Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott
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NO. 37447

Collection, characterization, evaluation and conservation of taro germplasm in the Philippines


Pardales, JR; Cerna, AF; Dalion, SS
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12 (1): 45 (1987)

Abstract:
Collection of taro (Colocasia esculenta) germplasm at Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center (PRCRTC) started in 1976. The collected materials are kept as living collection and subjected to a series of characterization and evaluation using an IPBGR guide. The germplasm accessions have been classified into seven major groups, each group with each own distinctive feature. Irrespective of groups, however, 240 distinct accessions are contained in the PRCRTC taro germplasm nursery. This number includes foreign introductions from Hawaii and the Solomon Islands.

Availability :
Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 401 - 02, 3091 453; (63) (74) 4222 281
Email: bsu@burgos.slu.edu.ph




NO. 1450

Variation of some cultivated and wild talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) in crude protein contents and electrophoretic pattern


Danimihardja, S; Sastrapradja, S
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Annales Bogorienses 6 (4): 177-186 (1978)

Abstract:
Variation in 13 samples of cultivars and 7 of wild varieties of taro (Colocasia esculenta), were detected in the crude protein contents of the tubers and the leaves and in the electrophoretic patterns of the protein of the fresh tubers. Two samples of Colocasia gigantea were also studied for comparison. The crude protein contents of the leaves in all samples were higher than those of the tubers. The percentages in the leaves ranged from 3.85 - 7.97%, and in the tubers from 0.42 - 3.55%. Among the leaf samples there was no significant difference in protein content between cultivated and wild varieties. Among the tuber samples, however, the difference was prominent, i.e. higher than 1% in most cultivars and lower than 1% in most wild varieties. Cultivar 'ketan' had the highest protein content in its leaves (6.99%), and cultivar 'bentul BM II' in its tubers (3.55%). Cultivar 'pandan' had the lowest percentages for both the leaf and tuber samples. With a few exceptions, the scattered diagram of the crude protein contents of the leaf and the tuber samples showed a separation between wild and cultivated varieties into groups. Furthermore within the cultivars themselves there was a regrouping between samples from West Java (Bogor and Sumedang) and those collected from East Java (Malang). The electrophoretic diagram showed that at least there was one band characteristic for each sample in all samples. These characteristic band differed in Rf value, ranging from 0.20 to 0.50. The data resulted from both observations supported each other in giving information of the relationships between and within cultivated and wild varieties of 'talas'.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 14647

Natural attractants in Colocasia esculenta blossoms for the oriental fruit fly (Dacus dorsalis Hendel.)
San thammachat chak dok bon thi dungdut malaengwan-thong

Sinchaisri, P; Areekul, S; Thongton, N
Agricultural Chemistry Division; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand

Kan prachum thang wichakan khong maha witthayalai Kasetsart khrang thi 26 [The 26th Kasetsart Annual Conference]; 3-5 February 1988; kamnot kan sanoe phon-ngan lae botkhatyo; Kasetsart University; Bangkok; p77

Abstract:
A study on potential attractants in Colocasia. esculenta blossoms for the oriental fruit fly was undertaken in the Department of Agriculture, Bangkok in 1985. Fresh flowers in full bloom and full fragrance were collected in the morning during the period of June to August to test their attractancy with the flies using an Olfactometer. The results showed that the blossoms were highly attractive to the flies. The attractant was demonstrated to be located in spadices and bracts. In order to establish the identity of the active compounds, the flowers were extracted, separated, fractionated and purified by silica gel column chromatography eluted by hexane/ether; chemical analysis was undertaken by the GLC & GC-MS methods and the crude extract was tested with the flies again. Methyl eugenol, eugenol, methyl ester of fatty acid and high molecular weight alcohol were found in the active fractions of the attractants.

Availability :
Central Library; Kasetsart University; 50 Phahon Yothin Road; Chatuchak; Bangkok 10903; Thailand; phone: (66) (2) 942 8616, 579 0113 ext. 1481; fax: (66) (2) 561 1369




NO. 37131

Identification of the natural enemies of important taro insect pest and their potential for biological control


Esguerra, NM
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1985; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Project No. 0900-80-00-31; p 61

Abstract:
Field and laboratory studies on the life history, behavior, feeding habits, natural enemies, and seasonal abundance of four insect pests of gabi were conducted at the Visayas State College of Agriculture (VISCA) from September 1981 to December 1984. The insect pests were: taro planthopper (Tarophagus proserpina), taro grasshopper (Gesonula mundata zonocera), taro hornworm (Hippotion cebrio), and melon aphid (Aphis gossypii). The natural enemies that attacked insect pests include: Cyrtorhinus sp. (two-egg nymphal predators attacking taro planthopper), Scelio sp. (two-egg parasites attacking taro grasshopper) and Trichogramma sp. (hymenopterous egg parasites attacking taro hornworm). Four predators, namely, coccinellid beetle, neuropteron, syrphid fly and red bug were found attacking melon aphids. All insect pests studied, except hornworm, were more abundant in dry months than in wet months of the year.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 20029

Yield and growth responses of leguminous and root crops grown on acid peat to magnesium lime


Chew, WY
Division of Agriculture; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

The Malaysian Agricultural Journal 48 (2): 142-158 (1971)

Abstract:
A number of experiments to investigate the response of two leguminous crops (groundnut and soybean) and three root crops (sweet potato, tapioca and colocasia) to magnesium lime on acid peat during 1968-71 were described. Addition of magnesium lime increased the peat reaction linearly at the rate of 0.15 pH unit per ton of lime up to 6 tons per acre. Beyond this level the rate of pH increase declined progressively to 0.01 pH unit per ton of lime per acre at 22 tons. Peat pH fluctuated with time but was maintained for at least 3 1/2 years after liming. All the crops tested, with the exception of tapioca, showed positive yield responses to added lime. Groundnut and soyabean needed up to 4 tons of Mg lime per acre. Sweet potato and colocasia were more tolerant of acidity, requiring only 2-4 tons. Tapioca could tolerate an acid peat without liming and give resonably high yields.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM); Jalan FRIM; Kepong; Karung Berkunci 201; 52109 Kuala Lumpur; Selangor; Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 20405

Genetic resources of root and tuber crops in Malaysia


Farah D. Ghani
Department of Botany; National University of Malaysia; Bangi; Selangor; Malaysia

Genetic resources of under-utilised plants in Malaysia; Proceedings of the National Workshop on Plant Genetic Resources, Subang Jaya, Malaysia, 23 November 1988; Zakri, AH (ed); Kuala Lumpur, Malaysian National Committee on Plant Genetic Resources, 1989; p 91-111

Abstract:
Underexploitation of available root crop genetic resources has confined the food industry to the use of tapioca starch. It is now recognised that there is a great need for germplasm exploitation and evaluation in order to maximise utilisation of the root crops in Malaysia. Cassava, sweet potato, taro and yams constitute the major root crops. These have been cultivated and both corms, roots and leaves have been widely consumed. The minor root crops include Amorphophallus companulatus, Alocasia macrorrhiza, Xanthosoma saggitifolium, Canna edulis, Coleus tuberosus and Maranta arundinacea. These are native or introduced and have remained under-exploited. Cultivation is limited to a few plants in the back garden plots. Germplasm collection of all the major root crops had been undertaken. Apart from cassava, sweet potato, taro and yam were presently being characterized and evaluated. There were, however, no germplasm collections of the minor root crops.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Jalan FRIM, Kepong Karung Berkunci 201, 52109 Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my
prosea@indo.net.id|info@proseanet.org




NO. 23884

Review of weed research, field crops Part 1. Root crops: cassava, cocoyam, groundnut and sweet potato


Lee, SA; Lo, NP
Fruits Research Division; Klang; Selangor; Malaysia

Teknologi Pelbagai Tanaman [Miscellaneous Crops Technology] 3: 53-62 (1987)

Abstract:
Past research on weed management in cassava, cocoyam, groundnut and sweet potato plantings was reviewed. Weeds reduced the yields of cassava and groundnut by 29% and 56%, respectively. The common weeds of the four crops were Ageratum conyzoides, Borreria latifolia, Asystasia intrusa, Digitaria ciliaris and Imperata cylindrica. Handpulling and manual weeding were practised by smallholders but herbicide usage was now gaining popularity. Paraquat was the most widely used herbicide and it controlled many annual weeds. Glyphosate was used against tough grasses. Soil residual herbicides, though minimally used, provided adequate control for 12 weeks; fluometuron was used for cassava; alachlor and oxyfluorfen for groundnut; and metolachlor for sweet potatoes.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Jalan FRIM, Kepong Karung Berkunci 201, 52109 Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 24966

Characterization of starches from selected cultivars of taro and sweet potatoes


Mohd. Nasir, A; Mohd. Said, S; Farah, G
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor; Malaysia

UPM Research Report 1993

Abstract:
Sweet potatoes represent one of the under-utilized starch resources in Malaysia. Their usage has been confined mainly to fresh consumption. This project aims to study the characteristics of sweet potatoes in more detail for industrial application and for the production of value added products. Studies on the characteristics of over 12 cultivars of sweet potatoes have successfully identified 6 different cultivars suitable for industrial use. Studies on these cultivars showed a wide range of characteristics. Analysis carried out included physical dimensions, colour of skin and flesh, starch characteristics such as amylose : amylopectin ratios, swelling and solubility of starches, gelatinizing and pasting characteristics, freeze thaw stability, viscosity, Brix value, and susceptibility to browning. Studies on the production of sweet potato crisps showed that cultivar 1990-10 was suitable, with high starch content, low Brix and low browning problem. Sweet potato cultivars selected have shown great potential for industrial use. Present studies are emphasizing the use of the refined sweet potato starch as a raw material for bioconversion into glucose and maltodextrin. Research on the industrial suitability of sweet potato varieties has caught the interest of Golden Hope. Presently, researchers are planting the selected sweet potato cultivars on a large scale in one of the company's research plots in Banting. The first harvest was carried out in November 1992, producing very good quality and high yielding sweet potatoes. Yields of 30-40 t/ha were achieved. With the increase in raw material supply, studies on the characteristics of sweet potato starch could be carried out more effectively.

Availability :
Universiti Putra Malaysia [Agricultural University of Malaysia]; 43400 UPM Serdang; Selangor; Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 894 86101: fax: 60) (3) 894 32514




NO. 37503

Market demand of taro in Baguio City and San Fernando, La Union


Sim, JM; Gayao, BT
Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a Series of Working Papers; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1989; Book 2; p 112-123

Abstract:
The demand of food service establishments includes hospitals at 92,107 kg/year, and household consumers at 3,097 t corms, 2,985,418 bundles of stalks used as food and 3,864,489 bundles of stalks used as animal feed. Of the 85% consumers of taro, 62% were from Baguio City and 38% from San Fernando.

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 37504

Assessment of postproduction practices and problems in highland taro and yam


Bayogan, EV; Quindara, HL
Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a Series of Working Papers; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1989; Book 2; p 124-139

Abstract:
The post production utilization and problem of 81 yam and taro farmers were assessed. Taro and yam are important cash in Sablan and Tuba, Benguet. Factors considered in harvesting are price and maturity. Harvesting tools traditionally used are "suwal" trowel and crowbar. The "kayabang" and "batulang" are common field containers. Sorting and washing is usually done in taro but not in yam. Yam and Taro are packed in thick-laced baskets and sacks, respectively. Majority of farmers store table yam in the ground for varying periods of 2 to 6 months. Yam setts are stored in field clamps (58%) and inside the house/ basement (34%). Taro cormels are similarly stored in the field (pit, field clamp, in the ground) and inside the house (45%).

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 37138

Gabi-based cropping system studies


Guintu, RS; Libunao, WH
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Central Luzon State University (CLSU); 1985; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 15 p

Abstract:
The performance of gabi with rice intercrop was studied under three systems of planting (single row, double row and triple row) and rate of fertilizer application (unfertilized, 65, 75, 85 and 95 kg NPK/ha). Rice seedlings (25 to 27 days old) were transplanted a day after planting gabi. Yield of gabi was better in triple row system (25.93 t/ha) than the single row (11.24 t/ha) and double row (17.91 t/ha) systems. Under triple row system, gabi produced bigger corms (12.43 cm long and 5.3 cm in diameter) and taller plants (177.24 cm). Rice plants in single row were taller (95.97 cm) and had higher yield (2.97 t/ha) than those in triple rows of gabi (1.96 t/ha). Gabi and rice were taller and gave better yields at 95 kg NPK/ha. Gabi produced 19.56 t/ha while rice produced 2.43 t/ha.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37502

Results of the regional evaluation trials on taro


Gonzales, IC; Balog-as, FS; Ganga, ZN
Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a Series of Working Papers; Northern Philippine Rootcrops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1989; Book 2; p 103-107;

Abstract:
Among the four trials, PRG-068 (kalpao) and BG-01 (Itchina) gave the highest mean yields at 6.38 and 5.51 t/ha, respectively. In the 1987-1989 trials, CG-5 and CG-4 yielded the highest with means at 6.82 and 5.99 t/ha, respectively. Both had high dry matter contents (DMC) of 35.83 and 30.99%. BG-01 (Itchina) had a higher DMC compared with PRG-068. Generally, however, these four high yielding entries were noted to have moderate to high DMC, ranging from 24.83 to 35.83%.

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 36729

Productivity of selected upland gabi cultivars intercropped with corn, peanut and sweet potato


Pascual, AC
MS thesis; Muñoz; Nueva Ecija; Crop Science Department; Central Luzon State University; 1985; 69 p

Abstract:
The experiment was conducted to determine the influence of different intercrops on the productivity of selected upland 'gabi' (Colocasia esculenta) cultivars. 'Gabi' grown in monoculture had significantly higher number of marketable cormels with similarly greater length and diameter, greater leaf area index (LAI) and dry weight but with slightly shorter petioles compared to those grown with sweet corn. Highly significant interaction was noted between variety and intercropping pattern particularly on the weight of harvested cormels. Results further indicated that when peanut was used as intercrop to Dasheen and Tininta cultivars, the plants tended to produce shorter petioles due to shading effects offered by the intercrop which grew close to the height of the cultivars mentioned. The weight of harvested cormels and LAI of San Fernando cultivar was significantly affected by sweet potato. This was probably due to its late bulking characteristics which commenced at almost the same time with the intercrop, resulting in a strong competition for soil moisture and nutrients. When sweet corn and peanut were grown together between rows of 'gabi' cultivars, all the crops involved in the combination gave a significantly lower yield suggesting a severe interplant competition for all factors affecting growth and development. In relation to monoculture, the Land Equivalent Ratio (LER) and yield efficiency of various intercropping schemes were significantly higher in corn + 'gabi' combination. However, none of the intercropping patterns had LER above 1, suggesting a net negative effect. Generally, considering the net profit obtained from each intercropping scheme, corn + 'gabi' combination gave the highest net returns among all the intercropping combinations used.

Availability :
Scientific Literature Services (SLS); Research, Extension and Training (RET); Central Luzon State University (CLSU); Munoz; Nueva Ecija; 3120 Philippines; phone: (63) (44) 4560 609; fax: (63) (44) 4560 609
Email: hlangeles@mozcom.com




NO. 37132

Cultural management of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk), cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and gabi (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) under various multiple cropping shemes utilizing legumes as source of nitrogen.


Escalada, RG; Quirol, BF; Escasinas, AB
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1983; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 211 p

Abstract:
The project was composed of two studies. Study 1 evaluated and selected promising legumes that could be used as intercrops with sweet potato, cassava and gabi for optimum productivity per unit area, and ascertained the effects of Rhizobium inoculation on the legume intercrops and on the associated root crops. Study 2, on the other hand, investigated the feasibility of crop rotating sweet potato, cassava and gabi with legumes to enable the crops to utilize the limited amount of fertilizers available in a complementary manner.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37072

Studies on a virus-like mosaic disease of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)


Palomar, MK
Baybay; Leyte; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); Philippines

Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1982; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 53 p

Abstract:
Surveys on symptoms and diseases incidence of taro feathery mosaic (TFM) in two taro-growing areas of Eastern and Central Visayas were conducted. Plants infected with TFM produced symptoms of feathery mosaic with or without mottling of leaves and characterized by slight green streak and/or irregular spots along or in between leaf veins. Symptoms of infection may disappear and then reappear on young leaves. Using the Kalpao variety of taro, mechanical inoculation showed 70% infection after 12.4 days of incubation while insect inoculation gave 63% infection after 15.2 days. Insect transmission studies revealed that both adults and nymphs of Tarophagus proserpina (taro planthopper) were efficient transmitters of TFM. Both the minimum acquisition feeding period and minimum infection feeding period were about five minutes.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37130

On-farm studies on spatial arrangement of taro and succession of legume intercrops


Sanchez, OA; Agarcio, B; Sarong, LQ
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; On-Farm Studies on Spatial Arrangement of Rootcrops and Succession of Legume Intercrops; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1986; Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center (PRCRTC) Project No. 085; Study 2; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); p 24-36

Abstract:
Taro cv. Kalpao was intercropped with mungbean, soybean and peanut in different successions and spatial arrangements (Sa 1-single row of taro spaced at 1 m with one row intercrop; Sa 2-double rows of taro spaced at 0.75 m and 1.5 m interval spacing with two rows of intercrops; Sa 3-triple rows of taro spaced at 0.75 m and 1.5 m interval row spacing with two rows of intercrops; and Sa 4-triple rows of taro spaced at 0.75 m and 2.0 m interval row spacing with three rows of intercrops). Taro plants produced higher corm yield at spatial arrangement with wider row interval which accomodated greater number of plants per unit area. The Sa 1 and Sa 4 treatments resulted in lower corm yields. Yields of peanut (first and successive intercroppings) and soybean (successive intercropping) were higher at Sa 4 where more space was provided for the intercrops. Mungbean gave higher yield at Sa 2 than at other spatial arrangements. The different spatial arrangements allowed succession planting of legume intercrop. Yields of succession planting, however, were very much reduced due to shading. Despite reductions in yield, planting of intercrop twice on taro provided additional income compared to that of Sa 1. Highest net income of P11,427.84/ha was obtained from Sa 4, followed by Sa 1 (P9,255.57/ha) with legume intercrop succession of peanut-soybean. Among the spatial arrangements, Sa 4 had the highest average net income of P8,841.75/ha, followed by Sa 1 (P7,877.16/ha) and Sa 2 (P7,458.49/ha). Sa 3 gave only P4,863.14/ha while the monoculture had P2,039.68/ha net income.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37541

Utilization by sweet potato and taro of residual fertility from soil previously grown with cash crops


Marquez, WL; Torres, HB; Gonzales, IC
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a Series of Working Papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p 92-97

Abstract:
Sweet potato planted after beans yielded higher fresh herbage and marketable roots of 15.8 t/ha. Taro planted after carrot significantly yielded the highest corm and stalk with a corm yield of 9.8 t/ha, while taro planted after white potato gave corm yield of 7.6 t/ha. The lowest corm and stalk yield was observed from taro planted after garden pea and cabbage.

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 37133

Intercropping sweet potato, cassava and gabi with legumes as a cultural management system


Escalada, RG; Quirol, BF; Escasinas, AB
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1983; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); p 1-85

Abstract:
Sweet potato (BNAS-51), cassava (Golden Yellow) and gabi (Kalpao) were alternately planted with mungbean (MG 50-10A), bushbean (Los Baños Bush Sitao) and soybean (TK-5) to evaluate and select promising legumes that could be used as intercrops with the root crops for optimum productivity per unit area. Inoculation of the legume intercrops with Rhizobium was done to determine its effect on the legume and on the associated root crops. Intercropping sweet potato and cassava with legumes reduced the yield of the root crops by as much as 17.78% and 20.58%. Gabi however, was not affected by the intercrops. The detrimental effect of competition by legume intercrops on sweet potato was effectively minimized by the inoculation of the intercrops with Rhizobium. However, cassava and gabi did not respond to this treatment, although the inoculation increased the yield of their legume intercrops. Bushbean was observed to be the best intercrop for the three root crops studied due to its lesser detrimental effects on the main crops and its greater productivity and economic return. The yield of the legume intercrops increased the profitability of the root crop farms. The reduced yield of root crops upon intercropping was more than compensated by the returns from the legumes. Thus, legume intercropping with root crops was found to be beneficial.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37134

Crops rotation of sweet potato, cassava and gabi with legumes as a cultural management system


Escalada, RG; Quirol, BF; Escasinas, AB
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1983; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); p 86-211

Abstract:
Sweet potato, cassava and gabi were planted in succession with mungbean, bushbean, soybean and peanut to evaluate, test and select promising legumes that will be used in crop rotation with the root crops and to develop an effective cropping system utilizing promising legumes with the root crops for optimum productivity per unit time. The effectiveness of legumes in supplementing the application of inorganic fertilizer to root crops was investigated. Yield of the root crops was found to decrease in subsequent croppings due to continuous planting despite rotation with leguminous crops. Only sweet potato responded positively to the rotation planting of legumes particularly mungbean, as exhibited by the increased root yield. Only plants rotated with mungbean showed a significant increase in yield over the control. Upon application of fertilizer at the rate of 0-60-60, gabi produced an average optimum corm yield of 4.98 t/ha. Thus, even without nitrogen but with phosphorus and potassium, gabi still produced a yield comparable to those applied with complete fertilizer at higher rates when rotated with legumes. Sweet potato and cassava yields on the other hand, were not affected by fertilizer application. Cost and return analysis showed that peanuts gave the highest combined net return regardless of the root crops used. Application of fertilizer did not prove economical due to the high cost of fertilizer materials. Therefore, rotation planting of root crops with legumes without the use of inorganic fertilizer might be employed to obtain reasonable yields.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37135

Spacing and fertilizer study on root crops in Leyte


Nombre, W
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Department of Agriculture (DA); RES; ? year; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 15 p

Abstract:
The yield performance of Kabiti sweet potato, Golden Yellow cassava and Kalpao gabi was evaluated using four spacing (100 cm x 25 cm; 100 cm x 50 cm; 100 cm x 75 cm; 100 cm x 100 cm) and fertilizer treatments (180 - 120 - 120; 135 - 90 - 90; 90 - 60 - 60; no application). The highest yields were obtained from treatment combinations 100 cm x 25 cm with 90 - 60 - 60 kg NPK/ha (14.93 t/ha) for sweet potato; 100 cm x 75 cm with 90 - 60 - 60 kg NPK/ha for cassava (31.37 t/ha) and 100 cm x 25 cm with 135 - 90 - 90 kg NPK/ha for gabi (10.52 t/ha). The control treatment in all root crops tested consistently gave the lowest yield.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37141

Multiple cropping in Silang, Cavite


Grecia, DH
Greenfields 10 (12): 13-16 (1980)

Abstract:
The article presented in detail the multiple cropping system adopted by Mr. Juan Baon, a farmer in Silang, Cavite. Baon intercropped pineapple with papaya, coffee, banana, and gabi. Baon's farming system, as discussed in the article, was common to Silang farmers. Other crops planted were coconut and black pepper. Also presented was an estimated breakdown of input and output of multiple cropping per hectare for the first two years in Cavite (for 1980), and an estimated average input and output on multiple cropping in Cavite based on Cropping Pattern II in 1979-1980. Total gross income and net income estimated from the first two years of multiple cropping were 48,260 and 25,547 pesos, respectively.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37137

Agronomic approaches to root crop-legume cropping system and their economic consideration


Evangelio, LA; Posas, MB
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1982; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 32 p

Abstract:
The study was conducted to evaluate the best timing of planting root crops and legume in an intercropping system, and to determine the economics of root crop-legume cropping system. Results revealed that the best timing of planting root crops and legume in an intercropping sytem was planting root crops simultaneously with legume intercrop. Marketable tuber yields of sweet potato and gabi plants were significantly higher when grown simultaneously with mungbean intercrop. Cassava, on the other hand, performed better when grown alone than when it was intercropped with mungbean. Similarly, mungbean intercrop produced the highest yield when simultaneously grown with root crops. Based on the income analysis, root crops and mungbean planted simultaneously gave the highest net profit which was 53% higher than the yield of root crops under monoculture stands and the rest of the root crop-legume intercropping schemes under the two experiments.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37139

Effects of ipil-ipil as organic fertilizer on root crops


Escalada, RG; Posas, MB; Javier, RR; Abit, S
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1986; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 147 p

Abstract:
Studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of ipil-ipil herbage as organic fertilizer on the growth and yield of cassava, sweet potato, taro and yam, its effect on some physical and chemical properties of the soil, and whether ipil-ipil can substitute or supplement inorganic fertilizer on root crops. The use of ipil-ipil herbage resulted in higher marketable and total root yield of cassava, taro and yam. However, ipil-ipil fertilization, singly or in combination with inorganic fertilizer reduced the number and weight of marketable roots compared with the control plants. The application of ipil-ipil leaves with inorganic fertilizer under sweet potato cropping, increased the soil organic matter and available P and K. In other root crops, ipil-ipil fertilization augmented the fertility status of the soil. The use of ipil-ipil leaves as substitute or supplement to inorganic fertilizer on root crops was found feasible.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37140

Effects of application of ipil-ipil herbage on taro (Colocasia esculenta)


Abit, S; Escalada, RG
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1976; Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD), Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Project No. 0998-81-00.12 (151); p 79-118

Abstract:
Four successive croppings with the following fertilizer treatments were undertaken: F-0 = (control); F-1 = 60-90-90 kg NPK, K?O/ha; F-2 = 90-90-90 kg NPK/ha; F-3 = 7.23 t/ha ipil-ipil +78 kg P?O? + 42 kg K?O/ha and F-4 = 10.84 t/ha ipil-ipil + 72 kg P?O? + 17.4 kg K?O/ha. These were applied during the first and third plantings only. The second and fourth croppings served as residual croppings. Two treatments: F-5 = 7.23 t/ha ipil-ipil alone and F-6 = 10.84 t/ha ipil-ipil alone, were added during the third and succeeding crops. Treatment F-4 stimulated vigorous growth of taro particularly during the first cropping as manifested by significantly taller plants at harvest, larger leaf area indices, and higher herbage yield. In the third cropping, a similar response of the crop under F-3 and F-4 were noted. In most cases, F-2 significantly influenced the yield and yield components of taro which was essentially the same as that of F-3. Treatment F-4, in the first cropping resulted in appreciably heavier marketable corms (15.18 t/ha) and heavier total corm yield (16.39 t/ha) than the rest of the treatments. Application of F-5, although not included in the statistical analysis, resulted in the production of higher herbage yield than the rest of the treatments. Similarly, F-5 and F-6 produced marketable corms and total corm yield comparable to or even higher than F-3 and F-4. Despite the high cost of production incurred in organic fertilization,higher net returns were obtained due to considerable yield of the crop. No significant differences were observed among the growth and yield component parameters in the residual croppings (2nd and 4th).

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 38274

The influence of fertilization and rice intercropping on the growth and yield of lowland Gabi


Cotejo Jr, FR; Forio, AF
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5 (2): 89 (1980)

Abstract:
A split experiment with gabi (taro) monoculture vs. intercropped with rice as main plots and fertilized vs. not fertilized as sub-plots was conducted on Umingan clay loam soil. Results showed the beneficial effects of fertilization especially on gabi intercropped with rice. Under no fertilization, gabi plants were completely swamped over by rice such that they were able to grow only after rice was harvested. Use of fertilizers, however, allowed gabi intercropped with rice to grow and produce good yields. In general, intercropping with rice affected adversely the growth and yield of lowland gabi. Economic analysis, however, showed greater monetary returns from intercropping with rice, especially when fertilizers were used.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of Philippines at Los Baños (UPLB); College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 37553

Assesment of quality losses in taro at harvest


Bayogan, EV; Quindara, HL
Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1989; 2: 108 - 111

Abstract:
An average of 82% sound corms was obtained from their harvest assessments in taro. The remaining 18% were either insect damaged, mechanically damaged, diseased or with a combination of defects. The degree of quality loss was either slight, moderate or excessive. Insect damaged surface was the most common cause of corm rejects in the three assessments.

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 37728

Yield of taro as affected by different sizes of sets


Gonzales, IC; Tianza, GA; Contada, Rc; Luis, JS
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Resarch results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; Mountain State Agricultural College; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1991-1992; vol. 2; 6 p

Abstract:
Different sizes of 'Itchina' corms prepared for planting were evaluated to determine the best size. The treatment were: big mother suckers with cut corms (150-270 g), medium mother suckers with uncut cormels (30-59 g), and small suckers with uncut cormels (10-29 g). Results showed that while small suckers with uncut cormel gave significantly lower corm and cormel yields resulting to a lower returns on investment (ROI), the use of small suckers with uncut cormels should be encouraged. It produced dumbbell-shaped corm which are most preferred by consumers. In addition, the ROI is high enough to be considered profitable. On the other hand, medium suckers with uncut cormels produced the same corm and cormel yields and ROI as those of the mother sucker with cut corms should be discouraged because of the inferior shape of the produce due to the retained portion of the mother corms that affects the market price.

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 37729

Response of taro cormels to spacing, planting depth, mulching and cormel size


Gonzales, IC; Torres, HB; Butangen, ET; Dalang, PA; Macario, VA; Kiswa, VA; Balaki, ET; Luis, JS
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; Mountain State Agricultural College; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1991-1992; vol. 2; 176 p

Abstract:
The use of big cormels (30-39 g) or planting material resulted to higher yield in terms of corm and cormel production. Big cormels have more reserved food for growth and development. An analysis on the return of investment (ROI) showed that the bigger the planting material, the higher the return of investment (58%). Spacing in taro did not significantly affect yield. However, clover spacing consistently had higher yields. Wider spacing at 50 cm gave moderate yield and low levels of disease and insect damage in corms. Planting at an inch deep had high yield, although difference among treatments were not significant. Percentage of sound corms was high in cormels planted 1-2 inches deep. Percentage decay was similarly low. In terms of reduction in corm decay, planting at 1-inch deep appeared to be beneficial. Furthermore, higher yield with return benefits were realized when mulching was made at 6-9 inches thick. Thicker mulching significantly minimized insect damage.

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 37902

Interplanting of selected agricultural crops with major forest tree species in Benguet


Costales, AB; Costales, EF
DENR-CAR Technical Bulletin 1 (2): 1-12 (1989)

Abstract:
Interplanting selected agricultural crops with 3 major forest species in the Binga Watershed at Itogon, Benguet was conducted. The agro-forest crops tested were 'gabi'/taro (Colocasia esculenta), ginger (Zingiber officinale), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), 'Baguio' beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), and Chinese pechay (Brassica campestris), white Benguet pine (Pinus kesiya), Alnus (Alnus japonica) and Murrary Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) represented the forest tree/reforestation species.

Availability :
ERDS-DENR-CAR; Loakan Road; Baguio City; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4472 541; fax: (63) (74) 4472 806
Email: erds-car@moscom.com




NO. 37733

Postproduction, consumption and utilization of indigenous cocoyams in the Northern Philippines


Salda, VB
Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; Mountain State Agricultural College; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1991-1992; vol. 2; 8 p

Abstract:
'Galiang' (Xanthosoma sagittifolium), 'pitik' (Colocasia spp.) and 'rabok' (Dasheen type) are among the cocoyams cultivated in Northern Philippines. The information was gathered through a survey conducted in the province of Benguet and its contigious areas. Productions as usually done in small patches of land, in homegardens, in fields after rice or sweet potato, or in 'kaingin' areas either monocropped or mixed with other crops. In warmer areas, 'galiang', 'pitik' and 'rabok' cormels are important mainly as cash crops and food while others used them as initial feed, especially in cooler areas due to swine acidity. The problem of acidity could be attributed to limited cooking techniques that may lessen acidity. These are sometimes used as supplemental food when staple is limiting. Each of these crops has its own particular characteristic that influence their consumption and utilization. To determine their potentials, there is a need to explore the farming practices employed such as cultural management, postharvest handling, processing and food product development.

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 38027

Village level method of preparing and utilizing gabi and yautia flavor


Alo-o, MP
ME thesis; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1985; xii p 760 p

Abstract:
This study was primarily conducted to utilize gabi (taro) and yautia (new cocoyam) corm flour into three (3) different snack recipes. Specifically, the study aimed: 1) to compare gabi and yautia corm flour in terms of texture, colour and flavour; 2) to utilize gabi and yautia corm plant in preparing three kinds of snack recipes; and 3) to determine some of the nutrient contents of gabi and yautia corm flour. A testing panel composed of 15 home technology graduate professionals and 15 plain housewives from La Trinidad, Benguet served as respondents. Results revealed that colour and odour of yautia flour differed very significantly. However, there was no significant difference between texture of the two flour varieties. Almost all the panel members preferred yautia flour because it was whiter than gabi flour. Considering colours and flavour, yautia flour is recommended for use in the household because of its similarity to wheat flour.

Availability :
Graduate School Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 401 - 12, 3091 453; fax: (63) (74) 4222 281
Email: bsu@burgos.slu.edu.ph




NO. 38028

Root crop-based snacks: their effect on the nutritional level of Sablan Central pupils


Reboldela, RA
ME thesis; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1990; xi p; 87 p

Abstract:
This study was intended to determine the initial nutritional status of pupil respondents, the calorie and nutrient contents of snack items prepared from selected root-crops, the calorie and nutrient contributions of the snack items compared to the pupils daily Recommended Dietary Allowances, the effect of the food nutrients of these root-crop snacks on nutritional status based on pupils' weight and height, and the relationship between dietary intake and nutritional status. Pupils from primary level composed of 50 males and 70 females whose ages ranged from 7 to 10 years served as respondents. They were divided into three: one group was not fed with root-crops, another group was individually fed with 100 g of unenriched root-crops, and the other group was individually fed with 100 g of enriched root-crops. Feeding was made daily and lasted for three months. It was concluded that respondents fed with root-crops for three months were better in nutritional status than those not fed with root-crops. Root crops are good food supplement, especially when they are enriched.

Availability :
Graduate School Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 401 - 12, 3091 453; fax: (63) (74) 4222 281
Email: bsu@burgos.slu.edu.ph




NO. 38366

Storage of taro corms in wooden boxes containing various packing media


Quevedo, MA; Ramos, AD
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 16 (3): 121-125 (1991)

Abstract:
Storage of taro corms in boxes with different moist packing media was undertaken. Incidence and severity of decay and weight loss were significantly low in taro corms stored in box storage with moist media than those in unpacked corms/without packing medium. The corms could be stored for as long as 3 months without affecting the eating quality. Dry matter, starch and sugar contents and sensory quality attributes of stored taro corms were not significantly affected by packing media. A slight decrease in dry matter and starch contents was observed with time of storage. The sensory quality attributes of the cooked-stored and newly harvested corms were comparable.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of the Philippines Los Baños, College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 38042

Evaluation of various storage methods for taro (Colocasia esculenta) cormels


Sannadan, IJ
MSc. thesis; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1990; 120 p

Abstract:
Farmers usually planted their taro crops from the month of February to May. Harvesting was carried out over an indefinite time. Harvest losses were due to decay, mechanical damage, insect damage, and marble size cormels. Final sorting of the cormels was done under the shade either in the field or at home. Farmers left decayed cormels in the field to rot but mechanically damaged cormels were used for food or animal feeds. Plastic sacks were the most common containers for transporting taro cormels as these were cheap and reusable. Cormels stored in the dark were the best over all postharvest quality at 2 and 4-month storage. Cormels stored in-ground for three months and five months in ambient condition had lower mean weight loss, decay and high percentage of sound cormels. The rapid deterioration of cormels stored 5 and 6 months in-ground was mainly due to high rainfall in the field during the storage period. Under the storage conditions of this study, in-ground storage is considered practical, low cost in prolonging the shelf-life of taro cormels.

Availability :
Graduate School Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 401 - 12, 3091 453; fax: (63) (74) 4222 281
Email: bsu@burgos.slu.edu.ph




NO. 38306

Performance of taro in the upland as affected by fertilizer application and population density under different production system


Villanueva, MR; Pardales, JR; Abenoja, EA
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8 (1): 17-22 (1983)

Abstract:
The trend in the vegetative development of taro was the same whether the crop was planted in monoculture, rotation cropping or intercropping. Higher plant height and leaf area was exhibited by plants which received higher combination rates of N, P2O5 and K2O per ha. The effects of fertilizer on the main crop yields of taro in all of the production systems were not consistent but fertilizer application generally brought about greater yield. Application of only 30 kg N/ha was needed to reach optimum yield. Mean yields obtained with the application of only P2O5 and K2O without any N was statistically the same as that of the unfertilized plants. Corm yields increased with increasing plant population but the size of the individual corm at harvest decreased as planting distance was made closer. Regardless of fertilizer level and population density, production system did not show any pronounced effect on the corm yield of taro. Similar yield level was attained under continuous monoculture cropping, rotation cropping or intercropping when taro was planted at about the same time of the year. Under any production methods in the upland, taro seemed to be more sensitive to climate variation. When prolonged dry period occurred plant development became impaired and corm yield was reduced.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of Philippines at Los Baños (UPLB); College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 38651

Isolation, screening, and identification of fungi for protein enrichment of root and tuber crops


Mabesa, RC; Vallaralvo, JA; Melendres, RR
The Philippine Agriculturist 67 (1): 9-16 (1984)

Abstract:
Molds growing in decaying root and tuber crops such as cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), gabi (Colocasia esculenta), potato (Solanum tuberosum), and giant swamp taro (Cyrtosperma chamissonis) were isolated and screened for protein production. At least three promising strains from each crop were selected for identification. Isolates from cassava possess the characteristics of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus sulphureus and Penicillium simplicissimum. Fungi similar to Aspergillus niger, Penicillium purpurogenum and Syncephalastrum racemosum gave the higher protein yield in sweet potato. In the case of gabi, promising isolates appeared to be Aspergillus niger, Mucor sp. and Penicillium purpurogenum. Isolates resembling Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor sp. were found to be efficiently convert potato starch to protein. Fungi which appear to be Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus and Monilia sp. increased the protein content of giant swamp taro substantially. Fermentation with fungi considerably increased the original protein content of the root crops. Fungi with the higher amylolytic activity gave the highest protein yield in the product.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of the Philippines Los Baños, College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 50283

Plant Resources of South-East Asia No 9. Plants yielding non-seed carbohydrates


Flach, M (ed); Rumawas, F (ed)
Department of Agronomy; Wageningen Agricultural University; Wageningen; the Netherlands

PROSEA Foundation; Bogor; Indonesia; 1996; 237 p

Abstract:
This volume deals with plants in South-East Asia that produce and store starch and/or sugar as a reserve food in organs other than seeds, e.g. in tubers, corms, cormels, stolons, thickened roots, stems, trunks and fruits. Starches and sugars are the main source of food energy for humans and animals. Most of the crops dealt with in this volume are grown at subsistence level in the tropics. Although many of them may potentially produce twice the amount of useful energy per unit of land and time than cereals, they have never received comparable scientific, industrial and commercial attention. This neglected group of crops deserves more attention to realize its full potential. In this volume 54 important crops (cultivated and wild) including sago palm, sugar palm, fishtail palm, sugar cane, yams, cassava, sweet potato, Irish potato, taro, arrowroot, yam bean, plantain and cooking banana, zedoary, Chinese artichoke, are treated in 33 papers. Some 50 species of minor importance are described briefly and a further 100 species yielding non-seed carbohydrates as a by-product are listed. The introductory chapter deals with general aspects of the plants. A glossary is included to explain the terms used. Two indexes, of scientific and vernacular plant names, are provided.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 39832

Yield of taro [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott] as affected by taro feathery mosaic virus inoculated at various growth stages


Gapasin, RM; Sajise, CE; Buyser, A
Philippine Phytopathology 28: 24-33 (1992)

Abstract:
The effect of taro feathery mosaic virus (TFMV) infection on yield and growth of taro plants was determined using mechanically inoculated and seedpieces already infected with the disease. In both pot and field experiments TFMV reduced the yield of taro (variety Kalpao) from 2.80 to 58.04% and 20.24 to 32.14%, respectively. Inoculation of plants at the earlier stage of growth, generally showed higher disease incidence and yield reduction than inoculation at the later stage. In addition, plants infected with TFMV produced more suckers than uninfected ones.

Availability :
Main Library; University of the Philippines Los Baños; College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 71129

Taro
Khoai nuoc

Vu Cong Diem
Scientific and technical Office of Hung Yen, 1962; 38p

Abstract:
Some cultivars of taro were introduced into Vietnam. Their morphological and ecological properties, planting suitable soil for planting, breeding, husbandry, harvesting and utilization of the taro plants are discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71130

Why should we plant taro
Tai sao nen trong nhieu khoai nuoc.

Information of scientific and technical diffusion, Haiduong, 1962; 12p

Abstract:
Introduction of taro into Haiduong is put forward. Current situation, soil and soil tilling, manuring, propagating and handling of planting stock, suitable density, tending, harvesting and productivity, storing of taro as seed stock, are discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71813

Calla palustris
Cay khoai nuoc

Mong Hung
So tay sinh ly mot so cay trong o Vietnam [Handbook on physiology of some cultivated plants in Vietnam]; Vol 1, Hanoi, Science Publishing House, 1966; p 38-41

Abstract:
Alocasia macrorrhizos and Colocasia esculenta grow througout the year, are adapted to humid land, and used as food and feed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 92929

Processing of starch and other binder products from plants


Ponciano, GV
Tarlac College of Agriculture Research Journal 19: 35-39 (1996-1997)

Abstract:
This study was conducted to extract and process the starch components of crops which are growing luxuriantly in Western Tarlac. Starch is being utilized as binder gelling agent, stabilizer and as major food additive in bakery products. About 10 plant species belonging to 3 different families have been collected. Chemical analysis on the components of the crops such as moisture ash, fat, protein, carbohydrates and crude fiber have been carried out. The starch contents were processed into quality flour, noodles, pasta and cellulosic plastics.

Availability :
Library; Department of Research and Development; Tarlac College of Agriculture; Camiling; Tarlac; Philippines; phone: (63) (45) 9340 216; fax: (63) (45) 9340 216
Email: tca@mozcom.com




NO. 68658

In vitro propagation of taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott)
Perbanyakan talas (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) secara in vitro

Imelda, M; Ermayanti, TM; Atmowidjojo, S
Research and Development Centre for Biotechnology, Cibinong, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Hasil Penelitian dan Pengembangan Bioteknologi; Bioteknologi untuk Menunjang Pembangunan Nasional [Proceedings of the Seminar on the Findings of Biotechnology Research and Development: Biotechnology in Supporting National Development]; Bogor, 11-12 Pebruari 1992; Soetisna, U; Tappa, B; Sukara, E (eds); Bogor, Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Bioteknologi, 1992; p 227-233

Abstract:
Propagation of taro (Colocasia esculenta) by shoot tip culture and somatic embryogenesis was investigated in 11 cultivars, namely andong, bentul, burkok, gambir, ketan, lahun anak, loma, mentega, padang, paris and sutera. Apical and axillary buds were cultured in MS media supplemented with 150 mg/l of coconut water and plant growth regulators such as 2,4-D, NAA or IAA and kinetin, ranging from 0.1 to 4 mg/l. Shoot multiplication with the highest rate (25 shoots per explant) was obtained in cv. paris within 6 weeks, whereas formation of planlets (31 shoots per explant) derived from somatic embryos was achieved in cv. ketan. Plantlets were acclimatized in media consisting of soils and compost, and of sand moistened with mineral solution. Temperature and air humidity were gradually adjusted to ambient conditions. All planlets survived and grew in the two types of media tested. (Revised authors' abstract)

Availability :
Research Centre for Biotechnology, Library
Email: p3biotek@rad.net.id




NO. 68670

In vitro preservation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott.) shoots under a mineral oil layer
Penyimpanan pucuk talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott.) secara in vitro dibawah lapisan minyak mineral

Lydia; Prana, MS
Research and Development Centre for Biotechnology, Cibinong, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Hasil Penelitian dan Pengembangan Bioteknologi; Bioteknologi untuk Menunjang Pembangunan Nasional [Proceedings of the Seminar on the Findings of Biotechnology Research and Development: Biotechnology in Supporting National Development]; Bogor, 11-12 Pebruari 1992; Soetisna, U; Tappa, B; Sukara, E (eds); Bogor, Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Bioteknologi, 1992; p 329-334

Abstract:
The effect of mineral oil and strength of medium on the in vitro growth of taro shoots cultivar Ketan were investigated. Shoot tips were used as explants for shoot multiplication cultures. Shoot tips were grown on Murashige and Skoog (MS) media supplemented with 1 mg/l BAP. Shoot tips from in vitro multiplication were conserved on various strengths (1, 1/2 and 1/4) of MS medium and with/without overlayered by mineral oil. Shoot growth was determined by fresh tissue weight. Shoot cultures overlayered by mineral oil showed an average growth slower than those cultured without mineral oil. The growth of shoots under mineral oil on the full strength medium (46.44%) was slower than on the 1/2 strength (75.54%) and on the 1/4 strength (110.51%). Shoots could be conserved under mineral oil on the full strength medium up to 6 months without being subcultured. Shoots regrew normally on the standard medium after 3 passages of subculturing. (Revised authors' abstract)

Availability :
Research Centre for Biotechnology, Library
Email: p3biotek@rad.net.id




NO. 94348

Studies on the rhizosphere-rhizoplane microflora including mycorrhizal fungi of selected crop plants


Santel, LS
NCRP Research Bulletin 42 (1): 1-32 (1991)

Abstract:
An investigation was undertaken to determine the qualitative distribution of mycoflora rhizosphere and rhizoplane, with emphasis on fungi, to study the morphology and taxonomy of mycoflora isolates and determine if there is selective qualitative stimulation of microorganisms by crop plants. A total of 226 fungi isolates from the rhizosphere and 155 from the rhizoplane were obtained from the 24 crop plant samples. An additional 83 fungi isolates were obtained from the rhizosphere samples of the 12 crop plants. In both soil and root habitats, the most dominant fungi occurring in the above-mentioned 24 crop plants are the genus Aspergillus. All crop plants studied except for one showed varying degrees of mycorrhizal infections.

Availability :
Rizal Library; Ateneo de Manila University; Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 92027

Selected multi-purpose tree species as hedgerows for gabi


Baya, WA
Greenfields 22 (6): 30 (1994)

Abstract:
The growth and yield of gabi as an alley crop was monitored for three years with selected trees as hedgerows. Flemingia macrophylla (synonym: Flemingia congesta), Gliricidia sepium and Sesbania sesban were used as hedgerow.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library,
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 67498

Study on the effect of taro processing method on tannin and phytic acid contents of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)
Mempelajari pengaruh cara pengolahan terhadap kadar tanin dan asam fitat pada talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Rohaman, MM; Rahmani, AW; Anwar, F; Riyadi, H
Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry

Warta IHP (Industri Hasil Pertanian) [Agro-based Industry Newsletter] 10 (1-2): 27-29 (1993)

Abstract:
A study on the effect of processing method on tannin and phytic acid contents of taro corms has been conducted. The study used fresh, boiled, steamed and roasted taro corms and also taro flour. The result showed that uncooked taro contained 750.5 mg of tannin and 374 mg of phytic acid per 100 g of taro corm. Boiling treatment showed the decrease of 50.17% of tannin and 13.57% of phytic acid. The steaming treatment resulted in the decrease 49.90% of tannin and 16.30% of phytic acid. Roasting treatment showed the decrease 53.63% of tannin and 51.11% phytic acid, and flour treatment showed the decrease of 35.31% of tannin and 64.37% of phytic acid. (Revised authors' abstract)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: ariebud@indo.net.id




NO. 67637

Traditional agricultural system, environment understanding and utilization of plant resources by Dani tribe in Baliem valley
Sistem pertanian tradisional, pemahaman lingkungan dan pemanfaatan sumber daya tumbuhan oleh masyarakat Dani di lembah Baliem

Purwanto, Y; Waluyo, EB
Research and Development Institute for Botany, Research and Development Centre for Biology, LIPI; Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Hasil Penelitian dan Pengembangan Sumber Daya Hayati, Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI 1991/1992 [Proceedings of a Seminar on Research Finding and Development of Biological Resources, Centre for Research and Development in Biology - LIPI]; Bogor, 6 Mei 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Proyek Litbang SDH, Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI, 1992; p 112-123

Abstract:
The Dani tribe residing in Baliem valley is wholly dependant upon natural resources, and is kept in essential balance with nature through religious and cultural control on exploitation. It was found that, more than 214 species of plant were identified as sources of food (54 species), medicines (28 species), clothing material (8 species), dye stuffs (6 species), plants for social and ritual activities (16 species), timbers (56 species), rope material (7 species), material for tools (15 species) and others (7 species). Utilization of these plants in conjunction with their traditional agricultural systems and the management of environments was discusssed. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 93801

Determination of calcium and of oxalic acid and oxalates in some Philippine plant foods


Berdana-Brown, AM; Banzon, NS
Natural and Applied Science Bulletin 19 (2): 101-107 (1965)

Abstract:
Nine vegetables and fruits were analyzed for their calcium and oxalic acid content. Kamias, was found to have 19.99% of oxalic acid on the dry basis while alibangbang leaves has fairly low oxalate content. Kutsarita verde, asistasia leaves and kutsarita pula have 3.97 to 8.87% of oxalic acid (on the dry basis) which is far in excess of their calcium content. Mustasa, Humbaban leaves as well as flowers contain calcium much in excess of their oxalate content and can thus serve as dietary sources of calcium.

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 118

Utilization and cultivation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)
Pemanfaatan dan pembudidayaan talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Danimihardja, S
Bogor Botanical Gardens; Indonesia

Buletin Kebun Raya [Bulletin of the Botanical Gardens] 3(4): 101-108(1978)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 228

The influence of Phytophthora colocasiae on the distribution of Colocasia esculenta varieties on Java island
Pengaruh jamur Phytophthora colocasiae terhadap penyebaran varietas-varietas Colocasia esculenta di P.Jawa

Yusuf, R
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia

Berita Biologi [Biological News] 3(supplement): 17-19(1987)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 254

Kariotypes of some taro varieties and related species
Kariotipe beberapa varietas talas dan kerabatnya

Imamuddin, H
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia

Berita Biologi [Biological News] 3(7): 364-365(1987)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 391

Types of germination and seedling morphology in Colocasia esculenta and Colocasia gigantea
Pola perkecambahan dan morfologi semai Colocasia esculenta dan Colocasia gigantea

Abdulhadi, R
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Berita Biologi [Biological News] 2(9-10): 228-229(1984)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 408

Observations on the chromosome number and karyotype of Alocasia species on Java island
Pengamatan jumlah kromosom dan kariotipe jenis-jenis Alocasia di Pulau Jawa

Imamuddin, H
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Berita Biologi [Biological News] 3(4): 189(1986)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 476

Wild populations of Colocasia esculenta on the slopes of Mt.Gede, West Java


Hambali, GG
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Berita Biologi [Biological News] 2(2): 40-41(1977)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 526

Corm and root crops


Tisbe, VO; Cadiz, TG; Bautista, ODK
Vegetable production in Southeast Asia; Knott, JE(ed); Deanon Jr, JR(ed); College of Agriculture; UP Los Banos; 1967; 293-317

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 534

On the cytology of Javanese Colocasia


Sastrapradja, S; Rijanti, AM
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Annales Bogorienses 5(3): 117-122(1972)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 547

The role of visiting insects in the pollination of Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta and C.gigantea
Peranan beberapa serangga pengunjung perbungaan pada penyerbukan Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta dan C.gigantea

Kramadibrata, K; Hambali, GG
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Berita Biologi [Biological News] 2(7): 143-146(1983)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 569

Callus production and organogenesis from shoot tip and petiole explants of six Indonesian cultivars of Colocasia esculenta var. esculenta


Irawati; Webb, KJ
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Annales Bogorienses 8(1): 13-22(1983)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1000

Taro plants (Colocasia and some other genera)
Tanaman tales (Colocasia dan beberapa marga lain)

Nur AE, M
Research Institute for Agricultural Techniques; Bogor; Indonesia

Tehnik Pertanian [Agricultural Techniques] 4: 401-412(1955)

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1051

Effect of plant spacing and nitrogen fertilization on tuber yield of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)
Pengaruh jarak tanam dan pemupukan nitrogen terhadap hasil tanaman Talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Pandang, MS; Mulia, S; Husain, B
Maros Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Agrikam 1(2): 31-34(1986)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1340

Keys to the cultivars of keladi (Colocasia esculenta - Araceae) in Peninsular Malaysia


Ghani, FD
Department of Botany; National University of Malaysia; Bangi; Selangor

The Gardens'Bulletin Singapore 37(2): 199-208(1984)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1605

Relation between tubers' age and carbohydrate content in taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)
Hubungan antara usia umbi dan kandungan karbohidrat pada talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Danimihardja, S; Naiola, BP; Ishak
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Ilmu dan Budaya [Science and Culture] 8(6): 446-448(1968)

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office




NO. 1740

Tissue culture of taro


Arditti, J
Department of Developmental & Cell Biology; University of California; Irvine; USA

Proceedings of the COSTED Symposium on Tissue Culture of Economically Important Plants; Rao, AN(ed); Singapore; 1981; p83-84

Availability :
UPSEA; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2065

Germination behaviour of taro seeds (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) after drying
Perlakuan perkecambahan biji talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) sesudah dikeringkan

Roemantyo
Institute for Botanical Garden Development; Bogor; Indonesia

Paper presented at the 9th Scientific Seminar and National Congress of Biology, Padang, July 10-12, 1989; Indonesian Biological Association; B-028; 7p

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office; Bogor




NO. 2111

Effect of shading on taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)
Pengaruh peneduh pada tanaman talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Hadikoemoro, S; Hidayat, A
Agronomy Department; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia

Buletin Agronomi [Agronomy Bulletin] 1(2): 10-13(1962)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 6288

Isolation extraction and characterization of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) starch
Ekstraksi isolasi dan karakterisasi pati talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Sutrisno, B
Thesis; Bogor; Department of Food and Nutrition Technology; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; IPB; 1983; 83p

Availability :
Faculty of Agricultural Technology Library, Bogor Agricultural University




NO. 6291

Effects of preparation and drying methods on the quality of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) chips produced during storage
Pengaruh cara pembuatan dan pengeringan terhadap mutu keripik talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) yang dihasilkan selama penyimpanan

Gafar, PA
Thesis; Bogor; Department of Food and Nutrition Technology; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; IPB; 1986; 106p

Availability :
Faculty of Agricultural Technology Library, Bogor Agricultural University




NO. 30388

Performance of taro in the upland as affected by fertilizer application and population density under different production systems


Villanueva, MR; Pardales Jr, JR; Abenoja, EA
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(1): 17-22(1983)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30399

Cultural management studies on upland taro: Effects of population density and planting method on growth and yield


Pardales Jr, JR; Belmonte Jr, DV
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 9(1): 29-32(1984)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30400

Dry matter accumulation and partitioning in upland taro main plants under drought stress condition


Pardales Jr, JR
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 10(1): 13-15(1985)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31290

Araceous and nonaraceous host of feathery mosaic disease


Palomar, MK; Duatin, JY; Palermo, VG
Annals of Tropical Research 6(?): ?? (1984)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31295

Factors limiting fruit and seed set in taro


Pardales, JR
Annals of Tropical Research 2(3): 165-171(1980)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31296

Effects of water temperature on the early growth and development of taro


Pardales, JR, Jr.; Melchor, FM; Dela Pena, RS
Annals of Tropical Research 4(4): 231-238(1982)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 2564

Growth and development of Colocasia and Xanthosoma spp.under upland conditions


Igbokwe, MC
National Root Crops Research Institute; Umudike; Umuahia; Nigeria

Proceedings of the Second Triennial Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops Africa Branch; Terry, ER et al. (eds); Douala; Cameroon; 1983; p172-174

Availability :
UPSEA; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2565

Effects of water-table depth on cocoyam


Ghumal, BS; Lal, B
Soil and Water Management Section; Institute for Agricultural Research; Ahmadu Bello University; Zaria; Nigeria

Proceedings of the Second Triennial Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops Africa Branch; Terry, ER et al. (eds); Douala; Cameroon; 1983; p175-181

Availability :
UPSEA; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2566

Intercropping cocoyams with plantain: effects on the yield and disease of cocoyams


Igbokwe, MC; Arene, OB; Ndubuizu, TC; Umana, EE
National Root Crops Research Institute; Umudike; Umuahia; Nigeria

Proceedings of the Second Triennial Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops Africa Branch; Terry, ER et al. (eds); Douala; Cameroon; 1983; p182-184

Availability :
UPSEA; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2721

Identification of dasheen mosaic virus on taro, Colocasia esculenta
Identifikasi dasheen mosaic virus pada talas, Colocasia esculenta

Saleh, N
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Prosidings Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan; Soejitno, J et al.(eds); Balittan Bogor; Vol.2.Palawija; 1986; p275-279

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3469

Araceae as a forest resource
Araceae sebagai sumber daya hutan

Burhan, AL
Public Forest Corporation; Jakarta; Indonesia

Gema Rimba [Jungle Echo] 6(51-52): 25-27(1980)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3703

Isolation and characterization of starch, and non-conventional starch resources
Isolasi dan karakterisasi pati dan komoditi sumber tepung pati non-konvensional

Fardiaz, D; Effendi, H; Sutrisno; Apriyantono, A
Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia

Proceedings Diskusi Teknologi Pangan VI [Proceedings of the 6th Discussion on Food Technology]; Bogor; 1985; pU1-U15

Availability :
Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industy; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 6078

Comparison between weed vegetation in taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) plantation grown as monoculture and in intercropping with maize (Zea mays) in the villages of Cileuer, Sukaresmi, and Pasir Eurih, Ciomas sub-district, West Java
Perbandingan vegetasi gulma antara pertanaman talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) monokultur dan tumpangsari dengan jagung (Zea mays)di Desa Cileuer, Sukaresmi, dan Pasir Eurih, kecamatan Ciomas, Jawa Barat

Harahap, R; Siregar, M
Centre for Research and Development in Biology; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding 1, Konferensi X Himpunan Ilmu Gulma Indonesia [Proceedings of the Tenth Conference of the Indonesian Weed Science Society, Book 1]; Kuntohartono, T et al(eds); Malang; 1990; p199-208

Availability :
Setyowati, N; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 6475

Cultivation of taro and its diseases
Penanaman tales dan beberapa penjakitnja

Adiratma, ER
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agriculture; University of Indonesia; 1960; 28p

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia




NO. 6560

Biological resources: Their potentials and development
Sumber daya hayati: Potensi dan pengembangannya

Sastrapradja, S; Adisoemarto, S
National Biological Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

BioIndonesia (3): 7-16(1977)

Availability :
Bogor Botanical Gardens; Indonesia




NO. 6611

Germplasms exploration of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) in Bogor and the surrounding area
Eksplorasi plasma nutfah talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) di daerah Bogor dan sekitarnya

Sarono
Directorate of Food Crop Protection; Jakarta; Indonesia

Makalah disajikan pada Latihan Kerja Eksplorasi Plasma Nutfah Nabati [Paper presented at the Training Course on Plant Germplasms Exploration]; Bogor; Komisi Pelestarian Plasma Nutfah Nasional; 1978; 7p

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 9117

Study on the effect of drying method on physical properties of taro starch
Mempelajari pengaruh cara pengeringan terhadap sifat fisik pati talas

Andimulia, BA
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1984; 51p

Availability :
Faculty of Agricultural Technology Library, Bogor Agricultural University




NO. 10461

Taro
Phuak

Sinthuprama, S
Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand

Kasikorn [Farmers Journal] 52(6): 368-376(1979)

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 10524

Taro
Phuak

Sangnimnuan, C
Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand

Kasikorn [Farmers Journal] 30(3): 193-196(1957)

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 10656

Tuber crops
Hua phuet-Phuet hua

Chomchalow, N; Wichapan, K
Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research; Bangkok

Warasarn Witthayasartkaset [Journal of Agricultural Science] 5(1): 57-69(1972)

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 10891

Taro
Phuak hom kamlang maraeng

Pramonpanya, P
Chaokaset [Farmers Magazine] 3(29): 3-14(1983)

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 10931

Taro
Phuak hom banna

Bunnop, M
Warasarn kasettakorn [Farmers Journal] 2(6): 3-10(1976)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 10979

Taro
Karnpluk phuak

Anonymous
Phuankaset [Thai Farmers Journal] 2(4-5): 46-49(1975)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 11637

Agronomic characteristics and yield studies of root crops
Kan ruap ruam phan suksaphan lae phonphalit phuethua

Charernrat, S; Pinsuwan, T; Nattraiphop, S; Kanchanahut, C; Mudathu, W; Sinthuprama, S
Field Crops Research Institute; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand

[Tapioca research annual report 1979]; Bangkok; Field Crops Research Institute; 1980; p164-167

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 12016

A new sperm agglutinin from taro
Agglutinin chap tua asuchi chanit mai chak phuak

Phrompluk, P; Chulawatthanathol, M
Mahidol University; Bangkok; Thailand

Research and Text Abstracts, Prince of Songkhla University No.4: 51 (1987)

Availability :
Horticultural Research Institute; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 13283

Growing taro in an area of 40 acres yielded 3 million baht
Chua mai pluk phuak 100 rai khai dai thung 3 lan baht

Chansidaeng, S
Chao Kaset [Farmers Magazine] 119(25): 32-39(1991)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 13402

Taro
Phuak-hom kam lang ma raeng

Witchachu, P
Department of Agricultural Extension; Bangkok; Thailand

Muang Kaset [Agricultural Town Magazine] 4(48): 12-15(1991)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 13415

Physicochemical properties of taro starch for industrial uses
Kan suksa sombat thang khemikaiyaphap khong paeng chak phuak phua nam pai chai prayot thang uttasahakam

Nakraksa, W
[King Mongkut's Agricultural Journal] 4(1): 16-33(1986)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 13724

Taro propagation through shoot tip culture
Kan khayai phan doi kan pho liang nua yua

Kitwichan, B; Chawirat, R; Butcha, P
Faculty of Science; Khon Kaen University; Thailand

Warasan Withayasat Mo Kho [The Journal of Science Khon Kaen University] 19(1): 29-33(1991)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 13727

Taro; a popular plant
Phuak-hom phut thi kamlang maraeng

Minsitry of Agriculture and Cooperatives; Bangkok; Thailand

Khao Kaset [Agricultural News] 13(295): 16-18(1991)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 20655

In-vitro studies of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott for germplasm preservation


Abdul Karim, AG; Hairani, H
National University of Malaysia; Bangi; Selangor

Malaysian Applied Biology 16(1): 303-305(1987)

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 20704

Effects of polyamines and polyamine precursors on morphogenesis in cultured tissue of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)


Shakuntala, S; Nair, H
University of Malaya; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

Simposium Kultur Tisu Tumbuhan Kebangsaan Ke II dan Bengkel Kultur Tisu Getah Antarabangsa [2nd National Symposium on Plant Tissue Culture and International Workshop on Rubber Tissue Culture], October 15-17, 1985; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 20818

Effects of gibberellic acid on flowering and growth morphology of keladi China (Colocasia esculenta)


Farah, DG; Raja Barizan, RS
Department of Botany; National University of Malaysia; Bangi; Selangor

Malaysian Applied Biology 15(1): 43-49(1986)

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 20875

Information on tuber vegetables
Maklumat sayur-sayuran jenis umbisi/rizom

Extension Branch; Department of Agriculture; Malaysia

Bingkisan Pertanian [Agricultural News] No.27h

Availability :
Department of Agriculture; Lundang; Kota Bahru; Kelantan; Malaysia




NO. 21652

Yam crops (Colocasia spp.)
Tanaman Keladi (Jenis Colocasia)

Hasmah, H
Department of Agriculture; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

Department of Agriculture, Kuala Lumpur, Bingkisan Pertanian [Agricultural News] No.29; 1982; 28p

Availability :
Department of Agriculture; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia




NO. 21767

In-vitro propagation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)


Shakuntala, S
University of Malaya; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

MSc thesis; Kuala Lumpur; University of Malaya; 1989; 121p

Availability :
Department of Botany; University of Malaya; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia




NO. 22414

Effects of gibberellic acid on flowering and growth morphology of 'keladi cina'


Raja Barizan, RS; Ghani, FD
Forest Research Institute Malaysia; Kepong; Selangor

Journal of the Malaysian Applied Biology 15(1): 43-49(1986)

Availability :
Ghani, FD




NO. 22415

Artificial pollination and seed production in Malaysian keladi cultivars - keladi cina and keladi banjar


Ghani, FD; Hassan, BA
Forest Research Institute Malaysia; Kepong; Selangor

Research Priorities in Malaysian Biology; 1982; p82-85

Availability :
Ghani, FD




NO. 22720

Several methods of conserving plants of importance to civilization
Beberapa cara mencegah kepupusan beberapa tumbuhan yang memberi erti penting kepada tamaddun

Adirukmi, NS; Mohd.Nor, S
Science University of Malaysia; Penang

Prosiding Seminar Kebangsaan Etnobotani Pertama [Proceedings of the First National Seminar on Ethnobotany], 16-18 September 1991, Agricultural University of Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor; 12p

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 23842

Conservation of tuber crops


Tan, SL
Horticulture Research Division; Malaysian Agricultural Research Development Institute; Serdang; Selangor

Proceedings of National Seminar on the Indigeous Food Crops Conservataion: 73-85(1995)

Abstract:
The current status of tuber crops in Malaysia was reviewed with regard to area planted and usage. The most important are cassava, sweet potato and cocoyam. Future potential of these crops include sources of starch for myriad uses, animal feed stuff and use in convenience foods. Local living collections of germplasm for sweet potato, cassava and edible aroids were reported, together with inherent problems in their maintenance. Alternative conservation systems include duplicate collections, in vitro genebanks, and cryopreservation, with some mention of storing pollen, true seed, storage roots, wild related germplasm and in situ conservation.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 30418

Yield and chemical composition of root crops at different ages of harvest


Data, ES; Villamayor Jr, FG; Abenoja, EA; Dingal, AG; Reoma, VL; Anzano, DR
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 13(Supp.1): S4(1988)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30467

The Philippines recommends for gabi


Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resources Research; Los Banos; Laguna

Los Banos; Laguna; Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resources Research; 1977; vip; 34p

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 30606

The availability of carotene in some Philippine vegetables. II. Mustasa, gabi leaves, saluyot and kalabasa tops


Ortaliza, IC; Del Rosario, IF; Santos, MH; Aguilar, CG; Dumada-ug, LM
Philippine Journal of Science 100(2): 95-102(1971)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30628

Performance of taro under lowland condition as affected by genotype, nutritional status and population density


Pardales Jr, JR; Villanueva, MR; Cotejo, FR
Annals of Tropical Research 4(3): 156-167(1982)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30630

Effects of water temperature on the early growth and development of taro


Pardales Jr, JR; Melcitor, FM; De la Pina, RS
Annals of Tropical Research 4(4): 231-236(1982)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30634

Cultural management studies on upland taro: Effects of cultivation systems on growth and yield of taro and incidence of associated weeds


Annals of Tropical Research 5(1): 13-22(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30635

Effect of method of placement and rate of Leucaena leaves application on taro


Payot, JA; Abit, SE; Evangelio, LA
Annals of Tropical Research 5(1): 38-46(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30637

Incidence, symptom development and transmission of taro feathery mosaic disease


Palomar, MK; Gloria, RP; Napiere, CM
Annals of Tropical Research 5(3-4): 102-109(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30640

Effect of mulch application and planting depth on growth, development and productivity of upland taro


Pardales Jr, JR
Annals of Tropical Research 7: 27-38(1985)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30650

Effect of sett size on the growth, development and yield of taro


Dalion, SS; Pardales Jr, JR; Baliad, ME
Annals of Tropical Research 10(2): 121-125(1988)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30661

Ways of improving gabi production
Ang mga paagi sa pagpadaghan abot sa gabi

Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

Gabi Technology for Leyte No.1; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1989; 20p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30671

Gabi and yautia: Their classification and description


Pardales Jr, JR
Root Crops Digest 1(3): 1-4(1985)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30704

Crop rotation of sweet potato, cassava, and gabi with legumes as a cultural management system


Escasinas, AB; Escalada, RG
Annals of Tropical Research 6: 63-76(1984)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30761

Determination of constant factor and index leaf for rapid leaf area estimation in taro


Pardales Jr, JR
Annals of Tropical Research 2(4): 198-205(1980)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30767

Factors limiting fruit and seed set in taro


Pardales, JR, Jr
Annals of Tropical Research 2(3): 165-171(1980)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30768

Root crops-legumes rotation at varying fertilizer levels


Escarinas, AB; Escalada, RG; Baliad, ME
Annals of Tropical Research 8(2): 87-95(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30785

Comparison of different planting materials of gabi


Abenoja, EA; Villamayor Jr, FG
Radix 8(1): 6-7(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30791

Annual report PRCRTC 1987


Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Baybay; Leyte; Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1988; 110p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30796

Biology and host range of the taro planthopper, Tarophagus proserpina Kirk.


Duatin, CJY; De Pedro, LB
Annals of Tropical Research 8(2): 72-80(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30802

Biology of taro hornworm (Hippotion celerio)


Diongzon, OCE; Gapasin, DP
Annals of Tropical Research 3(2): 101-110(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30804

Floral morphology and biology, fruit and seed set, seed germination and seedling development of taro


Pardales Jr, JR
Annals of Tropical Research 3(3): 169-176(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30808

Technology for yam and taro production in Southeast Asia


Villanueva, MR
Radix 8(1): 1-6(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30915

State of the art abstract bibliography of sweet potato research


Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resources Research and Development; Los Banos, Laguna

Los Banos; Laguna; Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resources Research and Development; 1986; 78p; Crops Bibliography Series No.9

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 30959

Physico-chemical properties of some Philippine root crops starches


Madamba, LSP; Aurellana, BH; Rodriguez, JB; Gutierrez, I
NRCP Research Bulletin 35(1): 62-81(1980)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31086

Uptake of fission products by certain vegetables crops


Pablo, FE
Natural and Applied Science Bulletin 29(1): 17-36(1977)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31138

Survey and control of pathogens and insect pest attacking rootcrops


Divinagracia, GG
NSDB Technology Journal 3(2): 62-72(1978)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31183

Status of integrated pest management on root crops in the Philippines


Esguerra, NM
The Philippine Entomologist 5(3): 291-319(1982)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31186

Gesonula mundata (Walker) not Ovya chinensis (Thunberg), the grasshopper pest of taro, Colocasia esculenta (Linnaeus) in the Philippines


Kevan, DKM
The Philippine Entomologist 6(5): 477-483(1986)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31198

Coconut-based cropping with annual crops in Eastern Visayas


Carcallas, CD; Aparra, NO
VICARP News 4(2): 2-7(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31202

Cropping pattern under young coconut


Aparra, NO
Abstract of Coconut Researches 1977-1980; Baybay; Leyte; Regional Coconut Research Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; p18

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31229

Effect of defoliation, runner removal and fertilization on tuber yield of taro


Abit, SE; Alferez, AC
Annals of Tropical Research 1(2): 112-119(1979)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31231

On-farm studies on spatial arrangement of root crops and succession of legume intercrops


Agarcio, BC; Sanchez, OA; Sarong, LQ; Ratilla, TC
Baybay; Leyte; Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1988; 51p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31238

Effect of varying concentrations of three growth regulators on sprouting of gabi corm


Cajes, BC
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1982; 62p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31243

Effect of processing on amount of starch and residue from four varieties of cocoyam


Daisog, DS
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1986; 53p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31248

Biology of taro horn worm, Hippotion celerio Linnaeus (Sphingidae, Lepidoptera)


Diongzon, OC, Jr
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1978; 48p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31255

Effect of ipil-ipil as organic fertilizer on root crops


Escalada, RG; Posas, MB; Javier, RR; Abit, SE; Ratilla, BC; Peque, EC; Tobias, R
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1986; 147p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31286

Studies on a virus-like mosaic diseases of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)


Palomar, MK
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1982; 54p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31339

Grow gabi throughout the year


Cadiz, TG
Agriculture at Los Banos 9(4): 13-14(1970)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31508

The effect of rhizome removal on the growth and yield of lowland gabi


Orpiano, DR
CLSU Scientific Journal 5(2) and 6(1): 124(1984-1985)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 32711

Critical period of weed control in upland taro (Colocasia esculenta)


Talatala, RL; Baliad, ME; Pardales, JR, Jr
Philippine Journal of Weed Science 10: 51-55(1983)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 32922

Oxalate content of the leaves of different gabi (Colocasia esculentum) varieties


Anzaldo, FE; Torres, RC
NIST Research Abstracts 10(1986)

Availability :
Library; Industrial Technology Development Institute; Department of Science and Technology; Manila; Philippines




NO. 33240

Intercrop pineapple and taro with coconut
Magtanim ng pinya at gabi sa ilalim ng niyugan

Brodkast Digest 8(1990)

Availability :
Library; Department of Agriculture; Diliman; Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 33485

Rootcrops


Padilla, GC
Communication Unit-University Extension Primer No.4; Series 1989; 4p

Availability :
Library; Northern Mindanao Consortium for Agriculture and Resources Research and Development; Central Mindanao University; Musuan; Bukidnon; Philippines




NO. 33709

Evaluation of various storage methods for taro (Colocasia esculenta) cormels


Sannadan, IJ
MSc thesis; La Trinidad; Benguet; Benguet State University; 1990; xiiip; 120p

Availability :
Office of Research and Technology Refinement; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 33842

Four kinds of vegetables in the preparation of snack chips


Azurin, AF
BSc thesis; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Central Luzon State University; 1977; 20p

Availability :
Library; Central Luzon State University; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Philippines




NO. 34158

Performance of gabi under different levels of lime


Calapini, ALV
Aborlan; Palawan National Agricultural College; 1982; 15p

Availability :
Library; Palawan National Agricultural College; Aborlan; Philippines




NO. 34229

A study on the effect of different spacing on the growth and yield of gabi


Netura, LG
BSc thesis; Aborlan; Palawan National Agricultural College; 1980; 25p

Availability :
Library; Palawan Agricultural Research Center; Palawan National Agricultural College; Aborlan; Philippines




NO. 34465

Aflatoxin contamination on raw agricultural crops and their by-products in the Philippines


Santamaria, PA; Pizarro, AC; Jackson, CR
Philippine Phytopathology 8(1-2): 12-20(1972)

Availability :
Valmayor, RV; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 34865

Prospects of the varietal improvement program of the Philippines Root Crop Research and Training Center


Villanueva, MR
Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar-Workshop on Root Crops, Visayas State College of Agriculture, Baybay, Leyte, Philippines; 1978; p11-15

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources and Research Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 35782

Effect of two herbicides and non-tillage planting on the germination and growth of Colocasia esculenta and on population and density of weeds


Ale, K
BSc thesis; Malabon; Metro Manila; Gregorio Araneta University Foundation; 1982; viiip; 27p

Availability :
Library; Gregorio Araneta University Foundation; Malabon; Metro Manila; Philippines




NO. 35958

The effect of storage media on the quality of gabi corms


Ramirez, MA
BSc thesis; Pili; Camarines Sur State Agricultural College; 1990; 33p

Availability :
Library; Camarines Sur State Agricultural College; Pili; Philippines




NO. 35992

Acceptability of gabi leaves as leafy vegetable


Ariola, JH
BSc thesis; Pili; Camarines Sur State Agricultural College; 1990; viip; 21p

Availability :
Library; Camarines Sur State Agricultural College; Pili; Philippines




NO. 36502

A survey of the different cultural practices employed by gabi farmers in Banilad


Mission, DP
BSc thesis; School of Agriculture; Silliman University; Dumaguete City; Philippines; 1978; iiip; 11p

Availability :
Library; School of Agriculture; Silliman University; Dumaguete City; Philippines




NO. 36916

Postproduction technology on highland taro I. Taro dehydration and utilization


Botangen, ET; Salda, VB; Quindara, H
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

NPRCRTC-Benguet State University In-House Review, La Trinidad, Benguet, June 24-25, 1993

Availability :
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37129

Culture of Tilapia nilotica with taro (Colocasia sp.) in rotational cropping of fish and rice


Dela Cruz, CR; Villareal, NG
RETRES Research Abstracts; CLSU; FAC; 1980; pp.65-69; NSDB Assisted Proj. No. 7103 Ag; Tech. Rep. No. 17; MISD; PCARRD

Abstract:
Tilapia nilotica with an average size of 3.6 - 4.5 g was stocked at the rate of 15, 000/ha in six 200 m plots with three treatments replicated three times: T1-rice alone in paddies; T2-fish and taro in paddies; and T3-fish alone in paddies. Taro tubers were planted at 35-40 cm spacing on uphilled plots in treatment 2 and were fertilized with 2 kg Urea (46-0-0)/paddy every 2 weeks. Fish paddies were applied with chicken manure daily at the rate of 1 kg/paddy for half of the culture period (60 days). Fish were fed fine rice bran at the rate of 10% fish body weight in the remaining half period. Rice paddies were planted with IR-42 seedlings and fertilized with 300 kg 14-14-14 and 150 kg 46-0-0/ha. Insecticides were sprayed at the rate of 30 cc/13.5 liter sprayer load every 2 weeks.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 37142

Opportunities for gabi and peanut producers


Martin, C
Agribusiness Weekly 4(13): 20(1990)

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 37596

Storage studies of taro corms grown in upland condition


Quevedo, MA; Ramos, AD
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Science 14(1): 33; 1989

Abstract:
Taro corms (cv. Kalpao) were stored in modified clamp, but and box. In box storage, different moist packing media such as garden soil, rice hull ash and sand were used. Incidence and severity of decay and weight loss were significantly low in taro corms stored in modified clamp and box storage with moist packing medium. Under these two methods, the corms could be stored for as long as 3 months without affecting the eating quality. Taro corms stored in (?) had the highest weight loss and decay incidence which reached 100% after 2 months of storage. Dry matter, starch and sugar contents and sensory quality attributes were not significantly affected by the storage methods. Dry matter and starch contents decreased lightly with time of storage except in the corms stored with buts. The sensory quality attributes of the cooked stored and newly harvested corms were comparable.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37638

Competitive ability of lowland taro against weeds


Pardales, JR; Talatala, RL; Vasquez, EA
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science; 11(1): ?; 1986

Availability :
Highland Agriculture Resource Research and Development Consortium Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37759

Regional trial on gabi


Gonzales, IC; Ganga, ZN; Dicksen, M
Compiled Abstract of Completed Researches; La Trinidad; Benguet; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1981-1985

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37794

Development and evaluation of lasagna pasta from taro


Palomar, LS; Sales, CL
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science; 13(1): ?(1p); 1988

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37859

Effect of spacing on the spread of taro leaf blight caused by Phytophthora colocasiae


Diccion, TC; Perez, JC
In-house Review; Northern Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; 1992; 5pp.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37860

Performance of taro under upland and lowland conditions


Gonzales, IC; Torres, HB; Macario, VA
In-house Review; Northern Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; 1992; 4pp

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38007

Philippine seedboard regional evaluation trial on different cultivars of gabi (Colocasia esculenta)


Gonzales, IC; Ganga, ZN
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; 1982-1988; 1p

Abstract:
Among the entries tested, PR-G 068 was the top yielder followed by BSU-G01 and PR-G062, which also the most acceptable entries because of their good flavor, texture and attractive "cobo" and appearance.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38008

Philippine Seed Board Regional Evaluation Trial of Taro


Gonzales, IC; Ganga, ZN; Dicksen, MC
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University, La Trinidad, Benguet, 1982-1988; 1p

Abstract:
Among the 9 entries evaluated the three cultivars describe above were the most promising. However, previous trials during the dry season of 1984 showed that PR-G062, 068 and 066 were the highest yielders.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38009

Preliminary study on the distance and depth of planting taro in the highlands


Basalang, AA
Researches on Root Crops; 1982-1984; pp. 10-15

Abstract:
The distance of planting revealed no significant effect on the weight, diameter and leght of corms. The yield/ha, however, was significantly higher in the 35 x 25 cm distance (20.43 tons) than the 35 x 50 cm distance (9.90 tons). Differences in the depth of planting in all terms of comparison were found to be significant. The 10.16 cm depth significantly outyielded the 5.08 cm depth of planting with respective means of 18.43 and 9.9 tons/ha.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38010

Storability of taro under highland conditions


Puntawe, NF; Bayogan, EV; Salda, VB
Abstract of researches on root crops; Northern Philippines Root Crop Researches and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; 1982-1988; 1p

Abstract:
Results showed that washing the corms before storing did not affect significantly the percentage weight loss in the different taro cultivars. However, there was a difference in the incidence of decay. Taro cultivars namely `Itchina', VISCA 067 and VISCA 092 showed greater susceptibility to fungal rots while VISCA 066 and VISCA 067 were quite resistant to decay. Similarly, the storability of taro corms was determined by using some simple store. It was shown that the storage methods did not significantly affect the percentage weight loss and incidence of decay. Degree of corm decay was, however, affected significantly by the store methods. Corms stored in sealed and unperforated polyethylene bags for two uses were observed to have decayed severely.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38011

Effect of presence of petioles and containers on storability of taro corms


Bayogan, EV; Quindara, HL
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines; 1982-1988; 1p

Abstract:
Except for a statistical difference in weight loss of 3 days storage, there was no significant differences on the storage quality of corm stored with or without petioles. The different storage materials had significantly affected the storability of taro corms. The use of polypropylene sacks had reduced moisture loss but had increased the incidence of decay and lowered the visual quality of corms after 12 days storage. Corms held in jute sacks and trays had lower incidence of decay and higher quality of corms with higher weight loss.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38012

Preliminary study on the storability of `Itchina' taro corms


Bayogan, EV; Salda, VB
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; 1982-1988; 2pp

Abstract:
Results of the study showed that weight loss and incidence of decay was highest in small-sized corms (less than 200g) and lowest in big-sized roots (greater than 300g). Weight loss and incidence of decay were not different in corms which have been scraped with both ends exposed (i.e. cut). Weight loss was minimized and eating quality unaffected when taro was held in either modified atmosphere or diffusion hole technique for ten days. Similarly, very rough handling causes excessive weight loss and decay. The storage rot of corms caused by Diplodia tubericola was found to be the predominant postharvest disease in `Itchina' corms.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38424

Effects of water temperature on the early growth and development of taro


Pardales, JR Jr; Melchor, FM; de la Rosa, RS
Ann. Trop. Res. 4(4): p? (1982)

Abstract:
Taro (C. esculenta) plants exposed to 28 oC water temperature exhibited better plant growth and leaf area development, more and longer roots and higher dry matter content than those grown at other water temperature, i.e., 18-22 oC (normal) and 37 oC. Inferior vegetative growth and least and shortest roots were noted in plants grown at 37 oC. In a follow-up experiment conducted using 2 taro varieties, production of higher number and significantly longest roots was found to be greatly favored by a temperature range of 27-29 oC. Reduction in both number and length of roots occurred when temperature was very apparent at 36-38 oC. Temperature beyond 29 oC seemed to be detrimental to root growth in newly planted taro. At 36-38 oC, roots of the 2 varieties used did not grow beyond 2 cm.

Availability :
Library; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38423

Determination of constant factor and index leaf for rapid leaf area estimation in taro


Pardales, JR Jr
Ann. Trop. Res. 2(4): p? (1980)

Abstract:
Five taro cultivars were selected from the germplasm at the Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center in VISCA, Baybay, Leyte to determine their estimated and actual leaf areas. Correlation analysis of the estimated and actual leaf areas revealed a high linear association between them. A general regression equation (Y = -11.85 + 0.954X) was developed and further verified to be accurate in determining the actual leaf area of taro by simply substituting the estimated leaf area (product of length x width) to the x in the equation. The same question can accurately determine the actual leaf area of different taro cultivars regardless of their stage growth. The second leaf from the youngest open leaf was identified as the index leaf for both 3- and 4-leaf stage taro plants. The estimated area of the second leaf was highly correlated with the total plant leaf area. The regression equations Y = 9.12 + 2.785X and Y = 12.22 + 3.531X can be used to determine accurately the total leaf areas in 3- and 4-leaf stage taro plants, respectively.

Availability :
Library; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38425

Characteristics of growth and development of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) under upland environment


Pardales, JR Jr
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 11(3): 209-212 (1986)

Abstract:
Two varieties of taro (viz. PR-G 066 and PR-G 068) were planted under upland condition for two consecutive years to determine the pattern of their growth and development. Although the two varieties differed in their parametric values they generally showed similar pattern of development regardless of year of planting. During the earlier stages of growth the vegetative organs acted as the active sink for dry matter. Later, when its dry matter commenced to decline after reaching a peak at around the twelf week after planting, the corm dry matter progressively increased until the final harvest. With reference to the total dry matter, corm dry matter accumulation exhibited a curvilinear manner. The proportion of dry matter partitioned to the corm increased steadily with age. The corm and total plant dry matter exhibited a very significant linear response to LAI. Both components also showed marked linear response to LAI during the first 12 weeks of growth which indicate the necessity of maintaining greater leaf area during the earlier phases of corm growth.

Availability :
Library; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38790

Factors limiting fruit and seed set in taro


Pardales, JR Jr
Ann. Trop. Res. 2(3): ?p (1980)

Abstract:
The factors which limited fruit and seed development in taro were determined through laboratory and field observations in the flowers of 18 selected cultivars from the taro germplasm in the Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center in ViSCA, Baybay, Leyte. The limited fruit and seed set in some taro cultivars were attributed to the following factors: (1) failure of the staminate flowers to produce pollen; (2) shot receptivity period of the stigmas; (3) relatively low pollen fertility; (4) irregular number of ovules in the ovaries; (5) presence of trinucleate pollen; and (6) short life duration of the flowers. Low seed set in taro may also be influenced by (a) fungal infection causing decay in many flowers, especially after controlled pollination; and (b) presence of insects found to be found to be feeding on the pollen grains during pollen shedding.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38789

Floral morphology and biology, fruit and seed set, seed germination and seedling development of taro


Pardales, JR Jr
Ann. Trop. Res. 3(3): ?p (1981)

Abstract:
The natural flowering habit of taro was studied in a population comprising of 299 cultivars. The floral biology and the development of fruits and seeds were also determined. Very few cultivars readily produced flowers under natural conditions. Flowering in the field commenced in May and reached its peak in July or August. For many cultivars, flowering ceased towards the end of September or early October. The inflorescence of taro is a spadix type. A maximum of two spadices was present in any plant at a time. Floral abortion was very common while natural fruit and seed set was very rare. Artificial pollination within and between cultivars produced little success. Germination of taro seeds was also made and seedling development was studied. Seeds that developed from pollination within variety. Seedling development was very slow during the early stage and their vigor varied. Some seedlings were normally green while others lacked the normal green coloration and subsequently died. Other seedlings appeared green during the early stage of development but did not grow beyond the cotyledonary leaf stage.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39432

Growth performance of gabi as affected by fertilizer levels and population densities


Silvestre, JC; Oliva, AG
Abstract Bibliography of USM Graduate Research (1978-1988); Vol 1; 1988; p24

Abstract:
A significant difference in yield and agronomic characters were observed in the two varieties of gabi planted. Kalpao performed better than the native variety. Kalpao also produced significantly higher number of suckers, longer marketable corms at higher rate of fertilizer application. Likewise, with higher population density, more corms were produced. Kalpao performed better at 60-60-60 kg NPK/ha at 80 plants/20 sq. m. No significant difference was obtained in the interaction effect between population density and fertilizer level. Four diseases were prevalent, namely: Sclerotium rot, Phytophthora leaf blight, anthracnose leaf spot and gabi mosaic.

Availability :
Library; University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; North Cotabato




NO. 39431

Cultural management studies on upland taro: Effects of cultivation systems on growth and yield of taro and incidence of associated weeds


Pardales, JRJr; Villamayor, FGJr
Annuals of Tropical Research 5(1): ?p (1983)

Abstract:
Two croppings were conducted to determine the effects of 2 levels of land preparation and different post planting cultivation systems on the performance of upland taro and weed incidence. Plowing and harrowing once or twice with a carabao-drawn plow resulted in the same corm yield. The vegetative growth, biological yield of main plants, weight of rhizomes, number rhizomes/m2 and harvest index were also not affected by levels of land preparation. The different postplanting cultivation systems likewise did not significantly affect the above parameters including main corm yield. This effect was attributed largely to the adequate weed control provided by the cultivation systems. Off-baring with carabao-drawn plow at 2 weeks after planting (WAP) + handweeding at 3 WAP + hilling-up at 5 WAP consistently gave high return of investment and required least cost in producing 1 kg of main corms. Handweeding was the most expensive operation. Apparently, one plowing and harrowing is sufficient for upland taro as postplanting cultivation is employed with adequate weed control measures.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39515

Performance of gabi with rice intercrop as affected by the system of planting and rate of fertilizer application


Libunao, WH; GArcia, DS
Abstracts of Completed Research and Development Projects (1984- 1994); Munoz, Nueva Ecija: Central Luzon State University; 1986; p44

Abstract:
An experiment was conducted at the CLSU Field Experiment Station from August, 1985 to February, 1986 under three systems of planting namely: single row, double row and triple row using fertilizer rates as unfertlized, 65-65-65 kg NPK/ha, 75-75-75 kg NPK/ha, 85-85-85 kg NPK/ha and 95-95-95 kg NPK/ha. Gabi plants in single row system of planting was badly affected by the intercropping of rice. Gabi plants in this system of planting were shorter (77.19 cm height), produced smaller corms (10.03 cm length and 3.15 cm diameter) and low yield (11.24 ton/ha). While those in triple row system of planting were taller (177.24 cm height), produced bigger corms (12.43 cm length and 5.3 cm diameter) and more yield (25.93 tons/ha). Rice intercrop was also significantly affected by the system of planting. Rice plants in single row system of planting gabi were taller (95.97 cm) and produced more yield (2.97 tons/ha) compared those intercropped with triple rows of gabi which produced lower yield (1.96tons/ha). Taller gabi and rice plants were recorded from plots fertilized with 95-95-95 kg NPK/ha. Plants fertilized with this rate of fertilizer gave better yield, 19.56 tons/ha and 2.43 tons/ha for gabi and rice.

Availability :
Library; Central Luzon State University; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Philippines




NO. 39830

Identification of post-harvest disease on gabi corms in North Cotabato


Cordero, JL; Silvestre, JC
University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; North Cotabato

Abstract Bibliography of Research; Dept. of Plant Pathology; USM; Kabacan; North Cotabato (1977-1988) Vol. 1: 73; 1983

Abstract:
The result of the study showed that there were four fungal pathogens found associated with gabi corms, namely: species of Fusarium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Rhizopus. Result of the pathogenicity tests further showed that all identified organisms caused infection on gabi corms, as indicated by positive result manifected in terms of rotting symptom.

Availability :
Dept. of Plant Pathology; University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; North Cotabato; Philippines




NO. 39833

Araceous and nonaraceous hosts of taro feathery mosaic disease


Palomar, MK; Duatin, JY; Palermo, VG
Annales of the Tropical Research; Vol. 6; ?p; 1984

Abstract:
Six plant species belonging to Araceae and one species of Solanaceae were infected with taro feathery mosaic disease. Typhonium trilobatum (L.) Schott, Dieffenbachia maculata, Dieffenbachia sp., and Datura metel L. were highly susceptible while Xanthosoma sp. was moderately susceptible. Caladium bicolor (Ait.) Vent. showed stunting and leaf distortion while Cyrtosperma merkussii (Schott) Merrill was the only species which showed latent infection. Dieffenbachia spp. had an average incubation period of 4.5 days followed by D. metel with 7.8 days; T. trilobatun, 13.5 days; Xanthosoma sp., 14.4 days; C. bicolor, 17.6 days and C. merkussii, 18 days. Back-inoculation to taro showed the positive presence of taro feathery mosaic in these plants.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39828

Identification of foliar disease of gabi in North Cotabato


Bongcawil, FG; Silvestre, JC
Dept. of Plant Pathology; College of Agriculture; University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; North Cotabato; Philippines

Abstract Bibliography of Research; Dept. of Plant Pathology; USM; Kabacan; North Cotabato (1977 to 1988) Vol. 1: 73; 1983

Abstract:
A study aimed at identifying foliar diseases of gabi occurring in five municipalities of North Cotabato showed that leaf blight caused by Phythopthora colocasia Racc., anthracnose leaf spot caused by Colletotrichum sp., and two unidentified diseases one caused by a bacterium and other by a virus, gave a blighted appearance to the plant. Leaf blight, anthracnose leaf spot, and bacterial blight diseases were observed to be more prevalent in the municipalities of Libungan and Tulunan. Percentage infection ranged from 6.0 to 14.83%. The varieties were classified based on the color of the petioles regardless of their source. The green-petioled varieties were seemingly more susceptible to disease infections than the violet-petioled ones.

Availability :
Dept. of Plant Pathology; College of Agriculture; University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; North Cotabato; Philippines




NO. 39829

Bioassay and control of Phythopthora leaf blight (Phytophthora colocasiae Racc.) of gabi using ten fungicides


Carpentero, LP; Silvestre, JC
Abstract Bibliography of Research; Dept. of Plant Pathology; USM; Kabacan; North Cotabato (1977-1988) Vol. 1: 73-74; 1983

Abstract:
The result of the bioassay test revealed that three of the ten fungicides tested showed effectiveness against Phytophtora colocasiae Racc. Namely: Delesen MX (2.5 g/100 ml water), Brassicol (3.6 g/100 ml water), and Galben (2 g/100 ml water) with respective zones of inhibition means of 2.43 mm, 2.06 mm and 1.99 mm. Among the tested fungicides in vivo, Delsen MX gave the lowest percentage infection with a mean of 20% disease index, followed by Manzate, Galben, and Brassicol with means of 21, 23, and 24%, respectively, and which were rated moderately effective.Delsen MX gave the mean disease reductions of 47.57% followed by Mansate, Galben and Brassicol with means of 44.75%, 39.47% and 36.84%, respectively.

Availability :
Dept. of Plant Pathology; University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; North Cotabato; Philippines




NO. 39831

The influence of fertilizer rates and population densities on the occurrence and severity of gabi diseases


Gamit, LR; Silvestre, JC
University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; North Cotabato

Abstract Bibliography of Research; Dept. of Plant Pathology; USM; Kabacan; North Cotabato (1977-1988) Vol. 1: 74; 1983

Abstract:
Three fungal diseases and one viral disease were found to infect gabi regardless of fertilizer rate applied and population density used. The three fungal diseases namely: anthracnose, leaf blight, and Sclerotium blight occurred at vegetative to maturity stages while the virus disease was found only during maturity stage. Plants fertilized with a rate of 60-60-60 kg NPK/ha gave the lowest mean of infection index of 16.0% while the control gave the highest mean percentage infection of 26.29%, plants applied at 30-30-30 kg NPK/ha has the highest anthracnose leaf blight infection mean of 40.94%, Phytophthora leaf blight infection was significantly lower in comparison.

Availability :
Dept. of Plant Pathology; University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; North Cotabato; Philippines




NO. 39834

Incidence, symptom development and transmission of taro feathery mosaic disease


Palomar, MK; Gloria, RP; Napiere, CM
Annales of the Tropical Research 5 (3 & 4): ?p; 1983

Abstract:
A survey of taro-growing areas in Eastern and Central Visayas showed about 10% infection with taro feathery mosaic disease (TFMD). TFMD-infected plants produced the characteristic feathery mosaic with or without mottling of leaves. The symptoms would sometimes be a slight green streak/irregular spots along or in between leaf veins.Symptoms of infection may disappear from a mature leaf and then reappear on the young leaf.Using the Kalpao variety of taro, manual inoculation showed 70% infection after 12.4 days of incubation while insect inoculation gave 63% infection after 15.2 days. The taro planthopper, Tarophagus proserpina Kirk., was found to be a vector of taro feathery mosaic disease.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39853

Seaweed (Eucheuma sp.), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) and gabi (Colocasia esculenta Schott) as culture medium ingredients for some fungal pathogens


Montesclaros, LB
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Philippine Phytopathology 24: 57; 1988

Abstract:
The suitability of seaweed of "gozo" carrageenan as a substitute for commercial agar in the preparation of culture media for Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., Helminthosporium maydis Nish. Miy., Pestalotiopsis sp., Cercospora henningsii Allescher, and Sphaceloma batatas Saw. was examined. The potential of sweet potato and gabi as substitutes for white potato in PDA with selected "gozo" carrageenan concentrations was also determined. Seaweed carrageenan was found to be an excelent substitute for commercial agar in the preparation of PDA and Onion Agar. S. rolfsii., H. maydis, C. henningsii, S. batatas and Pestalotiopsis sp., exhibited the best mycelial growth in 30, 45, 25, 20 and 45 g/li "gozo" carrageenan, respectively.For food sporulation/sclerotial formation and high percent spore germination, 30 g/li "gozo" carrageenan was superior for S. rolfsii and H. maydis; for S. batatas, 20 g/li; and for Pestalotiopsis sp., 40 g/li. C. henningsii, grown in PDA and in medium with "gozo" carageenan substitute, did not sporulate. Sweet potato at 300 g/li can replace white potato in PDA for culturing i while gabi at 500 g/li can be used for Pestalotiopsis sp.

Availability :
Main library; U.P. Los Banos; College; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 39856

Relationship between taro feathery mosaic disease: its insect vector Tarophagus proserina Kirk


Palomar, MK
Annals of Tropical Research 9 (2); 1987

Abstract:
Adults and nymphs of the taro planthooper, Tarophagus proserpina Kirk., were equally efficient in transmitting taro feathery mosaic disease. Both the minimum acquisition feeding period and minimum inoculation feeding period were about 5 min. A single insect could induce the disease in healthy plant and percentage of infection increased as the number of insects feeding was also increase. Starving the insects for 1-6 hours prior to acquisition feeding produced more infected plants than shorter or longer starvation periods. Infective insects could transmit the disease until death and most individuals transmitted the pathogen intermittently.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 40027

How important a food is winged bean in Papua New Guinea?


Claydon, A
Department of Chemistry; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Science in New Guinea 6(3): 144-153(1978-1979)

Availability :
Library; National Herbarium; Division of Botany; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40006

Diseases of taro


Sickey, B
University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Science in New Guinea 1(3-4): 45-50(1973)

Availability :
Library; National Herbarium; Division of Botany; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40071

Virus diseases of taro


Pearson, MN
Department of Biology; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Harvest 7(3): 136-138(1981)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40078

Preventing seasonal shortages of root crops


Siki, BF
Highlands Agriculture Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 6(2): 61-64(1980)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40086

Virus diseases of taro (Colocasia esculenta) and Xanthosoma sp.in Papua New Guinea


Shaw, DE; Plumb, RT; Jackson, GVH
Department of Primary Industry; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 30(4): 71-97(1979)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40097

Influence of sett size on growth and yield of Taro (Colocasia esculenta)


Bourke, RM; Perry, CH
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 27(4): 115-120(1976)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40111

Resistance of Colocasia esculenta to leaf blight caused by Phytophtora colocasiae


Hicks, PG
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 19(1): 1-4(1967)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40128

Some cultural practices observed in the Simbai administrative area, Madang province


Burnett, RM
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Aiome; Milne Bay Province; Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea Agricultural Journal 16(2-3): 79-84(1963)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40154

Agriculture and population in the Mortlock islands


Boag, AD; Curtis, RE
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Bougainville; Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea Agricultural Journal 12(1): 20-27(1959)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40188

Taro (Colocasia esculenta) in the New Guinea Highlands


Smith, TB
Department of Geography; University of Cambridge; UK

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 1; p134-147

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40189

Preliminary results of a survey of taro (Colocasia esculenta) cultivation on the Gazelle peninsula of New Britain


Rangai, SS
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 1; p123-133

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40195

Subsistence gardening in the Hoskins oil palm scheme


Benjamin, C; Wapi, I
Department of Primary Industry; West New Britain Province; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 1; p168-175

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40198

Traditional leafy vegetables of Papua New Guinea: Aibika (Hibiscus manihot)


Westwood, V; Kesevan, V
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 2; p391-395

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40218

The role of plant breeding in the improvement of food crops in Papua New Guinea


Khan, TN
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p117-125

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40228

Disease resistance in plants and its role in crop production strategy and tactics in Papua New Guinea


Putter, CAJ
Vudal Agricultural College; East New Britain province; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p261-274

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40240

Tubers


Sillitoe, P
Social Anthropology; La Trobe University; USA

Roots of the earth: crops in the highlands of Papua New Guinea; Section 1; Washington; 1983; p29-52

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40266

Changing food supply systems in the Eastern inland Manus


Rooney, WJ
Department of History; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka, 14-18th July 1980; Part 2; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1975; p273-278

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40276

Crops; staples


Twohig, A(ed)
Appropriate Technology Development Institute; Lae; Papua New Guinea

Liklik buk: a sourcebook for development workers in Papua New Guinea; Lae; Liklik Buk Information Centre; PNG University of Technology; 1986; p50-66

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40278

Crops; traditional vegetables


Twohig, A(ed)
Appropriate Technology Development Institute; Lae; Papua New Guinea

Liklik buk; a sourcebook for development workers in Papua New Guinea; Lae; Liklik Buk Information Centre; PNG University of Technology; 1986; p74-81

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40288

Notes on traditional cultivation and subsistence crops


Godyu, DL; Godyu, ME
Department of Primary Industry; Eastern Highlands province; Papua New Guinea

Six studies in subsistence agriculture; Department of Primary Industry Extension Bulletin No.11; 1980; p25-30

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40313

A students'guide to Monocotyledons of Papua New Guinea, part 1


Johns, RJ(ed); Hay, A(ed)
Forestry Department; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea

The Office of Forest; 1981; iip; 90p; Papua New Guinea Forestry College training manual vol.13

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40390

Papua New Guinea food problems: time for action


Bourke, RM; Carrad, B; Heywood, P
Department of Primary Industry; Kainantu; Eastern Highlands province; Papua New Guinea

Department of Primary Industry Research Bulletin No.29; 1981; 42p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40395

Illustrated notes on flowering, flowers, seed and germination in taro (Colocasia esculenta)


Shaw, DE
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Konedobu; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Port Moresby; Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; 1975; Research Bulletin No.13; p39-60

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40437

Plant genetic resources of Papua New Guinea


Charles, AE; Kesavan, V
Department of Primary Industry; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of South East Asian Workshop on Plant Genetic Resources, Los Banos, Phillipines, 1977; p37-46

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40444

Taro


Rangai, SS
Department of Primary Industry; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1977; 12p; Rural Development Handbook No.12

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40489

The effects of sett size and desuckering on yield of Colocasia esculenta (L.)Scott var. esculenta


Hombunaka, PPH
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Thesis; Port Moresby; Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; 1985; 32p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40534

Intensification of subsistence agriculture on the Nembi plateau, Papua New Guinea 1. General introduction and inorganic fertilizer trials


D'Sonza, E; Bourke, RM
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Department of Primary Industry; Aiyura; Kainantu; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 34(1-4): 19-28(1986)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40575

Illustrated notes on flowering, flowers, seed and germination of taro (Colocasia esculenta)


Shaw, DE
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Konedobu; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Port Moresby; Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; 1975; Research Bulletin No.13; p39-60

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40587

The sweet potato in subsistance agriculture


Kimber, JA
Highlands Agricultural Experiment SStation; Aiyura; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 23(3-4): 80-101(1972)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40628

Statistical report on Enga Provincial smallholding crop survey - 1979/80


Waliji, ZA
Department of Primary Industry; Konedobu; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Rural Statistics Bulletin No.5; Konedobu; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; vp; 7p

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40653

A Simple how to make local chips manual


Paskua, M
Appropriate Technology Development Institute (ATDI); Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe

ATDI Series; Appropriate Technology Development Institute; University of Technology; 1989; 31p

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40676

The effect of oxygen, humidity and temperature on sprouting and deterioration in sweet potato and taro tubers


Kuso, J
Apropriate Technology and Development Institute; University of Technology; Lae; Morobe

Appropriate Technology and Development Institute; University of Technology; 1989; 23p

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 50005

Fertilizing taro in the lowlands of Papua New Guinea


Akus, W; Pisea, T; Kriosaki, P; Ghodake, RD
Bubia Agricultural Research Centre; Department of Agriculture and Livestock; PO Box 1629; Papua New Guinea

Palawija News 8(1): 1-7(1991)

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 60109

Response of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) to N, P and K fertilizers application on regosol
Tanggapan tanaman talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) terhadap pemupukan N, P, dan K pada tanah regosol

Sumardi, SF
Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Postgraduate Education; Gadjah Mada University; 1985; 69p

Availability :
Faculty of Postgraduate Education; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 60250

Study on some species and cultivars of Colocasia, Alocasia and Xanthosoma as carbohydrate food sources in Manokwari and the surroundings
Mengenal jenis-jenis dan kultivar Colocasia sp., Alocasia sp. dan Xanthosoma sp. sebagai bahan makanan penghasil karbohidrat di daerah Manokwari dan sekitarnya

Mat, L.
Thesis; Manokwari; Faculty of Agriculture, Husbandry and Forestry; Cenderawasih University; 1979; 40p

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor: Indonesia




NO. 60281

Preparation of glucose from various tuber crops and the effort of changing it into fructose
Pembuatan glukosa dari beberapa ubi-ubian dan usaha untuk mengubahnya menjadi fruktosa

Mudjiran, SR
Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Postgraduate Studies; Gadjah Mada University; 1984; 58p

Availability :
Faculty of Postgraduate Studies; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 60357

Role of taro in the effort of supporting food and nutrition
Peranan talas dalam usaha kecukupan pangan dan gizi

Tarik (13): 37-38(1981)

Availability :
Faculty of Agricultural Technology Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 61913

Preliminary study on glycosides and determination of cyanide in the leaves of Alocasia indica (Lour.) Koch and Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott
Penelitian pendahuluan glikosid dan penetapan kadar asam sianida dalam daun Alocasia indica (Lour.) Koch dan Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott

Sudarsih, S.; Suhastuti
S1 Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Pharmacy; Gadjah Mada University; 1979; 46p

Availability :
Faculty of Pharmacy; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 62510

Relationship between soil humidity and the growth and tuber yield of some taro cultivars
Hubungan kelembaban tanah dengan pertumbuhan tanaman dan hasil ubi beberapa jenis talas

Sumardi, S.F.; Harsono, S.
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Laporan Penelitian Proyek PPPT-UGM [Research Report of "PPPT-UGM" Project] (8/L): 1-19 (1981/1982)

Availability :
Gadjah Mada University, Central Library




NO. 62525

Measurement of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) leaf area by quadratic function
Pengukuran luas daun talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) dengan fungsi perpangkatan

Fatimah, S.
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Ilmu Pertanian [Agricultural Science] 4 (4): 167-171 (1987)

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 62541

Effect of seed size on the growth and tuber yield in taro (Colocasia esculenta)
Pengaruh besar bibit terhadap pertumbuhan dan hasil ubi tanaman talas (Colocasia esculenta)

Fatimah, S.
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Karya Penelitian Universitas Gadjah Mada [Research Contribution of the Gadjah Mada University] 1 (1): 85-92 (1985)

Availability :
Gadjah Mada University, Central Library




NO. 63955

Preliminary study of glycosides and determination of cyanides content in Alocasia indica (Lour) Koch. and Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott. leaves
Penelitian pendahuluan glikosida dan penetapan kadar sianida dalam daun Alocasia indica (Lour) Koch. dan Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott.

Sudarsih, S.; Suhastuti
S1 Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Pharmacy; Gadjah Mada University; 1979; 46 p

Availability :
Faculty of Pharmacy; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 64438

Effect of seedling size on the growth and tuber yield of taro (Colocasia esculenta)
Pengaruh besar bibit terhadap pertumbuhan dan hasil ubi tanaman talas (Colocasia esculenta)

Fatimah, S.; Widodo
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Research Report; PPPT-UGM Project (51): 1-19 (1984)

Availability :
Gadjah Mada University, Central Library




NO. 64440

NPK fertilization on taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)
Pemupukan NPK pada tanaman taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Sumardi, S.F.; Harsono, S.; Soejono, T.
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Research Report; PPPT-UGM Project (14): 1-15 (1980/1981)

Availability :
Gadjah Mada University, Central Library




NO. 64443

Effect of planting distance on taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) tuber
Pengaruh jarak tanam terhadap ubitalas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Fatimah, S.; Widodo
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Research Report; PPPT-UGM Project (12): 1-18 (1985)

Availability :
Gadjah Mada University, Central Library




NO. 64450

Taro plant multiplication by using various kinds of plant parts
Perkembangbiakan tanaman talas dengan berbagai macam bagian tanaman

Fatimah, S.; Waluyo, S.
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Research Report; PPPT-UGM Project (46/L): 1-21 (1982/1983)

Availability :
Gadjah Mada University, Central Library




NO. 65135

Traditional agroforestry at Gunung Bunder II village, Cibungbulang subdistrict, Bogor district, West Java
Agroforestri tradisional di desa Gunung Bunder II, Kecamatan Cibungbulang, Kabupaten Bogor, Jawa Barat

Priarso, S.R.
S1 Thesis; Jakarta; Faculty of Biology; Nasional University; 1986; 56 p

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office




NO. 65161

Effects of drying and storage on the seeds germination of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)
Pengaruh pengeringan dan penyimpanan terhadap perkecambahan biji talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Roemantyo
S1 Thesis; Jakarta; Faculty of Biology; Nasional University; 1984; 78 p

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office




NO. 65344

Interaction between N and K fertilizer with paddy straw application on the growth and yield of taro (Colocasia esculenta)
Interaksi pemberian pupuk N dan K dengan pemberian jerami pada pertumbuhan dan produksi talas

Pambudi, A.S.
Department of Agronomy; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Karya Ilmiah; Jurusan Agronomi; Fakultas Pertanian; Institut Pertanian Bogor [Scientific Paper; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University]: 1983; 80p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 66890

Dani, an ethnic group dwelling the Baliem valley, Irian Jaya: a case study of the knowledge and utilization of plant resources
Etnobotani suku Dani di lembah Baliem-Irian Jaya: Suatu telaah tentang pengetahuan dan pemanfaatan sumber daya alam tumbuhan

Purwanto, Y.; Walujo, E.B.
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 Februari 1992; Editors: Nasution, R.E. et al p. 132-148 (1992)

Abstract:
Dani, an ethnic group dwelling the Baliem valley, Irian Jaya, is wholly dependance upon gathering, hunting and plant growing near their dwelling sites. Among 180 plant species utilized, 64 species were for house construction, 30 species for traditional medicine, 36 species for food, 15 species for ritual ceremonies, while the rest were for dyeing stuff, clothing and others. Almost 80% of the plants needed were solely depend upon their availability in the surrounding forests

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68750

Biodiversity as food resources and for plant genetic improvement
Keanekaragaman hayati sebagai sumber pangan dan perbaikan genetik tanaman

Harahap, Z.; Dimyati, A.; Moeljoprawiro, S.; Silitonga, T.S.
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Kinerja Penelitian Tanaman Pangan; Prosiding Simposium Penelitian Tanaman Pangan III [Proceedings of a Symposium on Food Crops Research III]; Jakarta/Bogor; 23-25 August 1993; Syam, M.(ed); Hermanto(ed); Kasim, H.(ed); Sunihardi(ed); 1994; p229-244

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69109

Ethnozoological survey on Melayu society and Kubu tribe in Riau and Jambi provinces: Animals and traditional medicines
Survey ethnozoology terhadap masyarakat Melayu dan suku Kubu di Propinsi Riau dan Jambi: Hewan dan obat tradisional

Maryanto, Ibnu; Saim, Ahmad; Danielsen, Fim
Research and Development Institute for Zoology; Bogor; Indonesia

Rain Forest and Resource Management, Proceeding of Norindra Seminar-Jakarta 25-26 May 1993, Indonesian Institute Science (LIPI); 1993; p61-66

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 69220

Study on several chemical characteristics of various tuber species during fermentation processes by yiests
Kajian beberapa sifat kimia selama fermentasi beberapa jenis umbian oleh ragi

Hanafiah, H.
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Agriculture; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Agriculture; University of Agriculture; 1992; 82p

Availability :
University of Agriculture; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 71128

The taro
Cay khoai nuoc

Nguyen Huu Binh
Khoai nuoc, rong rieng trong van de luong thu [the taro, canna edulis in the food problems] Scientifics publishing house, Hanoi: 23-45(1963)

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71132

The taro
Cay khoai nuoc

Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi, 1963; 23 pages.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 90657

Consumption of secondary food crops by low- and high-income households


Alkuino, JMJr
Annals of Tropical Research 9(1); 1987

Abstract:
The study attempted to identify the kinds of secondary food crops consumed by households when the normally consumed staple food is scarce or when such households experience an income squeeze. One thousand two hundred households in the Visayas region were included in the survey. The respondents were divided into high- and low-income groups based on the median income of the groups. Four secondary food crops, namely: sweet potato, plantain banana, cassava and taro were usually bought by respondents to supplement their staple food consumption. In general, more respondents in the low-income group bought plantain bananas than those who bought sweet potato and vice versa in the high-income group. Low-income households showed higher preference for cassava than high income households most notably because of its low price. Most respondents preferred sweet potato due to its easy preparation.

Availability :
Western Visayas Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Department of Agriculture; Hamungaya; Jaro; Iloilo City; Philippines




NO. 91169

Floral morphology and biology, fruit and seed set, seed germination and seedling development of taro


Pardales, JR, Jr.
Annals of Tropical Research 3(3); 1981

Abstract:
The natural flowering habit of taro was studied in a population comprising of 299 cultivars. The floral biology and the development of fruits and seeds were also determined. Very few cultivars readily produced flowers under natural conditions. Flowering in the field commenced in May and reached its peak in July or August. For many cultivars, flowering ceased towards the end of September or early October. The inflorescence of taro is a spadix type. A maximum of two spadices was present in any plant at a time. Floral abortion was very common while natural fruit and seed set were very rare. Artificial pollination within and between cultivars produced little success. Germination of taro seeds was also made and seedling development was studied. Seeds that developed from pollination within variety. Seedling development was very slow during the early stage and their vigor varied. Some seedlings were normally green while others lacked the normal green coloration and subsequently died. Other seedlings appeared green during the early stage of development but did not grow beyond the cotyledonary leaf stage.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91170

Performance of taro under lowland condition as affected by genotype, nutritional status and population density


Pardales, JR, Jr.; Villanueva, MR; Cotejo, FR, Jr.
Annals of Tropical Research 4(3); 1982

Abstract:
The local taro variety Kalpao performed better than the introduced variety Big Lehua. Kalpao had higher yield, shorter growing period and was relatively resistant to adverse growing conditions than Big Lehua. Nitrogen was a more important nutrient than P and K for growth and increased yield in lowland taro. Plant which received higher rates of N, regardless of the levels of P2O5 and K2O, consistently grew taller and produced larger leaf area. Corm yield was significantly increased with increasing rate of N. Yield of plants applied with P2O5 and K2O but without N was not significantly different from that obtained from the unfertilized plants Corm yield increased proportionally with increase in plant population. Yield of taro appeared to be associated with the number rather than the size of the corns at harvest.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91416

Storage of taro corms in wooden boxes containing various packing media


Quevedo, MA; Ramos, AD
Crop Science Society of the Philippines; c/o Institute of Plant Breeding; University of the Philippine Los Banos; College; Laguna

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 16(3): 121-125; 1991

Abstract:
Storage of taro corms in boxes with different moist packing media was undertaken. Incidence and severity of decay and weight loss were significantly low in taro corms stored in box storage with moist media than those in unpacked corms/without packing medium. The corms could be stored for as long as 3 months without affecting the eating quality. Dry matter, starch and sugar contents and sensory quality attributes of stored taro corms were not significantly affected by packing media. A slight decrease in dry matter and starch contents was observed with time of storage. The sensory quality attributes of the cooked-stored and newly harvested corms were comparable.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 100128

Study on glucose syrup processing from taro powder (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)
Studi produksi sirup glukosa dari tepung talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Gumbira-Sa'id, A.; Fauzi, A.M.; Suriadi; Subakti, E.
Department of Agricultural Industrial Technology; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Jurnal Teknologi Industri Pertanian [Agricultural Industrial Technology Journal] 6(3): 36-41(1994)

Abstract:
The powder of taro (C. esculenta) may be converted to glucose syrup enzimatically. In the preparation, the peeled taro was cut into thin slices, sun dried and ground into very fine powder. The combination of Alpha-amylase and amiloglucosidase concentrations during the process affected the quality of glucose syrup being produced. The best result (42.3% yield and 85.96% of dextrose equivalent) was obtained when taro powder was liquified by 1.8 ml of Alpha-amylase (per-kg powder), followed by saccharification with 2.0 ml of amiloglucosidase (per-kg powder).

Availability :
Research and Development Center for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100518

Effect of banana extract on the growth and shoot propagation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) in vitro
Pengaruh ekstrak pisang terhadap pertumbuhan dan perbanyakan tunas talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) secara in vitro

Erawati, V.O.A.
S1 Thesis; Bogor; Bogor Agricultural University; 1992; 56p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 101833

Effect of processing method on taro and tannia flour quality
Pengaruh metode pengolahan terhadap mutu tepung talas dan kimpul

Afdi, Edial; Sastrodipuro, Darsono; Jastra, Yulmar; Azman; Iswari, Kasma
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar on Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops]; Jusuf, A(ed); Jusuf, M. (ed); Irfan, Z(ed); Rusli, I(ed); Buharman, B (ed); Marzampi(ed); Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami; 1994; Vol.3; p.160-169

Abstract:
The study was conducted at Pariaman and food laboratory of Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops in September 1992. The local cultivars of taro and tannia were used in this experiment, in which the flour processing was made throught "gelondong", chip and "sawut". Bleaching agents were salt and sodium bisulfite solution. The concentration of salt solution were from 2 to 6 percent, while the concentration of sodium bisulfite were from 0.5 to 2.5 percent. After processed into "gelondong", chips and "sawut", taro and tania were soaked in preservatif solution for five minutes. Processing throught "sawut" and soaked in 2 percent of salt and 0.5 percent of sodium bisulfite solution gave white flour for both commodities, and its flour had low total acidity.

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 102767

Seed viability of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) after storage treatments
Daya hidup biji talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) setelah penyimpanan

Roemantyo
Prosiding Seminar Nasional Biologi XI [Proceedings of the 11th National Seminar on Biology] Ujung Pandang, 20-21 Juli 1993; Penyunting: Hassan, M.; A.Mattimu, J.G.Nelwan; M.Litaay; 1; 1995; p89-94

Abstract:
Study on seed viability of taro (C. esculenta) after storage treatments was conducted. The treatments used in this experiment were period of storage, temperature of storage cabinet and seed moisture content. The combinations of treatments were applied after storage for 6 months. The results showed that dry seeds (below 10% moisture content) still have good viability (82-86% viability) after 6 months storage in 10, 4-10 and -20oC, respectively. The problems arising from the behaviour of seeds were discussed in this paper.

Availability :
Forest Research and Development Centre (FRDC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 103571

Effect of KCl fertilization and sowing date of corn in the cocoyam-corn intercropping on the growth of weeds and the yields of cocoyam and corn plants
Pengaruh pemupukan KCl dan saat penyisipan jagung dalam sistem tumpangsari dengan kimpul terhadap pertumbuhan gulma dan hasil kedua tanaman

Sarjito, Agus; Agustono, Tridjoko; Supartoto
Faculty of Agriculture; Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia

Research Report; Purwokerto; Faculty of Agriculture; Jenderal Soedirman University; 1992; 66p

Abstract:
An experiment on the effect of KCl fertilization and sowing date of corn was conducted at the Faculty of Agriculture's Field Experiment, Jenderal Soedirman University, from July 1991 to February 1992. The aims of this experiment was to study the effect of KCl fertilization and sowing date of corn on the growth of weeds and the yields of crops in the cocoyam - corn intercropping. This experiment used factorial experiment methods with two factors, employing a Randomized Completely Block Design (RCBD), with three replications. The factors were KCl fertilization and sowing date of corn. There were three levels of KCl fertilization and three levels of sowing date of corn. The result of this experiment showed that KCl fertilization and sowing date of corn treatments caused high variation on structure and weed composition. Based on SDR value it was found that there were three kinds of very dominant weeds in the cocoyam-corn intercropping area, i.e. Cyperus rotundus L., Amaranthus spinosus L., and Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.. The effect of KCl fertilization was non significant on all of the growth and the yield components of cocoyam and corn. Delayed planted corn have no significant effect on the growth and yield components of cocoyam, but it has high significant effect on the corn yield. The highest yield of corn (6807.33 kg) was resulted at delayed planted corn 20 days after cocoyam planted. The interaction of the two have significant effect on LAI of corn only. The two and their interaction have significant effect on Land Equivalent Ratio (LER).

Availability :
Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia




NO. 103773

Study on the processing of glucose syrup from taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) powder
Studi produksi sirup glukosa dari tepung talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

E.Gumbira-Said; Fauzi, A.M.; Suriadi; Subakti, E.
Department of Technology of the Agricultural Product Industry; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia

Jurnal Teknologi Industri Pertanian [Agricultural Product Technology Journal] 4(3): 36-41(1994)

Abstract:
The powder of taro (C. esculenta) may be converted to glucose syrup enzimatically. In the preparation, the peeled taro was cut into thin slices, sun dried and ground into very fine powder. The combination of Alpha-amylase and amiloglucosidase concentrations during the process influenced the quality of glucose syrup being produced. The best result (42.3% yield and 85.96% of dextrosa equivalent) was obtained when taro powder was liquified by 1.8 ml of Alpha-amylase (per kg powder), followed by saccharification with 2.0 ml of amiloglucosidase (per-kg powder).

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 104079

Utilization of some saprophyte microorganisms and metalaksil fungicide to control of leave blight disease on taro (Phytopthora colocasiae Racib)
Penggunaan beberapa mikroorganisme saprofit dan fungisida metalaksil untuk pengendalian penyakit hawar daun talas (Phytopthora colocasiae Racib)

Erari, Derek Kornelis
Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

S2 Thesis; Bogor; Bogor Agricultural University; 1994; 62p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 104829

Germplasm collection and identification of taro in Mentawai island
Koleksi dan identifikasi plasma nutfah talas di Kepulauan Mentawai

Jusuf, M.; Marzempi; Azwar
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar on Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops] 7: 1-10(1995)

Abstract:
The survey was conducted in Mentawai island (West Sumatra) during the wet season of 1992/93. The aim was to collect all cultivars which differ in their phenotypes. From the exploration, it was collected 36 local clones, which were planted in peat soil and tidal swamp. They were mature for 6-8 months. Most of the farmers used the tubers for their own consumption. Physico-chemistry analysis in laboratory indicated that water content ranged from 61 to 84%, while carbohydrate content ranged from 2.40% to 7.67% and all clones had weak gel consistency. Clones with white flesh colour were Gettek Simagurigogo, Siaite Simaingo, Sasarewu 1, Sasarewu 2, Pulegleg and Silakkuk.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 106460

Changes in physico-chemical chacteristics of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott.) flour during extruction on various supplementation levels of rice (Oryza sativa L.)
Perubahan sifat-sifat fisikokimia tepung talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott.) selama ekstruksi pada berbagai tingkat suplementasi beras (Oryza sativa L.)

Irfan, M.
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; 1993; 99p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 106511

Study on the effect of amilose content in the processing of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott.) extrudate
Mempelajari pengaruh kadar amilosa pada pembuatan ekstrudat talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott.)

Fatah, Z.
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; 1995; 101p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 106927

Effort to vanish itchy-taste of wild taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) tuber in the processing of taro flour
Usaha menghilangkan rasa gatal umbi talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) dalam pembuatan tepung talas liar

Nuyah; Jamali, B.
Palembang Industrial Institute; Sumatera; Indonesia

Dinamika Penelitian BIPA [Research Dynamics of the Palembang Industrial Institute] 3(6): 23-28(1993)

Abstract:
This research was done to learn how to vanish itchy-taste of wild taro (C. esculenta) by using chloride acid solution in the processing of taro flour. Chloride acid concentration that were used in this research were 0.1 N (K1), 0.3 N (K2), 0.5 N (K3) and as control was used treatment without chloride acid (K0). The parameter being observed was calcium-oxalic content of taro flour. Their submersion time were 0.5 hour (L1) and 1 hour (L2). The result of this research indicated that chloride acid concentration and submersion period gave variation in calcium-oxalic content of taro flour. Compared with edible taro (calcium-oxalic content 3.43 percents), submersion treatment for 1 hour in chloride acid of 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 N and for 0.5 hour in cloride acid of 0.5 N had decreased calcium oxalic content under 3.43%.

Availability :
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 107130

Food diversification of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) flour
Penganekaragaman makanan dari tepung talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)

Yusmeiarti; Murni, M.; Silfia
Padang Research and Development Institute for Industry; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Buletin BIPD (Balai Industri Padang) [Padang Industrial Institute Bulletin] 1(3): 12-25(1995)

Abstract:
Research on food diversification of taro (C. esculenta) flour had been done. The variation use of taro flour was treatment A (without taro flour as the control), treatments B (50% of taro flour) which was used in making cookies, the cookies which were fried and deep fried. Using taro flour in making cookies as replacement of wheat flour, glutinous flour and rice flour. The result showed that organoleptic testing from cookies ovened or fried by using 50% of taro flour (treatment B) prefered to b panelist; colour, texture, taste was not significantly different with the control, while organoleptic testing, texture and taste from deep fried with using 50% of taro flour (treatment B) and 100% of taro flour (treatment C) were prefered to panelist and it was not significantly different with control. Storing cookies which were ovened and fried for three months showed that texture and taste were still normal.

Availability :
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 107287

Study of some chemical characteristics of some species of tubers during fermentation by yeast
Kajian beberapa sifat kimia selama fermentasi beberapa jenis umbian oleh ragi

Hanafiah, A.
Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Yogyakarta Agricultural College; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Yogyakarta Agricultural College; 1992; 82p

Availability :
Yogyakarta Agricultural College; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 107502

Application of simple multivariate analysis for adaptation testing of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) in Koya Barat, Jayapura
Analisis sidik peubah ganda pada parameter uji adaptasi talas (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) di Koya Barat Jayapura

Yasin HG., M.; Chalijah; Djamaluddin
Informatika Pertanian [Agricultural Information] 5(2): 273-278(1995)

Abstract:
The application of simple multivariate analysis for testing adaption of taro cultivars in Koya Barat is performed to test hypotesis H0: U(1)=U(2) vs H1=U(1)#U(2). The statistical distribution Hotelling (T2-test) is used within to reject or to accept with the value of (3.28) degrees of freedom. The results of analysis showed that there is no significant difference in yield (weigh of root/tuber), plant height, and diameter of stem between two cultivars of taro (Green taro and Red taro) in Koya Barat. The value of calculated T=10.192 and T tabel (3.28)=14.980, at 1% level of significance.

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication (CALREC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 65735

Productivity test of several lines of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk)
Uji daya hasil beberapa galur ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk) introduksi

Sulistijorini
S1 thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1986; 74p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 66030

Propagation of breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis)
Perbanyakan tanaman sukun

West Kalimantan Agricultural Information Service 6: ?p (1990)

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 106613

Utilization of wheat, taro, corn and cassava composite flour in biscuit processing
Pendayagunaan tepung komposit terigu, talas, jagung dan ubi kayu untuk pembuatan biskuit

Azman; Iswari, K.
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Balai Pengkajian Teknologi Pertanian Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar on Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops] 9: 95-101 (1996)

Abstract:
The objective of the experiment was to study the use of wheat, taro, cassava and corn composite flour in biscuit processing. The experiment was conducted at the Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops in 1993, using a Completely Randomized Design with three replications. The treatments were substitution levels of wheat flour by taro + corn and cassava + corn flour at proportion of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60%. Observations were done on gel consistency, water absorption, chemical composition, and organoleptic test. The results showed that the substitution of wheat flour by taro + corn and cassava + corn flour at proportion of 30 and 20% did not affect the quality of biscuits.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 91641

Adaptability of different field crops under lahar-laden soils


Suyat, MN; Lacson, RT; Bayot, AJ
Central Luzon State University (CLSU), Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, 3120 Philippines

Adaptability of different field crops under lahar-laden soils; Proceedings 1993; Research, Extension and Traiining; Central Luzon State University; 279 p

Abstract:
Among the tested crops, sweet potato, cassava, mungbean, peanut, cowpea, pigeon pea, corn, sorghum, soybean, sesame, and leguminous cover crops appear to be the most suitable for lahar. Although the growth and yield of these entries are not as superior as when grown under normal conditions, these crops showed better seedling vigour, uniform emergence, high percentage of survival, uniform crop and reasonable yield. These characteristics of the crops under strange environment made them suitable or adaptable to the prevailing situation in the lahar-laden areas.

Availability :
Research, Extension and Training; Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium
Email: clarrdec@ne_link.net




NO. 93340

Effects of defoliation, runner removal, and fertilization on tuber yield of taro


Abit, SE; Alferez, AC
Annals of Tropical Research 1 (2): 112-119 (1979)

Abstract:
Three degrees of defoliation (light, medium, and heavy), removal and non-removal runners and three levels of complete fertilizers were studied on taro cv. Kalpao under lowland condition. Light defoliation treatment did not affect the leaf area index but increased plant height at maturity, size to tubers, and yield compared to the under-foliated plants, and those subjected to heavy defoliation. Heavy defoliation on the other hand resulted in a significant decrease in plant height and tuber yield. The removal of runners from the mother plant markedly enhanced better growth of plants and significantly increased tuber yield as manifested by the development of larger tubers. Tubers yield and other agronomic characters significantly increased with increasing levels of complete fertilizer applied from 50 to 150kg/ha each of N1, P2O5 and K2O. There was an increase of about 2 tons of tubers for every 50kg/ha of NPK applied.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 93392

Morphological and anatomical changes of the keladi cina (Colocasia esculenta) plant in the vegetative and flowering stages


Ghani, FD
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.): p115-119

Abstract:
The crop cycle of the C. esculenta plant varies from 4 to 12 months depending on the cultivar. After planting, there is a period of rapid vegetative growth followed by in the size of the undergrown corm. Flowering in the Malaysia cultivars of C. esculenta is rare; it occurs only in a few cultivars. In the growth cycle of the plants without inflorescence, the apical meristem produces only foliar primordia which develop into leaves. In a flowering plant, the pattern is interrupted by the emergence of the floral primordia. Morphological and histological changes in the plant and meristem were observed.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93398

Anatomy and histochemistry of taro seed


Schierer, DC; Struass, MS
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon H (eds.): p121-124

Abstract:
This study reports findings on seed anatomy and histochemistry in taro (Colocasia esculenta). Perhaps because taro is propagated vegetatively, little information is available regarding taro sexual propagules (seeds). Major significance of this study is the first time observation of internal seed structure in taro and the identification of an aleurone layer. Seeds were fixed in 5% glutaradehyde and post-fixed in 2% osmium tetroxide and subsequently embedded in epoxy resin. One-micrometer thick sections were cut on an ultra-microtome and were subjected to various histochemical stains. A uniseriate aleurone layer which is rich in protein bodies is clearly differentiated as the outermost layer of the endosperm. A starchy endosperm underlies the aleurone layer. In addition to protein bodies, the aleurone layer contains starch granules and lipid bodies. The cotyledon is rich in lipin, but also contains numerous starch granules.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 92676

Ethnobotanical survey of edible aroids in the Philippines I. Farmers' beliefs, experiences and uses


Pardales Jr, JR
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 22 (1): 1-7 (1997)

Abstract:
Taro (Colocasia esculenta), yautia (Xanthosoma sagittifoliun), giant taro (Alocasia macrorrhiza), swamp taro (Cyrtosperma chamissonis) and elephant foot yam (Amorphophallus campanulatus) comprise the edible aroids (Araceae) in the Philippines. Among these, it is only taro that is culturally and economically important. Yautia is also important but only to a very limited degree. Because of their use and extent of production taro and yautia are considered as major aroids while the other three-minor aroids. The major aroids are grown largely for food in practically all parts of the country whereas, the minor aroids are planted as surety crops especially in calamity-prone areas and for processing into special food products. The minor aroids can be found in greater concentration only in certain places of the country. The people in many rural areas adhere to a lot of folk beliefs regarding increasing the size of corms, getting rid of the itchy nature and ensuring good yield of the edible aroids. The indigenous knowledge system and traditional uses of the edible aroids are two significant reasons why the edible aroids, particularly the minor ones, are still in cultivation at present in some locations.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 92956

Adaptability of different field crops under lahar-laden soils


Suyat, MW; Lacson, RT; Bayot, AJ
The Philippine Journal of Plant Industry 57 (3-40: 1-34 (1992)

Abstract:
Seventeen different annual field crops were tested on a formerly lowland rice irrigated area totally covered with lahar at a depth 1.5 to 2.0 meters primarily to determine and identify which crop can be grown suitably and successfully after the rainy season wherein the danger of lahar flow is extremely low. This study was conducted at Barangay San Antonio, Bacolor, Pampanga from November, 1991 to July, 1992. The agronomic and yield responses of the test crops were the parameters used as basis in assessing their adaptability to lahar. The test crops were critically observed under two growing scenarios (i.e. fertilized based on the recommended rate under normal condition and unfertilized). After 3 to 8 months of growth, results showed that plant growth and yield depend largely on the kind of crops and cultural and management inputs given to the. Studied growth was very evident on all test crops grown without fertilizer due to the inadequacy of nutrients present in the lahar that is necessary for the sustenance for a normal inadequacy of nutrients presents in the lahar that is necessary for the sustenance for a normal growth. Laboratory analysis of the lahar deposits in the test site revealed that it contained 0.12% total N, 0.13% total P2O5, 0.38% total K2O,0.09 S, 0.30% total Fe and 7.96 pH value. However, when applied with the recommended rate of complete fertilizer 914-14-14), there was a great manifestation that some crops could thrive and performs well in lahar.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 93013

Reaction of different corn, legume and root-crop varieties to the rice root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne graminicola golden and birch-field


Zamora, OB; Gapasin, RM; Lim, JL
Philippine Phytopathology 33 (1): 37-44 (1997)

Abstract:
This study conducted to determine the resistance/susceptibility of different corn, legume and root-crop varieties to the rice root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne graminicola and determine the inoculum density of the nematode that can affect their growth. All the corn, peanut and sweet-potato varieties evaluated were resistant to the rice root-knot nematode. No galls were developed on these varieties suggesting that they were non-host of the nematode. The mungbean variety, Taiwan green and the taro variety PSB-VG 2 (Iniito) were found moderately resistant while Mg-9 and GO-049 varieties of mungbean and taro, respectively, were found susceptible. The rest of the varieties were moderately susceptible. Pathogenicity test using different inoculum densities of M. graminicola on mungbean variety Mg-9 showed no significant effect on plant height, herbage yield and number of pods except on the weight of roots and pods. Likewise, no significant effects was observed on plant height, length of petiole and number of leaves except on top and root weights of taro variety GO-049.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 93391

Promotion of flowering, seed production and seedling screening in major edible aroids


Wilson, JE; Cable, WJ
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Raincon, H (eds.): p151-156

Abstract:
In the Pacific, Colocasia is clearly the most important of the edible aroids and Xanthosoma is spreading rapidly and widely. The less well known Alocasia macrorrhizos and Cytosperma chamissonis have more restricted distributions and are considered minor crops in the regions as a whole. They are, however, staple foods on some islands. Alocasia being frequently cultivated in Samoa and Tonga, and Cyrtosperma on atolls and low coralline islands where few other crops survive. Germplasm collections of Alocasia and Cyrtosperma have been assembled at Alafua and a genetic improvement programmeinitiated. Studies related to the promotion of flowering with gibberellic acid, hand pollination, seed germination and seedling rearing are discussed.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93511

Evidence of proteolytic enzyme activity in taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott


dela Pena, RS
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.); p157-159

Abstract:
A substrate for the assay of proteolytic activity, Azocoll, was used to demonstrate presence of protease in taro. Using 10 g samples of taro corms and 100 mg off Azocoll in 10 ml 0.05 m tris-HCl buffer incubated for 30 min at 37 C, differences in degree of proteolytic enzyme activity in some taro cultivars were detected. Due to relative speed and ease of the procedure, its development as a possible chemical method in quantification of proteolytic enzyme activity in taro and other aroids is suggested.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93513

Root crops in developing countries - An economic appraisal


Horton, D; Lynam, J; Knipscheer, H
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.); p9-39

Abstract:
Recent developing country patterns and trends in production and use of cassava, potato, sweet potato, yam and taro are documented and analyzed. Production costs for these crops are estimated and related to their marketing and uses. The roles of these crops in different ecological zones and farming systems are discussed. Research and development programs are reviewed. Some tentative projections of root and tuber crops production and use are made to the year 2000.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93526

Rhabdovinus infection of taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, from Papua New Guinea: comparison of symptomatic and asymptomatic material


Strauss, MS
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.); p181-185

Abstract:
Samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic leaves of taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, from Papua New Guinea, were fixed, embedded and sectioned for electron microscopy. Symptomatic material showed marked bobone disease virus (BDV) symptoms. Cells of infected, symptomatic tissue contained inclusions, of virions and viroplasm. The cytoplasm appeared granular and contained large numbers of polyribosomes. The chloroplasts had reduced membrane contents and increased amounts of starch. General anatomy of the leaf was altered with an increase in cell number and decrease in size of the palisade cells. In similar samples from the same plant at a later, asymptomatic, time no cellular evidence of viral infection could be detected. The cytoplasm contained fewer polyribosomes and plastids, less starch and more extensive granal membrane. Leaves had palisade anatomy like that in uninfected material.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93527

Variability in taro, Colocasia esculenta starches: sizegelation and amylose content


Strauss, MS
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.); p165-170

Abstract:
Starch of a large number of taro cultivars was examined. Mean particle sizes were determined by laser light scattering. Additional data on gelation temperature and amylose content were also assayed. Initial results indicated segregation into two distinct size classes. However, the larger sample size reveals a normal distribution for starch particle size. Gelation temperatures and amylose contents also vary about a generalized mean. Deviation from the mean is greatest for amylose content. There is no correlation between particle size and gelation temperature or amylose content. When morphological similar cultivars are compared the variation seen is less than that in the whole sample. Suggesting possible usefulness of these in characteristics assaying relatedness of closely allied cultivars. Although not of taxonomic significance, results here indicate that breeding taro to produce particular starch qualities should be possible for industrial application.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 94517

Genetic resources and development on root crops


Villamayor, FG
The Radix 9 (2): 1-7 (1987)

Abstract:
Root crops particularly cassava sweet potato, potato gabi and ubi are important carbohydrate sources in the tropics. Cassava and sweet potato are especially important in marginal areas where other crops like cereals will fail. At present, the Philippine government through ViSCA and the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) maintains a large collection of root crops except potato in the field gene-bank. It is imperative that root crops genetic resources be maintained safely so that it can be used especially by future generation. Once lost it will be very difficult to retrieve them. It may infest be lost forever.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94055

The availability of calcium from petsay, malunggay, saluyot, ampalaya, kalabasa, gabi and mustasa


Alcaraz, AP
Abstract Bibliography of FNRI Research : 24-25 (1947-1997); Nutrition News 13 (2): 4-18 (1960)

Abstract:
Calcium availability was determined in 7 local leafy vegetables by two methods, namely, balance studies and calcium deposition using albino rats as test animals. - Based on the value for skimmed milk the following result were obtained: By balance studies the percentage calcium availability was "mustasa", 96%, "petsay" and "ampalaya", 89%, "kalabasa", 88%, "malunggay", 82% "gabi", 73% and "saluyot" 69%. - Results of the two method did not parallel each other even though the protein content of the experimental diets were maintained at the same level. The author believes that a closer agreement of results may be obtained by running the two methods for the same length of time. Sex had no influence on calcium utilization by rats.

Availability :
Food and Nutrition Research Institute; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 94750

Bibliography on root crops


Miranda, LK
The Radix 9(1): 13-18(1987)

Abstract:
The Philippine Root Crops Information Service (PRIS), a joint project of the Visayas State College of Agriculture (ViSCA) Library and the PRCRTC has already collected a member of bibliography dealing on root crops. Partial list of this are presented.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 93393

Salt tolerant tissue of taro: selection and constituents


Nyman, LP; Gonzales, CJ; Arditti, J
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.): p133-142

Abstract:
A salt-tolerant tissue was selected from callus of Colocasia esculenta var. antiquorum initiated on solid Knop's medium by sub-culturing for 4 years on modified Linsmaier-Skoog medium containing 100-700 milliomoles (10%-70%) artificial seawater. Plantlets were initiated by transferring the tissue to TIBA containing solid medium. Cell wall thickness, cell size, chloroplast size and structure, and starch grains are affected by the concentration of seawater. The same is true for levels of inorganic, calcium oxalate, chlorophyll, protein, and secondary and quaternary alkaloids. These changes may be related to salinity tolerance and adaptation.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93396

The potential of taro in some South Pacific Island


Wang, JK; dela Pena, RS
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.): p109-114

Abstract:
The South Pacific has more than a thousand scattered islands, large and small. This paper presents potential used of taro (Colocasia esculenta) in American Samoa, Western Samoa, the Cook Islands, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, The Solomon Islands, and Tonga. The development of taro silage and its use as animal feed, especially swine feed, is emphasized; and pig feeding trial data from recent University of Hawaii and American Samoa Government collaborative studies have been summarized in the paper. The potential of taro alcohol as a fuel for remote island and the potential of taro such as a raw material in cosmetics manufacturing are also discussed.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93400

A root crop statistics: a world perspective


Chandra, S
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.): p41-46

Abstract:
Analysis of the world root crop statistics shows that main producers are China, Nigeria and Brazil. The main crops are cassava and sweet-potatoes. Most of the world production is consumed as subsistence products on the farms. Contribution of tropical root crops in the national economy of Papua New Guinea, Fiji and Japan, respectively, showed a sharply declining influence. Future outlook for tropical root crops is likely to be strongly influenced by population growth and urbanization. Urbanization is likely to pose major problem for food production in the developing nations.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93531

Breeding strategies for controlling diseases of taro in Solomon Islands


Patel, MZ; Saelea, J; Jackson, GVH
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.); p143-149

Abstract:
Progress towards breeding taro resistant to four severe diseases is described. Resistance to Phytophthora leaf blight was found in a wild taro from Thailand and appears to be monogenic and dominant. A back-cross program to incorporate resistance to local cultivars has begun. Different reaction to dual infection by taro large and small bacilliform viruses exists in local cultivars. when those tha are resistant buy low yielding ("female") were crossed with others that have high yields and are susceptible ("male") all the progeny died. Resistance is now sought from selfed and inter-crosses F1 plants derived from further 'male' x 'female' crosses. The only cultivar resistant to a corm and root rot caused by the nematode Hirschmanniella miticausea is low yielding and corms and leaves are acrid when cooked. Crosses have been made between this cultivar and those with more favoured taste and higher yields. The possibility of combining the breeding programs is discussed.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 94452

An experimental study on the effects of Colocasia esculenta Schott(gabi) stalk extract on blood coagulation


Abellardo, ES; Angulo, Lopez, CT; Abella, FEM; Abuato, R, Jr
Inventory of Health Researches: 137-138(1994-1996)

Abstract:
This study investigated the effects of Colocasia esculenta on the process of blood coagulation. In vivo effects on bleeding time were measured by dipping the bleeding rat tail in the fresh extract. In vivo effects on clotting time using Lee and White method were measured by mixing equal amounts of human whole blood and ethanol extract. The specific pathway affected in the coagulation cascade was determined by mixing equal amounts of human plasma and plant extract and measuring the effects on Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time(APTT), Thrombin Time(TT), and Prothrombin Time(PT). Distilled water and NSS were used as control. Results showed significant decrease in the bleeding time as well as APTT, PT, and TT of human plasma mixed with the plant extract. This means that the effects of Colocasia esculenta is not on blood coagulation but may be on other phases of hemeostasis such as vasoconstriction, platelet function, or inhibition of fibrinolysis and warrant further investigation. Control and experimental values were analyzed using one-tailed t-test.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 94507

Nature of postharvest disease resistance in taro(Colocasia Esculenta (L.) Schott)


del Rosario, CS; Palomar, MK; Molato, AP
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 22(2): 112-117(1997)

Abstract:
The effects of different factors on the reaction of taro corms to infection by Botryodiplodia theobromae (Pat.), Fusarium solani (Mart.) Sacc. and Sclerotium Rolfsii (Sacc.) were investigated. Resistance or susceptibility of taro corms to the three pathogens was not significantly affected by dry matter and total sugar contents of taro corms. The same fungal pathogens did not infect at 3-11C in resistant taro(VG-1 variety)stored for 3 weeks. Higher levels of antifungal compounds were present in infected resistant corms compared to infected susceptible corms. Extracts from infected resistant VG-1 corms inhibited the mycelial growth of B.theoromae, F.solani and S.rolfsii. Furthermore, in resistant VG-1 tarro, injury was a prerequisite to the establishment of infection; severity of rot disease was largely affected by the degree and kind of injury inflicted on the corm. In susceptible VG-2 taro, rotting was severe both in uninjured and injured corms.

Availability :
Crops Science Society of the Philippines Secretariat, Institute of Plant Breeding, University of Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 94521

Gabi:prospects for production and processing


Ferraren, D
The Radix 13(2): 13(1991)

Abstract:
Commercialization of gabi for food products or as source of "gum" or paste holds great promise for local farmers. The PRCRTC has a long standing effort in improving the status of gabi from being a substance to a cash crop. The food technologies and scientists showed down due to budgetary constraints.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 93399

Water use and efficiency in lowland taro production


dela Pena, RS; Melchor, FM
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-24 February 1983; Shideler, FS. and Rincon, H. (eds.); p97-101

Abstract:
Experiments were conducted to determine th effects of different rates of water flow and depth of flooding on the yield and yield components lowland taro. Using rates of water flow of 280,470 l/ha/day to 981,640 l/ha/day (30,000 gal/A/day to 105,000 gal/A/day, no significant difference were obtained in total corm, marketable cormel and total yields averaged 23.3; 31.7; and 94. tonsha, respectivelty. Water use efficiency calculated on the basis of litters water needed to produce kilogram of taro corms was 800 l/kg for the lowest rate of water flow and 2,790 l/kg for the highest. Yields of lowland taro decreased as depth of flooding increased from 0cm to 20cm. Highest yields were obtained from plots where water depth was maintained at 0cm. Flooding to a depth of 12 and 20cm drastically reduced marketable cormel yields coursing a severe drop in total yield. Optimum depth flooding in lowland taro appear to be 4 to 8cm as this is sufficient to keep weeds under control without causing severe yield at 20cm depth of flooding.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 94541

Tillage practices in contorous hillside forming of root crops


Abenoja, EA; baterna, JP
The Radix 4(2): 9-11(1982)

Abstract:
The study aimed to identify the minimum tillage requirement of root crops planted on hillsides, compare different tillage practices for root crop production and make recommendations about tillage practices suitable for hillside root crop production. The study consisted of 3 experimental setups such as setup for cassava, sweet potato and gabi using six treatments for each setup. Generally tillage practices did not significantly influence the yield of cassava, sweet potato, and gabi. However, tuber yield in the tilled plots was slightly higher than in the untilled plots. The effect of tillage practices on soil erosion was not apparent probably due to rapid infiltration of rain water of the newly opened forest land.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94542

effects of temperature and methods f preparation on the storability of upland taro corms


Pardales, JR; dela Peña, RS; Melchor, FM
The Radix 4(2): 12-14(1982)

Abstract:
The study was conducted to determine the effects o temperature and methods of preparation on the storage life of upland taro corms, a factorial experiment was employed using a)the presence or absence of growing points and the length of intact petioles, and b)the storage temperature. The overall result of this study implies that the storability of upland taro corms under normal temperature conditions is rendered short by both physiological and microbial determination cold storage could prevent such deterioration and thus could lengthen the shelf life of taro corms. Therefore, the availability of refrigeration units is extremely useful in storage of taro corms.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94578

Technoguide or lowland gabi production


dela Cruz, N
Technoguides for Agricutural Production and Livelihood Projects(Third Edition): 23-26(1993)

Abstract:
This techno guide summarizes some of the recent technology in gabi production. It includes site selection, land preparation, system of planting, weed control, fertilizer application, pest and disease control, and the cost and return analysis for one-hectare production.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94599

Physico-chemical properties of some Philippine rootcrops starches


Madamba, LSP; Aurellana, BH; Rodriguez, JB; Gutierrez, I
NRCP Research Bulletin 35(1): 62-81(1980)

Abstract:
A physico-chemical study conducted on the following different minor root crops, gabi, yam, pongapong, arrow root and yabyaben, showed that all the sample root crops are potential sources of industrial starch, they being all rich in carbohydrates and low in other constituents like fat, ash, crude protein and crude fiber content. They, therefore, could be substituted for corn starch and other high value crops whose release from industrial use will improve the food economy of the country.

Availability :
Ateneo de Manila University




NO. 94655

Performance of camote (Ipomoea batatas) and gabi (Colocasia esculenta) as alley crops in agroforestry farming system


Baya, WA
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21(sup. 1): 33 (1996)

Abstract:
The growth and yield of camote (Ipomoea batatas) and gabi (Colocasia esculenta) including changes in soil fertility were monitored for a period of three years (1989-92) under alley cropping scheme of agroforestry farming system involving selected multipurpose tree species (MPTS) as hedgerows. The trees used as hedgerows were Flemingia congesta, Gliricidia sepium and Sesbania sesban. The study was conducted at the grassland portion of the University of Eastern Philippines, Catarman, Northern Samar. The split-plot design in RCBD in three replicates was used in laying out the field experiment. Results showed that the species of trees used as hedgerows did not significantly affect the growth and yield of gabi and camote in the first in terms of influence to the growth and yield of gabi and camote. This is followed in descending order by Gliricidia and Sesbania. The significant contribution of each hedgerow species to the nutrient content of the soil particularly OM, P and K is the main reason why each hedgerow had significantly enhanced the growth and yield performance of both the alley crops and the hedgerows themselves mainly through nitrogen fixation and nutrient cycling. Gliricidia exhibited the highest overall fresh weight herbage yield at 84.87 t/ha which did not differ significantly with Flemingia's 81.28 t/ha. Sesbania has 47.66 t/ha. In terms of dry weight herbage yield, Flemingia's 28.58 t/ha significantly outyielded Gliricidia's 21.22 t/ha which in turn significantly differed with Sesbania's 14.30 t/ha.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 94743

Storage medium of taro corms


Quevedo, MA; Ramos, AD
The Radix 10(1&2): 6-7(1988)

Abstract:
Taro corm can be stored beyond its usual storage life of 14 days with the use of rice hull ash. The optimum moisture content of the storage medium however, should be established to further improve the efficacy of the medium. Other potential storage media should also be tried so that whenever rice hulls are not available, other media could be used.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 95550

Improved processing of ubi, gabi and carrot noodles


Guanzon, MP; Peralta, CR; Dampil, ES
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights '99;PCARRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines;2000;143p.;Belen,EH(ed);pp.15-16

Abstract:
Ubi (Dioscorea alata), gabi (Colocasia esculenta), and carrot (Daucus carota L.) are among those crops whose products have high potential both for local consumption and export especially when these are in processed form. The products were found good up to 4-5 months. This technology can give a return on investment (ROI) of 78% for ubi, 74% for gabi, and 68% for carrot.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 93397

Anatomy and histochemistry of taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, leaves


Stein, BD; Stranss, MS; Schierer, DC
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.); p125-130

Abstract:
Taro (Colocasia esculenta) leaves are composed of a multi-layered palisade and air-filled spongy mesophyll. Vascular traced are encircled by a ring of vacuolate cells which may extend to the upper and lower epidermis. Abaxial and adaxial stomata are present, with the former being more numerous. Subsidiary cells appear to be of the para-mesaperigenous type and guard cells are sunken with plastids that display few membranes, but prominent starch inclusions. The epidermal cells are highly vacuolate with prominent protrusions of extensions on the exposed surfaces. Despite the presence of the bundle sheath, no conclusive evidence pathway. In light of other morphological and histochemical features of the leaf this appears even more unlikely.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 96472

Production and marketing of taro in Botolan, Zambales


Agustin, MG; Agular, CJ
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 22: 78-88 (2000-2001)

Abstract:
This study embraced the taro production, marketing and utilization of farmers in Botolan, Zambales. The descriptive survey method was used. Twenty two farmers were randomly selected and served as the respondents of this study.|The findings showed that almost all of the farmers were married. Majority of the respondents only reached the elementary level of education. The average years in farming taro were 12 years.|The farmers performed traditional practices in taro production. This includes land preparation, planting, weeding and harvesting done manually. The common variety planted by farmers was the Tagaytay variety because of good quality in terms of flesh color and taste.|The average net income of taro was P68,031.5 per hectare. The total production cost was P26,943.5. Total sales were P94,975 from the 150 bags of taro priced at P593/bag. Moreover, the return above variable cost was P90.803. The average production cost per cavan was P179.62 with the breakeven yield of 45 cavans.|All farmers sold their taro to viajeros. The viajeros channeled the tubers to different places such as Bulacan, Olongapo, Bataan and Pampanga.|The problems encountered by the farmers includes the lack of alternative market outlet, transportation from farm to market and low price for taro offered by the cooperative.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96474

Production of high-protein broiler feeds from root crops through microbial fermentation


Valdez, MTSJ; Tandoc, MG
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 21: 25-33 (1998-1999)

Abstract:
This research work was conducted to produce and evaluate the nutrient composition of fermented sweet potato, taro and cassava as broiler feeds; assess the growth performance and feed conversion efficiency of broilers fed with 10 per cent fermented rootcrop; and evaluate the cost efficiency of using these high-protein feeds.|Dried sweetpotato and cassava tubers and taro corms were separately ground and mized with a nutrient solution composed of urea, ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulfate, sucrose and vinegar to obtain the fermentable substrate. This substrate was sterilized in an autoclave, allowed to cool, and inoculated with either of two strains of fungi namely Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oligosporus. Inoculated substrates were allowed to ferment for two weeks, after which they were harvested and sundried to eliminate the odorous gaseous metabolites. Samples were taken and subjected to proximate analysis at the Animal Nutrition Analytical Service Laboratory, UPLB. The fermented or protein-enriched rootcrops were incorporated in broiler rations as 10 per cent replacements and test-fed using 84 seven-week old chicks. Broiler performance was evaluated in terms of weight gain and feed conversions efficiency. The feed cost per kilogram of broiler produced was also calculated.|Results of the study showed that the poor feeding values of sweetpotato, cassava and taro were significantly improved by fermentation using either A.niger or R.oligosporus. Increases in crude protein contents were as much as twelve-folds. Likewise, improvement in crude fat or ether extract, and ash were also noted. On the other hand, crude fiber and nitrogen-free extract decreased after fermentation. The suitability of utilizing the high-protein feeds in broiler rations was evidenced by the fact that broilers on test diets performed comparably well as those in the control lot. They exhibited similar weight responses and efficiency of feed utilization. Utilization of the high-protein fermented feeds proved more cost-efficient resulting in some amount of savings on feed costs.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96574

Biodiversity and nutritional value of some indigenous leafy vegetables in CLSU


Mateo, IG; Cacho, DR; Bala, AF
Abstracts of completed and on-going R&D projects 2001. Research, Extension and Training; Central Luzon State University (CLSU); Science City of Mu¤oz, Nueva Ecija; Philippines; (no pagination)

Abstract:
A survey inside the Central Luzon State University reservation area was conducted to document the presence of indigenous leafy vegetables. Based on the survey, more than ten species/groups were identified growing in the reservation area. Among the species being cultivated or grown commercially are the upland Kangkong, sweet potato and gabi. Some species are growing in the wild.|The nutritional value of some indigenous leafy vegetables were taken from available references in the library and from the web site. It is interesting to note that the nutritional value of these vegetables are far higher than the traditionally cultivated species.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 96533

Treatment of domestic wastewater using aerated taro costructed wetland


Solis, ABC
WMSU [Western Mindanao State University] Research Journal 22 (1): 47-63 (2002)

Abstract:
Treated wastewater can be a valuable resource in cities or towns where population is growing and where water supply is limited. Wastewater may be reclaimed and reused for crop and landscape irrigation, groundwater recharge, or recreational purposes. But such treatment faces significant public resistance and is expensive for domestic appication. Hence, an aternative was sought by means of a natural treatment, specifically using an aerated taro constructed wetland to treat domestic wastewater. A 2.20 m x 1.10 m experimental constructed wetland was constructed and planted with twenty-four (24) taro plants provided with aeratiion to determine the removal of BOD(sub)5, DO, TSS, and TKN. Forty-five days, after the taro plants grew; 678 liters of domestic wastewater (grey water) were emptied into the cell through a distribution pie after the influent sample was taken. The influent and effluent samples were taken to the DOST laboratory for the analysis of BOD(sub)5, DO, TKN, TSS, pH. the results of the study indicated that the mean removal of BOD(sub)5 at seven and fourteen days was 17.76% and 45.01%, respectively. The mean removal of TSS at the same time was 33.3% and 17.54%, respectively. The mean DO of the effluent wa 2.58 mg/L and 2.303 mg/L and mean pH of 5.25 and 2.51 for seven and fourteen days, respectively. These show that the aerated taro constructed wetland is effective at longer detention time for the removal of BOD5 pollutants. Further study is recommended using greater depth.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Western Mindanao Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Western Mindanao State University




NO. 96538

Natural treatment of domestic wastewater using taro (Colocasia esculenta) in onstructed wetland


Deloria, IB; Baclayon, DD
WMSU [Western Mindanao State University] Research Journal 21(1): 38-44 (2001)

Abstract:
At present there are many available technologies for wastewater treatments. However,most are expensive,and their operation is complex for domestic applications. Hence, an alternative method was sought using Taro plant as natural treatments. This study investigated the possibility of using the constructed wetland employing taro (Colocasia esculenta)to treat domestic wastewater.An experimental area was set-up in Tetuan,Zamboanga Citymeasuring 3m x 2m planted with taro to smulate a constructed wetland particularly with a subsurface flow system.The set-up was provided with a transparent roof covering to prevent precipitation from getting into the cell. After a month when taro plants have grown,a totalof 406 liters of domestic wastewater was poured into the set-up before an influent sample was taken. The effluent was analyzed after a detention time of seven days. The procedure was repeated for a month to determine the effectiveness of taro plants in reducing pollutants expressed in terms of BOD5 NO3-N and TSS. The results of the study revealed that constructed wetland using taro removed an average of 96.3% BOD5,35.66% NO3-N and 63.20% TSS. Although, the results showed that taro can be used to treat domestic wastewater further study should be conducted using this natural treatments system under uncontrolled conditions.

Availability :
Western Mindanao State University, Library




NO. 96561

Integration of different cash crops in newly established mango orchard in lahar-laden areas


Garcia, SS; Tabua, TA
Proceedings of the Agency In-House Review of Completed and Ongoing R & D Projects. Ramong Magsaysay Technological University, Iba, Zambales (2003); (no pagination)

Abstract:
The study aimed to develop a technoguide in the cultural management practices for mango-based farming in lahar-laden areas. Integration of the cash crops was undertaken and will be continued for 5 years.The results of the first two years of intercropping showed that cassava and gabi can be grown profitably in between young mango trees with return above costs of 297% and 242% respectively. Squash yielded a negative income. During the third year, tomato and cassava were found to be profitable when intercropped with newly transpalnted mango.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 26551

The uses and food value of keladi (Colocasia esculenta)


Farah, DG
Botany Department; National University of Malaysia; Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

Proceedings of the Symposium on Vegetables and Ornamentals in the Tropics; UPM; 27-28 October 1982; p213

Abstract:
Colocasia esculenta, an edible aroid plant, is commonly known as "keladi" in Malaysia. It has long been used as a food and for medicinal, religious and cultural purposes. Its present status here is as a mirror, 'backyard' crop. However, its importance as a major crop elsewhere, preliminary data on food value of local varieties, and its ability to grow well on peat soils indicate a good potential for selection and improvement of the crop.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 26865

The diversity of genetic relationship of the Taro cultivars


Sim, SS
Faculty of Agriculture; Universiti Putra Malaysia; 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

BSc Thesis; University Putra Malaysia; 2003; p44

Abstract:
A total of seventeen accessions of Taro cultivars from different states of Malaysia were subjected to RAPD analysis. The objective of this study was to analyze the diversity of their genetic relationship. Twelve arbitrary primers, which were capable in producing PCR amplification, were initially used. However, only four of them were able to produce reliable and clear banding patterns. The four primers were OPG 6,OPG5,OPG 8 and OPD 3. The four primers had produced a total of 75 bands for the 17 accessions of Taro. The bands produced were 100% polymorphic. The average genetic distances between the cultivars were calculated from Jaccard's Coefficient and a dendrogram was constructed from the NTSYS computer software program based on UPGMA. The dendrogram showed that the accessions can be separated into seven clusters, which stand for one large main cluster and six other small clusters. The dendrogram also indicates that there is a wide diversity among the seventeen accessions. Among these accessions, accession 10826 (Selangor) had the same similarity index with accession 10838 (Negeri Sembilan). This indicated that the two accessions had the closest genetic relationship between them as they share the same similarity index. Accession 10842 (Negeri Sembilan) and accession 10772 (Johor) had the lowest similarity index and are separated from the rest of the group. This may be due to the ecological factors that can influence the genetic features. The results of this study has shown the presence of wide variability within the Malaysian taro germplasm. Hence, RAPD is capable of tracing the DNA variation in Taro cultivars. Thus the identification and genetic relationship among the cultivars could be determined.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 27018

Crop loss by weeds in Malaysia


Chee, YK; Lee, SA; Ahmad Anwar, I; Teo, L; Chung, GF; Khairuddin, H
Rubber Research Institute of Malaysia; P. O. Box 10150; 50908 Kuala Lumpur

Proceedings of the Third Tropical Weed Science Conference (Eds. Lee. S.A. & Kon, K.F.); Malaysian Plant Protection Society; 4-6 December 1990; Kuala Lumpur; p1-21

Abstract:
Malaysian agriculture is largely dominated by plantation and food crops. In 1988, the area under these crops were 1.86, 1.78, 0.36 and 0.64 million hectares for rubber, oil palm, cocoa and rice, respectively. The export earnings for the three plantation crops rubber, oil palm and cocoa amounted to 11.67 billion ringgit and this constituted 21.1 % of the total export earnings of the country. In order for Malaysia to maintain its competitiveness in the international market, high yields of crops and lower production cost must be achieved. One of the important production factors is the control of weeds which compete aggressively with the main crop for nutrient, water and light. Weeds grow luxuriantly under tropical conditions because of high rainfall, humidity and temperature. The importance of weed control is shown by the high expenditure of 230 million ringgit for herbicides spent on agricultural crops in 1988. These herbicides were mainly used in plantation crops. This high cost in weed control amounted to 16 to 26% of the total production cost of rubber, oil palm and cocoa during their immature period, and it involves 18 to 28 spraying rounds. The competitive effects of weeds in term of growth, yield and economics on rubber, oil palm, rice, fruit trees and field crops are given. The weeds in the agricultural crops are classified into the following: Class A - beneficial weeds, Class B - acceptable but need control when necessary, Class C - noxious weeds. Weed control methods using herbicides, sheep grazing and biological agents (insects) are reviewed. The weed succession after long periods of application of a particular herbicide is discussed. An integrated weed management system involving cultural methods, herbicides, sheep grazing and biological agents was highlighted.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 96279

Araceae plants identified as alternate hosts of banana bunchy top virus


Basalong, AA; Luis, JS
Graduate School Benguet State University Research Journal 7: 8-12 (1999)

Abstract:
Araceae plants infested with Pentalonia nigironervosa Coq. were found in the municipalities of Kapangan, La Trinidad and Sablan, Benguet. The numbers of araceae plants infested by the virus vector were Xanthosoma sagittaefolium (L) Schott and Colocasia esculenta cv. Chinese and Mindanao. These infested plants in the field showed yellowing, had mosaic symptoms, and had distorted and rough leaf surface. Others had no symptoms. In the transmission trials of the virus from infected banana to healthy Araceae plants, no symptoms were observed. The inoculated Araceae plants did not show symptoms that were observed in the field. However, infested Araceae plants in the field that were collected and cultured in the experimental area had mosaic pattern and had distorted and rough leaf surface. In the transmission trials of the virus from alternate hosts to healthy tissue-cultured banana plantlets, inoculated plantlets showed bunchy top virus infection. Inoculated plantlets exhibited slight to very severe yellowing, had yellow and dark green streaks on leaf veins, were bunching and stunted, and had dead young leaf. The different growth stages of the vector are capable in acquiring and transmitting bunchy top virus. Assessment of the incubation periods and the severity of infection of the inoculated plantlets revealed that the first instars and adults are more efficient in acquiring and transmitting the virus than the 2nd and 3rd instars.

Availability :
One Stop Information Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 96309

"Itchina" and "Mindanao": most preferred taro cultivar in the highlands


Gonzales, IC; Simongo, DK; Botangen, ET
Benguet State University Research Journal 30: 96-102 (2001)

Abstract:
Evaluation on the seven (7) taro cultivars was done to test yield, adoptability, resistance to blight, and eating quality under La Trinidad conditions from July to February 2001. Based on the results, 'Mindanao' and 'Itchina', the local entries gave the highest yield of 5.99 tons/ha and 5.97 t/ha, respectively. It outyielded the check variety PSBG-5 with yield of 3.75 t/ha. As to the weight and number of corms, these two local varieties gave the highest with 7.17 kg/plot and 7.20 kg/plot, and 30 and 31 corms/plot. 'Itchina' gave the most number of 85 cormels with 2.1 kg/plot. Itchina and Mindanao was observed to be moderately resistant to late blight Phytophthora colocasia at 3 - 5 months after planting. Based on the eating quality and percent of dry matter content, 'Mindanao; had the highest dry matter content of 44.28% followed by 'Itchina' with 34.10%. For the general acceptability of 7.0 like moderately while 'Itchina' gave 6.0 - like slightly.

Availability :
One Stop Information Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 15153

A new sperm-agglutinin from taro (Colocasia esculenta)


Promplook, P; Chulavatnatol, M
Thai Abstracts: Science and Technology 15: 36 (1990)

Abstract:
Sperm agglutinating activity of taro was separated into three isoagglutinins and purified into homogeneity by ammonium sulphate fractionation, Sephadex G-100 DEAE-cellulose and finally chromatof °Cusing column. The isoagglutinins agglutinated rat caput epididymal sperm and washed human sperm. Their pI values were 6.45, 6.16 and 5.85, respectively, as determined by chromatof °Cusing column. They were found by gel filtration to have the same native molecular weight of 30,000. By SDS-PAGE, their sub-unit molecular weight was 8,000 suggesting a tetrameric structure. They were found to have similar amino acid compositions. They were similar heat-labile, protease-resistant and stable at neutral pH. The agglutination showed an optimum at neutral pH, was not affected by addition of metal ions CaCl2, MgCl2, MnCl2 or EGTA.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15196

Three sperm-agglutinating isolectins from the storage roots of taro (Colocasia esculenta)


Promplook, P; Chulavatnatol, M
Thai Abstracts: Science and Technology 15: 169 (1990)

Abstract:
During our search for new lectins from tropical plants, the storage roots of taro (Colocasia esculenta) were found to possess a strong agglutinating activity against rat and human spermatozoa but not red blood cells. The activity-bearing material was precipitated from the root homogenate by ammonium sulfate at 60% saturation. It was further purified by gel- filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column, followed by ion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column at pH 7.4 and a DEAE-cellulose column at pH 6.5. The ion-exchange columns resolved the activity into three peaks of isolectins, each was further purified by using a chromato-f °Cusing column. From the chromato-f °Cusing column, the pI values of the three isolectins were found to be 6.5, 6.1 and 5.9. By sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, each isolectin was found to be a single band with Mr of 7,400. However, the Mr of each native isolectin was determined by Sephadex G- 100 to be 29,000-31,000. Thus a tetrameric structure was proposed. The activity of each purified isolectin was reduced by half after heating at 60 °C for 20 min. The optimal pH for sperm-agglutination was 7.0 and each purified isolectin was most stable at pH 7.0 at room temperature. Although some 40 sugars were tested, none was found to inhibit the sperm-agglutination activity of each purified isolectin. Thus, the storage roots of taro were a possible sources of new lectins.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15301

A new sperm-agglutinin from taro (Colocasia esculenta)


Promplook, P.; Chulavatnatol, M.
Thai Abstracts: Science and Technology 15: 36 (1990)

Abstract:
Sperm agglutinating activity from taro was separated into three isoagglutinins and purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-100 DEAE-cellulose and finally chromatofocusing column. The isoagglutinins agglutinated rat caput epididymal sperm and washed human sperm. Their pI values were 6.45, 6.16 and 5.85 as determined by chromatofocusing column. They were found by gel filtration to have the same native molecular weight of 30,000. By SDS-PAGE, their subunit molecular weight was 8,000 suggesting a tetrameric structure. They were found to have similar amino acid compositions. They were similar heat-labile, protease-resistant and stable at neutral pH. The agglutination showed an optimum at neutral pH, was not affected by additions of metal ions CaCl2, MgCl2, MnCl2 or EGTA.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15344

Three sperm-agglutinating isolectins from the storage roots of taro (Colocasia esculenta).


Promplook, P; Chulavatnatol, M
Thai Abstracts: Science and Technology. 15: 169 (1990)

Abstract:
During our search for new lectins from tropical plants, the storage roots of taro (Colocasia esculenta) were found to possess a strong agglutinating activity against rat and human spermatozoa but not red blood cells. The activity-bearing material was precipitated from the root homogenate by ammonium sulfate at 60 percent saturation. It was further purified by gel-filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column, followed by ion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE-cellulose column at pH 7.4 and a DEAE-cellulose column at pH 6.5. The ion-exchange columns resolved the activity into three peaks of isolectins, each was further purified by using a chromato-focusing column. From the chromatofocusing column, the pI values of the three isolectins were found to be 6.5, 6.1 and 5.9. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, each isolectin was found to be a single band with Mr of 7,400. However, the Mr of each native isolectin was determined by Sephadex G-100 to be 29,000-31,000. Thus a tetrameric structure was proposed. The activity of each purified isolectin was reduced by half after heating at 60 degree celsius for 20 min. The optimal pH for sperm-agglutination was 7.0 and each purified isolectin was most stable at pH 7.0 at room temperature. Although some 40 sugars were tested, none was found to inhibit the sperm-agglutination activity of each purified isolectin. Thus, the storage root of taro was a possible source of new lectins.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 15748

Taro blight disease.


Kiratimahart, W.; Sommartaya, T.
Thai Abstracts Science and Technology. 13: 117(1988)

Abstract:
(Tiger's eye disease' or taro blight was incited by Phytophthora colocasiae. Severe loss could be obtained when planted during early rainy season (June to August). The fungus produced zoosporangia profusedly either on diseased leaves or on PDA. Optimum temperatures for vegetative growth were 25 and 30 degree celsius, respectively. Symptoms were noticed when high relative humidity prevailed (90-100%). Leaves and petioles were severely infected and in later stage became blight. Neither field chemical control with Aliette, Previcur-N and Tecto nor poisoned media revealed good result.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 73573

The genus Colocasia
Chi Colocasia

Le Kha Ke
Cay co thuong thay o Vietnam [Popular plants in Vietnam]; Vol. 5; Hanoi, Scientific and Technical Publishing House, 1975; p 44-47

Abstract:
Description of morphological characteristics and distribution of 2 species of the genus Colocasia are presented. They are Colocasia esculenta (synonym Colocasia esculenta var. antiquorum) and Colocasia gigantea (synonym: Colocasia indica). Colocasia esculenta is used as a source of starch and a vegetable.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78331

Colocasia esculenta Schot.
Khoai so

Le Tran Duc
Cay thuoc Viet Nam: Trong, hai, che bien va tri benh ban dau [Medicinal plants of Vietnam: planting, harvesting, processing and treating diseases] Agricultural Pub. House. Hanoi, 1997. p. 967-968

Abstract:
Colocasia escubenta is culterated throughout the country for harvesting tubers containing starch and used as food. The tuber is employed to cook a soup treating a tired, feeble, insomnia, It's used also to treat pimples of children. The leaves can treat a diarrhoea, a snake-bites.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam