Traditional Medicine Association
Pelestarian plasma nutfah tanaman obat di gabungan pengusaha jamu Indonesia

Kardiyono
'Jamu Air Mancur' Co.Ltd., Wonogiri; Solo; Indonesia

Prosiding Forum Komunikasi Ilmiah Hasil Penelitian Plasma Nutfah dan Budidaya Tanaman Obat; Bogor, 2-3 Maret 1992; Buku I; Sitepu, D(ed); Karmawati, E(ed); Januwati, M(ed); Rosita, SMD(ed; Bogor; Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Industri; Seri Pengembangan (19): 35-52(1992)

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 107603

Study on determination of medicinal plant species in National Park, Dumoga Bone
Studi pengenalan jenis tumbuhan obat di Taman Nasional Dumoga Bone

Muslich, M.; Sumardjito, Z.; Gunawan, M.
Ujung Pandang Chemical Research Institute; South Sulawesi; Indonesia

Prosiding Diskusi/Ekspose Hasil-Hasil & Program Penelitian & Pengembangan Pelita VI [Proceedings of the Discussion/Expose on Results and Research & Development Programme of the 4th Pelita]; BPK Ujung Pandang, 31 Maret 1995; p.73-80

Availability :
Forest Research and Development Centre (FRDC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 996

The advantages of some leguminous plants as green manure compared to Crotalaria juncea
Manfaat pemupukan dari beberapa tanaman Leguminosae dibandingkan dengan Crotalaria juncea

Goor, GAW van de
Research Institute for Agricultural Techniques; Bogor; Indonesia

Tehnik Pertanian [Agricultural Techniques] 4: 221-229 (1955)

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 65919

Study on the post-harvest handling of fresh citrus fruits
Penelitian penanganan lepas panen buah jeruk segar

Herman, A.S; Surtiningsih, N; Subardjo
Laporan Balai Penelitian dan Pengembangan Kimia Bogor [Report of the Bogor Research and Development Institute for Chemistry]; Indonesia

Availability :
Indonesian Center for Horticulture Research and Development Library




NO. 65925

Cinnamon (Cinnamomum spp.)
Kayu manis

Rusli, S; Hamid, A
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC); Bogor; Indonesia

Edisi Khusus Penelitian Tanaman Rempah & Obat [Special Edition of Spices and Medicinal Crops Research] 6 (1): 45-53 (1990)

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 65942

Determination of the components of Cinnamomum sp. leaf oil and commercial chinese cinnamon oil through GLC and GC-MS
Penentuan komponen minyak daun Cinnamomum sp. dan minyak kayu manis cina komersial dengan cara GLC dan GC-MS

Moestafa, A
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia

Pemberitaan Penelitian Tanaman Industri [Contribution of the Research Institute for Industrial Crops] 14 (1-2): 1-11 (1988)

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 67930

Weeds of peanut
Gulma pada tanaman kacang tanah

Harsono, A
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops; Malang; East Java; Indonesia

Monograf Balitan Malang [MARIF Monograph] (12): 153-170 (1993)

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 4392

Effect of the amount of active alkali on the bleaching of sulphate pulps of timbers from peoples' plantations
Pengaruh jumlah alkali aktif terhadap pemutihan pulp sulfat dari kayu tanaman rakyat

Elias
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Forestry; Bogor Agricultural University; 1980; 98p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 12435

Antimicrobial activities of some medicinal plants
Kan thotsop rit khong samunphrai thai to chua ra

Khongsupphalak, K; trinut, A; Thawonset, T; Wutudomloet, M
Bot katyo khrongkan phiset [Abstracts of Special Research Project] 2518-2523; Bangkok; Mahidol University; p6

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 5085

Position of essential oil cells in trees and method to extract the oil
Kedudukan/letak sel-sel minyak atsiri di dalam pohon serta cara memperoleh minyaknya

Soemaatmadja, A
Manggala Wanabakti Museum; Jakarta; Indonesia

Manggala Wanabakti 2 (13): 1-4 (1986)

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 5795

Cassia vera and city regreening
Kayu manis dan penghijauan dalam kota

Rudjiati, D
Thesis; Jakarta; Faculty of Landscape Architecture; Trisakti University; 1980; 21p

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 65952

Techniques of extracting the essential oil
Tehnik pengambilan minyak atsiri

Indeswari, N
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Majalah Ilmiah [Science Journal]: 24 (1, 2): 19-33 (1984)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication (CALREC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 331

A guide to the cultivation of Cinnamomum
Pedoman bercocok tanam kayu manis (Cinnamomum sp.)

Research Institute for Industrial Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Circular Lembaga Penelitian Tanaman Industri [Circular of the Research Institute for Industrial Crops] (27): 1-18 (1973)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 364

Cinnamon
Kayu manis (Cinnamon)

Sanusi; Isdiyoso, SH
Research Institute for Industrial Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Pemberitaan Lembaga Penelitian Tanaman Industri [Contribution of the Research Institute for Industrial Crops] (25): 77-85 (1977)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 705

Effect of organic solvents on oleoresin yield from Cinnamomum bark
Pengaruh pelarut organik terhadap rendemen oleoresin kulit kayu manis

Ando, J
Forest Products Research and Development Centre; Bogor; Indonesia

Duta Rimba [Jungle Envoy] 13 (85-86): 25-33 (1987)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1504

The prospects of cinnamon leaves as a raw material for eugenol
Prospek daun cinnamon sebagai sumber bahan baku eugenol

Hakim, A; Hadiman; Tatang S
Laboratory for Research and Development; PT Kimia Farma; Bandung Production Unit; Indonesia

Proceedings Seminar Minyak Atsiri II [Proceedings of the Second Seminar on Essential Oils]; 20-22 April 1976; Bogor; Balai Penelitian Kimia; p98-111

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2264

Distillation of cassia leaves oils (Cinnamomum burmanii, C. zeylanicum and C. cassia) by cohobation method and the identification of oil components
Penyulingan minyak daun kayu manis Cinnamomum burmanii, Cinnamomum zeylanicum dan Cinnamomum cassia secara kohobasi dan identifikasi komponen minyak yang dihasilkan

Moestofa, A; Badeges, F
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia

Warta IHP (Industri Hasil Pertanian)[Journal of Agro-based Industry] 3 (1): 22-25 (1986)

Availability :
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 4783

Study on the distillation of cinnamon leaves by steaming and quality analysis of the oil
Mempelajari penyulingan daun kayu manis secara dikukus dan analisis mutu minyaknya

Suryani, Y
Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1985; 64p

Availability :
Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 5443

Prospects of cinnamon development in Indonesia
Prospek pengembangan kayu manis di Indonesia

Rusli, S; Abdullah, A
Research Institute for Spice and Medicinal Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Jurnal Penelitian dan Pengembangan Pertanian [Agricultural Research and Development Journal] 7 (3): 75-79 (1988)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 5600

Analysis of leaf oils of Cinnamomum burmanii, Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Cinnamomum cassia from Indonesia using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry
Analisis minyak daun Cinnamomum burmanii, Cinnamomum zeylanicum dan Cinnamomum cassia Indonesia dengan cara kromatografi gas dan spektrometri massa

Moestafa, A
Thesis; Bogor; Department of Chemistry; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; Pakuan University; 1987; 106p

Availability :
Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; Pakuan University; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 8241

Isolation of oleoresin from the leaves, bark and bark powder of cinnamon
Pemisahan oleoresin dari daun, kulit dan bubuk kulit kayu manis

Djubaedah, E
Bogor Chemical Research Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Proceedings Seminar Minyak Atsiri III [Proceedings of the Third Seminar on Essential Oils]; Bogor; Balai Penelitian Kimia; 1978; p223-245

Availability :
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 9752

Cinnamon
Kulit manis

Anonymous
Padang Agricultural Information Service; 1985; 26p

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 60681

Cinnamon
Kayu manis

Rismunandar
Jakarta; Penebar Swadaya; 1988; 103p

Availability :
National Library of Indonesia; Jakarta; Indonesia




NO. 61268

Cinnamon
Kulit manis

Anonymous
Agricultural Information Bulletin; Sumatra Utara [North Sumatera] (11): (1990-1991)

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 61398

Several oil properties during storage of Cassia verra products
Beberapa sifat minyak selama penyimpanan hasil olahan Cassia verra

Asfaruddin
MS Thesis; Yogyakarta; Gadjah Mada University; 1988; 104p

Availability :
Faculty of Postgraduate Studies; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 62281

Determination of oil components of Cinnamomum spp. leaves and commercial Chinese cassia oil through GCL and GC-MS methods
Penentuan komponen minyak daun Cinnamomum spp. dan minyak kayumanis Cina komersial dengan cara GCL dan GC-MS

Moestafa, A
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia

Pemberitaan Penelitian Tanaman Industri Bogor [Industrial Crops Research News, Bogor] XIV (1-2): 1-11 (1988)

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 62302

Development prospect of cinnamon in Indonesia
Prospek pengembangan kayu manis di Indonesia

Rusli, S; Abdullah, A
Research Institute for Tobacco and Fibre Crops (RITFC); Malang; East Java; Indonesia

Jurnal Litbang Pertanian [Agricultural Research and Development Journal] 7 (3): 75-79 (1988)

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 63083

Determination of essential oil components in the leaves of two cinnamon species, i.e. Cinnamomum burmani and C. zeylanicum through GLC and GC-MS
Penentuan komponen minyak daun Cinnamomum sp dan minyak kayu manis cina komersial dengan cara GLC dan GC-MS

Moestapa, A
Industrial Crops Research Bulletin; Bogor 16 (1-2): 1-11 (1988)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 63094

Lossing of cinnamon oil in the processing of cut and washed, broken cleaned and Cassia powder
Kehilangan minyak Cassia vera pada pengolahan cut and washed, broken cleaned dan Cassia powder

Gusmalini
S1 thesis; Padang; Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; 1984; p1-54

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 63139

Effects of planting distance and utilization of NPK 15-15-15 fertilizers on cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanii Bl.) seedings
Pengaruh jarak tanam dan pemakaian pupuk NPK 15-15-15 pada pembibitan kayu manis padang (Cinnamomum burmanii Bl.)

Syukur, A.R
S1 thesis; Padang; Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; 1979; p1-84

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 63141

Effects of the planting hole depths and the shades on germination and growth of cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanii Bl.) in the nurseries
Pengaruh dalamnya lobang penanaman dan peteduh terhadap munculnya kecambah dan pertumbuhan bibit tanaman kayu manis (Cinnamomum burmanii Bl.) di persemaian

Zain, A
S1 thesis; Padang; Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; 1978; p1-102

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 63158

Oil content determination from various qualities of cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanii Bl.) based on the altitude
Penentuan kadar minyak (content oil) dari beberapa kualitas Cassia vera (Cinnamomum burmanii Bl.) berdasarkan tinggi tempat tumbuh

Mochtar, H
S1 thesis; Padang; Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; 1978; p1-54

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 63796

Some notes on the cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanii) barks
Beberapa catatan tentang kulit kayu manis (Cinnamomum burmanii)

Jafarsidik, Y
Journal of Forestry Research and Development; Bogor 5 (2): 27-28 (1989)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 63868

Effort in knowing the principle factors controlling the bark colour of cinnamon
Usaha untuk memahami faktor-faktor atau dasar-dasar yang berhubungan dengan warna kulit kayu manis

Anggrahini, S
S1 thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Gadjah Mada University; 1977; 25p

Availability :
Faculty of Agricultural Technology Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 64302

Industrial development of cassia oil
Pengembangan industri minyak casia

Moestafa, A; Yasnida; Aminah
Laporan Balai Besar Penelitian dan Pengembangan Industri Hasil Pertanian [Report of the Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry] (1984/1985); 23p

Availability :
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 64651

Yield and quality of some cinnamon species
Produksi dan mutu beberapa jenis kayu manis

Rusli, S; Wahid, P
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC); Bogor; Indonesia

Proceedings of the Seminar on Medicinal Crops Cultivation; 1985; p336-343

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 64653

Cultivation of cinnamon (Cinnamomum burmanii) in Kebumen village, Baturaden subdistrict, Banyumas district
Budidaya kayu manis di desa Kebumen kecamatan Baturaden kabupaten Banyumas

Aminudin, S
Faculty of Animal Husbandry; Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwoketo; Central Java; Indonesia

Proceedings of the Seminar on Medicinal Crops Cultivation; 1985; p74-82

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 65045

Yield and quality of some cinnamon species
Produksi dan mutu beberapa jenis kayu manis

Rusli, S; Wahid, P
Seminar Lokakarya Pembudidayaan Tanaman Obat dan Pameran Obat Tradisional, [Seminar and Workshop on Cultivation of Medicinal Plants and Exhibition of Traditional Medicine] Proceedings 2 Lokakarya Pembudidayaan Tanaman Obat; Purwokerto October 17-18, 1985; Unsoed Purwokerto; 336-343 (1986)

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 65772

Prospect of cinnamon development in central Sumatra
Propspek pengembangan kayu manis di daerah Sumatera Bagian Tengah

Zamarel; Hamid, A
Solok Research Station for Spices and Medicinal Crops; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Prosiding Temu Tugas Perkebunan/Tanaman Industri [Proceedings of the Duty Meeting of Estate/Industrial Crops] Lingkup Propinsi Sumatra Barat; Riau dan Jambi; Balittro; Puslitbangtri; Kanwil Deptan. dan Disbun Sumbar Riau dan Jambi; Bukit Tinggi; 15-17 January 1990; p304-314

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 34089

A survey of the antibacterial properties of some local plant products


Sadili, M.V
Centro Escolar University; Manila; Philippines

Graduate and Faculty Studies 5: 158-174 (1954)

Availability :
National Library; Manila; Philippines




NO. 65798

Yield and quality of several cinnamon species
Produksi dan mutu beberapa jenis kayu manis

Rusli, S
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC); Bogor; Indonesia

Proceedings I Seminar dan Lokakarya Pembudidayaan Tanaman Obat dan Pameran Obat Tradisional [First Proceedings of the Seminar and Workshop on Cultivation of Medicinal Crops and Exhibition of Traditional Medicine]; UNSOED; Purwokerto; 1985; p336-343

Availability :
Semarang College of Farming; Semarang; Central Java; Indonesia




NO. 63881

Effect of plant age on the essential oil concentration of cinnamon
Pengaruh umur tanaman terhadap kandungan minyak atsiri kayu manis

Suhardiyono L
S1 thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Gadjah Mada University; 1977; 26p

Availability :
Faculty of Agricultural Technology Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 108068

Components of essential oil composing on some Cinnamomum
Komponen penyusunan minyak atsiri beberapa Cinnamomum

Chairul; Agusta, A
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Simposium Penelitian Bahan Obat Alami VIII [Proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Research of Natural Medicine]; Bogor, 24-25 Nopember 1994; Perhiba & Balittro; 1996; p534-542

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops (RISMC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 70755

The first results of asexual reproduction on Cinnamomum cassia and Pinus caribaea
Ket qua buoc dau sinh san vo tinh cua Cinnamomum cassia va Pinus caribe

Vo Luong
Bureau of Forest of Quang Nam-Da Nang

Thong tin khoa hoc 7 Ky thuat Quang Nam-Da Nang [Information of Science and Technology of Quang Nam-Da Nang] (1): 18-20 (1986)

Abstract:
The asexual reproduction of C. cassia and Pinus caribaea have got high economic effect.

Availability :
Library of Danang city




NO. 67943

New diseases of some industrial crops and their pathogens in Indonesia


Kobayashi, T; Djiwanti, S.R; Manohara, D; Wahyuno, D; Oniki, M
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops; Bogor; Indonesia|Jica Short-term Expert; Jica Long-term Expert

Proceedings of final seminar of the joint-study programme ATA-380 (Srengthening research and disease of industrial crops in Indonesia); Sitepu, D. (ed); Manohara, D. (ed); Oniki, M. (ed); Japan International Cooperation Agency; Agency for Agricultural Research and Development; 1992; p90-92

Abstract:
There are not much information of the diseases on industrial crops, especially of the medicinal crops. Identification of the causal agent of those diseases is one of the important factors for making the decision on controlling the disease. Plant disease surveys on industrial crops in Indonesia were conducted to identify their causal agents. During the survey, some diseases which have not recorded in Indonesia were observed. Those diseases were white root rot of Cinnamomum cassia caused by Dematopthora necatrix, brown leaf blight of Cassia alata caused by Cercospora sp., sooty blotch of Clausena excavata caused by Mycovellosiella sp., brown leaf spot of Blumea balsamiifera caused by Pseudocercospora blumea-balsamiferae, white spot of Zingiber ottensii caused by Phyllosticta zingiberii, and leaf spot of Anacardium occidentale caused by Pestalotiopsis desseminata. But effort to prevent spreads of the pathogen is necessary needed, so it hoped did not become problems on agricultural cultivation in the future. (Revised authors' abstract)

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 13527

Thai medicinal plants
Phromchit Soraram kap samunphrai ya thai thi mai na lum

Ban lae Suan [Home and Garden Magazine] 13 (153): 213-216 (1989)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 13624

Inhibitory action of some Thai herbals


Achrarit, C; Panyayong, W; Ruchataromut, E
Faculty of Pharmacy; Mahidol University; Bangkok; Thailand

Special Project for the degree of BS Pharmacy; Bangkok; Mahidol University; 1984; 13p

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Center; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 10576

Chinese medicinal plants in Thailand
Samunphrai chine nai Prathetthai

Phetphlai, D
Division of Medical Research; Department of Medical Science; Bangkok; Thailand

Warasarn khong Krom witthayasart karnphaet [The Bulletin of the Department of Medical Sciences] 16 (3): 109-124 (1974)

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 4224

Reforestation in the watershed areas of Wair Klau,Wair Pelit and Iligetang,Flores,Nusa Tenggara Timur
Reboisasi hutan di daerah aliran sungai-sungai Wair Klau,Wair Pelit dan Iligetang,Flores,Nusa Tenggara Timur

Husaeni,EA
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Forestry; Bogor Agricultural University; 1970; 66p

Availability :
Faculty of Forestry;Bogor Agricultural University;Indonesia




NO. 11280

Inhibitory action of some Thai medicinal plants on fungi


Limsrimanee, S; Siriratana, S
Special Project; BSPharm; Bangkok; Faculty of Pharmacy; Mahidol University; 1983; 15p|TISTR Bibliographical Series No.6; 1980; p58; Abstract No.137

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 37244

Performance of some medicinal plants under varying degrees of shade and fertilizer levels


Maghirang, R.G
PROJECT Database; Philippine Council for Health and Resources Development; DOST Main Bldg; Bicutan; Metro Manila; Philippines

Abstract:
The fertilizer and/or light requirements of 20 medicinal plants were studied. The plants were subjected to varying levels of light intensity and different fertilizer materials and application rates. Growth performance and amount of "active constituent" (total alkaloid and volatile oil content) were monitored at regular intervals. Cassia alata L. (akapulko), Thevetia peruviana (Pers) Merr. (campanilla), Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don) (chichirica), Artemisia vulgaris L. (damong maria), Leucaena leucocephala (Lamk.) de Witt (ipil-ipil), Vitex negundo L. (lagundi), Tabernaemontana pandacaqui Poir (pandakaki) and Blumea balsamifera (L.) DC (sambong) are sun loving plants. Ocimum basilicum L. (balanoy), Alstonia scholaris L. R. Br. (dita), Kibatalia blancoi Rolfe Merr. (laniting gubat), and Carmona retusa (Vahl.) Masam (tsaang gubat) have better performance under partial shade. Some plants grow better under full sun, but their "active principle" is higher under partial shade. These are Datura metel L. (talumpunay), and Mentha cordifolia Opiz (yerba buena). Most of the plants respond best to various application rates of complete fertilizer (14-14-14). These are balanoy at 20 g/plant, damong maria at 10 g/plant, lagundi at 20 g/plant, Quisqualis indica L. (niyog-niyogan) at 10 g/plant, Coleus amboinicus Lour. (oregano) at 10 g/ plant, Ocimum sanctum L. (sulasi) at 10 g/plant, talumpunay at 20 g/plant, tsaang gubat at 10 g/plant and yerba buena at 20 g/plant. Instead of complete fertilizer, lagundi can also be fertilized with 750 g/plant ipil-ipil leaves and yerba buena with 10 g/plant ammonium sulfate (21-0-0) or 40 g/plant chicken manure. Sambong responds best to 40 g/plant ammonium sulfate or 100 g/plant solophos (0-18-0).

Availability :
LAB. NAME: UPLB-CA; LAB. LOC.: Los Ba¤os, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 11560

Properties of Thai medicinal plants
Pramuan sapphakhum yathai

Samakhom Rongrian Phaet Phaen Boran
Bangkok; Samakom Rongrian Phaet Phaenboran; 1964; TISTR Bibliographical Series No.6; 1980; p62-63; Medicinal plants in Thailand No.1; Abstract No.207-215

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 33994

List of ten medicinal plants recommended by the Ministry of Health


Ticzon, R.R
Ticzon herbal manual; [place; publisher ??]; 1986; p4-7

Availability :
National Library; Filipiniana and Asia Division; Ermita; Manila; Philippines




NO. 62101

Pod peel anatomy of various Leguminous species
Anatomi kulit buah beberapa spesies dari familia Leguminosae

Lestari, S.
S1 Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Biology; Gadjah Mada University; Indonesia; 1983; 37p

Availability :
Faculty of Biology; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 30511

Antimutagenic effects of eighteen Philippine plants


Sylianco,CYL;Concha,JA;Jocano,AP;Lim,CM
Philippine Journal of Science 115(4):293-298(1986)

Availability :
Library;University of the Philippines at Los Banos;College;Laguna




NO. 33312

Clinical pharmacologic studies on medicinal plants


Maramba,CNP
Proceedings of the Seminar and Press Conference on Herbal Medicine,November 10,1982

Availability :
Library;College of Medicine;University of the Philippines;Ermita; Manila




NO. 92175

Medicinal Plants
Mga halamang gamot

De Padua; LS
Raniag 1 (2): 30-31 (1996)

Availability :
Department of Horticulture Library; University of the Philippines Los Ba¤os; College; Laguna




NO. 92310

Herbal medicine make a comeback


Romulo,BD
Reader's Digest 49-54 (1989); HERDIN Database; PC911734; MFN 007437

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; DOST Complex; Bicutan; Taguig; Metro Manila, R-324




NO. 32282

A study on the propagation of Cananga odorata Lamarck,Phaeanthus ebracteolatus Merrill,Intsia bijuga (Colebrooke) O.Kuntze,Cassia javanica Linnaeus and Toona calantas Merrill and Rolfe by cuttings


Jacalne,DV;Galinato,PF
The Philippine Journal of Forestry 14(1-4):97-110(1958)

Availability :
Library;College of Forestry;University of the Philippines at Los Ba¤os; College;Laguna




NO. 103923

Study on quality of 'embung' Boentuka and Biloto forest, South Timor Tengah, Timor, East Nusa Tenggara as based on effort to conservation of water catching area
Studi kualitas hutan embung Boentuka dan Biloto, Kabupaten Timor Tengah Selatan (TTS), Timor, NTT sebagai dasar untuk upaya konservasi daerah tangkapan airnya

Harahap,R.; Naiola,B.P.
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB)-LIPI; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Pengelolaan Tata Air dan Pemanfaatannya dalam Satu Kesatuan Toposekuens [Proceedings of the Seminar on Water Management and Utilization in Toposequential Unit], Cilacap 7-8 Oktober 1993; p.136-142

Availability :
Research and Development Institute for Botany; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 32281

A preliminary study on the marcottage of five species of tall flowering trees and three species of fruit trees with the use of plastic cloth,moss and soil


Chanphaka,U
The Philippine Journal of Forestry 14(1-4):77-96(1958)

Availability :
Library;College of Forestry;University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College;Laguna




NO. 61868

Species selection for highway landschape: Tolerance study of wayside shade trees against air pollutants produced by motor vehicles in their ability of reducing the timbal
Pemilihan jenis untuk lansekap jalan raya; studi toleransi tanaman peneduh jalan terhadap pencemar udara dari kendaraan bermotor dan kemampuannya dalam mengurangi timbal

Fakuara,Y.; Dahlan,EN.; Husin,YA.; Eharelawan; Danur,IAS.; Pringgodigdo,H.; Sigit,PH.
Media Persaki; Jakarta; 1(1):12-18(1991)

Availability :
Forest Research and Development Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3558

The role of Wanagama I reforestation in the development of bird population
Peranan penghutanan kembali Wanagama I terhadap perkembangan satwa burung

Djuwantoko
Faculty of Forestry; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Perumusan dan Himpunan Makalah Sarasehan I di Wanagama I; Buku II [Proceedings of the Workshop I,Wanagama I; Book II]; Yogyakarta; 1983; p708-719

Availability :
Centre for Research and Development in Biology;Bogor;Indonesia




NO. 3916

Effect of host plant species on the growth of sandalwood seedlings (Santalum album L.)
Pengaruh jenis inang terhadap pertumbuhan semai cendana (Santalum album L.)

Kharisma;Suriamihardja,S
Santalum (2):1-8(1988)

Availability :
Central Library for Agriculture and Biology;Bogor;Indonesia




NO. 37606

The establishment and performance of tree legume hedge rows on farmers' fields in a sloping acid upland environment


Garrity, DP; Mercado Jr, A
Benguet State University, La Trinidad, Benguet, Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 14 (1): 4 (1989)

Abstract:
Severe soil erosion and nutrient depletion were diagnosed as dominant threats to the sustainability of sloping acid upland food crop systems. Contour hedgerow technology was initiated to develop the biological component of contour hedgerow systems in Northern Mindanao. Four legume species identified for contour bund were Gliricidia sepium, Cassia spectabilis, Flemingia macrophylla (synonym Flamingia congesta), and Senna siamea (synonym Cassia siamea). The former two species were studied in extensive plantings due to the availability of planting materials (20cm). Branch cuttings substantially improve Gliricidia hedgerow establishment, with or without application of commercial hormone. Cassia establishments from stem cuttings were poor in all treatments. Biomass production of 6 m wide hedgerows on farmers' fields contributed 94 to 4114 kg/ha green leaf manure (GLM) during the second year. Average nutrient condition of the GLM was 53 kg N/ha, 4 kg P/ha, and 8 kg K/ha per year.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Benguet State University
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 38559

Effects of flooding on seven species of tropical pasture legumes


Javier, RR
Annals of Tropical Research 5 (2): ?-? (1983)

Abstract:
Seven tropical pasture legume species were grown in pots inside the glasshouse. At the start of flowering stage plants were continuously flooded to 5 cm above the soil surface for 10 and 21 days. Dry weights of shoots, roots and nodules of the flooded plants were compared to the corresponding unflooded plants after a recovery period of 7 days. Macroptilium lathyroides exhibited superior tolerance to flooding while Cassia rotundifolia and Vigna parkeri showed very poor tolerance. Root growth was more affected by flooding than shoot growth. Nodulation was reduced in all species except in Macroptilium lathyroides. The adaptation of Macroptilium lathyroides, Desmodium heterophyllum, Lotonomis bainesii and Trifolium semipilosum to flooding was related to the rapid production of adventitious roots from the immersed stems and branches and to the rapid nodulation of these adventitious roots and the original roots. High stomatal conductance was maintained in flood-tolerant species with increased duration of flooding while high leaf diffusive resistance was common in species intolerant to flooding.

Availability :
Institute of Plant Breeding, Library; University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 90679

Marketing of products and by-products of multi-purpose tree species in La Union


de Padua, VM
DMMMSU (Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University) Research and Extension Journal: 13-34 (1994)

Abstract:
The marketing systems of products and by-products of selected multipurpose tree species (MPTS) in La Union was studied. Result of the study showed that there is a potential market of mango fruit because the production is not enough to cater the demand in the international and local markets. This is also true to woodfiles, charcoal, fuelwood and driftwood by-products of madre de cacao and fuelwood and lumber products of Acacia auriculiformis and Cassia spectabilis in the local market. The findings suggest that there is a need to increase production to satisfy the demand. This may be done through research and development of production area expansion. Temporary market shortages would have been due to the inefficiency in the distribution system of the products. This distribution system was the major factor that influenced the existence of intermediaries which formed the marketing of mango fruit while short channel in products and by-products of madre de cacao, Acacia auriculiformis and Cassia spectabilis. Such difference could be due to the differences in the market orientedness of the products and income levels generated from the marketing activities. Disparity in income levels would be due to the differences in the assumed risk, degree of control on the means of production especially capital and accessibility or control of the market. Exploitation on the different uses of these products may be improve the income distribution among the market intermediaries and physical distribution of the product in different localities. The buying behaviour of consumers towards mango fruit was significantly influenced by the consumer's case of madre de cacao products and by-products. Market segmentation is necessary to cater the needs in accordance to buyers characteristics in the case of major fruit. A study dealing with the correlation between consumer's buying behaviour and products' characteristics is essential.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office
Email: prosea@ultra.pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 93360

Mutagenicity, clastogenicity, and antimutangenicity potential of Akapulko decoctions and lotion


Lim-Sylianco, CY; Blanco, FRB; Lim, CM
Natural and Applied Science Bulletin 39 (1): 49-58 (1987)

Abstract:
decoction of akapulko leaves and akapulko lotion do not posses direct DNA damaging capacity. Genotoxicity before and after metabolic activation was not exhibited. No chromosome-breaking were observed of the decoctions as well as the lotion. The decoctions exhibited antimultagenic effects against dimethylnitrosamine, tetracycline and methymethanesulphonate. This was shown by the reduction of formation of micro-nucleated polychromatic erythr °Cy in bone marrow cells.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 25178

Absence of appetite suppression in rats after administration of Cassia tora and Ampelopsis sp. extracts


Ng, LT
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM); Jalan FRIM, Kepong Karung Berkunci 201, 52109 Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Malaysia

Proceedings of the Fourth Conference; Conference on Forestry and Forest Products Research 1997; p 445-452

Abstract:
Obesity is a growing problem worldwide, with effective therapies for this disease remaining unavailable at the present time. In searching for safer and more effective herbal products or drugs, many scientists are interested in finding new anorectic extracts and/or compounds from plants. Preliminary studies have indicated that both Cassia tora (CT) and Ampelopsis sp. (AS) are potential candidates for development into herbal drinks, with CT being reportedly used for weight control and hypertension and AS being traditionally used for treating rheumatism. The present study was, therefore, conducted to test the efficacy of CT as an herbal drink for weight loss, with AS being evaluated as a control with no reported effect on weight control. Both acute and chronic effects of CT and AS extracts on food intake (FI) and body weight (BW) were examined. Rats, adapted to a 14 h (1800-0800 h) feeding schedule (food was available only during the dark period), received CT or AS extracts intragastrically (0.2g/4ml/rat) 30 min prior to food presentation. Acute administration of either CT or AS extracts failed to suppress short-term FI (at 0-1, 1-2 and 2-14 h time period). Furthermore, long-term FI and BW were also not affected by chronic administration of these extracts. This study did not find evidence to support the reported claim that CT has weight reduction properties. Under present dosages, FI and BW are not affected by either acute or chronic administration of CT or AS extracts.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 94861

Growth and development of Paraserianthes falcataria, Albizia saponaria, A. lebbeck, A. procera and other nitrogen fixing trees as affected by spacing on hillsides in Eastern Visayas, Philippines


Bumatay, EC; Escalada, RG; Buante, C
Proceedings International Workshop on Albizia and Paraserianthes Species, Bislig, Surigao del Sur, Philippines, 13-19 November 1994; Forest, Farm and Community Tree Research Reports, 1997; p 76-79

Abstract:
Distance of planting had dramatic effects on the diameter and height growth of the nitrogen fixing tree species grown under trial. Generally, the wider the spacing, the shorter the trees but the bigger their diameter. Paraserianthes falcataria trees spaced at 1m x 0.5 m grew very tall compared to other spacings. The growth pattern of all the species was observed at each time of measurement not to have followed the biological curve due to stem breakage and other damages caused by typhoons which passed over the experimental site.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 94009

Determination of anti-fungal property of Cassia fistula (golden shower)


San Diego, MS; Sayaman, MC; Saxclon, MA; Silverio, G
Inventory of Health Researches : 1997-1998; p 90

Abstract:
The freshly gathered leaves, pulp and seeds of Cassia fistula plant were used. The 10 grams of air-dried leaves, pulp and seed were submerged in 10 ml of 95% ethanol. Mixture was warmed for one hour and diluted with distilled water two-fold at 100%, 50%, 25%, and 12.5% concentrations. Fungal inocula were prepared from 24-48 hour old cultures and grown in Sabouraud's agar. Suspensions were aseptically prepared and adjusted to MacFarland standard no. 3. Results:At 100% concentration of the leaf extract, M. gypseum, T. rubrum, E. fl °Ccosums and Candida albicans exhibited zones of inhibition (ZI) at 9 mm, 9.5 mm, 12 mm and 15 mm, respectively. However only, C. albicans produced ZI greater than control (95% ethanol). At 50% concentration, only T. rubrum and Candida albicans showed sensitivity to the leaf extract. Only Candida albicans was inhibited at 25% concentration. At 100% concentration of pulp extract, Candida albicans produced ZI of 13 mm which is only slightly lower than the control (13.5 mm). On the other hand, M. gypseum was the only organism showing ZI greater than control. At 50% both M. gypseum and Candida albicans were inhibited. Only M. gypseum showed sensitivity at 25% and 12.5% concentrations. Comparing to the leaf and pulp extract with reference to M. gypseum and Candida albicans, results showed the latter was significantly inhibited up to a 25% concentration of the leaf while the former was significantly inhibited up to 12.5% concentration of the pulp extract. Cassia fistula was found to have potent anti-fungal properties. The leaves extract had the greatest inhibitory activity by inhibiting the growth of all test organisms (M. gypseum, T. rubrum, E. fl °Ccosum and Candida albicans). By determining the zones of inhibition, C. albicans exhibited the greatest sensitivity to the 3 extracts (leaves, pulp and seed). In the MIC determination, the leaves extract required the lowest concentration to inhibit the Candida albicans. M. gypseum was significantly inhibited by the pulp extract. Further analysis of the constituents of the leaf extracts show potential for anti-fungal activity for possible medical and commercial use.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology
Email: pchrd@pchrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 94262

Pharmacognistical studies of selected Philippine medicinal plants


Zamora, CV
Inventory of Health Researches 1992-1993; p 117

Abstract:
The study aims to provide macroscopic and microscopic descriptions, illustrations and photomicrographs of the following plants and their respective parts:1)Vitex negundo L.(lagundi) leaves 2)Blumea balsamifera (sambong), 3)Cassia alata(akapulko) leaves, 4)Mentha cordifolia(yerba buena) leaves, 5)Carmona retusa(tsaang gubat) leaves, 6)Allium sativum(bawang) bulb, 7)Leucaena leucocephala(ipil-ipil) seed, 8)Psidium guajava(guava) leaves, 9)Momordica charantia(ampalaya) leaves, 10)Artemisia vulgaris(damong maria) herb, 11) Ocimum santum(sulasi) leaves, 12)Cymbopogon citratus(tanglad) leaves, 13)Peperomia pellucida(ulasimang bato) leaves and stems, 14)Garcinia mangostana(mangosteen) mesocarp, and 15)Quisqualis indica(niyog-niyogan) seeds.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology
Email: pchrd@pchrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 93755

The value of Cassia siamea and Gliricidia sepium as "in situ" support systems in yam cultivation: experiences from a farm-based trial


Budelman, A; Pinners, ECM
Proceedings; Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Walp.: Management and Improvement; Turrialba, Costa Rica; 21-27 June, 1987; Withington, D; Glover, N; Brewbaker, JL (eds.); Nitrogen Fixing Tree Association Special Publication (87-01); Waiwanalo, USA; pp.90-91

Abstract:
Gliricidia sepium and Cassia siamea were introduced into a yam, Dioscorea alata, cropping system. Yams were planted a year after the trees were established. Trees were gradually lopped once the yams needed light. Cassia was less acceptable than gliricidia as a support because it did not shed its leaves after ringing, its branches were harder to trim, and yam yields were lower than yields in a yam monoculture. Yam yields with gliricidia were equal to yields in a yam monoculture.

Availability :
College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños, College




NO. 25976

Antibacterial activities of Cassia alata and Cassia tora


Elysha Nur, I; Somchit, MN; Abdul Rahim, M; Zaraini, MT
Department of Biomedical Science; Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences; Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 UPM Serdang; Selangor

4th. Asian Science and Technology Congress 2002; 25-27 April 2002; Kuala Lumpur

Abstract:
Cassia alata and Cassia tora are two of the wild plants in tropical countries that have been reported to be very useful in treating many illness including fungal skin infections (Carlson, 1997). Crude ethanol and water extract of leaves from Cassia alata and Cassia tora were tested for antibacterial activity against two bacterias (Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli). Sterile discs (6 mm diameter from Oxoid, UK) impregnated with both extract were used for the in vitro sensitivity testing (Ibrahim D, 1995). Six different concentrations were used (5 mg/ml, 10 mg/ml, 15 mg/ml, 20 mg/ml, 25 mg/ml and 30 mg/ml). Staphylococcus aureus showed dose-dependent sensitivity towards ethanol and water extract of Cassia alata (ranging from 9 to 14 mm diameter) while both extracts of Cassia tora showed resistant. Escherichia coli showed resistant to bothe extract of Cassia alata but dose- dependent inhibitory zone was observed for both extract of Cassia tora (ranging 20 to 30 mm diameter). Results were compared to commercial antibiotic chloramphenicol, penicillin and aerofloxacin, which had 19 mm, 26 mm, and 22 mm respectively for Staphylococcus aureus. Escherichia coli growth showed resistant when compared with penicillin but resistant to chloramphenicol and aerofloxacin. The antibacterial efficacy of the extracts depends upon the concentration and is comparable to commercial antibacterial drugs. These results affirm the use of Cassia alata and Cassia tora as a potential treatment of an alternative medicine in human with certain bacteria infections. Both Cassia alata and Cassia tora can be exploited scientifically for utilization in modern medicine in future.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 96655

The indigenous rice extenders/substitutes and food seasoners in the hinterlands of Marinduque


Regio, VR; Merlin, MM
Marinduque State College Journal of Research and Innovation 2 (2): 29-31 (1999-2000)

Abstract:
Five species of wild rootcrops under family Dioscoreaceae and two species of food seasoners were documented in this study. Four were directly boiled as source of carbohydrates or kisa for rice and one was processed in different ways to remove the toxic material present before using as food or kisa to rice. The two studied seasoners are eaten as additives to cooked fish, shrimp and meat for their sour flavor.

Availability :
Southern Tagalog Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium One Stop Information Shop




NO. 26919

Fungi Associated With Foliar Diseases of Selected Domesticated Medicinal Plants in Malaysia


Mazidah, M; Tosiah, S; Mansor, P; Zalilah, MA
MARDI Headquaters; P.O Box 12301; KualaLumpur

26th. Symposium of the Malaysian Society for Microbiology; Langkawi; Kedah; 25-28 November 2004; p81

Abstract:
Several genera of fungi were found in association with foliar diseases of selected medicinal plants in Malaysia. Among them, Colletotrichum, Curuularia and Pestalotiopsis were commonly found. The genus Colletotrichum was associated with leaf spot diseases of Cassia a ngustifo lia, Gendarnssa SF, Kaempferia galanga, Goniothalamus sp and Murraya koenigii. The genus Curuularia was found associated with leaf spots of Eurycoma longifolia and Pandanus odorns and leaf blight of Cymbopogon SF. Pestalotiopsis was associated with leaf spot of Morinda SF, Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Myristica fragrans.

Availability :
Patahayah




NO. 96085

Evaluation of leguminous species as green manure in rice production


Agustin, E; Malab, B; Guinsanto, L
Ilocos Research Abstracts 1986-1987; Mariano Marcos State University, Batac, Ilocos Norte; 1987; Dy, MEY (ed); Ilocos Norte; Philippines; p. 63

Abstract:
The fertilizing value of Cassia tora, Sesbania rostata and Crotalaria quinquefolia was evaluated based on their dry matter yield, total N content, nutrient content of the soil after green manuring and yield and plant height of rice.|S. rostata and C. tora produced more dry matter yield than C.quinquefolia but had lower nitrogen content. The nitrogen and potassium contents of the soil increased with the incorporation of the green manures to the soil. This indicates that green manures do not supply nitrogen in the soil but also other elements like potassium.|Rice plants fertilized with green manures produced yield similar to the yield obtained from plants fertilized with 45 kg N/ha. Yield ranged from 1.38 to 1.46 t/ha. The yield obtained in these treatments was higher than the unfertilized plants (1.2 t/ha) but lower than the yield of plants fertilized with 90 kg N/ha and green manure + 45 kg N/ha (1.92 t/ha).

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 96088

Performance of 12 reforestation species on the FDPIN plantation areas


Malab, SC; Visco, RG
Ilocos Research Abstracts 1986-1987; Mariano Marcos State University, Batac, Ilocos Norte; 1987; Dy, MEY (ed); Ilocos Norte; Philippines; p. 66

Abstract:
A trial planting of exotic and endemic reforestation species was conducted at FDPIN area to determine their adaptability to the site. The 12 species were: Acacia mangium, Acacia auriculiformis, Eucalyptus deglupta, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Cassia siamea, Casuarina equisetifolia, CAssia spectabilis, Leucaena leucocephala, Pterocarpus indicus, Gliricidia sepium, Gmelina arborea and Swietenia macrophylla. Height measurements and survival counting were conducted every three months during the first year and every six months during the second year.|The survival of 12 species were not significantly different at 18 months after planting. Survival count ranged from 74.1 to 97.2%.|The species had considerable variation in height A. mangium was the tallest (174.3 cm), but this height did not differ significantly from those of E. camaldulensis, G. arborea, C. siamea, A. auriculiformis and E. deglupta. All the other species were significantly shorter.|The findings during the second year followed the same trend as those obtained during the first year.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 96353

Ornamental and shade tree production


Vendiola, EE
Sustainable Livelihood Options: An information Kit, Upland Ecosystems; Visayas Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City; Department of Environment and Natural Resources; 1997; pp. 234-244

Abstract:
The establishment of instant forest in environmentally critical areas such as industrial zones could be viewed as a mitigating factor. Trees and plants are known to ameliorate the climatic conditions, reduce pollutants and beautify the environment. Moreover, leaves and branaches for disposal can be used as mulch for the tree itself.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 15230

Biological value of plant proteins: protein quality and safety of 'Khi-lek' (Cassia siamea)


Suphakarn, V; Ngunboonsri, P; Glinsukon, T
Thai Abstracts: Science and Technology 16: 23 (1991)

Abstract:
The leaves of Cassia siamea or 'Khi-lek' is widely consumed by the Thais. The protein quality of 'Khi-lek' as determined by amino acid score was moderate whereas the value from the biological assay was poor. Animals died upon the acute toxicity test of 'Khi-lek' was an indicator for the presence of toxic chemical compounds. Therefore, it is suggested that the safety consumption of 'Khi-lek' should include the proper preparation of 'Khi-lek', in addition to a good combination of high quality protein in order to improve it's nutritive value.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15716

A preliminary study of antidiarrheoal plants; 1. Antibacterial activity


Gritsanapan, W; Chulasiri, M
Thai Abstracts: Science and Technology 13: 31 (1988)

Abstract:
In the study of the extracts from 38 samples of 35 reported antidiarrheoal plants which belong to 22 families against 8 tested bacteria isolated from the stools of patients with infective diarrheoa, 15 plants (16 samples) showed antidiarrheoal activity. These plants included Lawsonia inermis, Camellia sinensis, Punica granatum, Psidium guajava, Pithecellobium dulce, Jatropha multifida, Annona squamosa, Bridelia ovata, Shorea roxburghii, Cassia fistula, Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula, Alangium salviifolium, Caesalpinia sappan, and other species of Terminalia. However, no extract from these plants was able to inhibit all tested bacteria.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15784

The usage of medicinal herbs in urology


Muangman, V; Ratana-Olarn, K
Thai Abstracts: Science and Technology 14: 25-26 (1989)

Abstract:
Five medicinal herbs were clinically studies out at Department of Surgery, Ramathibodi Hospital with the objective to uncover their effects urological diseases, 130 patients were involved in these studies. Yaa Knot Maew (Orthosiphon stamineus) dried leaves were used as diuretic to elderly patients having difficulty voiding from benign prostatic hypertrophy. Twelve patients in this group benefited from improved sensation of voiding although this contradicted to uroflowmetry. It was used as diuretic, analgesic and stone expulsive agents in patients with ureteric calculi of diameter smaller than 0.5 cm. Twenty-three ureteric stone patients drank Orthosiphon solution and stone expulsion was noted in 40%, and pain alleviation in 20% of the cases. Bai Bau Bok (Centella asiatica) 1% cream having Asiatic acid, Madecassic acid and Asiaticoside as active ingredients, was used as topical cream for infected wounds after surgery for renal, ureteral calculi, cancer of bladder and prostadenoma. Eight of fourteen cases of infected wound showed wound healing within 4 weeks, half of them healed within 2 weeks. Tae Chae Chaw (plantago) leaves were used as diuretic in ureteral stone patients. Two patients passed ureteric stone, one case after 2 months, another after 6 months of treatment. Ma-kham khag (Cassia acutifolia) tablets proved to be an active cathartic with results comparable to those of the milk of magnesia on 28 patients after surgery for benign prostatic hypertrophy with 27 patients serving as control group. Pungpuay Farang (Cantharanthus roseus) having Vinblastine and Vincristine as active substances was used orally as tonic, urinary antiseptic and probably antitumor in 6 patients with carcinoma of bladder stage B to C. All showed less bloody urine and good appetite.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 16797

Development of Acne Gel with Cassia Oil (Cinnamomum cassia)
Kan phattana chle ta sio thi mi suan phasom khong nam man hom rahoei chak opchoeichin.

Charoenkul, N.; Rimkeereel, H.; Chompreedal, P.; Dilokkunanane, U. and Changchenkit, C.
Department of Product Development, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Kasetsart University; Bangkok, Thailand.

The Procedings of 42nd Kasetsart University Annual Conference 2004, Feb 3-6, 2004; Kasetsart University; Bangkok, Thailand. p089_14. (in CD ROM)

Abstract:
This research is aimed at developing of acne gel that use cassia oil as anti-acne agent. Susceptibility testing against two strains of acne-causing bacteria; Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes. showed the MICs of cassia oil were 156 and 625 µg/mi, respectively. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that major constituent of cassia was cinnamaldehyde (C9H8O). Results from consumers age ranged between 15-25 years survey, showed that most of them required acne cosmetic in gel form. The antibacterial test of prototype product with 108 CFU/ml of strain, showed that appropriate formula for acne cosmetic from cassia oil contained 0.5% of oil. Comparison with commercial products showed that efficiency of S. epidermidis against similar to those of the commercial product. The product was gel-cream type has the color with L*, a*, and b*: 39.9, 31.2, and 5.7, respectively, viscosity 8,483.3 cP and pH 5.7. From consumer test with 109 consumers aged between 15-25 years in central location test, 58.9% of consumers accepted this product.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 16616

Inhibitory effect of some medicinal plant extracts on the growth of Ascosphaera apis


Chantawannakul, P.; Puchanichanthranon, T. and Wongsiri, S.
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand. (panuwan@yahoo.com)

The 3rd World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare : 421. (2003)

Abstract:
Ascosphaera apis is a fungal pathogen causing Chalkbrood disease in honey bee larvae. Chalkbrood is most frequent during damp conditions. Infected larvae turn chalky white color, become hard and then turn black. It can be regarded as 'the most widespread infectious disease' in Thailand and this has led to economic loss in apiculture. A. apis strains were isolated on Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) from the dead honey bee larvae, collected from infected hives in Northern Thailand. The fugal strains were identified as A. apis by their morphology in comparison with the A. apis IFO9831. We aim to find an alternative approach by using medicinal plants in combating and controlling the disease. Studies on the effect of crude medicinal plant extracts, therefore, have been carried out. Dried powdered plants (Allium sativum Linn., Eugenia caryophyllum Bullock&Harrison, Piper betle, Curcuma longa Linn., Illicium verum Hook, Cinnamomum cassia, Rhinacanthus nasutus Kurz, Azadirachta siamensis, Acorus calamus Linn., and Stemona tuberose Lour) were extracted in seven different solvents by incubating for 48 hours. The aqueous extracts in suitable solvent of E. caryophyllum Bullock&Harrison, P. betle, I. verum Hook, C. cassia, A. calamus Linn. and S. tuberose Lou gave inhibitory effect when tested with Thai isolates of Ascosphaera apis. Various concentrations (0.25-10%) of the extract of the six chosen plants were experimented. Cinnamomum cassia and Piper betle (1.5-2% (w/v)) gave the best inhibitory effect on the fungal growth. The further analysis of these active compounds was done by using Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC).

Availability :
Chiang Mai University Library




NO. 16658

Effects of sub-acute administration of barakol on liver and kidney function in rats


Thongsaard, W.; Deachapunya, C. and Showpittapomchai, U.
Srinakharinwirot University, Wattana, Thailand. (eatchare@swu.ac.th)

The 3rd World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare : 554. (2003)

Abstract:
Barakol; 3a,4-dihydro-3a,8-dihydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxaphenalene (C13H12O4), extracted from Cassia siamea has been tested in male Wistar rats for the sub-acute toxic effect. Serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) were used as indicators of hepatic injuries and serum creatinine was also measured to indicate primarily the impaired kidney function. In addition, the microscopic examination of livers and kidneys tissues was also performed to determine the abnormal histologically. The rats were given barakol orally at the doses range of 10-100 mg/kg for 30 days. Blood sample was taken on the last day of experiment and measured all parameters on the same day. The results indicate no alterations of these enzymes in the serum when compared to control levels. From histopathological examination, there were no sign of abnormalities found in the liver and kidney tissues. It can be concluded that all doses of barakol used in this study in a period of 30 days did not have any toxic effects on liver and kidney.

Availability :
Chiang Mai University Library




NO. 16655

Cassaia siamea induced hepatitis, a case report of phytomedicine side effect


Wiwanitkit, V.
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University 10330, Thailand. (Viroj.W@Chula.ac.th)

The 3rd World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare : 539. (2003)

Abstract:
Cassia siamea is a widely used herb in Thailand. It has been used as the anxiolytic drug. Here, we reported a case of middle-aged non-alcoholic female patients who presented to the physician with the abnormal elevation transarninase enzyme. She was investigated for the hepatitis profile and review negative serological result. From further history taking, she revealed the use of traditional herb capsule of Cassia siamea for months. She was suggested to stop using this herb. On follow up, her liver function test return normal within 1 month after stop ingestion of the herb.

Availability :
Chiang Mai University Library




NO. 16643

Toxicity of barakol : hepatotoxicity and subacute toxicity


Pumpaisalchai, W.; Siriaunkgul, S.; Taesothikul, T.; Niwatananun, W.; Sanichwankul, K. and Kaewichit, S.
Department of Pharmeceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50200, Thailand. (pumpaisalchai@yahoo.com)

The 3rd World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare : 477. (2003)

Abstract:
Barakol, an active principle of Cassia siamea (Caesalpiniaceae), exhibits an anxiolytic property. This study was undertaken to evaluate the acute hepatotoxicity and subacute toxicity of barakol in rats. The LD50 of barakol after oral administration was 2.33 g/kg. In acute hepatotoxity study, single-oral administration of various doses of barakol, (60, 100 and 200 mg/kg) were given to rats and the animals were sacrified at 24 hours after the administration. Results from liver biopsy revealed no sign of liver damage when compared to those from paracetamol treated positive control group. In subacute toxicity test, barakol at doses of 60, 120 and 240 mg/kg were orally administered daily for period of four weeks. A half of 240 mg/kg group, called a recovery group, was maintained for further 1 week without barakol administration. No mortality was observed in the controlled and barakol-treated animals. Body weight gain of the barakol-treated group significantly (p<0.05) decreased. From histological examination, the barakol-treated group showed only fatty change in liver, but hepatocellular necrosis was not identified. Barakol did not interfere the hematological examination values. From blood chemistry determination, barakol increased (p<0.05) bilirubin in dose-dependent manner and the value return to normal values obtained from those of the controlled group within one week. Barakol in the doses of 60-240 mg/kg also decreased triglyceride and the effect persisted for at least one week in the recovery group. In conclusion, barakol may disrupt liver function, especially lipid metabolism and bilirubin, in dose-dependent manner. These effects were reversible. The data indicated that barakol may be clinically used in short term treatment. In repeated administration, serum bilirubin should be carefully monitored.

Availability :
Chiang Mai University Library




NO. 16659

Immunomodulating activities of extracts and aromatic oils from thai medicinal plants


Manosroi, J.; Dhumtanom, P.; Jansom, C.; Jainonthee, P.and Manosroi, A.
Pharmaceutical-Cosmetic Raw Materials and Natural Products Research and Development Center (PCRNC), Institute for Science and Technology Research and Development, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50202, Thailand. (pmptiOO6@chiangmai.ac.th)

The 3rd World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare : 560. (2003)

Abstract:
Immunomodulating activities of extracts and aromatic oils from Thai medicinal plants were tested for in vitro phagocytosis response of mouse macrophages and proliferation assay of mouse lymphochytes from spleen, born marrow and thymocytes. The plant extracts were Turmeric (Curcuma longa, L.), Betel Vine (Piper betle, L.), Peper (Piper nigrum, L.), Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana, Bertoni.), Pueraria mirifica, Butea superba, Pouteria cambodiana, Clausena excavala, Chili Peper (Capsicum frutescens), Carthaginian Apple (Punica granatum, L.), Cassia Bark (Cinnamomum cassia), Noni (Morinda citrifolia, L.) Gynostemma pentaphyllum, Solanum laciniatum Ait, Stephania venosa and the aromatic oils which were Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum, Linn.), Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum, Linn.) Turrneric (Curcuma longa, L.), Lesser Galanga (Alpinia officinarum), Betel Vine (Piper betel, Linn.), Lemon Grass (Cymbopogon citrates, Stapf), Citronella (Cymbopogon nardus, Rendle), Plai (Zingiber montanum), Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides), Lavender (Lavandula angustifola, P.), Kaffir Lime Leaf (Citrus hystrix, DC) and Blaqk Pepper (Piper nigrum, L.). The results suggested the tendency of in vitro immunomodulating activity of some plant extracts and aromatic oils which can be further developed as active constituents in nutraceutical products.

Availability :
Chiang Mai University Library




NO. 16657

Behavioral effects of long-term treatment of barakol in rats


Deachapunya, C. and Thongsaard, W.
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Wattana, Bangkok 10110, Thailand. (watchare@swu.ac.th)

The 3rd World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare : 553. (2003)

Abstract:
Barakol, an active compound extracted from Cassia siamea, was shown to have anxiolytic effects similar to diazepam when treated acutely. In this study, long-term treatment of barakol on anxioiytic effects and exploratory behaviors were examined in rats using elevated plus maze and holeboard. The effects of barakol were compared with anxiolytic diazepam and fluoxetine. In elevated plus maze model, an oral administration for consecutive 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg for consecutive 30 days produced on significant changes on the percentage of the open/total number of arm, entries and time, total number of arm entries, time spent on the open arms and number of rears/min. In contrast, diazepam (5 mg/kg) significantly increased the percentage of the open/total number of arm entries and time, time spent on the open arms and number of rears/min, and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg), significantly increased only the percentage of the open/total number of arm entries. In holeboard test, all three doses of barakol significantly decreased the number of head-dippings while decreases in the time spent on head- dippings were observed with barakol (10 mg/kg). In addition, barakol (100 mg/kg) significantly reduced the number of rears per min. All parameters tested using holeboard were not affected by diazepam and fluoxetine. These results suggest that long-term treatment of barakol has no anxiolytic effect when tested on an elevated plus maze and appears to decrease the directed exploratory behaviors on a holeboard test.

Availability :
Chiang Mai University Library




NO. 16818

Development of Acne Gel with Cassia Oil (Cinnamomum cassia)
Kan phattana chle ta sio thi mi suan phasom khong nam man hom rahoei chak opchoeichin.

Charoenkul, N; Rimkeereel, H; Chompreedal, P; Dilokkunanane, U; Changchenkit, C
Department of Product Development, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Kasetsart University; Thailand.

The Proceedings of 42nd Kasetsart University Annual Conference 2004. On 3-6 Feb, 2004; Kasetsart University; Bangkok, Thailand. (in CD-ROM)

Abstract:
This research is aimed at developing of acne gel that use cassia oil as anti-acne agent. Susceptibility testing against two strains of acne-causing bacteria; Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes. showed the MICs of cassia oil were 156 and 625 µg/mi, respectively. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that major constituent of cassia was cinnamaldehyde (C9H8O). Results from consumers age ranged between 15-25 years survey, showed that most of them required acne cosmetic in gel form. The antibacterial test of prototype product with 108 CFU/ml of strain, showed that appropriate formula for acne cosmetic from cassia oil contained 0.5% of oil. Comparison with commercial products showed that efficiency of S. epidermidis against similar to those of the commercial product. The product was gel-cream type has the color with L*, a*, and b*: 39.9, 31.2, and 5.7, respectively, viscosity 8,483.3 cP and pH 5.7. From consumer test with 109 consumers aged between 15-25 years in central location test, 58.9% of consumers accepted this product.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 16378

The action of Cassia tora Linn. on renal blood flow


Kolatat, T.; Chulkarat, P.
Thai Abstracts Science and Technology. 6:28(1976)

Abstract:
The action of Cassia tora Linn on renal blood flow was studied in anaesthetized dogs with either renin depletion or high renin storage. The action was compared to that of A.M. P. The results obtained were as follows: the renal blood flow in high renin storage dogs was markedly decreased after the injection of Cassia tora, while that in the renin depletion group was unchanged. It was concluded that Cassia tora Linn. decreases the renal blood flow by the "renin-angiotensin mechanism" , similar to A.M.P.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 73296

Cassia tora
Muong muong

Hospital of National Medicine Thanh Hoa
The Hospital of National Medicine Thanh Hoa

Nhung cay con va khoang vat lam thuoc [Plants, animals and minerals to be used as medicine]; Thanh Hoa, Thanh Hoa Publishing House, 1987; p 171-172

Abstract:
Cassia tora grows wildly in Thanh Hoa. The seeds are harvested in winter, when the fruits are ripe. This plant is used as medicine to treat insomnia, or as tonic to treat kidney malfunction.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78301

Cassia mimosiodes L
Muong tinh nu

Le Tran Duc
Cay thuoc Viet Nam: Trong, hai, che bien va tri benh ban dau [Medicinal plants of Vietnam: planting, harvesting, processing and treating diseases] Agricultural Pub. House. Hanoi, 1999. p. 620-621

Abstract:
Cassia mimosoides grows wildly in waste fields, coast sandy lands. The seeds harvested in winter, dried by sunny and are applied as medicine treating some diseases such as: beriberi, indigestion, urinating retention; The leaves and root are employed to treat a dysentery, constipation and to counter a poison.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78302

Talinum patens wildd
Sam tho cao ly

Le Tran Duc
Cay thuoc Viet Nam: Trong, hai, che bien va tri benh ban dau [Medicinal plants of Vietnam: planting, harvesting, processing and treating diseases] Agricultural Pub. House. Hanoi, 1999. p. 959-961

Abstract:
Cassia patens is propageted by seed in spring. The tuber is harvested after 3 years from propagation. The leaf and flower harvested all the year round can be used as a nutrious vegetable. It tuber can treat a feeble, tired caused by illness, a cough in somnia, a lack of appetite, prickly heats.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78358

Cassia fistula L.
O moi

Le Tran Duc
Cay thuoc Viet Nam: Trong, hai, che bien va tri benh ban dau [Medicinal plants of Vietnam: planting, harvesting, processing and treating diseases] Agricultural Pub. House. Hanoi, 1999. p. 679-681

Abstract:
Cassia fistula grows wildly in South and is cultivated in some places of North. The bark of tree is used for dyes, The wood can be used to make houses or instruments; The bark of tree, root, fruit and seeds are used as medicine treating some diseases. The fruit treat a constipation; The leaf treats a rheumatism, dysentery, indigestion.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78359

Caesalpinia minax Hance
Vuot hum

Le Tran Duc
Cay thuoc Viet Nam: Trong, hai, che bien va tri benh ban dau [Medicinal plants of Vietnam: planting, harvesting, processing and treating diseases] Agricultural Pub. House. Hanoi, 1999. p. 665-666

Abstract:
Cassia minax grows wildly and is cultivated for hedges. It's propagated by seeds or branches in spring. The plant and seed are used as medicine treating a chlora, a malria, a belly-ache, a backache, a dysentery, a constipation.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78390

Cassia alata L.
Muong trau

Le Tran Duc
Cay thuoc Viet Nam: Trong, hai, che bien va tri benh ban dau [Medicinal plants of Vietnam: planting, harvesting, processing and treating diseases] Agricultural Pub. House. Hanoi, 1999. p. 649

Abstract:
Cassia alata grows wildly in Nghe An, Ha Tinh award the South. It can be propagated by branch or seeds in spring, The fruits harvested in October-December, dried by sunny are employed as medicine treating a constipation. The fresh leaves are used to treat scabies, skin-diseases.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78454

Survey on the diseases in the forest nursery
Ket qua buoc dau ve dieu tra thanh phan benh hai tren mot so cay con lam nghiep o giai doan gieo uom

Nguyen Thi Binh
Tap san khoa hoc ky thuat Nong Lam Nghiep [Journal of agricultural sciences and technology] 3: 86-88 (2000).

Abstract:
To contribute in promoting regreening barren land and uncovered upland areas-reforestation clear cutting forest areas and restoration biodiversity of forest nursery technique, sivilculture, afforestation and protection forest are important. Addition to, researching diseases and pathogens of quickly growing plants such as Eucalyptus, Acacias and other economic trees is necessary. Establishing system of prevention and treatment harmful diseases with principle: "itegrated pathogen Management (IPM)" is practical and urgent. During from August 1999 to January 2000 at cuttings and Micro shoots Nusery Station- Tam Ky District, Quang Nam Province, we searched pathogens on three different plants such as Hopea odorata, Acacia hydri and Acacia cassia with result following as: There are six different pathogens on Hopea odorata, but gloeosporium sp is the most serious. Curvularia sp and Meleola commixta are more popular on Acacia hydri; gloeosporium sp, curvularia sp and Rhizoctonia sp. have appeared on Acacia cassia.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 74208

Cassi siamea Lamk.
Cay mong den

Vu Van Can
Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] 5: 14-15 (1991)

Abstract:
In the World, there are about 400 species of Cassi genus they are distributed in the tropical and temperate zones. In Vietnam there are 20 species of this genus, they are used as timber tree, ornamental and medicinal plants. Among them, Cassi siamea can be planted to prevent wind, or as shading plant. Its morphology, growth and development and biological properties are also offered.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 74812

Caesalpiniaceae
Ho vang

Le Kha Ke
Cay co thuong thay o Viet Nam [The popular plants in Vietnam]. vol. 1, p. 168-195. Scientific and Technical Publ. House. Hanoi. 1976. AN illustrations

Abstract:
In Vietnam, this family includes 19 genera and 84 species. Among them, Caesalpinia sappan, Cassia alata are used as medicinal plant; some others are used as ornamental plant (sideway plant) and some others give wood as Erythrophlaeum fordii, the bark of this tree can be use for leather industry; Peltophorum dasyrachis, sindora cochinchinensis. Tamarindus indica can give fruit.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 74897

Cassia tora L.
Muong ngu

Le Tran Duc
Trong hai va dung cay thuoc [Planting, harvesting and using the medicinal plants] vol. 1: (1984)

Abstract:
Cassia tora L. grows wildly in waste land, waysides or planted for medicine. Its seeds are spread in Winter-Spring and harvested in September-October. Its seeds is used to treat headache, sore eyes, high blood pressure, dysentery, hamorrhoids.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 76730

Cinamomum spp.
Cay que

Nguyen Van Lan; Trinh An Vinh
Ky thuat trong mot so cay duoc lieu [Techniques of cultivating medicinal plants], Hanoi, Medicinal Publ. House, 1997; vol. 2, p. 46-64.

Abstract:
Cinamomum spp. are special tropical tree. In Vietnam, it is cultivated widely (in Yen Bai, Quang Ninh, Nghe An, Thanh Hoa, Quang Nam(. The suitable coditions for it are following altitude: 100-300 m, temperature 1 to 32 °C (best suitable temperature 20-26°C) humidity 85-90%; rainfall 2500-3000 mm. The density is 2 x 2 m (2500 trees/ha). The planting time is February-March. The barks is used as medicine and harvested after planting 10 years; the yield can be reach to 15-20 tons/ha. The technique of husbandry, harvest and pr°Cessing medicine is presented here.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 76789

Cinanamomum cassia Blume
Cay que.

Nguyen Xuan Luu; a.o.
So tay ky thuat hat giong va gieo uom mot so loai cay trong rung [Handbook on breeding seeds and propagation of some trees for forest plantation], Hanoi, Agricultural Publ. House, 1995; p. 212-217.

Abstract:
C. cassia distributed in Central and Northern Provinces of Vietnam, where the rainfall is 1500-2000 mm/year. The tree grows well in humid caly soil with pH = 4.5-5.5. The breeding seeds are harvested at the end of December to middle of January from the tree of over 8 years of age. They are stored in humid sands under normal temperature (for 15-20 days); or by PE bag under low temperature (for several months). the treeis propagated on February-March. Before sowing, the breeding seeds are soaked in hot water at 40 °C for 8 hours. The seeds are sown in bags of 9x15 cm size. After 6-7 months the young tree can be planted.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 76799

Cassia siamea Lam.
Muong den

Nguyen Xuan Luu; a.o.
So tay ky thuat hat giong va gieo uom mot so loai cay trong rung [Handbook on breeding seeds and propagation of some trees for forest plantation], Hanoi, Agricultural Publ. House, 1995; p. 127-132.

Abstract:
Cassia siamea can be planted in regions where the rainfall is over 600 mm; the average temperature is 15 °C in coldest month and 26-30 °C in hottest month. The breeding seeds should be collected from 8 year old tree on February-April. This seed is stored in dried condition under normal temperature. Before sowing, the seeds is treated by hot water at 60-70 °C then made cold down for 10-12 hours. After treated, the seeds is covered for 2-3 days for geninating. Germinated seeds is planted in bag of 9x15 cm size. After 3-4 months the young tree will be transplanted when they must be 25-30 cm high.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 76964

Cinnamomum cassia Blume
Cay que

Ngo Quang De; Nguyen Mong Menh
Ky thuat giong cay rung [Breeding technique of forest trees], Hanoi, Agricultural Publ. house. 1986; p. 133-134.

Abstract:
C. cassia distributed in tropical and subtropical areas. In Vietnam, the plant grows in Thanh Hoa, Yen Bai, Quang Nam, Da Nang. It adapts to a humidity of 80% and over, rainfall of 2000 mm. The tree demands a deep, clay, soft and fertile soil. It can be generate by root buds strongly. The breed seeds are harvested in February-March from a strong mother trees of 15-20 year old. There are 3000-3600 seeds per Kg. The germination in humid sands.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 76973

Cassia siamea Lamk.
Cay muong den

Ngo Quang De; Nguyen Mong Menh
Ky thuat giong cay rung [Breeding technique of forest trees], Hanoi, Agricultural Publ. house. 1986; p. 114.

Abstract:
Cassia siamea grows in secondary forest. The tree likes a region having a reinfall of 500-1000 mm, altitude of lower 1200 m, humid sandy soil. The breed seeds are harvested in November-December. There are 30,000-35,000 seeds per kg.The seeds can be kept a germinating capacity 2-3 years.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 76975

Cassia fistula L.
Cay muong hoa vang

Ngo Quang De; Nguyen Mong Menh
Ky thuat giong cay rung [Breeding technique of forest trees], Hanoi, Agricultural Publ. house. 1986; p. 112-113.

Abstract:
Cassia fistula grows in half drought forest, mixed with Terminalia corticosa and other plants.The tree grows in regions with a rainfall of 500-3000 mm, temperature of 38-39 °C, at 1200-1300 m alt. It can grow and develop in different soils including poor and fertile soils. There are 5,700-10,000 seeds/kg; The geminating capacity can be keeped during 2-3 years.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam