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NO. 66884

Utilization of plants in ethnoveterinary by Alor and Pantar communities
Pemanfaatan tumbuhan dalam etnoveteriner masyarakat Alor dan Pantar

Maryanto, I; Astuti, O
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani , Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 Februari 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Perpustakaan Nasional R.I., 1992; p 90-96

Abstract:
An ethnoveterinary study of plants used by communities who live along the coastal areas in Alor and Pantar islands had been undertaken. It was found that 24 different species of plants had been utilized for the preparation of 45 kinds of 'jamu' which were gathered from the surrounding dwelling areas, and from the sea water. Battery, coal and kerosine were needed for the preparation of the 'jamu'.

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NO. 101941

Roles of plants and livestocks in the "Djoka Dju" traditional ceremony of Lio (ethnic group), in Ende, Flores, East Nusa Tenggara
Peran tumbuhan dan ternak dalam upacara adat "Djoka Dju" pada suku Lio, Ende, Flores, Nusa Tenggara Timur

Temu, ST
Center for Environmental Studies; Nusa Cendana University; Kupang; East Nusa Tenggara; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Yogyakarta, 24-25 Januari 1995; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia, 1995; Buku 2; p 265-268

Abstract:
"Djoka Dju" is a ritual ceremony of Lio ethnic group at Ende district, Flores Island, East Nusa Tenggara. This ritual is held routinely every year at mid-period between the postharvest of agricultural crops and field preparations for the next planting period. In this ritual, the trees used are in local language called "pare", "jita", "nio", "peri", and "laka", and the livestocks are "manu" and "rongo". However, before the ritual was performed other trees were used in the framework to prepare later ritual, i.e. "kembo" and "taru" as raw materials for textile (cloth and wrapper) which were still used by the ritual leader and the society members at the villages which hold the ritual. The roles of trees and livestocks in the "Djoka Dju" ritual were discussed.

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NO. 66946

Medicinal plants in relation to sustainable rainforest ecology in Indonesia


Hamid, A; Sitepu, D
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Industrial Crops Research Journal 5 (2): 28-36 (1993)

Abstract:
A rainforest as a unit of natural ecology is a tremendous asset for Indonesia and the world as well, since it provides a great number of useful plant species. A group of medicinal plants is one of the plant groups in the system having very important role for the rural society as well as for the industrial sector. The "still uncontrolled" collection of many species from the system has resulted in serious problems of genetic and soil erosions. Many of the utilized species are difficult to cultivate using conventional methods, partly because they are only limited to their natural habitats. Almost all medicinal tree plants in the rainforests provide not only beneficial drug, essential oil and condiment components, but also high quality of timbers. Several shrubs or herbs in the system can also be used for medicinal home industries, etc. Well planned and integrated approach should be implemented to improve the future ecology of the rainforests. The approach would involve coordination among members of the rural society and the government to obtain high quality of products as well as to prevent the indiscriminate cuttings or harvestings of medicinal plants.

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NO. 50280

Plant Resources of South-East Asia No 5(3). Timber trees: Lesser-known timbers


Sosef, MSM (ed); Hong, LT (ed); Prawirohatmodjo, S (ed)
PROSEA Publication Office; Wageningen Agricultural University; Wageningen; the Netherlands

Low-price, hardbound edition; Bogor; PROSEA Foundation; 1998; 859 p

Abstract:
This volume on lesser-known timbers completes the PROSEA trilogy on timber trees. Lesser-known timbers merit attention because of the growing appreciation of their importance in the sustainable management of tropical forest and their potential for forest plantations. The increasing use of wood-based panels, requiring less outstanding timber qualities and less uniformity, also intensifies their use. These lesser-known species are also essential to supply timber for local use and therefore for rural development. The up-to-date information on these timbers contained in this volume supports all these applications. It includes information on palm wood as well. As wood properties are related to botanical classification, it is important to identify trees and wood correctly. Therefore, there is an extensive list of wood anatomical features plus macroscopic photographs of all timbers. The volume covers 309 genera and about 1550 species, amongst others African mahogany, agoho, antiaris, balsa, ficus, lilin, maple, mempisang, and tempinis. A glossary is included to explain the terms used. Two indexes, of scientific and vernacular plant names, are provided.

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PROSEA Network Office




NO. 50292

Plant Resources of South-East Asia No 18. Plants producing exudates


Boer, E (ed); Ella, AB (ed)
PROSEA Publication Office; Wageningen; the Netherlands

Low-price, paperback edition; Bogor; PROSEA Foundation; 2001; 189 p

Abstract:
Exudates are generally obtained by tapping trees (latexes, resins, gums). A few of them, such as rubber and pine resin, are economically very important: in South-East Asia, rubber is a major source of income for well over 1 million households. Other exudates, however, have not been able to compete with synthetic substitutes and have declined in importance or have fallen out of use. Of the exudates that are still commercially important, resins are applied in paints and varnishes, yield essential oils and are transformed chemically into a variety of products, whereas latexes yield rubber, prized for its elasticity, and gutta-percha, a non-elastic but thermoplastic product. In this volume the former, current and potential uses of plant exudates are discussed in the hope that this may revitalize production systems that include exudate-producing plants. In the introductory chapter, in addition to the botany, ecology and management of exudate-producing species, the different tapping techniques are highlighted and put into perspective. The following 15 papers deal in detail with individual species, including those yielding copal, pine resin, damar, elemi, benzoin, gurjun balsam, sepetir wood oil, jelutong, rubber, and gutta-percha. About 40 minor species producing exudates are also treated briefly. Another 270 species producing exudates but having another primary use, are listed. A glossary is included to explain the terms used. Two indexes, of scientific and vernacular plant names, are provided.

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PROSEA Network Office




NO. 50450

Ficus adenosperma Miq.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 280

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus adenosperma (Synonyms: Ficus pauper, Ficus turbinata), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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NO. 50451

Ficus ampelas Burm.f.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 280-281

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus ampelas (Synonyms: Ficus soronensis, Ficus kingiana, Ficus blepharosepala), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50452

Ficus aurantiacea Griffith


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 281

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus aurantiacea (Synonyms: Ficus callicarpa, Ficus pomifera, Ficus megacarpa), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50453

Ficus baeuerleni King


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 281

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus baeuerleni (Synonyms: Ficus mespiloides, Ficus hollrungii, Ficus laurentina), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50454

Ficus benghalensis L.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 281-282

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus benghalensis (Synonyms: Ficus indica, Ficus lasiophylla, Ficus banyana), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50455

Ficus botryocarpa Miq.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 282

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus botryocarpa (Synonyms: Ficus barnesii, Ficus mindorensis, Ficus linearifolia), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50456

Ficus calopilina Diels


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 282

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus calopilina (Synonyms: Ficus setistyla), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50457

Ficus copiosa Steud.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 282-283

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus copiosa (Synonyms: Ficus magnifolia, Ficus krausseana, Ficus longipedunculata), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50458

Ficus dammaropsis Diels


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 283

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus dammaropsis (Synonyms: Dammaropsis kingiana), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50459

Ficus deltoidea Jack


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 283

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus deltoidea (Synonyms: Ficus diversifolia, Ficus lutescens, Ficus motleyana), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50460

Ficus hispida L.f.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 283-284

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus hispida (Synonyms: Ficus letaqui, Ficus poilanei), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50461

Ficus microcarpa L.f.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 284

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus microcarpa (Synonyms: Ficus cairnsii, Ficus retusiformis, Ficus retusa), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50462

Ficus nasuta Summerh.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 284

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus nasuta , reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50463

Ficus nodosa Teijsm. & Binnend.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 284-285

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus nodosa (Synonyms: Ficus du), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50464

Ficus pachyrrachis Lauterb. & K. Schumann


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 285

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus pachyrrachis (Synonyms: Ficus grandis, Ficus hypoglauca, Ficus pachythyrsa), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50465

Ficus pachystemon Warb.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 285

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus pachystemon (Synonyms: Ficus mangiferifolia, Ficus brassii, Ficus aechmophylla), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50466

Ficus parietalis Blume


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 285

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus parietalis (Synonyms: Ficus cerasiformis, Ficus grandifolia), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

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Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50467

Ficus pungens Reinw. ex Blume


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 286

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus pungens (Synonyms: Ficus myriocarpa, Ficus ovalifolia, Ficus kalingaensis), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50468

Ficus religiosa L.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 286-287

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus religiosa (Synonyms: Ficus caudata, Ficus superstitiosa, Ficus peepul), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50469

Ficus rumphii Blume


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 287

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus rumphii (Synonyms: Ficus cordifolia, Ficus conciliorum, Ficus damit), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50470

Ficus sagittata J. K?nig ex Vahl


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 287-288

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus sagittata (Synonyms: Ficus ramentacea, Ficus crininervia, Ficus ramosii), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50471

Ficus septica Burm.f.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 288

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus septica (Synonyms: Ficus hauili, Ficus casearia, Ficus kaukauensis), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50472

Ficus subcuneata Miq.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 288

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus subcuneata (Synonyms: Ficus stoechotricha, Ficus formosa), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50473

Ficus sublimbata Corner


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 288

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus sublimbata , reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50474

Ficus wassa Roxb.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 289

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus wassa (Synonyms: Ficus eulampra, Ficus rhodocarpa, Ficus nubigena), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50673

Ficus L.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 277-289

Abstract:
A brief information on Ficus , reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50674

Ficus pumila L.


Rojo, JP; Pitargue, FC; Sosef, MSM
Department of Science and Technology, Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College, Laguna 4031, the Philippines

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 12(1): Medicinal and poisonous plants 1; de Padua, L.S., Bunyaprapatsara, N & Lemmens, R.H.M.J. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 285-286

Abstract:
A comprehensive knowledge on Ficus pumila (Synonyms: Ficus stipulata, Ficus scandens, Ficus repens), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 50713

Ficus virgata Reinw. ex Blume


Jansen, PCM
Prosea Publication Office, Department of Plant Sciences, Wageningen Agricultural University, P.O. Box 341, 6700 AH Wageningen, the Netherlands

Plant resources of South-East Asia No. 13: Spices; de Guzman, C.C. & Siemonsma, J.S. (eds); Paperback edition; Bogor, PROSEA Foundation, 1999; p 255

Abstract:
A brief information on Ficus virgata (Synonyms: Ficus decaisneana, Ficus trymatocarpa, Ficus philippinensis), reviewed from selected literature sources, is presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 71294

Timber trees of Vietnam
Cay go rung Viet Nam

Institute of Investigation and Forest Plan
Ministry of Forest; Vietnam

Agricultural Publishing House, Hanoi, 1982; 204 p

Abstract:
The book introduces timber trees of Vietnamese forests with their descriptions, wood charateristics, growth rate and development, and economic values.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 14962

Tree leaves as a feed resource in northeast Thailand


Meulen, UT; Fischer, W; Vearasilp, T
Institute for Animal Physiology and Nutrition, Georg-August University, 37077 Goettingen, Germany

Thai Journal of Agricultural Science 29 (1): 11-21 (1996)

Abstract:
This literature review described some tree and shrub species which were adapted to the climatic conditions in northeast Thailand and which could more or less be utilized as fodder trees for ruminants. The individual species were briefly discussed from a nutritional aspect, some examples were given and total rations of leaves and supplemental rations were described. It was emphasized that leaves in general were not suitable as production feed but rather they could be utilized as feeds to bridge nutritional gaps. Other species listed (other than those in TA field) were Melia azedarach, Bauhinia variegata, Dendrocalamus strictus, Bambusa arundinacea, Syzygium cumini, Ficus bengalensis, Milletia auriculata, Ficus infectoria, Ficus religiosa, Mallotus philippensis, Ziziphus mauritiana.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14921

A preliminary study on the edible forage of sambar deer


Srikhao, A
Zoology Department, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand

The 34th Kasetsart University Annual Conference, 30 January-1 Febuary 1996, Bangkok; p ?

Abstract:
Nine sambar deer (Cervus unicolor) were employed in this experiment and penned in 2 paddocks of 10 m x 10 m and 20 m x 30 m at the Lopburi Research Station, Kasetsart University, Kook Jareon district, Lopburi province, Thailand. Forage of 29 species were edible for sambar deer i.e.: Acacia sp., Amaranthus spinosus, Azadirachta indica, Brachiaria mutica, Brassica chinensia, Broussonetia papyrifera, Cassia siamea, Cyperus sp., Eupatorium odoratum, Ficus sp., Ficus vasculosa, Garuga pinnata, Imperata cylindrica, Ipomoea sp., Leucaena leucocephala, Manihot exculenta, Millingtonia hortensis, Oryza sativa, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Pithecellobium dulce, Pterocapus macrocarpus, Saccharum officinarum, Samanea saman, Setaria italica, Shorea obtusa, Shorea siamensis, Solanum sp., Sorghum vulgare, Zea mays. Average values of dry matter intake on a hemp, corn plants and cassava chips were 2.57, 2.80 and 1.32 kg/head/day, respectively. The hemp contained per 100 g dry matter: water 8.07%, protein 17.28 %, NDF 33.62, ADF 26.56, Ca 0.92 % and P 1.10%.

Availability :
Thailand National Documentation Centre, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research




NO. 102005

Medicinal plant utilization to treat headache in South Sulawesi and East Kalimantan areas
Penggunaan tanaman obat sebagai pengobatan sakit kepala di daerah Sulawesi Selatan dan Kalimantan Timur

Pudjiastuti; Sa'roni; Nuratni, B
Research and Development Centre for Pharmacy, Ministry of Health, Jakarta, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Yogyakarta, 24-25 Januari 1995; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia, 1995; Buku 1; p 183-190

Abstract:
A survey had been conducted to find out species of plants for curing headache in South Sulawesi and East Kalimantan. This survey was a result of an exploration by means of interview with local citizen and the assistance of local university students. It was based upon the last two weeks headache cured with medicinal plant preparation. Conclusion of the survey showed that there were 17 kinds of plant used to alleviate headache, i.e. "turi", "srikaya", "sirsak", "bawang merah", "belimbing wuluh", "sembung", "kesumba", "sampi", "saldo", "cocor bebek", "beluntas", "sirih", "pisang", "bang bangkara", "raja bangun", "raja membangun" and "bangle". The medicinal plants, the recipes, and the way to use them were different in both provinces.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 108576

Ethnomedical study and inventory of medicinal plants in several localities in Indonesia
Kajian etnomedis dan inventarisasi tumbuhan obat di beberapa daerah di Indonesia

Jafarsidik, Y; Sutomo, S
Forest and Nature Conservation Research and Development Centre, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Simposium Nasional I Tumbuhan Obat dan Aromatik [Proceedings of the 1st National Symposium on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants], Bogor, 10-12 Oktober 1995; D. Gandawidjaja et al (eds), Bogor, Simpul Nasional APINMAP Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI & UNESCO; 1996; p 525-543

Abstract:
Ethnomedical study and inventory of medicinal plants were carried out in 10 localities in Indonesia. About 80 therapeutic treatments, using 106 different species, were recorded to cure about 50 diseases in 6 localities. A total of 213 species of medicinal plants occurred in the 10 localities, with 21 species of which were found in 3 or more localities, such as Phyllanthus niruri, Brucea amarissima, Ficus septica and Alstonia scholaris. Phyllanthus niruri was found in 8 localities including Subah (Central Java), Meru Betiri (East Java), Siberut and Seram. Brucea amarissima occurred in Subah, Pesongsongan (Madura), Cekik (West Bali), Pesisir Selatan (West Sumatra) and Pasir Pangarayan (Riau). Popular species, such as Rauvolfia serpentina ("pule pandak") and Aegle marmelos ("maja") were found only in Java and Madura and Eurycoma longifolia ("pasak bumi") in Pesisir Selatan (West Sumatra) and Pasir Pangarayan (Riau). There was a variety in the utilization of medicinal plants in the 6 areas studied, and there were quite a lot of species utilized in one area were not utilized in another area, for example Justicia gendarussa is used as a medicinal plant in Siberut, but it is not used in Seram, although it also occurred in the latter area. Traditional therapeutic treatment uses a mixture of 2 or more plant species or only a single species to cure diseases. Most of the medicinal plants were found in Siberut with 65 species, followed by Baluran with 32 species, Seram 30 and Madura 26 species. Utilization of the medicinal plants by local people was discussed, and a list of all the medicinal plants could be seen in the appendix.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 101988

Utilization of forest medicinal plants by the Sundanese ethnic group
Pemanfaatan tumbuhan obat dari hutan oleh suku Sunda

Iskandar, MI; Ismanto, A; Anggraeni, I
Forest Products and Forestry Socio-Economics Research and Development Centre, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Jakarta, Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia, 1995; Buku 1; p 55-60

Abstract:
Medicinal plants collected from forest have been used since a long time by the Sundanese people, particularly those who live in surrounding forest areas. Field observations showed that, kemudu (Ruellia formosa), leme ati (Tacca palmata), rempelas (Ficus ampelas), tembelekan (Lantana camara), meniran (Phyllanthus neruri), tapak liman (Elephantopus scaber), encok-encok (Plumbago zeylanica), angkep-engkep (Desmodium triquettum), kendem jarem (Desmodium triflorum), and gendorusa (Justicia gendarusa) can be used as external medicine, barbiturate, cough, stomach-ache, kidneystone and cholera.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 24205

The nutrient status of the plateau health forest on Gunung Keriong, Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia


Chua, GLS; Koh, BL; Lee, SC; Mathias, M; Turner, IM; Yong, JWH; Heah, HH
Forest Research Centre, Sandakan, Sabah, Malaysia

Journal of Tropical Forest Science 8 (2): 240-246 (1995)

Abstract:
Foliage from six species (Dacrydium beccarii, Eugenia caudata , Eugenia stapfiana, Eurycoma longifolia, Ficus deltoidea and Podocarpus neriifolius, leaf litter and mineral soil (0-20 cm) samples were collected for elemental analysis from the heath forest growing on the summit plateau of Gunung Keriong on the southern border of Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia. The leaves of the trees (Ficus deltoidea being an epiphytic shrub) were generally small in size and sclerophyllous with a notably low foliar nitrogen concentration. The mineral soil was strongly acidic (pH in water of 4.04) and low in total N, P and K but not extremely so. These analyses were similar to other published data for heath forests in Southeast Asia.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 105282

Spatial distribution of trees as long-tailed macaque food resource in the teak plantation forest of Pasarsore Forest Subdistrict, Cepu Forest District
Distribusi spasial pohon pakan kera ekor panjang di Hutan Tanaman Jati BKPH Pasarsore KPH Cepu

Trihadiyanto, B
Faculty of Forestry, Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Thesis; Yogyakarta, Faculty of Forestry; Gadjah Mada University; 1994; 60p

Abstract:
Spatial distribution of trees as long-tailed macaque food resource in teak plantation forest of Pasarsore Forest Subdistrict, Cepu Forest District, Central Java, was analysed using Poisson method. The teak forest was grouped into four subsystems namely young, middle-aged, old teak plantations and gallery forest. It was revealed that at least 15 tree species were found in the teak plantation, including Butea monosperma, Caesalpinia sappan, Senna siamea, Eugenia monoliifolia, Ficus benjamina, Ficus racemosa, Grewia eriocarpa, Lepisanthes rubiginosa, Leucaena leucocephala, Macaranga gigantea, Samanea saman, Schleichera oleosa. Syzygium cumini, Syzygium polyanthum and Syzygium pycnanthum. In young teak plantation, Caesalpinia sappan was found in clumps, while species with a random distribution consisted of Butea monosperma, Senna siamea, Eugenia monoliifolia, Lepisanthes rubiginosa, Schleichera oleosa, Syzygium cumini, Syzygium polyanthum, and Syzygium pycnanthum. In the middle-aged teak stand Butea monosperma, Eugenia monoliifolia, Macaranga gigantea, Syzygium polyanthum and Syzygium pycnanthum were found in clumps; while Senna siamea, Ficus benjamina, Ficus racemosa, Lepisanthes rubiginosa, Schleichera oleosa, and Syzygium cumini were randomly distributed. In old steak stand a clumped distribution was showed by Butea monosperma, Caesalpinia sappan, Leucaena leucocephala, Syzygium cumini, Syzygium polyanthum, and Syzygium pycnanthum. Random distribution was exhibited by Senna siamea, Eugenia monoliifolia, Ficus benjamina, Ficus racemosa, Lepisanthes rubiginosa, Macaranga gigantea, Samanea saman, Schleichera oleosa. In gallery forest Leucaena leococephala, Syzygium polyanthum and Syzygium pycnanthum were found in clumps, while Butea monosperma, Senna siamea, Eugenia monoliifolia, Ficus benjamina, Ficus racemosa, Grewia eriocarpa, Lepisanthes rubiginosa, Schleichera oleosa and Syzygium cumini were randomly distributed.

Availability :
Faculty of Forestry Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 105756

Traditional therapy and medicinal plant species in Sirisurak and Tei-tei Batti Game Reserve, Saibi, Siberut
Pengobatan tradisional dan jenis-jenis tumbuhan obat di Sirisurak and Tei-tei Batti, Saibi, Siberut

Jafarsidik, Y; Sutomo, S
Buletin Penelitian Hutan [Forest Research Bulletin] (587): 45-58 (1995)

Abstract:
An ethnomedical study was conducted in Sirisurak village, Siberut, Mentawai Islands, in July 1992. A traditional healer was consulted and the plant species regarded as medicines by the traditional healer ("Sikerei") were collected. An inventory of medicinal plants was also made inside Tei-tei Batti Nature Reserve near Sirisurak village to find out diversity and potential of the medicinal plants (in the reserve). The Mentawaian traditional way of life is tied up with the surrounding environment. The wealthiness of traditional therapy reflects the close affinity with nature, resulted most probably among other things from a long history of geographic isolation. The study revealed the occurrence of at least 60 plant species utilized as medicines in Sirisurak village, as indicated by the "Sikerei". The plant parts of two or more species were mixed to cure various diseases. About 44 different mixtures were commonly used in the traditional healing to cure about 20 diseases. Diversity of medicinal plants was quite high, represented about 40% of all plant species in the study plots in Tei-tei Batti Forest Reserve near Sirisurak. Some species were found quite abundant while some others were hardly found. There are many species utilized in the traditional therapy in Sirisurak which are also traditionally used in Java, including Phyllanthus fraternus, Urena lobata, Merremia peltata, Litsea elliptica, Justicia gendarussa and Abelmoschus moschatus.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Centre




NO. 66899

Plants in the traditional life of Dawam tribe in Timor
Tumbuhan dalam kehidupan masyarakat Dawam di Timor

Waluyo, EB
Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Biologi; Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 Februari 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Perpustakaan Nasional R.I., 1992; p 216-224

Abstract:
The traditional life of Dawam tribe residing Insana district of Timor Island entirely depends on their surrounding natural resources. In this review the local knowledge on plants resources was discussed based on ethnobotanical data. Report on the utilization, conservation and management of the resources were also presented

Availability :
Research Centre for Biology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 69004

Why are orang utans so rare in the higlands? Altitudinal changes in a Sumatran forest


Djojosudharmo, S; van Schaik, CP
Perlindungan Hutan dan Pelestarian Alam, Balai Konservasi Sumber Daya Alam 1; Jl. Sisingamangaraja Km 5.5, Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia

Tropical Biodiversity 1 (1): 11-22 (1992)

Abstract:
At Ketambe (northern Sumatra), orang utan (Pongo pygmaeus) are largely restricted to lowland regions of less than 1200 m altitude. It was assumed that fruit resources determine the limit of this highly frugivorous ape. We examined an elevational gradient from 350 m to 1,400 m altitude in order to identify the critical resources for the orang utans. However, the decline in the availability of the fruits of strangling figs or other fruits with soft or juicy pulp paralleled that of nest density. At the altitude of its greatest abundance, the orang utan includes a higher proportion of species with fruits with soft pulp in its diet than is available in the forest. We concluded that the abundance of fruits with soft pulp, of which strangling figs were an important component, determined the altitudinal limits of the orang utan at Ketambe, and may also be largely responsible for regional variation in orang utan density. The relevance of this finding for orang utan conservation was discussed.

Availability :
Zoology Division Library, Research Centre for Biology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences




NO. 69009

Preliminary observation on the breeding biology of the endemic Sulawesi red-knobbed hornbill (Rhyticeros cassidix)


Kinnaird, MF; O'Brien, TG
NYZS/The wildlife Conservation Society; 185th and Southern Blvd., Bldg A, Bronx, NY 10460, USA

Tropical Biodiversity 1 (2): 107-112 (1993)

Abstract:
Observations on 16 nests of the endemic Sulawesi Red-knobbed hornbill (Rhyticeros cassidix) were made during the 1992/1993 nesting season in Tangkoko-Dua Saudara Nature Reserve, North Sulawesi. Nests were found in large (x=115 cm DBH) living trees more than 13 m above the ground. Nesting began in July and ended by mid-January. The nesting period for two pairs followed from sealing for fledging lasted 133 days. Females scaled or partially scaled themselves in cavities using fecal material. Females remained incarcerated, on average, 93 days before emerging to assist the male in feeding the chick. Diet items delivered to the nest were primarily figs. The breeding biology and diet of Rhyticeros cassidix is broadly similar to that reported for the Wreathed hornbill, Rhyticeros undulatus, in Thailand.

Availability :
Zoology Division Library, Research Centre for Biology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences




NO. 69018

Activities of seed dispersing bats (Cynopterus brachytis) in utilizing ripe fruits at upper Cisadane watershed
Aktivitas kelelawar pemencar biji (Cynopterus brachytis) dalam memanfaatkan buah-buahan masak di kawasan DAS Hulu Cisadane

Maryanto, I
Research and Development Institute for Zoology (RDCB); Bogor, Indonesia

Zoo Indonesia [Indonesian Zooligy] (17): 1-7 (1993)

Abstract:
A study on frugivorous bats (Cynopterus brachytis) was conducted at upper Cisadane watershed. The aim of this study was to collect information about fruit bat activities and its food. Bats flying activities were observed in 90 minutes interval from 06.00 PM to 06.00 AM. The results indicated that the number of bats were decreasing at higher altitudes. The effort of trapping bats by mist nets at the location of 500, 700, 900 m altitude resulted in 5.6, 2.9 and 2.09 bats per 100 m² mist net per night, respectively. The percentage of activities for searching fruits were 30.3% between 07.30 and 09.00 PM, 27.27% between 09.00 and 10.30 PM and 4% between 03.00 AM and 06.00 AM. During the course of searching fruits, the bats moved in two different groups. The first group consisted of adult females and lactating females and the other was of young males, young females, adult males and pregnant females. It was also noted that seeds of Ficus variegata, Ficus padana, Ficus fistulosa, Ficus sp. and Maesopsis eminii were subjected to be dispersed by this bats species.

Availability :
Research and Development Institute for Zoology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 72945

Ficus elastica
Da

The Hospital of National Medicine Thanh Hoa
Nhung cay con va khoang vat lam thuoc [Plants, animals and minerals to be used as medicine]; Thanh Hoa, Thanh Hoa Publishing House, 1987; p 96-97

Abstract:
In Vietnam, Ficus elastica is planted as an ornamental around pagodas and temples, and as a shaded plant in many places. Its air-roots are used to treat liver-complaints and help urination.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 95822

Woody patches in grassland of Northeastern Luzon: an important source of indigenous tree species for reforestation of rangeland?


Snelder, DJ; Masipiquena, AB
Proceedings International Conference on Reforestation with Philippine Species for Biodiveristy Protection and Economic Progress, Palo Leyte, 3-6 March 1997; Visayas State College of Agriculture-Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammenarbeit, Applied Tropical Ecology Program, 1997; p 85-93

Abstract:
Future government plans for Region 02 are to reduce the area under grassland from 550,838 to 178,782 ha, devoting more land to reforestation and forest plantations. This study reports on the identification of indigenous species suitable for reforestation of grassland under different environment conditions. The size, species richness and composition of woody patches, i.e. potential sources of indigenous tree species in grassland areas, are investigated. Two sites are selected, one in grassland under previous protection and lightly affected by grazing, burning and wood extraction activities and another one in grassland under intense utilization and affected by soil erosion. Patch size and species richness change with a degree of utilization. Patch size doubles or triples when utilization is restricted for at least five years, with 70% of the patches covering an area of 150 m or less. A total of 31 trees, 12 shrubs and 5 herbaceous plants are identified on grasssland under intense utilization. Most species serve multiple usages. They produce fruits and leafy vegetable and are of medicinal value. Among the woody species are three tree species with wood used as light construction material, three resin and gum producing trees, two shrub and tree species serving as important sources of dry-season fodder, two herbage legumes to be used as green manure, and two fibre producing shrub species.

Availability :
Library; Technology Transfer and Information Division; Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region 7; Mandaue City; Philippines




NO. 101936

Ethnobotany of rampayan in Batak Angkola and Mandailing tribes
Etnobotani rampoyan dalam suku Batak Angkola dan Mandailing

Hasairin, A; Hasanah, U
Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Medan Institute of Tachers' Training and Educational Science; Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Yogyakarta, 24-25 Januari 1995; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia, 1995; Buku 2; p 238-242

Abstract:
"Rompayan" is a place for slaughtering traditional animal (buffalo) for Batak Angkola and Mandailing ethnic groups. It is usually executed for the traditional "Siridon" (happy) ceremony. Field study shows that for "rompayan", plant species of 8 families are used; five of them are wild, two are growing widely and three species are cultivated. This knowledge have been passed on from one generation to another and each plant species has its meaning and value. Analysis of plants and its ethnobotanic value are discussed.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 70078

Banyan tree (Ficus benghalensis)
Cay Da (Ficus benghalensis)

Pham Dinh Tri
Agriculture and Forestry Secondary School of Viet Bac, Vietnam

Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] (4): 45-46 (1966)

Abstract:
Banyan is a fast-growing tree, the latex is used in industry, the bark produces tannin, is a host-tree for Laccifera lacca, and a pepper-prop giving high yield. It is a good shade tree, can be planted where there is gathering of people as market, school, roadside. Fruit lures birds and wild animals for hunting. The tree gives also timber and firewood, is easy to plant. Therefore attention to the tree is worth while.

Availability :
National Information and Documentation Center for Science and Technology, Library




NO. 23162

Leaf litter fall, decomposition and nutrient element release in the lowland dipterocarp forest


Gong; WK
Science University of Malaysia; Penang, Malaysia

Malaysan Forester 45 (3): 367-378 (1982)

Abstract:
The total litter fall in a lowland dipterocarp forest was estimated to be 9.2 t/ha/yr of which leaf litter consituted 6.8 t (74.2%). The rate of loss of leaf material was very rapid- up to 98.5% being lost after five weeks. The rate of loss was affected by the nature of the leaves as well as by whether the leaves were exposed or covered. The annual release of nutrients from the leaf litter was estimated to be 214.6 kg/ha, nitrogen constituting about half the total.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 101934

"Menyat tana" ceremony of Dayak Kenyah Lepo Bakung tribe in East Kalimantan
Upacara "menyat tana" suku Dayak Kenyah Lebo Bakung di Kalimantan Timur

Ngindra, F
FKIP, Universitas Palangkaraya, Kalimantan Tengah, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Yogyakarta, 24-25 Januari 1995; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia, 1995; Buku 2; p 219-226

Abstract:
"Menyat tana" is a ceremony undertaken to ensure fertility of soils. This is done when some people are in doubt of the fertility of soils which has been determined through "mamat" ceremony on the third to the seventh day (mamat is a ceremony to determine the location for a new field). The "menyat tana" was practised by people who believed in Bungan religion and stayed in the traditional longhouse. At present, the ceremony is not recognized anymore, but their previous wisdom on land and forest to be used for paddy field is still tightly followed.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 103560

Forest recovery estimation in the south slope of Mt. Slamet based on the existing gap condition
Estimasi pemulihan hutan lereng selatan gunung Slamet berdasarkan kondisi rumpang yang ada

Supadi, TH; Soeroso, L; Setijanto; Nasution, EK; Amurwanto, A
Faculty of Biology, Jenderal Soedirman University, Purwokerto, Central Java, Indonesia

Research Report; Purwokerto, Faculty of Biology, Jenderal Soedirman University, 1994; 75p

Abstract:
The forest reserve at the south slope of Mt. Slamet is heterogeneous natural forest. It has been noted that dying of one or more trees can cause a gap in the canopy, and it is also a sign of forest destruction. Studies to prevent forest destruction and its recovery need to be done with the following goals: 1. To know cause of occurring gaps. 2. The role of gaps in forest regeneration. 3. Which environmental factors are affecting forest regeneration. 4. Time needed for recovery of a destructed forest. It is hoped that the results of these studies could give contribution to the nature and characteristics of forest in the policy of forest management, source of information in the role of gaps in the forest recovery and in conservation of forests as natural resources. The result of study showed that forest destruction at south slope of Mt. Slamet was caused by felling of trees, and climate factors such as wind. These factors were the cause of occurring gaps in the canopy, thus an open space is formed. This event of forest destruction, however, is a stimulant in the regeneration process of the forest. Environmental factors which have changed due to gaps stimulate the growth of seedlings found under the canopy. This caused variation of structural composition of trees between gaps and canopy. Environmental factors changing under the gaps were light intensity, humidity, temperature and soil pH. The light intensity is the most dominant factor, while the other factors minor use to structure and composition of seedlings, belt, or trees. Based on the condition of natural regeneration and gaps at the south slope of Mt. Slamet it is estimated that in the period of 100 to 150 years, the forest will be recovered. In the coming years from 2094 up to 2144, the forest of the south slope of Mt. Slamet is estimated to be recovered by the canopy.

Availability :
General Soedirman University, Central Library




NO. 23375

Vine infestation of large remnant trees in logged forest in Sabah, Malaysia: Biomechanical facilitation in vine succession


Pinard, MA; Putz, FE
Danum Valley Field Centre, P.O. Box 282, c/o Rakyat Berjaya Sdn.Bhd., 91108 Lahat Datu, Sabah, Malaysia

Journal of Tropical Forest Science 6 (3): 302-309 (1994)

Abstract:
Seventy-nine percent of trees larger than 20 cm DBH remaining after logging in the Ulu Segama Forest Reserve carried vines in their crowns 13-14 years later. On 62% of the vine infested trees, the vines grew over from neighboring trees; on the remaining trees, vines climbed up their stems from the ground. Isolated trees with diameters exceeding the maximum support diameters used by the common vines often were infested with twining and tendril-climbing vines that climbed up root and branch twiners. This biomechanical dependence of some types of climbers on others results in a successional sequence of vine colonization of isolated remnant trees.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 103082

Effect of leaf area on the growth of branch cuttings of golden fig (Ficus benjamina L.)
Pengaruh luas permukaan daun terhadap pertumbuhan stek cabang beringin (Ficus benjamina L.)

Effendi, M; Setiadi, D; Sinaga, M
Santalum (17): 9-18 (1994)

Abstract:
An experiment was undertaken to determine the effect of leaves area on the growth of branch cuttings of Ficus benjamina. Four treatments were tested namely middle part of branch cutting with 100% leaves area; middle part of branch cutting with 50% leaves area; middle part of branch cutting with 0% leaves area (without leaves) and top part of branch cutting with 100% leaves area. The experiment was laid out following a Completely Randomized Design with 50 replications. The effects of leaves area were measured through the evaluation of survival, stem height, stem diameter, root length, number of leaves, stem dry weight, root dry weight, total dry weight and root-top ratio at the age of 6 months. The result showed that there is no significant effect of leaves area on survival, stem diameter, number of leaves, stem dry weight, root dry weight, total dry weight. However the effect on stem height, root length and root-top ratio are significant. The middle part of branch cutting with 50% leaves area is the best in term of survival, stem height, stem diameter, number of leaves, root length, stem dry weight, root dry weight, total dry weight, and root-top ratio.

Availability :
Institute for Information Resources, Bogor Agricultural University




NO. 70079

Cultivating Sycamore at Thai Binh province
Trong Sung o Thai Binh

Vu Hong Nghi
Agriculture Service of Thai Binh province, Vietnam

Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] (2): 35-36 (1966)

Abstract:
The author presents sucessful Sycamore cultivation technique in some places of Thai Binh province

Availability :
National Information and Documentation Center for Science and Technology, Library




NO. 110205

Pollination biology of the fig species (Ficus spp.) in the Bogor Botanical Garden
Biologi polinasi jenis-jenis ficus di Kebun Raya Bogor

Mawdsley, N; Erniwati
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops; Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Nasional; Tantangan Entomologi pada Abad XXI [Proceedings of the National Seminar on Entomology Challenge in the 21st Century], Bogor, Januari 1997; p 472-481

Abstract:
Ficus is a big tree in the tropics. There are many species of Ficus including strangler tree scrubs, and climbers. Ficus pollination is very unique. Each species of Ficus is pollinated with the help of a kind of wasp (Agaoninae; Chalcidoideae). Wasps are only able to survive in the Ficus if flowering and pollination occur at the presence of the wasp. Those fenomena is the so called host specific. Pollination biology of Ficus in the Botanical Gardens has been observed. Ficus in the Botanical Gardens may be devided into three kinds based on its distribution, namely (1) Ficus originating from Bogor, (2) Ficus originating from Java (that include Bogor), and (3) Ficus originating from out side Java. It has been found that pollination only occurred on Ficus originating 20-40 km from Bogor. It was interesting that there were two species of Ficus (Ficus ribes and Ficus callosa) easily found in Bogor, but no pollination happen. This observation supports the hypothesis that interaction between Ficus and insect pollinator is very host specific. It is difficult that pollination occurs on the plants that have been sepparated away as far as 30-50 km.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library
Email: dir-riv@indo.net.id




NO. 70095

Sycamore cutivation
Trong Sung

Ngoc Uyen
Tap chi Lam nghiep [Journal of Forestry] (6): 37-38 (1965)

Abstract:
Sycamore is planted using three methods: (1) By sowing seeds; seeds germinate 5-7 days after sowing (2) By planting roots of mother tree: make cuts on root of 2-4 cm in diameter shortly after shoots grow up, cut this piece of root for planting. (3) By planting mature branches cuttings are 2-4 cm in diameter, layer of 2 cm, water regularly more than a week after shoots grow up. Viability percentage reaches 80-95%.

Availability :
National Information and Documentation Center for Science and Technology, Library




NO. 39303

The blighting of coconut and other plants caused by salt water


Crisostomo, LC; Malimban, SB; SantaMaria, PA; Pizarro, AC
Philippine Phytopathological Society, c/o Dept. of Plant Pathology, Institute of Biological Sciences, U.P. Los Baños, College, Laguna, Philippines

Philippine Phytopathology 6 (1&2): 3 (1970)

Abstract:
The row of palms and ornamental plants planted along the Roxas Boulevard facing Manila Bay has been a disturbing sight to passers-by. Examination of these plants revealed blighting symptoms. In coconut, Cocos nucifera and in bunga de china, Adonidia merrillii, the blighting symptoms were found to be similar. The latter plant appeared to be more extensive to the injury than the former. Bo-trees, Ficus religiosa and calachuchi, Plumeria acuminata were also severely infected. Anii, Erythrina fusca was less infected. Because salt water from the sea was suspected to be the primary cause of this injury, an investigation was conducted. Experimental results showed that salt water induced plant injury. Evidence of leaf burning and defoliation of plants was obtained under simulated conditions. The high chloride content and total alkalinity of salt water appeared to be responsible for leaf burning; the toxicity level of salt varied with the kind of plants.

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines Los Baños; College, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 91804

Ficus cyathistipula


Sarian, ZB (ed)
Manila Bulletin May 20: 26 (1997)

Abstract:
Ficus cyathistipula differs from other Ficus varieties due to its green, inedible fruits. The leaves are leathery and tough. It is a good indoor plant and easily propagated by marcotting.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, Library; Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016




NO. 91848

Ornamentals that you can also eat


Sarian, ZB (ed)
Manila Bulletin July 8: B-13 (1997)

Abstract:
Some ornamentals are good to eat. The true water lily makes a tasty vegetable when cooked with meat, boiled fish or other vegetables. The niyog-niyogan can be used for wrapping pinangat. Kutsay can be used in soup and other dishes.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, Library; Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016




NO. 91850

Meet the Ficus rotundifolia: good for bonsai, other uses


Sarian, ZB (ed)
Manila Bulletin June 3: B-12 (1997)

Abstract:
Ficus rotundifolia is a good pot plant indoors or outdoors. As a bonsai material, it is excellent for rock clasping. It could be grown as an ornamental plant in a container and thrives well in bright locations.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, Library; Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016




NO. 91855

Ficus triangularis


Sarian, ZB (ed)
Manila Bulletin June 17: 30 (1997)

Abstract:
Ficus triangularis is called such because of its triangular leaves. It is hard to multiply, but when propagation has been mastered, it becomes easy to multiply.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, Library; Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016




NO. 91869

Trees have the power to heal illness too


Philippine Journal March 24: 12 (1997)

Abstract:
Trees not only provide us with shade and fruits but also medicine. Several trees provide cure to common ailments. The rain tree is used against skin rashes. The root juice of the narra can cure syphilitic sores. Other medicinal trees include the kapok, caballero, ipil-ipil, balete and kalantas.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, Library; Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016




NO. 72344

Ficus stenophylla
Re hia

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Thuoc tri benh tu cac cay hoang dai [Medicines from wild plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1995; p 308-309

Abstract:
Ficus stenophylla use to grow near streams in mountain regions. Its roots are harvested all year round. It is used to treat swelling caused by falling or biting, pain caused by rheumatism, stimulate milk production of women when giving birth to treat, feeble, cough, and chest-ache.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71691

Ficus heterophyllus
Vu bo

Do Tat Loi
Nhung cay thuoc va vi thuoc Vietnam [Medicinal plants and medicaments in Vietnam]; Vol. 2; Hanoi, Scientific and Technical Publishing House, 1970; p 917-920

Abstract:
Ficus heterophyllus grows naturally everywhere in the mountain regions of Vietnam. Its roots and, resin are used for treating leucorrhoea, tuberculosis and rheumatism. It is also used as a tonic.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71697

Ficus benjamina
Cay sy

Do Tat Loi
Nhung cay thuoc va vi thuoc Vietnam [Medicinal plants and medicaments in Vietnam]; Vol. 2; Hanoi, Scientific and Technical Publishing House, 1970; p 1551-1552

Abstract:
Ficus benjamina grows and is planted everywhere in Vietnam as ornamental and wayside tree. Its resin is a popular medicine (according to people's experiments) to treat cough, asthma, leg-ache and arm-ache.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71706

Ficus pumila
Cay xop

Do Tat Loi
Nhung cay thuoc va vi thuoc Vietnam [Medicinal plants and medicaments in Vietnam]; Vol. 2; Hanoi, Scientific and Technical Publishing House, 1970; p 1244-1246

Abstract:
Ficus pumila grows naturally everywhere in Vietnam. This plant gives two medicines such as: fructus fici pumilae (drying fruits) to treat a noctunal ejaculation of sperm, impotency, back-ache, rectocele, and coculis fici pumilae (drying branch with leaves) for treating scabies, dexoxication, and helps urination.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 92435

Ficus: Current and potential uses as multipurpose tree species


Dichoso, WC; Arcilla, RP
Canopy International 16 (6): 4, 11 (1991)

Abstract:
Figs (Ficus spp.) belonging to the family Moraceae has about 800 species of trees, shrubs, and woody vines native to the world's tropical regions. Many species are epiphytic. The conservation of these valuable tree species would provide our forest ecosystems protection and the sanctuary for wildlife. Aside from their potential as multipurpose trees, Ficus species have numerous economic values.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 92645

Bio-active furanocoumarin derivatives from Ficus pumila (Moraceae)


Juan, EA; Rideout, JA; Ragasa, CY
The Philippine Journal of Science 126 (2): 143-153 (1994)

Abstract:
The chloroform extract of Ficus pumila afforded bergapten and oxypeucedanin hydrate. Their structures were elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The compounds were tested for anti-microbial activity against six micro-organisms by the agar well method. Bergapten was found to inhibit the growth of Staphyllococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi but was inactive against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Mycobacterium pleie and Candida albicans. Oxypeucedanin hydrate inhibited the growth of Salmonella typhi, but was found inactive against the other five microorganisms. Both compounds were also tested for antimutagenic activity by the use of the micronucleus test. Results of the study indicated that bergapten reduced the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE) induced by mitomycin C by 44% while oxypeucedanin hydrate reduced MPCE by 74%.

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines Los Baños; College, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 72632

Ficus benjamina
Cay si

The Hospital of National Medicine; Thanhhoa, Vietnam

Nhung cay, con, va khoang vat lam thuoc [Medicinal plants, animals and minerals]; Thanh Hoa, Thanh Hoa Publishing House, 1987; p 78-79

Abstract:
In Thanhhoa Ficus benjamina grows naturally and is planted as an ornamental in many places along road-sides. Its roots and resin are used to treat stomach-ache, fever, and convulsion. It is harvested all the year round. There are experiences in treating backache and swelling using this medicine in Thanhhoa.

Availability :
The National Library of Vietnam




NO. 72359

Ficus hispida
Ngai

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Thuoc tri benh tu cac cay hoang dai [Medicines from wild plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1995; p 276-277

Abstract:
Ficus hispida grows naturally everywhere in Vietnam. It roots, leaves, barks are used for medicine. It can be harvested all the year round. This medicine is used to treat cold, fever, inflamations, dysentery, and swelling.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71352

Alstonia scholaris, Ficus pumila
Cay sua. Cay xop

Do Tat Loi
Association for Scientific and Technical Diffusion of Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnam

Nhung cay thuoc va vi thuoc Vietnam [Medicinal plants and medicaments in Vietnam]; Vol. 3; Hanoi, Scientific Publishing House, 1963; p 104-110

Abstract:
Bark of Alstonia scholaris and fruits of Ficus pumila are recognised as medicaments.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 72897

Ficus glomerata
Sung

The Hospital of National Medicine Thanh Hoa
Nhung cay con va khoang vat lam thuoc [Plants, animals and minerals to be used as medicine]; Thanh Hoa, Thanh Hoa Publishing House, 1987; p 218-219

Abstract:
Ficus racemosa (synonym: Ficus glomerata) grows naturally and is planted in many places in Vietnam. Its resin, ripe fruits and young leaves are used to treat pimples, sore eyes and swelling.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 72922

Ficus pumila
Vay oc

The Hospital of National Medicine Thanh Hoa
Nhung cay con va khoang vat lam thuoc [Plants, animals and minerals to be used as medicine]; Thanh Hoa, Thanh Hoa Publishing House, 1987; p 246-247

Abstract:
Ficus pumila grows and creeps on big trees everywhere in Thanh Hoa. Its fruits, branches and leaves are used to treat backache, nocturnal ejaculation of sperm, dysentery and hemorrhoids. The fruits are harvested in late winter, while the branches and leaves are harvested all year round.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 93872

Pre-germination treatment of seeds of four pioneer tree species


Lucero, GV
Sylvatrop 4 (1): 89-98 (1994)

Abstract:
The effect of pre-germination treatment on seeds of four pioneer tree species was investigated. The species were: (1) tibig (Ficus nota), (2) is-is (Ficus ulmifolia), (3) hauili (Ficus septica), and (4) anabiong (Trema orientalis). Hauili seeds soaked in tap water overnight had the highest germination percentage, germination energy and germination value. Immersing the seeds of all the above tree species in boiling hot water for one minute gave the poorest results. The seeds of is-is, tibig and anabiong, without pre-germination treatment had better germination than when treated. Soaking hauili seeds in tap water overnight improved its germination while tibig seeds immersed in diluted sulfuric acid (1% of 36 N) for one minute accelerated its germination.

Availability :
Library; Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau, College, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 73148

Ficus racemosa
Sung

Vo Van Chi
Nhung cay thuoc thong thuong [Popular medicinal plants]; Dongthap, Dongthap Publishing House, 1988; p 273-274

Abstract:
In Vietnam, Ficus racemosa grows naturally and is planted in many plain provinces. Its resin, leaves and bark are harvested all the year round. Its fruit is used as decongestant, diuretic and blood tonic. Its bark is used to treat lack of blood, rheumatism and jungle fever (used dry or fresh). Its resin is used to treat burning, pimples and headache.

Availability :
The National Library of Vietnam




NO. 73886

Ficus pumila
Vay oc

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Cay thuoc quanh ta [Popular medicinal plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1998; p 382-383

Abstract:
Ficus pumila is planted as an ornamental plant. Its stem, leaves and fruits are used as medicine to treat nocturnal ejaculation of sperm, impotency, irregular menses, rheumatism, wounds, dysentery, pimples, and haemorrhoids.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 73894

Ficus stenophylla
Re hia

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Cay thuoc quanh ta [Popular medicinal plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1998; p 306-307

Abstract:
Ficus stenophylla grows naturally in the mountain regions of Vietnam. Its roots are harvested all the year round to treat wounds, pain caused by rheumatism, feeble, chest-ache, cough, and to stimulate milk production.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 73955

Ficus hispida
Ngai

Le Quy Nguu; Tran Nhu Duc
Cay thuoc quanh ta [Popular medicinal plants]; Hue, Thuan Hoa Publishing House, 1998; p 274-275

Abstract:
Ficus hispida grows mainly on the sides of mountains, in wastelands, edges of fields or roadsides. Its roots, leaves and barks are collected for medicine to treat cold, inflammation of the trachea, rheumatism, indigestion and wounds.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 68679

Composition and structure of secondary forest in Bengkulu province
Komposisi dan struktur hutan lahan pamah di Propinsi Bengkulu

Mirmanto, E; Sambas, EN; Soedjito, H
Research and Development Centre for Biology, Bogor, Indonesia

BIOTROP Special Publication 46: 101-108 (1992)

Abstract:
Study on plant ecology of the secondary forest in Air Putih (Rejang Lebong) and primary forest in Ulu Talo (South Bengkulu) were performed to observe the community structure and tree composition. Phytosociologically, the secondary forest can be classified into Macaranga gigantea-Mallotus moluccanus community, with 85 tree species belonged to 53 genera and 33 families. The density was 554 trees/ha with total basal area of 13.29 sq. m/ha. The primary forest can be classified into Shorea multiflora - Shorea lepidota community, with 112 tree species belonged to 66 genera and 36 families. The density was 547 trees/ha with total basal area of 30.02 sq. m/ha. The density and the density diversity of the communities was rather comparable with other Sumatra lowland forests previously studied. (Authors' abstract)

Availability :
Clearing House of Information, SEAMEO-BIOTROP
Email: info@biotrop.org




NO. 50804

A riverine tropical rain forest in Ketambe, Gunung Leuser National Park, Sumatera, Indonesia


Abdulhadi, R; Kartawinata, K; Yusuf, R
Herbarium Bogoriense, Puslitbang Biologi; Bogor, Indonesia

Proceedings of the Fourth Round-Table Conference on Dipterocarps, Bogor, Indonesia, 12-15 December 1989; Soerianegara, I et al. (eds); Bogor, SEAMEO BIOTROP, 1991; BIOTROP Special Publication 41: 247-255 (1991)

Abstract:
A phytosociological analysis of a low-canopy forest near the Alas and Ketambe rivers in Ketambe, G. Leuser National Park, Sumatra was carried out using a quadrat method. A complete enumeration in 1.6 ha plot revealed 127 species, 80 genera and 50 families of trees with DBH > 10 cm. The density was 466 trees/ ha with the total basal area of 41.55 m²/ ha. Euphorbiaceae was the most common family which comprises 15 species with a density of 135 trees/ ha (28.4%). Five of the important species with importance values greater than 10 were recognized. The most dominant was Ficus sp. (IV = 20.23) followed by Dendrocnide sinuata (IV = 18.01). A dipterocarp species, Parashorea lucida, was recorded as the third most dominant species with importance value of 17.28. The differences with the other nearby forests are discussed. (Authors' abstract)

Availability :
SEAMEO BIOTROP Library




NO. 53621

Ethnobotanical and preliminary pharmaceutical study of tabat barito (Ficus deltoidea Jack)


Heryani, H; Sa'id, EG; Darusman, LK; Murdanoto, AP; Noor, E; Mas'ud, ZA
Faculty of Agriculture, Lambung Mangkurat University; Banjar Baru, South Kalimantan, Indonesia

Proceedings International Symposium on Biomedicines, Bogor, 18-19 September 2003; Lestari, Y et al. (eds); Bogor, Biopharmaca Research Center, Bogor Agricultural University, 2004; p 197-202

Abstract:
Tabat barito (Ficus deltoidea) is one of the Indonesian traditional herbs that approaching extinction. In Indonesia, the largest population of the plant is in Central Kalimantan. Traditionally, tabat barito is used as natural anti-microbes, especially for female organ. A study was conducted on the ethnobotany and pharmacy of the plant. The morphological characteristic of tabat barito used in this research is unique, because the lower surface of the leaves has three red dots arranged in a triangle. Bioassay evaluation revealed that tabat barito has antimicrobial activity against human pathogenic micro-organisms, i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Trichophyton rubrum. Fractionation and phytochemical identification revealed that tabat barito contains steroid, alkaloid, and triterpenoid compounds. The steroid compound is scientifically proven to have anti-microbial activity against Trichophyton rubrum, a fungus that may cause chronic infection of skin, scalp and nail. From the result it may be concluded that tabat barito is potential to be developed into skin sanitation products. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 54579

The potential of mistletoe fig (Ficus deltoidea Jack) as an extract base in the antiseptic product formula
Potensi tabat barito (Ficus deltoidea Jack) sebagai basis ekstrak pada formula produk antiseptik

Heryani, H; Sa'id, EG; Darusman, LK; Murdanoto, AP; Noor, E; Mas'ud, ZA
Fakultas Pertanian, Universitas Lambung Mangkurat; Banjarbaru, South Kalimantan, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Nasional Tumbuhan Obat Indonesia XXIV, 19-20 September 2003 [Proceedings of the 24th Seminar on Indonesian Medicinal Plants, 19-20 September 2003]; Sidowayah (Woodfordia floribunda) & Petai cina (Leucaena glauca); Lestari, Y et al. (eds); Bogor, Pusat Studi Biofarmaka, Lembaga Penelitian, Insitut Pertanian Bogor, 2004; p 156-160

Abstract:
Mistletoe fig (Ficus deltoidea; tabat barito) is one of the rare herbs in Indonesia. It is frequently found in Central Kalimantan and generally consumed as traditional herbal drink, prepared by boiling it in water. The herbal drink is believed to be beneficial for woman health. A research was conducted with the aim to study the utilization of tabat barito, especially the bark and stem as antiseptic for skin, nail and scalp. The efficacy was evaluated on some human pathogenic microorganisms, one of them was Trichophyton. From a series of extraction and fractionation, triterpenoid was successfully extracted from tabat barito, as much as 21.08%. The triterpenoid was effective against Trichophyton rubrum at MBC 2500 ppm. From the research results it may be concluded that tabat barito triterpenoid is potential to be developed into antiseptic products such as liquid soap, wet tissue and shampoo. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 66894

Various plant species used in "kembar mayang" and "gagar mayang" flower arrangements
Berbagai jenis tumbuhan dalam rangkaian "kembar mayang" dan "gagar mayang"

Sutanti BR, S
Faculty of Biology, Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani [Proceedings of National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany], Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 February 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Perpustakaan Nasional R.I., 1992; p 171-175

Abstract:
Plants have been used since the dawn of human life in the offerings and wedding and funeral ceremonies, such as "Kembar mayang" and "Gagar mayang". "Kembar mayang" is a bouquette of plant arrangement which is used in wedding ceremonies, while "Gagar mayang" is a bouquette of plants used for funeral ceremony, especially when the death is a girl or an unmarried man. Through observations and interviews, a research carried out in Central Java resulting that plants used for arranging "Kembar mayang" and "Gagar mayang", such as "janur", "bunga pinang", "meniran", "kemuning", etc., have special meanings to the Javanese. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 23025

The dynamics of Pantai Acheh Forest Reserve: A synthesis of recent research


Turner, I.M; Raich, J.W; Gong, W.K; Ong, J.E; Whitmore, T.C.
Department of Botany; National University of Singapore; Lower Kent Ridge Road; Singapore 0511; Singapore

The Malayan Nature Journal 45(1-4): 166-174(1992)

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 12806

Plants in the Buddha history
Phanmai nai phuttha prawat

Phengkhlai, C
Phanmai nai phutthaprawat; Royal Forest Department; Bangkok; [nd]; 17p

Availability :
Technical Library; Silviculture Division; Royal Forest Department; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 31621

Philippine plants: series III kamoteng kahoy and isis


Vergara, BS; Pancho, JV; Asis, CV
Philippine Biota 3(2): 3-

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 40015

Some medicinal plants of the Marawaka Kukukuku people


Holdsworth, DK
Department of Chemistry; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Science in New Guinea 1(3-4): 17-21(1973)

Availability :
Library; National Herbarium; Division of Botany; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40195

Subsistence gardening in the Hoskins oil palm scheme


Benjamin, C; Wapi, I
Department of Primary Industry; West New Britain Province; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 1; p168-175

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40200

Food cropping systems in the Tari Basin


Wood, AW
Geography Department; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 2; p256-267

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40202

Yam gardens and fallows in the Torricelli foothills, Drekikir District, East Sepik


Allen, BJ
Office of Environment and Conservation; Waigani; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 2; p236-255

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40234

Agricultural implements


Powell, JM; Kulunga, A; Moge, R; Pono, C; Ziminke, F; Golson, J
Department of Geography; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Agricultural traditions of the Mount Hagen area; University of Papua New Guinea Occasional Paper No.12; 1975; p13-14

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40278

Crops; traditional vegetables


Twohig, A(ed)
Appropriate Technology Development Institute; Lae; Papua New Guinea

Liklik buk; a sourcebook for development workers in Papua New Guinea; Lae; Liklik Buk Information Centre; PNG University of Technology; 1986; p74-81

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40534

Intensification of subsistence agriculture on the Nembi plateau, Papua New Guinea 1. General introduction and inorganic fertilizer trials


D'Sonza, E; Bourke, RM
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Department of Primary Industry; Aiyura; Kainantu; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 34(1-4): 19-28(1986)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 20858

A guide to ethnobotanical collection with reference to Malaysia


Chin, SC
Botany Department; University of Malaya; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

The Sarawak Museum Journal 29 (50): 229-238 (1981)

Availability :
Ministry of Agriculture; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia




NO. 40241

Greens


Sillitoe,P
Social Anthropology;La Trobe University;USA

Roots of the earth; crops in the highlands of Papua New Guinea; Section 1;Washington;1983;p53-77

Availability :
Library;PNG University of Technology;Lae;Papua New Guinea




NO. 6439

Correlation between lignin content and the cell-wall thickness of nine timber species from East Java
Hubungan kadar lignin dengan tebal dinding sel dari sembilan jenis kayu asal Jawa Timur

Haroen, H
Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1980; 38p

Availability :
Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 2764

Physical and chemical properties of some timber species from West Java
Sifat fisis dan mekanik beberapa jenis kayu Jawa Barat

Ginoga, B; Karnasudirdja, S
Forest Products Research Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Laporan Lembaga Penelitian Hasil Hutan [Forest Products Research Institute Report] (90): 1-11 (1977)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 600

Effort to support the 'jamu' (traditional medicine) industry by cultivation of its resources
Usaha menunjang industri jamu melalui pembudidayaan simplisia

Sudiarto; Abdullah, HA
Bogor Research Institute for Industrial Crops; Indonesia

Jurnal Penelitian & Pengembangan Pertanian [Agricultural Research & Development Journal] 3 (1): 20-23 (1984)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 63509

Effect of forest fire on the biennial species regeneration after fire in the Lempake secondary forest, East Kalimantan
Dampak kebakaran hutan terhadap regenerasi jenis dua tahun setelah kebakaran di hutan sekunder Lempake, Kalimantan Timur

Purwaningsih
Proceedings of the 1st National Seminar of the Basic Biology; Bogor; 1990; p102-107

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68606

In situ conservation aspect of medicinal plants
Aspek konservasi in situ tumbuhan obat

Wiriadinata,H.; Chairul
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Forum Komunikasi Ilmiah Hasil Penelitian Plasma Nutfah dan Budidaya Tanaman Obat; Bogor, 2-3 Maret 1992; Buku I; Sitepu, D(ed); Karmawati,E(ed); Januwati,M(ed); Rosita,SMD(ed; Bogor; Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Industri; Seri Pengembangan (19):53-59(1992)

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 91807

Cascading ficus


Sarian, ZB (ed)
Manila Bulletin May 24: C-6 (1997)

Abstract:
Ficus irregularis is characterized by cascading leafy branches. The leaves are thick and irregularly shaped. This leafy branches could cascade to the ground if not trimmed. It is easily propagated by cuttings and marcotting.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library




NO. 91876

Bonsai growing is hard work, time consuming but fulfilling


Metilla, SS
Philippine Daily Inquirer; March 14, 1997; p.D-4

Abstract:
[Note: The word bonsai came from a Japanese term meaning potted plant. In time, the meaning has evolved and a real bonsai now is one that is not only planted in a vase but must be treelike in appearance, artistic in form, old-looking and dwarfed, with the exact look of the natural tree in the fields.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library




NO. 91897

Of plants and gardens: Growing a "forest"


Reyes, O
Philippine Journal October 1: 14 (1997)

Abstract:
Mass planting is like having a forest in your own garden. Unlike in forest, instead of planting trees, you start planting flowering and colorful plants to make a beautiful garden.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library




NO. 92415

Pre-germination treatment of seeds of four pioneer tree species


Lucero, GV
Sylvatrop [Techincal Journal of Philippine Ecosystems and Natural Resources] 4 (1): 89-98 (1994)

Abstract:
Ficus seeds soaked in tap water overnight had the highest germination percentage, germination energy and germination value. Immersing the seed of all the above tree speciesin boilign water for one minute gave the poorest result. The seeds of Ficus ulmifolia, Ficus nota and Trema orientalis without pre-germination treatment had better germination than when treasted. Soaking Ficus hauili seeds in tap water overnight improved its germination while F. nota immersed in diluted sulfuric acid (1% of 36 N) for one minute accelerated its germination.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau; Forestry Campus




NO. 92822

Susceptibility of maturing calymyrna figs to decay by aflatoxin-producing fungi in California


Doster, MA; Michailides, TJ
Proceedings 1st International Symposium in Fig; Acta Horticulturae 480 ISHS 1998; p187

Abstract:
Calimyrna figs, while still on the tree, were inoculated with Aspergillus flavus (the aflatoxin-producing species that most commonly decays figs in California) on four dates in August 1994 and on two dates in August 1995. Figs became more susceptible as they matured through the four developmental stages: green with eye (ostiole) closed, green with eye open, yellow, and brown. Aspergillus flavus never grew in green figs with the eyes closed, and only rarely in green figs with the eyes open. The mature brown figs were the most susceptible to decay by Aspergillus flavus. In addition, aflatoxin analysis showed that brown figs had more than six times the aflatoxin of yellow figs and more than 30 times that of green figs. In another study, inoculating artificially-wounded figs in the orchard in 1995 and in 1996 resulted in more infections by Aspergillus flavus for green figs with the eye open and for yellow figs (compared to the inoculated, non-wounded figs); however, wounding did not result in a significant increase in infections in very immature figs (green with the eye closed) and very mature figs (brown). Similarly, aflatoxin analysis of the wounded figs showed that wounding substantially increased aflatoxin production for green and yellow figs but not for the mature brown figs. These results suggest that damage to mature brown figs does not favour aflatoxin production, which might explain why insect damage to mature figs does not result in increased aflatoxin contamination in figs.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 93535

Comparisons of phytotoxicity between soil-applied dicamba and two rates of an experimental dicamba analogue on twenty-three containerized species of environmental plants


Neel, PL
Proceedings; Eighty-ninth Annual Meeting; Florida State Horticultural Society; Miami Beach, Florida; 2-4 November, 1976; pp.341-434

Abstract:
An experimental dicamba analogue, (Phenylimino) di-2, 1-ethanediyl bis (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoate) (vel-4207) was applied as directed aqueous spray to the soil surface in 10 in. (25.4 cm) dia plastic containers. Twenty-three species of environmental plants actively growing in the pots were thus treated with 2 and 4 lbs. a.i./a(2.2 and 4.5 kg a.i./ha) and resulting phytotoxicity from root uptake compared to that from a similarly applied dicamba (3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid) spray at the rate of 2 lbs. a.i./a. Two applications 4 weeks apart were made of each chemical.Phytoxicity was evaluated 2 weeks after each treatment and 6 weeks after the second treatment. Dicamba was phytotoxic on 17 species ar 2 lbs. a.i./a while the analogue was phytotoxic on 10 species at 2 lbs. a.i./a, and on 16 species at 4 lbs. a.i./a. Damage from both chemicals appeared on the new growth and consisted mainly of leaf distortion and epinasty. Symptoms were somewhat reduced in severity on new folaige after 4 weeks, although earlier-produced damage was still unsightly in some cases. No plants were killed by the treatments, but damage was sufficient on a number of species, even with the lower rate of the analogue, to warrant caution in the use of this chemical on turf above the root zone of such sensitive species. Acalypha wilkensiana Muell. Arg., Asparagus densiflorus (Kunth) Jessup "Sprengeri', Brassaia actinophylla Endl., Carissa grandiflora (E.H.Mey) A.DC., C °Ccoloba uvifera (L.) L., Ficus benjamina L., Ixora coccinea L., Jasminum volubile Jacq.,Ligustrum japonicum Thunb., Murraya paniculata (L.) Jack, and Viburnum suspensum Lindl. were especially sensitive to the analogue at the 2 lb rate.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 94929

Mt. Pinatubo: a case of mass extinction of plant species in the Philippines


Madulid, DA
Silliman Journal 36 (2): 113-121 (1993)

Abstract:
The eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in Zambales in July 1991 caused serious damage to the vegtation of that mountain and its vicinity. It is feared that several of the more than 60 endemic species recorded in this area have succumbed to the intense heat, ash fall, and lava flow that accompanied the eruption. A detailed floristic inventory of the mountain in the near future will give information on what plants survived and recovered.

Availability :
International Rice Research Institute
Email: irri@cgiar.org




NO. 93973

Biological screening of 10 alkaloid-bearing plants from Palauig, Zambales


Buenafe, EMC
Inventory of Health Researches 1993-1994; p 128

Abstract:
Crude alcoholic extracts of ten alkaloid-bearing plants were tested for their biological activity. Antimicrobial screening using the agar cup method showed that 8 plants belonging to the family Annonaceae, Apocynaceae, Euphorbiaceae, leguminosae, Moraceae, Rubiaceae, Sonnerallaceae and Tiliaceae were active against S. aureus and Bacillus subtilis. Uncaria philippinensisElm. was active against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Prosopis vidaliana Nave was found to be active against the yeast, S. cerevisae and C. albicans. Three plant extracts that displayed toxicity in the brine shrimp bioassay as well as inhibition of crown gall tumors growth were Alstonia macrophylla, Commersonia bartramia (L.) Merr. and Prosopis vidaliana Nave. Ficus septica was found to be toxic to the newly hatched nauplii while Uvaria alba inhibited tumor growth induced by Agrobacterium fumefaciens.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology
Email: pchrd@pchrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 94002

Clastogenic activities of selected Philippine plants


Bautista, MYL; Pasahol, BV
Inventory of Health Researches : 1997-1998; p 88

Abstract:
The clastogenic activity of Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. (kamias), Ficus odorata Linn. (Pakiling). Gliricidia sepium Jacq. Steud. (kakauati), Piper betle Linn. (Samat) and Jatropha curcas Linn. (Tubang Bakod)was determined by Micronucleus test developed by Schmid and co-workers. DMN was used as a positive control. The readings on the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes found in the plants at 500,1000, and 500 mg/kg respectively: kamias 23.50+2.00, 25.25+1.32, 25.00+3.37; Pakiling 15.25+2.26, 17.80+0.81, 18.50+1.10; Kakauati 17.87+1.22, 18.00+3.02, 16.75+5.25;Samat 15.25+4.11, 17.50+1.90, 18.3+2.72; Tubang Bakod 8.60+2.53, 19.62+2.31, 22.0+2.26. Statistical analysis showed that the clastogenic potential of the five leaf extracts are comparable to DMN. This suggests that these herbal plants have mutagenic property.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology
Email: pchrd@pchrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 93738

Growth and yield of Gliricidia sepium in association with grasses, ground legumes and trees


Nitis, IM; Lana, K; Suarna, M; Sukanten, W; Putra, S
Proceedings; Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Walp. Management and Improvement; Turrialba, Costa Rica, 21-27 June, 1987; Withington, D; Glover, N; Brewbaker, JL (eds.); Nitrogen Fixing Tree Association Special Publication (87-01); Waiwanalo, USA; p 205-211

Abstract:
A three strata forage experiment was carried out for 17 months to study the association of grass and ground legumes (1st stratum), the shrubby legumes Leucaena leucocephala and Gliricidia sepium (2nd stratum) and three tree species (3rd stratum) in this system. Thirty-two plots, each with 2500 m² size, were randomly allocated in flat (13 plots), sloping (10 plots) and rolling land with both flat and sloping sections (9 plots). Each plot was divided into a 1600m² core area planted with a cash crop and a 900m² peripheral area with a circumference of 200m. Peripheral areas were divided into 20 lots of 45m² and planted with grass and ground legumes. The perimeter was planted with trees at 5m spacing. Shrubby legumes were planted at a 10cm spacing between trees. Leaf and branch yields of gliricidia in association with grass and legume were 31-35% and 33-50%, respectively, more than those in association with trees. Effect of individual grass (Cenchrus and Panicum), legume (Graham stylo, Verano stylo and Centrosema) and tree (Ficus, Lannea and Hibiscus) species depended on the season. Root nodule formations were affected (P>0.05) by the associations, but leaf chemical compositions were not. During the wet season, leaf yields on the flat and rolling plots were 32 and 23% higher, respectively, than yields on sloping plots. Leaf chemical composition was similar.

Availability :
College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños, College




NO. 39788

Life history and behavior of the fig moth, Cadra cautella Walter, as affected by varying moisture levels of copra


Paglinawan, RV; De Pedro, LB
Annals of Tropical Research 8 (1);1986

Abstract:
Life cycle was longer, and fecundity of females and % hatchability of eggs were lower when moths were reared on copra with 3 to 4% moisture content than when they were reared on substrates with 5 to 14% moisture content. Longevity, feeding, mating and oviposition behavior of adults were not significantly affected by the moisture levels tested. No significant difference in the life history of the insect was observed during the first and second generation.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 25970

Growth inhibition of hedge plants by the application of paclobutrazol


Tsan, FY; Nazarudin, MR; Adnan, M
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Kepong, 52109 Kuala Lumpur

4th. Asian Science and Technology Congress 2002; 25-27 April 2002; Kuala Lumpur

Abstract:
Chemical manipulative method has been a practical approach to retard vegetative growth of ornamental and nursery plants in the temperate countries lately. At present, paclobutrazol is one of the most potential triazole compound used for the mentioned purpose. This plant growth regulator (PGR) inhibits the gibberellin biosynthesis in plants. This paper reports the growth inhibition of hedge plants by the application of paclobutrazol. The species under study were Acalypha siamensis, Ficus nitida and Bougainvillea sp. The hedge plants were aerial sprayed to run off with the growth retardant when the new shoots emerged after trimming. Appropriate dosages enabled controlled vegetative growth in these hedge plants for periods of up to six months. It was more cost effective and long-lasting when compared to the conventional shoot trimming approach.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 25972

Preliminary studies on the chemical constituents and biological activity of the leaves and fruits of Ficus benjamina


Hassan, AA; Mawardi, R; Mohd Aspollah, S; Abdul Manaf, A
Department of Chemistry; Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Selangor

4th. Asian Science and Technology Congress 2002; 25-27 April 2002; Kuala Lumpur

Abstract:
The aim of this study is to investigate the chemical constituents and biological activity of Ficus benjamina. The isolation process involved extraction with various solvents and separation using column chromatography techniques. The structure of the compounds were assigned on the basis of spectroscopic data. Antimicrobial activity of the compounds against two species of bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was also carried out. One of the compounds, caffeic acid, gave strong cytotoxic activity against T- lymphoblastic leukemic (CEM-SS) cell line with IC50 value of 25 ug/ml.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 96549

Vegetational analysis of the Aurora State College of Technology (ASCOT) reservation area


Agbayani, EE
Proceedings of the Agency In-House Review of Completed and Ongoing R & D Projects. Aurora State College of Technology, Baler, Aurora (2003)

Abstract:
The study aimed to determine the existing forest resources found in the Aurora State College of Technology (ASCOT) Reservation Area, perform vegetational analysis and determine vegetational zonation on species composition. it was found out that the most dominant and most dense species was white lauan (Pentacme contorta), tailed leaf apitong, red lauan (Shorea negrosensis) and nagkaon (Elaeocarpus candollei). Other species such as hagimit (ficus minahassae), adena (Adena multifolia), kamagong (Diospyros philippensis) are found in the area but with minimal number.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 96676

Cacti as food, medicine, beauty aid and tool


Metilla, S
Philippine Daily Inquirer: H2 (November 28, 2003)

Abstract:
Cacti and other succulent are cultured not just for their aesthetic value but some of them are used as food, medicine , beauty aid and tool. Plants that are taken for granted or are not given much attention and care can be as important as others.

Availability :
Southern Tagalog Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium One Stop Information Shop




NO. 26315

Morphological variability of mas cotek (Ficus deltoidea) accessions collected in Kelantan and Terengganu


Musa, Y
Rice and Industrial Crops Research Centre; MARDI Research Station; Telong; 16310 Bachok; Kelantan

Seminar on Medicinal & Aromatic Plants; Current Trends & Perspectives; FRIM; 20-21 July 2004;p62

Abstract:
Besides tongkat ali and kacip fatimah, emas cotek (Ficus deltoidea) is another medicinal plant that is gaining popularity among the herbal practitioners. Traditionally, the leaves of mas cotek are boiled and the decoction is taken by women after given birth. The collectors do classify mas cotek into more than 30 accessions based on the morphology of leaf, stem and growth habits. Different local names are given to these accessions. Some confusion arisen when different names were sometime given to the same accession depending on the locality by which the accessions are collected. With this problem in mind, a systematic collection of the mas cotek accessions found in Kelantan and Terengganu was conducted. The effort had successfully collected 21 morphologically different accessions. These collected accessions were characterized based on leaf, flower morphology (size, shape and colour) and growth habits (growth stature). Evaluation of the growth of some of these accessions was also conducted. Results obtained showed that four of these accessions (Le. MFD 5, MFD 10, MFD 11 and MFD 13) were mas cotek jantan and the rest were mas cotek betina. The mas cotek jantan had smaller and more elongated leaves with parallel veins. On the other hand, mas cotek betina had larger, thicker, more rounded leaves and netted veins. The growth of mas cotek betina was more vigorous compared to mas cotek jantan. At 16 months after transplanting, the plant height of some of these accessions (Le. MFD 6 and MFD 7) was greater than 175 cm. The accessions with widest canopy (greater than 155 cm) were MFD 4 and MFD 7. Some of these accessions (MFD 4 and MFD 1) had good growth habits (short and compact stature) and the potential for commercial planting.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 96670

Herpetofauna of Puerto Galera, Mindoro Island, Philippines


Almiola,P; Gonzales,JCT; Daos, ATC; Afuang, LE; Dimapilis, AB
Sylvatrop [Technical Journal of Philippine Ecosystems and Natural Resources] 8 (1&2): 86-93 (1998)

Abstract:
The forest of Mt. Malasimbo, Puerto Galera contains a diverse assemblance of herpetofaunal species. It is possible that some of the species with unclear taxonomic status may be elevated to new species. With the inclusion of Mt. Malasimbo, as an Important Bird Area (IBA), the forest of Puerto Galera rates as one pf the most important strongholds for rare and endangered Minodoro endemic wild life.

Availability :
Southern Tagalog Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium One Stop Information Shop




NO. 26642

Maintaining landscape plants of Acalypha siamensis, Ficus microcarpa and Syzygium oleina by the application of Paclobutrazol: a non-mechanical approach


A. Nazarudin M.R; Tsan F.Y; and Adnan M.
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Kepong, 52109 Kuala Lumpur.

Transactions of the Malaysian Society of Plant Physiology Vol. 12(2003); Proceedings of the 14th. Malaysian Society of Plant Physiology Conference 2003; Genting Highlands; Pahang; 23-25 September 2003; p 231-233

Abstract:
Trimming procedures in the maintenance of a landscaped area are costly, time consuming and labour intensive. Disposal of the great quantity of trimmed biomass is also an issue in certain countries. Paclobutrazol, which inhibits the gibberellin biosynthesis in plants, was studied for its potential of retaining the landscape Junctions of some common hedge plants in Malaysia. The species under study were Acalypha siamensis, Ficus microcarpa and Syzygium oleina. Appropriate dosages of this plant growth regulator were better in controlling the growth of these species as compared to the conventional method of shoot trimming.

Availability :
Mohd Rizal Kassim




NO. 96986

The effects of varying levels of fertilizer on the growth and yield of abaca as intercrop to mature and immature rubber trees


Tolentino, LM; Tabora, RG; Turnos, NA; Castillo, AG
USM [University of Southern Mindanao] Research & Development Journal 11 (2): 160-174 (2003)

Abstract:
The effects of varying levels of fertilizer on the growth and yield of abaca as intercrop to mature and immature rubber trees was conducted at the experimental area of the Philippine Industrial Crops Research Institute, University of Southern Mindanao in Lumayong, Kabacan, Cotabato.|The different treatments were laid in a Split Plot Design in three replications with the age of rubber trees to where the abaca was intercropped as the main-plot and varying fertilizer levels as sub-plot. The fertilizer levels ranged from no fertilization to 75% higher than the recommended rate.|Increments in height and base diameter were significantly higher in fertilized plants regardless of whether the plants were intercropped in mature or immature rubber. Stolling ability of the abaca plants in mature rubber was drastically reduced however, bigger stalks were produced.|Fiber yield of abaca was significantly affected by fertilizer. Yield was highest in plants fertilized with 75% higher than RR. Tensile strength of abaca fibers, on the other hand, was significantly affected by the combined effects of age of rubber and varying fertilizers levels. Strongest fibers were produced in plants fertilized with 50% higher than RR. Strength of fibers decreased as the fertilizer level was further increased to 75% higher than RR.

Availability :
Scientific Literature Services; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 96266

Bioactive furanocoumarin derivatives from Ficus pumila (Moraceae)


Juan, EA; Rideout, JA; Ragasa, CY
Philippine Journal of Science 126 (2): 143-153 (1997)

Abstract:
The chloroform extract of Ficus pumila afforded bergapten and oxypeucedanin hydrate. Their structures were elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The compunds were tested for antimicrobial activity against six microorganisms by the agar well method. Bergapten was found to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi, butwas inactive against Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Mycobacterium pleie and Candida albicans.|Oxypeucedanin hydrate inhibited the growth of Salmonella typhi, but was found inactive against the other five microorganisms. Both compounds were also tested for antimutagenic acitivity by the use of micronucleus test. Results of the study indicated that bergapten reduced the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE) induced nu mitomycin C ny 44% while oxypeucedanin hydrate reduced MPCE by 74%.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 27031

Methods of glyphosate application for control of weeds in urban Singapore


Wee, YC
Department of Botany; National University of Singapore; Lower Kent Ridge Road; Singapore 0511.

Proceedings of the Third Tropical Weed Science Conference (Eds. Lee. S.A. & Kon, K.F.); Malaysian Plant Protection Society; 4-6 December 1990; Kuala Lumpur; p271-275

Abstract:
Three methods of application of glyphosate were tested on weeds of urban environment. Knapsack sprayer was ideal for control of prolific Imperata cylindrica in lawns, especially where the area covered was reasonably large. A "Roundup Ready to Use" hand sprayer was convenient to use to control isolated Imperata and other large weeds in lawns, as well as Ficus spp. growing from sides of drains. A "Zero Weeding Wand" could be useful for spot weeding of smaller lawn weeds. The use of a knapsack sprayer involved herbicide preparation but not the other two applicators. Due to its compactness and convenience, the "Roundup Ready to Use" hand sprayer has potential among urban dwellers in Singapore where control is once-in-a-while affair.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 96162

Field survival rates of the different propagating materials of 'balete' at Lambunao, Iloilo condition


Tomambo, E; Alli, R; Mamaril, R; Catedral, J
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights '97; PCARRD,Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; 1998; 167p; Malicsi, LC and Joven, JEA (eds); p. 100

Abstract:
Tomambo, Alli, Mamaril and Catedral (WVSU) conducted field planting of potted balete cuttings, water sprouts and marcots to determine which propagating methods was best suited for Iloilo conditions. Planting holes of 25 cm2 were made at a distance of 5mx5m. Strip brushing and ring weeding were done as needed. Fertilizer was pplied every four months at the rate of 5g/planting using T-14. The survival rate of balete planting in the watershed area of WVSU was determined one year after planting.|Of the three propagules, marcots performed best in terms of field survival.|One hundred percent of the marcots survived.|About 65% of the stem cuttings survived.|Only 50% of the watersprouts survived.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 14797

Sugar pattern of exotic fruits in a German market


Sugiyama, N; Roemer, K; Bunemann, G
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Tokyo, Japan.

International Symposium on Tropical Fruits; Theme: Frontier in tropical fruit research; Working abstrak; International Society for Horticultural Science, May 20-24, 1991, Pattaya, Thailand; p 123

Abstract:
23 samples of tropical and subtropical fruits were analysed for sugar and acid contents. Glucose and fructose were present in all of them, sucrose was not detected in persimmon (Kaki), fig, pomegranate, and lime. Sorbital was found only in Rosaceae. Citric and malic acid varied considerably between species. Carambola contained soluble oxalic acid. A classification by gross amount of glucose was attempted: kumquat, lychee, and pomegranate led the list, but in pomegranate and kumquat the sweet flavour is alleviated by high titratable acidity. Other fruits with high acidity (exceeding 200 meg.1-1) were cape gooseberry, passionfruit, cranberry (Vacc. macrocarpon) and lime.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 16651

Study of antioxidant property of some selected thai medicinal flowers and roots an In Vitro study by heinz body induction


Suwansaksri, J.; Wiwaiiitkit, V.; Soogarun, S.; Prachasilp, J. and Chotipheut, A.
Chulalongkom University, Bangkok, Thailand. (sjamsai@pioneer.netserv.chula.ac.th)

The 3rd World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare : 530. (2003)

Abstract:
Since the last decade, Thai traditional medicine has been awakened. Several parts of the plants such as leaves, roots, flowers and branches may have some different pharmacological effects. Their pharmacological effects such as antipyretic and antiseptic have been proved scientifically in many reports. The aim of the study is to test the antioxidant property of some selected Thai medicinal flowers and roots using the Heinz body model. Six flowers (as Nelumbo nicifera Gaertn, Carthamms tinctorius Linn. Mimusops elengi Linn., Ochrocarpus siamensis T. Anders, Mesua ferrea Linn. and Jasminum sambac Linn.) and eight roots (as Harrisonia perforata, Plumbag zeylaica Linn., Piper sarmentosum Roxb., Capparis micracantha DC., Clerodendrum indicum, Baliospernum axillare Blume, Ficus racemosa Linn. and Tiliacora triandra Diels) were studied. According to our study, 4 flowers (as Nelumbo nicifera Gaertn, Carthamus tinctorius Linn., Mimusops elengi Linn., Ochrocarpus siamensis T. Anders) and 1 root (as Plumbago zeylanic Linn.) showed positive inhibition effect. Of these 5 positive herbs, Ochrocarpus siamensis T. Anders, showed the strongest inhibition effect. Conclusively, the antioxidant property of the each selected herb is different from one another. This finding may be due to the difference of total antioxidant in each herb.

Availability :
Chiang Mai University Library




NO. 71189

Handbook on insects damaging cultivated plants
So tay sau benh hai cay trong

Nguyen Xuan Cung
Publishing house (?year) (?p)

Abstract:
Introduction to some major insect pests damaging cultivated plants and the insecticides to control them were discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71271

Fruit trees
Cay an qua

Department of Military Supplies; Vietnam

So tay rau rung [Notebook of forest vegetables]; Hanoi, Publishing House of Army, 1971; p 268-293

Abstract:
Eleven species of forest fruit trees in Vietnam are persented. Their properties and values, their living invironments, distribution and utilization are discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78377

Ficus pumila L.
Trau co

Le Tran Duc
Cay thuoc Viet Nam: Trong, hai, che bien va tri benh ban dau [Medicinal plants of Vietnam: planting, harvesting, processing and treating diseases] Agricultural Pub. House. Hanoi, 1999. p. 821-822

Abstract:
Ficus pumila grows wildly. Its leaf, fruit and resin are medicines harvested all the year round. The medicines can be used to relief some diseases such as: The fruit treating a dysentery, heart pain, swollen twdticle, an impotent; The leaf treating a backache, urinating with blood, a dysentery; The resin treaging scabies.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 78383

Ficus roxburghii Wall.
Va

Le Tran Duc
Cay thuoc Viet Nam: Trong, hai, che bien va tri benh ban dau [Medicinal plants of Vietnam: planting, harvesting, processing and treating diseases] Agricultural Pub. House. Hanoi, 1999. p. 689-690

Abstract:
Ficus roxburghii is cultivated by cutting branch. The fruits are used as vegetable. The fruit, root and leaf are used as a medicine treating a constipation, a dysentery, a haemorrhoid, a dropsy. The root and leaf are used also to counter a poison.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 74489

Ficus auriculata Lour.
Va

Vo Van Chi
Cay rau lam thuoc [Vegetable plants for medicine] pag. 238-239. Dong Thap Pub. House. Vietnam. 1998.

Abstract:
Ficus auriculata can be propagated by cutting branches; its young fruits can be used as vegatable, matured one can be eatten freshly. It fruits, roots and leaves are used to treat constipation, dysentery, hemorrhoids, dropsy.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 74516

Ficus racemosa L.
Sung

Vo Van Chi
Cay rau lam thuoc [Vegetable plants for medicine] pag. 225-227. Dong Thap Pub. House. Vietnam. 1998.

Abstract:
Ficus racemosa distributes in India, Srilanca, Thailand, Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia. In Vietnam, it grows or is planted by the lakes, pounds. It fruits, young leaves are used as vegetable. There are 70 g water, 3.4 g protein, 1.4 g lipid, 4.8 g cellulose in 100 gram fresh leaves. Its fruit are used for treating an obstructed mild, headache, the resin can treat a paralysed face.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam