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NO. 33236

Sweet potato that tastes and smells like chestnut
Kamoteng lasa at amoy kastanyas

Brodkast Digest 4-5(1989)

Availability :
Library; Department of Agriculture; Diliman; Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 93158

Utilization of weed extract for the control of golden snail (Pomacea canaliculata Lamarck)


Banoc, LM; Noriel, LM
Philippine Journal of Weed Science 18: 90-99 (1991)

Abstract:
The study was conducted to determine the molluscicidal potential of the aqueous extracts of different weed species, namely: Eichhornia crassipes, Euphorbia hirta, Ipomoea pes-caprae, Mikania cordata, Monochoria vaginalis, and Portulaca oleracea, against golden snail (Pomacea canaliculata) under laboratory condition. Of the six weed species, the crude extract of Mikania cordata was toxic against adult golden snails with 88% mortality. Among the different concentration (25, 50, 75 and 100%) of Mikania cordata extract used, the lowest effective concentration against golden snails was 50% which caused 61% snail mortality. Ten-day old golden snail was susceptible stage to 50% Mikania cordata extract with 100% mortality. Older (20, 30, and 40-days old) snails showed lower percent mortality.

Availability :
Main Library; University of the Philippines Los Baños; College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 37067

Erosion study involving semi-temperature fruit trees and vegetable on sloping areas of Benguet


Balaoing, J; Jaramillo, P
La Trinidad; Benguet; BSU

Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; BSU; 1986; Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development - BSU Project; Management Information Systems Division; 22 p

Abstract:
This study determined the effect of intercropping on the growth and development of fruit trees, soil properties, erosion and moisture conservation. A 281.935 sq m lot with approximately 20.25% slope was divided into two, and later subdivided into five plots. Apple seedlings were planted on the first five lots, while lemon seedlings were also planted on the next. Recommended rate of fertilizer was applied to the fruit trees yearly and other recommended cultural practices were followed. During the rainy season, sweet potato was planted in each plot excluding the control plots. During the dry season, vegetables such as white (Irish) potato, sweet potato, garden pea, tomato and pepper were planted in between rows of the fruit trees. In both orchards, intercropping was done in the following manner: no intercrop (control), sweet potato-pepper, garden pea-white potato, tomato-sweet potato, and white potato-garden pea. Data gathered during the first year showed that fruit trees without intercrops had the greatest amount of soil loss (49,963.63 kg/ha and 54,725.70 kg/ha for apple and lemon orchards), respectively. On the second, third, fourth and fifth year of operations, soil loss was greatest in the control plots in both orchards. This was followed by those planted to trees intercropped with sweet potato and pepper, then those intercropped with white potato and garden pea. Vegetable yields were also found higher in the lemon orchard. Mean value of the initial and final height of the fruit trees indicated that in the apple orchard, the tallest height (1.60 m) was observed from A1 (no intercrop) while the lowest (1.02 m) was taken from the trees in A4 (with tomato sweet potato intercrops). On the other hand, the tallest plants (1.00 m) in the lemon orchard was found from L4 (with tomato sweet potato intercrops) and the lowest (0.76 m) was taken from L5 (with potato-green pea intercrops). Intercropping vegetables (such as those used in the study) with fruit trees like apple and lemon in sloping areas is a suitable cropping scheme in minimizing erosion and also improving soil physical and chemical properties and at the same time providing additional farm income.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 20029

Yield and growth responses of leguminous and root crops grown on acid peat to magnesium lime


Chew, WY
Division of Agriculture; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

The Malaysian Agricultural Journal 48 (2): 142-158 (1971)

Abstract:
A number of experiments to investigate the response of two leguminous crops (groundnut and soybean) and three root crops (sweet potato, tapioca and colocasia) to magnesium lime on acid peat during 1968-71 were described. Addition of magnesium lime increased the peat reaction linearly at the rate of 0.15 pH unit per ton of lime up to 6 tons per acre. Beyond this level the rate of pH increase declined progressively to 0.01 pH unit per ton of lime per acre at 22 tons. Peat pH fluctuated with time but was maintained for at least 3 1/2 years after liming. All the crops tested, with the exception of tapioca, showed positive yield responses to added lime. Groundnut and soyabean needed up to 4 tons of Mg lime per acre. Sweet potato and colocasia were more tolerant of acidity, requiring only 2-4 tons. Tapioca could tolerate an acid peat without liming and give resonably high yields.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM); Jalan FRIM; Kepong; Karung Berkunci 201; 52109 Kuala Lumpur; Selangor; Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 20333

Population growth of rootknot nematodes on tobacco and ten other crops
Perkembangan populasi nematod bengkak akar pada tembakau dan sepuluh spesies tanaman

Abd Karim, S
Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute; Serdang; Selangor; Malaysia

Teknologi Pertanian [Agricultural Technology] 5 (1): 92-95 (1984)

Abstract:
The population development of Meloidogyne javanica on tobacco and ten other crop species was studied in a glasshouse. Only the chilli plant was not attacked by the nematode; whereas groundnut, maize, papaya and brassica (sawi) were poor host of the nematode. Tobacco, long bean, cucumber, spinach (bayam), kangkung and okra were very good hosts.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Jalan FRIM, Kepong Karung Berkunci 201, 52109 Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my




NO. 20405

Genetic resources of root and tuber crops in Malaysia


Farah D. Ghani
Department of Botany; National University of Malaysia; Bangi; Selangor; Malaysia

Genetic resources of under-utilised plants in Malaysia; Proceedings of the National Workshop on Plant Genetic Resources, Subang Jaya, Malaysia, 23 November 1988; Zakri, AH (ed); Kuala Lumpur, Malaysian National Committee on Plant Genetic Resources, 1989; p 91-111

Abstract:
Underexploitation of available root crop genetic resources has confined the food industry to the use of tapioca starch. It is now recognised that there is a great need for germplasm exploitation and evaluation in order to maximise utilisation of the root crops in Malaysia. Cassava, sweet potato, taro and yams constitute the major root crops. These have been cultivated and both corms, roots and leaves have been widely consumed. The minor root crops include Amorphophallus companulatus, Alocasia macrorrhiza, Xanthosoma saggitifolium, Canna edulis, Coleus tuberosus and Maranta arundinacea. These are native or introduced and have remained under-exploited. Cultivation is limited to a few plants in the back garden plots. Germplasm collection of all the major root crops had been undertaken. Apart from cassava, sweet potato, taro and yam were presently being characterized and evaluated. There were, however, no germplasm collections of the minor root crops.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), Jalan FRIM, Kepong Karung Berkunci 201, 52109 Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 627 42633; fax: (60) (3) 627 65531
Email: philip@frim.gov.my
prosea@indo.net.id|info@proseanet.org




NO. 24966

Characterization of starches from selected cultivars of taro and sweet potatoes


Mohd. Nasir, A; Mohd. Said, S; Farah, G
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor; Malaysia

UPM Research Report 1993

Abstract:
Sweet potatoes represent one of the under-utilized starch resources in Malaysia. Their usage has been confined mainly to fresh consumption. This project aims to study the characteristics of sweet potatoes in more detail for industrial application and for the production of value added products. Studies on the characteristics of over 12 cultivars of sweet potatoes have successfully identified 6 different cultivars suitable for industrial use. Studies on these cultivars showed a wide range of characteristics. Analysis carried out included physical dimensions, colour of skin and flesh, starch characteristics such as amylose : amylopectin ratios, swelling and solubility of starches, gelatinizing and pasting characteristics, freeze thaw stability, viscosity, Brix value, and susceptibility to browning. Studies on the production of sweet potato crisps showed that cultivar 1990-10 was suitable, with high starch content, low Brix and low browning problem. Sweet potato cultivars selected have shown great potential for industrial use. Present studies are emphasizing the use of the refined sweet potato starch as a raw material for bioconversion into glucose and maltodextrin. Research on the industrial suitability of sweet potato varieties has caught the interest of Golden Hope. Presently, researchers are planting the selected sweet potato cultivars on a large scale in one of the company's research plots in Banting. The first harvest was carried out in November 1992, producing very good quality and high yielding sweet potatoes. Yields of 30-40 t/ha were achieved. With the increase in raw material supply, studies on the characteristics of sweet potato starch could be carried out more effectively.

Availability :
Universiti Putra Malaysia [Agricultural University of Malaysia]; 43400 UPM Serdang; Selangor; Malaysia; phone: (60) (3) 894 86101: fax: 60) (3) 894 32514




NO. 36729

Productivity of selected upland gabi cultivars intercropped with corn, peanut and sweet potato


Pascual, AC
MS thesis; Muñoz; Nueva Ecija; Crop Science Department; Central Luzon State University; 1985; 69 p

Abstract:
The experiment was conducted to determine the influence of different intercrops on the productivity of selected upland 'gabi' (Colocasia esculenta) cultivars. 'Gabi' grown in monoculture had significantly higher number of marketable cormels with similarly greater length and diameter, greater leaf area index (LAI) and dry weight but with slightly shorter petioles compared to those grown with sweet corn. Highly significant interaction was noted between variety and intercropping pattern particularly on the weight of harvested cormels. Results further indicated that when peanut was used as intercrop to Dasheen and Tininta cultivars, the plants tended to produce shorter petioles due to shading effects offered by the intercrop which grew close to the height of the cultivars mentioned. The weight of harvested cormels and LAI of San Fernando cultivar was significantly affected by sweet potato. This was probably due to its late bulking characteristics which commenced at almost the same time with the intercrop, resulting in a strong competition for soil moisture and nutrients. When sweet corn and peanut were grown together between rows of 'gabi' cultivars, all the crops involved in the combination gave a significantly lower yield suggesting a severe interplant competition for all factors affecting growth and development. In relation to monoculture, the Land Equivalent Ratio (LER) and yield efficiency of various intercropping schemes were significantly higher in corn + 'gabi' combination. However, none of the intercropping patterns had LER above 1, suggesting a net negative effect. Generally, considering the net profit obtained from each intercropping scheme, corn + 'gabi' combination gave the highest net returns among all the intercropping combinations used.

Availability :
Scientific Literature Services (SLS); Research, Extension and Training (RET); Central Luzon State University (CLSU); Munoz; Nueva Ecija; 3120 Philippines; phone: (63) (44) 4560 609; fax: (63) (44) 4560 609
Email: hlangeles@mozcom.com




NO. 37132

Cultural management of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk), cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and gabi (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) under various multiple cropping shemes utilizing legumes as source of nitrogen.


Escalada, RG; Quirol, BF; Escasinas, AB
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1983; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 211 p

Abstract:
The project was composed of two studies. Study 1 evaluated and selected promising legumes that could be used as intercrops with sweet potato, cassava and gabi for optimum productivity per unit area, and ascertained the effects of Rhizobium inoculation on the legume intercrops and on the associated root crops. Study 2, on the other hand, investigated the feasibility of crop rotating sweet potato, cassava and gabi with legumes to enable the crops to utilize the limited amount of fertilizers available in a complementary manner.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37541

Utilization by sweet potato and taro of residual fertility from soil previously grown with cash crops


Marquez, WL; Torres, HB; Gonzales, IC
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a Series of Working Papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p 92-97

Abstract:
Sweet potato planted after beans yielded higher fresh herbage and marketable roots of 15.8 t/ha. Taro planted after carrot significantly yielded the highest corm and stalk with a corm yield of 9.8 t/ha, while taro planted after white potato gave corm yield of 7.6 t/ha. The lowest corm and stalk yield was observed from taro planted after garden pea and cabbage.

Availability :
Library; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC); Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: harrdec@skyinet.net




NO. 37133

Intercropping sweet potato, cassava and gabi with legumes as a cultural management system


Escalada, RG; Quirol, BF; Escasinas, AB
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1983; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); p 1-85

Abstract:
Sweet potato (BNAS-51), cassava (Golden Yellow) and gabi (Kalpao) were alternately planted with mungbean (MG 50-10A), bushbean (Los Baños Bush Sitao) and soybean (TK-5) to evaluate and select promising legumes that could be used as intercrops with the root crops for optimum productivity per unit area. Inoculation of the legume intercrops with Rhizobium was done to determine its effect on the legume and on the associated root crops. Intercropping sweet potato and cassava with legumes reduced the yield of the root crops by as much as 17.78% and 20.58%. Gabi however, was not affected by the intercrops. The detrimental effect of competition by legume intercrops on sweet potato was effectively minimized by the inoculation of the intercrops with Rhizobium. However, cassava and gabi did not respond to this treatment, although the inoculation increased the yield of their legume intercrops. Bushbean was observed to be the best intercrop for the three root crops studied due to its lesser detrimental effects on the main crops and its greater productivity and economic return. The yield of the legume intercrops increased the profitability of the root crop farms. The reduced yield of root crops upon intercropping was more than compensated by the returns from the legumes. Thus, legume intercropping with root crops was found to be beneficial.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37134

Crops rotation of sweet potato, cassava and gabi with legumes as a cultural management system


Escalada, RG; Quirol, BF; Escasinas, AB
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1983; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); p 86-211

Abstract:
Sweet potato, cassava and gabi were planted in succession with mungbean, bushbean, soybean and peanut to evaluate, test and select promising legumes that will be used in crop rotation with the root crops and to develop an effective cropping system utilizing promising legumes with the root crops for optimum productivity per unit time. The effectiveness of legumes in supplementing the application of inorganic fertilizer to root crops was investigated. Yield of the root crops was found to decrease in subsequent croppings due to continuous planting despite rotation with leguminous crops. Only sweet potato responded positively to the rotation planting of legumes particularly mungbean, as exhibited by the increased root yield. Only plants rotated with mungbean showed a significant increase in yield over the control. Upon application of fertilizer at the rate of 0-60-60, gabi produced an average optimum corm yield of 4.98 t/ha. Thus, even without nitrogen but with phosphorus and potassium, gabi still produced a yield comparable to those applied with complete fertilizer at higher rates when rotated with legumes. Sweet potato and cassava yields on the other hand, were not affected by fertilizer application. Cost and return analysis showed that peanuts gave the highest combined net return regardless of the root crops used. Application of fertilizer did not prove economical due to the high cost of fertilizer materials. Therefore, rotation planting of root crops with legumes without the use of inorganic fertilizer might be employed to obtain reasonable yields.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37135

Spacing and fertilizer study on root crops in Leyte


Nombre, W
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Department of Agriculture (DA); RES; ? year; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 15 p

Abstract:
The yield performance of Kabiti sweet potato, Golden Yellow cassava and Kalpao gabi was evaluated using four spacing (100 cm x 25 cm; 100 cm x 50 cm; 100 cm x 75 cm; 100 cm x 100 cm) and fertilizer treatments (180 - 120 - 120; 135 - 90 - 90; 90 - 60 - 60; no application). The highest yields were obtained from treatment combinations 100 cm x 25 cm with 90 - 60 - 60 kg NPK/ha (14.93 t/ha) for sweet potato; 100 cm x 75 cm with 90 - 60 - 60 kg NPK/ha for cassava (31.37 t/ha) and 100 cm x 25 cm with 135 - 90 - 90 kg NPK/ha for gabi (10.52 t/ha). The control treatment in all root crops tested consistently gave the lowest yield.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37137

Agronomic approaches to root crop-legume cropping system and their economic consideration


Evangelio, LA; Posas, MB
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1982; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 32 p

Abstract:
The study was conducted to evaluate the best timing of planting root crops and legume in an intercropping system, and to determine the economics of root crop-legume cropping system. Results revealed that the best timing of planting root crops and legume in an intercropping sytem was planting root crops simultaneously with legume intercrop. Marketable tuber yields of sweet potato and gabi plants were significantly higher when grown simultaneously with mungbean intercrop. Cassava, on the other hand, performed better when grown alone than when it was intercropped with mungbean. Similarly, mungbean intercrop produced the highest yield when simultaneously grown with root crops. Based on the income analysis, root crops and mungbean planted simultaneously gave the highest net profit which was 53% higher than the yield of root crops under monoculture stands and the rest of the root crop-legume intercropping schemes under the two experiments.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 37139

Effects of ipil-ipil as organic fertilizer on root crops


Escalada, RG; Posas, MB; Javier, RR; Abit, S
Research Storage and Retrieval System (RETRES) Research Abstracts; Visayas College of Agriculture (VISCA); 1986; Management Information Systems Division (MISD); Philippines Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); 147 p

Abstract:
Studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of ipil-ipil herbage as organic fertilizer on the growth and yield of cassava, sweet potato, taro and yam, its effect on some physical and chemical properties of the soil, and whether ipil-ipil can substitute or supplement inorganic fertilizer on root crops. The use of ipil-ipil herbage resulted in higher marketable and total root yield of cassava, taro and yam. However, ipil-ipil fertilization, singly or in combination with inorganic fertilizer reduced the number and weight of marketable roots compared with the control plants. The application of ipil-ipil leaves with inorganic fertilizer under sweet potato cropping, increased the soil organic matter and available P and K. In other root crops, ipil-ipil fertilization augmented the fertility status of the soil. The use of ipil-ipil leaves as substitute or supplement to inorganic fertilizer on root crops was found feasible.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD); Los Baños; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 38202

Management of sweet potato in lowland field previously planted to rice


Pardales, JR; Talatala, RL; Capuno, OB
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 3 (1): 53-57 (1978)

Abstract:
The study was conducted to determine the effects of green manuring in lowland field previously planted with rice, to determine the effects of fertilization on sweet potato planted in lowland field previously planted with rice and to develop a management system for growing sweet potato in lowland field previously planted with rice. BNAS-51 variety of sweet potato was planted in a lowland field previously planted with rice at a distance of 100 cm x 25 cm employing the ridge method. There were two main plots, one with green manure and the other plot without green manure. Mungo (Vigna radiata, syn.: Phaseolus aureus) was used as green manure. The subplots consisted of seven fertilizer treatments. Results showed that green manuring did not cause significant effects on the yield of marketable and non-marketable tubers, number of marketable tubers, total yield of tubers and harvest index of sweet potato. However, a significant increase in fresh and dry weights of vines was noted in green manured plots whereas the number of non-marketable tubers considerably decreased with green manuring. Analysis of variance indicated highly significant differences among fertilizer treatments for yield and number of marketable tubers, number of non-marketable tubers, total yield of tubers, harvest index and for fresh and dry weights of vines, but not for yield of non-marketable tubers. The results of this study indicated also the importance of N and K fertilization on tuber production of sweet potato while the effect of P was not apparent. Treatments with N and K fertilizers gave tuber yields comparable to treatments in which the three elements were all present. At higher fertilizer levels, there were considerable increases in the yield of tubers compared to the control. The results reveal the importance of nitrogen and potassium in normal plant development and in obtaining higher tuber yields of sweet potato. On the otherhand the fresh and dry weights of vines were influenced largely by N and little effect was noted with P and K application.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of Philippines at Los Baños (UPLB); College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 38228

Performance test on the promising cultivars of different crops in Capiz settlement


Palada, LP; Aquino, SP; Jereza, H; Labios, RV
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5 (2): 76 (1980)

Abstract:
Varieties trials of different crops were tested for CY 1978-1979 in Capiz settlement to identify the highest yielders, resistance to pests and diseases, and adaptation to the locality. Six cultivars of lowland rice, 10 of sorghum, 5 of soybean, 10 of cowpea and 10 of peanut were tested during the dry season of 1978-1979. For 1979 wet season, 6 field corn cultivars, 13 green corn, 12 upland rice, 12 lowland rice and 11 sweet potato were tested. Results of the 1978-1979 dry season planting showed that the highest yielders having good potential for adaptation to the locality were: S1-496 for lowland rice with 6.39 t/ha yield; IS-2940 for sorghum (1.87 t/ha); Clark 63 for soybean (0.62 t/ha); EG #3 for cowpea (1.3 t/ha); and Dixie Giant for peanut (1.27 t/ha). For 1979 wet season planting DMR Comp. $3 of field corn gave the highest yield of 2.24 t/ha. Glut. DMR. Comp. 41C for green corn (4.11 t/ha), C171-136 for upland rice (4.50 t/ha); IR46 for lowland rice (5.17 t/ha) and S.P. #45 for sweet potato (11.45 t/ha). The first five entries in each crop that showed promising performance would be tried for at least two cropping seasons in the area and the other entries were replaced by the new entries tested at IRRI and UPLB. Continuous trials are being made to have stable varieties to be recommended to farmers.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of Philippines at Los Baños (UPLB); College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 38266

Time of planting for upland crops - a progress report


Sorenio, A; Abrenica, A; Piggin, CM
PADAP/BPI Betinan Research Farm, Zamboanga del Sur

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5 (2): 87 (1980)

Abstract:
The growth of nine upland crops sown monthly, commencing in April 1979, was studied on a volcanic soil under rainfed conditions. Data were presented for the first eight planting times (April to November). The highest yield for each crop was obtained by planting as follows: rice in April and May, corn in April and September, sorghum in April, October and November, wheat in November, mungbean in October, cowpea in September, soybean in April and August, peanut in May and July and sweet potato in September. All crops were grown with moderate fertilizer applications and in addition, good control of pests and diseases was obtained. The residual effect of soil fertility on all crops for the first four planting times was also determined.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of Philippines at Los Baños (UPLB); College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 38663

Growth and yield of sweet potato grown from basal vine cuttings, treated with indolebutyric acid and planted at varying densities


Nzima, MDS; del Rosario, DA
The Philippine Agriculturist 65 (3): 339-351 (1982)

Abstract:
A study was conducted to investigate possible ways of improving the yield of sweet potato cv. BNAS 51 grown from basal cuttings. Under field conditions, 50 ppm indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) significantly increased the total yield (69.54 t/ha) and the marketable tuberous root yield (67.77 t/ha) more than the untreated basal cuttings (49.84 and 48.38 t/ha, respectively). The treatment also increased net assimilation rate (NAR), crop growth rate (CGR) and harvest index (HI). Differences in plant population densities of 30, 40, 50 and 60 thousand plants/ha did not affect yield but increased leaf area index (LAI) and NAR, while CGR and HI were decreased. The interaction between IBA treatment and population densities did not affect the total and marketable tuberous root yields of cv. BNAS 51.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of the Philippines Los Baños, College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 37902

Interplanting of selected agricultural crops with major forest tree species in Benguet


Costales, AB; Costales, EF
DENR-CAR Technical Bulletin 1 (2): 1-12 (1989)

Abstract:
Interplanting selected agricultural crops with 3 major forest species in the Binga Watershed at Itogon, Benguet was conducted. The agro-forest crops tested were 'gabi'/taro (Colocasia esculenta), ginger (Zingiber officinale), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), 'Baguio' beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), and Chinese pechay (Brassica campestris), white Benguet pine (Pinus kesiya), Alnus (Alnus japonica) and Murrary Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) represented the forest tree/reforestation species.

Availability :
ERDS-DENR-CAR; Loakan Road; Baguio City; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4472 541; fax: (63) (74) 4472 806
Email: erds-car@moscom.com




NO. 38028

Root crop-based snacks: their effect on the nutritional level of Sablan Central pupils


Reboldela, RA
ME thesis; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1990; xi p; 87 p

Abstract:
This study was intended to determine the initial nutritional status of pupil respondents, the calorie and nutrient contents of snack items prepared from selected root-crops, the calorie and nutrient contributions of the snack items compared to the pupils daily Recommended Dietary Allowances, the effect of the food nutrients of these root-crop snacks on nutritional status based on pupils' weight and height, and the relationship between dietary intake and nutritional status. Pupils from primary level composed of 50 males and 70 females whose ages ranged from 7 to 10 years served as respondents. They were divided into three: one group was not fed with root-crops, another group was individually fed with 100 g of unenriched root-crops, and the other group was individually fed with 100 g of enriched root-crops. Feeding was made daily and lasted for three months. It was concluded that respondents fed with root-crops for three months were better in nutritional status than those not fed with root-crops. Root crops are good food supplement, especially when they are enriched.

Availability :
Graduate School Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 401 - 12, 3091 453; fax: (63) (74) 4222 281
Email: bsu@burgos.slu.edu.ph




NO. 38651

Isolation, screening, and identification of fungi for protein enrichment of root and tuber crops


Mabesa, RC; Vallaralvo, JA; Melendres, RR
The Philippine Agriculturist 67 (1): 9-16 (1984)

Abstract:
Molds growing in decaying root and tuber crops such as cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), gabi (Colocasia esculenta), potato (Solanum tuberosum), and giant swamp taro (Cyrtosperma chamissonis) were isolated and screened for protein production. At least three promising strains from each crop were selected for identification. Isolates from cassava possess the characteristics of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus sulphureus and Penicillium simplicissimum. Fungi similar to Aspergillus niger, Penicillium purpurogenum and Syncephalastrum racemosum gave the higher protein yield in sweet potato. In the case of gabi, promising isolates appeared to be Aspergillus niger, Mucor sp. and Penicillium purpurogenum. Isolates resembling Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor sp. were found to be efficiently convert potato starch to protein. Fungi which appear to be Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus and Monilia sp. increased the protein content of giant swamp taro substantially. Fermentation with fungi considerably increased the original protein content of the root crops. Fungi with the higher amylolytic activity gave the highest protein yield in the product.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of the Philippines Los Baños, College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 38221

Evaluation of some agronomic practices for the control of sweet potato weevil


Villanueva, MR
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5 (3): 105-108 (1980)

Abstract:
Several agronomic approaches were evaluated to determine their effects on weevil (Cylas formicarius elegantulus) infestation in two varieties of sweet potato. The intensity of weevil infestation significantly increased as date of harvest was delayed from 90 to 150 days after planting. Variety PR-S10 was more severely affected than PR-S6. On the other hand, proper residue management, crop rotation, intercropping and earthing up effectively reduced weevil infestation of the tubers. Fertilization appeared to have little inconsistent effects on weevil infestations.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of Philippines at Los Baños (UPLB); College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 38314

Intercropping sweet potato with legumes as a cultural management system


Quirol, BF; Escalada, RG; Manatad, FA
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8 (2): S1-S2 (1983)

Abstract:
The employment of legume intercrops reduced the overall development of sweet potato. The yield of the root crop declined by as much as 17.78% as a consequence of the intercrop competition for nutrients and light. However, inoculation of the intercrops with Rhizobium effectively minimized the root crop yield reduction. Inoculation probably minimized the competition for nitrogen and allowed the sweet potato to develop enough herbage. Sweet potato intercroped with inoculated legumes produced some 6.5% greater yield than those intercropped with uninoculated legumes. Significant differences were observed on the effects of legume intercrops and their interaction with inoculation on sweet potato productivity. Bushbean was a better intercrop than either mungbean or soybean, mainly because this legume matures earlier than the other two. It has also a fairly high N-fixing potential to emerge as the least detrimental and relatively more beneficial to sweet potato. Soybean was far more competitive with its longer growth duration while mungbean was a poor N-fixer. Bushbean and mungbean increased the yield of sweet potato upon inoculation but soybean further decreased root crop yield under the same treatment. In general, however, inoculation of the legume intercrops and the practice of intercropping were more beneficial and profitable. Regardless of the legume used as intercrop, intercropping was 247% more profitable than monoculture even without inoculation. Inoculation of the legumes further raised the net profit to as much as 306% over that of monoculture. The highest profit in this experiment was P7468,70/ha/cropping obtained in the sweet potato-inoculated bushbean intercropping scheme. This was 5.67 times greater than the P1120.30/ha/cropping profit in monoculture scheme of sweet potato production.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding (IPB); University of Philippines at Los Baños (UPLB); College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 298; fax: (63) (49) 5363 438
Email: vmvc@ipb.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 38021

Physiological and agronomic comparisons between white potato and sweet potato in contrasting environments of the Philippines


Gabutan, JD
MSc. thesis; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1989; 160 p

Abstract:
Sweet potato is a traditional crop in the lowland tropics, while potato is well-established in the highland tropics. Recent results indicated that the potato was also well-suited to the lowland tropics. The major objective of this study was to compare these two crops in two lowland locations (Cagayan 50 m asl, 18 °N Lat. and Canlubang, 150 m asl, 14 °N Lat.) and one higland location (Benguet, 1330 m asl, 16 °N Lat.) to determine which crop had the comparative advantage in producing food. Canopy size and duration of potato were significantly greater than for sweet potato in the cooler highlands, while in Cagayan and Canlubang the potato developed a smaller canopy and senesced earlier than the sweet potato regardless of location. This was attributed to the early tuberization of the potato.

Availability :
Benguet State University Graduate School Library; Graduate School; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; phone: (63) (74) 4222 775; fax: (63) (74) 4221 656
Email: bsu@burgos.slu.edu.ph




NO. 39658

Chemodynamics of isoprocarb in the rice paddy environment


Bajet, CM; Magallona, ED
Philippine Association of Entomologists; Department of Entomology; Institute of Biological Sciences; UP Los Baños; College; Laguna

The Philippine Entomologist 5 (4): 355-371 (1982)

Abstract:
Granular isoprocarb + HCH broadcast in the rice field at the rate of 2 kg/ha gave a maximum concentration of 2.7 mg/l isoprocarb in paddy water 1 day after application. Isoprocarp decline in paddy water followed pseudo first-order kinetics with a half-life of 1.2 days. At pH 8, isoprocarb decreased from 5 mg/l fortification level to 0.025 mg/l after 3 hr. Half-life at pH 6 is 15 days and degradation followed pseudo first-order kinetics. At pH 7, two decline curves were observed, the first one with a half-life of 1.4 days and the second, of 88.8 days. Degradation followed pseudo first-order kinetics. Half-life in unflooded and flooded soils were 6.4 and 38.5, respectively. The major metabolites in the soils under laboratory conditions were tentatively identified as 2-isopropyl phenol, 2-(1-hydroxyl 1-methylethyl) phenyl N-methyl carbamate and possibly 2-(1-hydroxy 1-methylethyl) phenol, 2-Isopropyl phenol was not detected in water. Under field conditions, no metabolites were detected in paddy water. Radiolabeled isoprocarb could be detected in rice plants 6 hr after exposure with radioactivity concentrated on the stem and older leaves. After 2 days, radioactivity was concentrated on the tip of the leaves. In kangkong, Ipomoea aquatica, the radioactivity was concentrated in the veins and veinlets of the old leaves, distribution being diffuse in the young leaves. Isoprocarb was found in Tilapia nilotica and small snails, Pila luzonica, one day after exposure, with radioactivity concentrated on the head area of the first. Toxicity tests on snails gave an LC50 value of 26.3 mg/l.

Availability :
Main Library; University of the Philippines Los Baños; College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 50282

Plant Resources of South-East Asia No 8. Vegetables


Siemonsma, JS (ed); Kasem Piluek (ed)
PROSEA Publication Office; Wageningen; the Netherlands

Low-price, paperback edition; Bogor; PROSEA Foundation; 1994; 412 p

Abstract:
This volume deals with the vegetables of South-East Asia. A vegetable is a product or commodity that may be defined as a usually succulent plant or portion of a plant which is consumed as a side-dish with the starchy staple. All vegetable crops share certain characteristics but very few completely fit any definition. More than 1000 species have been used in South-East Asia as supplementary food. In this volume about 100 important vegetables, cultivated as well as wild species, are treated in 86 papers, where as 125 species of minor importance are described briefly. Another 800 species yield vegetables as a by-product and they are listed only. In the process of modernization and intensification of the horticultural sector, attention and means are increasingly focused on a limited number of commercially interesting crops, among them the much improved 'western' vegetables, grown in the highland areas of South-East Asia. This volume intends to contribute to preventing that the knowledge on lesser-known indigenous species is lost. The introductory chapter deals with general aspects of vegetables. A glossary is included to explain the terms used. Two indexes, of scientific and vernacular plant names, are provided.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 50283

Plant Resources of South-East Asia No 9. Plants yielding non-seed carbohydrates


Flach, M (ed); Rumawas, F (ed)
Department of Agronomy; Wageningen Agricultural University; Wageningen; the Netherlands

PROSEA Foundation; Bogor; Indonesia; 1996; 237 p

Abstract:
This volume deals with plants in South-East Asia that produce and store starch and/or sugar as a reserve food in organs other than seeds, e.g. in tubers, corms, cormels, stolons, thickened roots, stems, trunks and fruits. Starches and sugars are the main source of food energy for humans and animals. Most of the crops dealt with in this volume are grown at subsistence level in the tropics. Although many of them may potentially produce twice the amount of useful energy per unit of land and time than cereals, they have never received comparable scientific, industrial and commercial attention. This neglected group of crops deserves more attention to realize its full potential. In this volume 54 important crops (cultivated and wild) including sago palm, sugar palm, fishtail palm, sugar cane, yams, cassava, sweet potato, Irish potato, taro, arrowroot, yam bean, plantain and cooking banana, zedoary, Chinese artichoke, are treated in 33 papers. Some 50 species of minor importance are described briefly and a further 100 species yielding non-seed carbohydrates as a by-product are listed. The introductory chapter deals with general aspects of the plants. A glossary is included to explain the terms used. Two indexes, of scientific and vernacular plant names, are provided.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 50287

Plant Resources of South-East Asia No 12(2). Medicinal and poisonous plants 2


van Valkenburgh, JLCH (ed); Bunyapraphatsara, N (ed)
PROSEA Publication Office; Wageningen Agricultural University; Wageningen; the Netherlands

Low-price, hardbound edition; Bogor; PROSEA Foundation; 2002; 782 p

Abstract:
This second of the three volumes on the medicinal and poisonous plants of South-East Asia presents a mixture of species with a long-standing reputation in traditional medicine and species that have been well investigated phytochemically or pharmacologically, but are poorly known in the South-East Asian region. Up-to-date information is provided concerning local knowledge as well as modern research findings, where possible. This is important in view of the resurgence of interest in medicinal plants in South-East Asia. In general, less information on the phytochemistry and pharmacology is available for the medicinal and poisonous plants covered in the present volume compared to those highlighted in the first one. The alphabetical treatment of genera and species comprises 171 papers. Genera such as Alstonia, Alyxia, Capparis, Croton, Polygala and Quassia are well-known in traditional medicine in South-East Asia. Other genera have been quite well investigated in the field of phytochemistry and may have prospects for the production of bioactive intermediates. Examples include Strophanthus and Cerbera for their cardiac glycosides, Tabernaemontana, Ipomoea and Phaeanthus for their alkaloids and Dioscorea for its steroidal glycosides. The introductory chapter deals with some aspects of quality control of herbal drugs. A glossary is included to explain the terms used. Four indexes, of compounds, pharmaceutical terms, scientific and vernacular plant names, are provided.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 39688

Fate of carbosulfan in a rice paddy environment


Tejada, AW; Magallona, ED
Philippine Association of Entomologists; c/o Department of Entomology; Institute of Biological Sciences; UP Los Baños; College; Laguna

The Philippine Entomologist 6 (3): 255-273 (1985)

Abstract:
The fate of carbosulfan in a rice paddy environment was determined and the extent of pollution through its drainage water was monitored in a simulated lake ecosystem. Carbosulfan was rapidly converted to carbofuran in all components of the rice paddy ecosystem except on rice leaves where it remained up to 7 days as the parent compound. The major metabolite, carbofuran remained up to 30 days in the soils. Hydrolysis was the major degradation route in water with a higher rate at higher pH and temperature. In the simulated lake ecosystem, carbofuran was the major metabolite detected. The concentration in water was biomagnified in fish (Tilapia nilotica) up to 100 times. The residue was concentrated in entrails, then fillet and least in head. In snails (Pila luzonica), 50% of the residue were in the shell. Carbofuran uptake by water plant, Ipomoea aquatica, was observed up to 20 days, declining thereafter. From the half life values of carbofuran residues in fish (3.8 d), water (5.8 d), soils (4.0 d) and rice plants (1.5 d), it can be concluded that the pollution potential of this insecticide is small.

Availability :
Main Library; University of the Philippines Los Baños; College; Laguna; Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 71509

Some major diseases infecting cultivars and methods to present them
Mot so benh chinh hai cay trong va phuong phap phong tru

Nguyen Quang Tho; Nhu Dinh Duat
Rural Publishing House, Hanoi, 1962; 46 p

Abstract:
Introduction to some diseases infecting cultivars of rice, maize, coffee, sweet potato and methods for preventing them.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71211

Cereals
Hoa mau luong thuc

Bui Huy Dap
Rural Publishing House, Hanoi, 1957; 367 p

Abstract:
The situation of cereals, peanut, green gram and black gram in agricultural economy were discussed. The botanical characteristics, growth and development, and planting techniques of those crops were also put forward.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71219

Notebook on plant diseases
So tay benh hai cay trong.

Duong Hong Dat
Rural Publishing House, Hanoi, 1976; 415 p

Abstract:
The author introduced the causes of plant diseases and their symptoms, the botanical immunity and methods of controlling the diseases of rice, maize, wheat, millet, sweet potato, cassava, vegetables, tomato, potato and other vegetables.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71221

Cereals: industrial crops
Cay luong thuc: Cay cong nghiep

Association of Scientific and Technical Diffusion, 1964; 20 p

Abstract:
Natural and physiological conditions of some cereals and industrial crops in suburb of Hanoi namely, rice, sweet potato, maize, peanut, black gram, soybean, greengram and sugar cane were discussed. Their planting time methods of manuring and others were also discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71251

Experiences on overcoming harsh weather to improve productivity of winter-spring crop plants in Thai Binh province
Nhung kinh nghiem khac phujc kho khan ve thoi tiet trong viec tham canh tang nang suat cay trong vu Dong Xuan o Thai Binh

Nguyen Xuan Tuan
Society of Science and Technological Dissemination of Thai Binh, Thai Binh, 1967; 34 p

Abstract:
The winter-spring crops, cultivated from October to June during which the temparature fluctuates from 15 °C to 19 °C are the main and important crops in Vietnam. Experiences in mitigating the impacts of heavy rains, unfavourable temperatures and air humidity on rice seedlings, azolla, sweet potato and other vegetables, as well as the impact of phosphate fertilizer are discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71472

Preservation and processing of cereals
Bao quan va che bien mau

Nguyen Thi Mai; Le Thi Tuong
Thanh Hoa, Thanh Hoa Publishing House, 1981; 46 pages

Abstract:
Methods of preservation and preliminary treatment of cereals after harvested, as well as methods of further processing are discussed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 69593

Effect of rice straw and N K fertilizer application on sweet potato
Pengaruh jerami padi dan pemupukan N K pada ubi jalar

Tuherkih, E; Wargiono, J; Soemaryono
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF), Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 February and 2 March 1992; Hardjosumadi, S et al (eds); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol 1; 1992; p 28-32

Abstract:
An experiment was conducted in Latosol soil at Citayam Experimental Farm, Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops, on the dry season of 1990, using a Split-Plot Design with three replications. The main plots were no rice straw incorporation and with rice straw. The sub-plots were different levels of NK fertilizer i.e. N (0,30,60,and 90 kg/ha) and K (0,45 and 90 kg/ha). The results showed that N application increased leaf area index (LAI), green weight and fresh root yields, but the application level did not affect all observed parametres significantly. No interaction was found between N and K fertilizers and rice straw incorporation.

Availability :
Research Institute for Food Crop Biotechnology, Library
Email: borif@indo.net.id




NO. 69646

Economic analysis of crop-animal farming system at Batumarta, South Sumatra
Analisis ekonomi sistem usaha tani tanaman-ternak di Batumarta, Sumatra Selatan

Anwarhan, H; Supriadi, H
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF), Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 February and 2 March 1992; Hardjosumadi, S et al (eds); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol 3; 1992; p 497-507

Abstract:
A crop-animal farming system research was conducted in the past six years from 1985 until 1991, involving food crops, rubber and animals. Four farming system models were tested for their economic feasibility. Model C consisting of 0.775 ha food crops, 1 cattle, 3 goats and 11 chickens, was found to show higher income (Rp 2,055,000/family/year) as compared to existing farm (model A, without animal) which showed only Rp 1,231,000/family/year. The internal rate of return (IRR) and net present value (NPV) of model C were 29% and Rp 6,500,000, respectively, indicating the feasibility of model C for long - term application. Rubber contributed highest income (52%) compared to food crops (31%) and animal (17%). Among food crops, cassava was the highest income contributor (23%), followed by lowland rice (19%). For animal, cattle was most important (55%), goat being the least (18%) in its contribution to farm income.

Availability :
Research Institute for Food Crop Biotechnology, Library
Email: borif@indo.net.id




NO. 69647

The potential of farming system development in rainfed ricefield in the southern part of Sukabumi
Potensi pengembangan usahatani pada lahan sawah tadah hujan di Sukabumi bagian selatan

Herman, S; Malian, AH
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF), Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 February and 2 March 1992; Hardjosumadi, S et al (eds); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol 3; 1992; p 508-528

Abstract:
A survey designed according to Rapid Rural Appraisal Method (RRA) was conducted at Sukabumi, West Java in April-May and October 1991. The objective of the survey was to identify the potential, problem and probability in developing of specific location technology for West Java, such as Sukabumi. This identification will be useful for repackaging of specific location technology which will be evaluated through research activities. Agroclimatic conditions of rainfed lowland area of Sukabumi and other similar areas in the southern part of West Java significantly different with that of the northern part of West Java. Secondary data showed that 117,699 ha of these lowland areas were mostly located in a poverty area of West Java. Results of discussions with farmers and field observations showed that there were still many chances to improve productivity and efficiency of farming system, farmers group dynamic, external supporting factors, government policies and other factors related to the development of rainfed lowland farming system, especially area specific to southern part of West Java.

Availability :
Research Institute for Food Crop Biotechnology, Library
Email: borif@indo.net.id




NO. 100833

Medicinal plants and traditional cosmetics of Kutai and Dayak Tunjung ethnic groups in Kota Bangun subdistrict, Kutai district, East Kalimantan
Tumbuhan obat dan kosmetik tradisional suku Kutai dan Dayak Tanjung di Kecamatan Kota Bangun, Kab.Kutai, Kalimantan Timur

Setyowati, FM; Waluyo, EB; Siagian, MH; Siregar, M; Riswan, S
Botany Division, Research Centre for Biology; Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Hasil Penelitian dan Pengembangan Sumber Daya Hayati Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI [Proceedings of a Seminar on Research Findings and Development Centre for Biology - LIPI], Bogor, 4 April 1994; Farida, WR (eds); Proyek Litbang SDH, Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI, 1994; p 367-377

Abstract:
Plants which are used for traditional medicines and cosmetics by Kutai and Dayak Tunjung tribes in several villages in Kota Bangun subdistrict, Kutai district, East Kalimantan were studied. Data were compiled from observations and interviews with head of villages, midwives and persons who know well about the medicinal plants. Results showed that there were 97 species of 43 which species were used by Dayak Tunjung tribe and 6 species by Kutai tribe.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 111439

Urban and peri-urban vegetable production systems in Bandung municipality and Bandung district
Sistem produksi sayuran urban dan peri-urban di Kotamadya dan Kabupaten Bandung

Adiyoga, W; Suherman, R; Soetiarso, TA; Udiarto, KB; Sulastrini, I
Central Research Institute for Horticulture, Jakarta, Indonesia

Jurnal Hortikultura [Horticultural Journal] 9 (4): 331-352 (2000)

Abstract:
A study was conducted from December 1997 until February 1998 in Bandung municipality and the surrounding areas, involving randomly selected 53 farmers. The objective of this study was to characterize vegetable production systems in the areas. Results showed that cropping pattern varied among different ecosystems (low-lands: rice based cropping systems, medium-lands: vegetables-vegetables-secondary crops, vegetables-secondary crops-vegetables, vegetables-secondary crops-secondary crops; high lands: vegetables-vegetables-vegetables). Farmers observed that the dynamics of bio-physical production environment in the last five years had caused: (a) shifts in planting time, (b) changes in priority of commodity, and (c) an increase of production risks. In the last five years, some farmers also observed a decrease in soil fertility as reflected by a decreasing yield and increasing need of inputs. Limitation in land availability was indicated from the data showing that the land size cultivated by some farmers (>25%) was getting smaller in the last three years. Routine spraying and pesticide mixing were commonly practiced as preventive measures to minimize production risks. Pesticide use in highland areas was much more intensive than in lowland areas, and even tended to be excessive. This was supported by the results from residue analysis for some vegetable crops which were above tolerable threshold. Three problems considered as the main production constraints as perceived by farmers, based on their ranks of importance were funds/capital availability, price fluctuation and pest and disease incidence. Meanwhile, technical information and soil fertility were perceived as low priority constraints and specifically, that control of pests and disease was the most needed technology for improving vegetable production systems.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library
Email: dir-riv@indo.net.id




NO. 13946

Fungal diseases of weeds of Thailand
Rok ra khong watchaphut nai prathetthai

Sonthirat, P; Prachasaisoradet, W; Chubamrung, W; Phithakphraiwan, P
Plant Pathology and Microbiology Division, Department of Agriculture, Bangkok, Thailand

Abstract of the 31st Kasetsart University Annual Conference; Bangkok, Kasetsart University; 1993; p 98

Abstract:
Fungal diseases of weeds were collected from some locations in Thailand from June 1991 to October 1992. Anthracnose, leaf spot, leaf blight, powdery mildew, and white rust diseases were found on 37 different kinds of weed belonging to 19 families. Morphotaxonomy of the causal agents were studied thoroughly under the microscopes and identified as Albugo sp., Alternaria sp., Bipolaris spp., Cercospora spp., Corynespora cassiicola, Curvularia sp., Exerohilium spp., Gibbago trianthemae, Odium sp., Oidiopsis sp., Pestalotiopsis sp., Pseudocercospora spp., and Pyricularia grisea.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 94539

weeds as organic fertilizer for sweet potato


Villamayor, FG
The Radix 8 (2): 10-11 (1986)

Abstract:
The study was undertaken to determine if weeds even without composting can be utilized as fertilizer. Fresh weeds which mainly consisted of Cyperus rotundus, Rottboellia exaltata, Digitaria sanguinalis and Desmodium sp. were collected, weighed and mixed with sweet potato vine before they were applied in furrows at the rate of 5.6 kg/m2. Results showed that the number and weight of marketable roots as well as the herbage and total plant weights of sweet potato were significantly increased by the application of weeds as fertilizer.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 90192

Preliminary survey, identification and bioassay of plants with pesticide potential in Mt. Pangasugan


Noriel, LM; Vasquez, EA; Ranchez, CV; Sopsop, GO; Duatin, FMY
Philippine Phytopathology 28: 65-66 (1992)

Abstract:
A preliminary survey of plants from Mt. Pangasugan with pesticidal potential was conducted. The extracts of the identified pesticidal plants based on existing literature references were further bioassayed using various kinds of test organism. Eighteen species of plants belonging to nine plant families were identified during the survey. The extracts of Mikania cordata and Senna alata (synonym: Cassia alata) caused greater mycelial growth inhibition on fungal pathogens. Pyricularia oryzae was the most sensitive while Sclerotium rolfsii was the least sensitive to the extracts. On the other hand, all plant extracts used did not show contact and stomach toxicity against sweet potato weevil. All extracts however, possessed repellent activity.

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines Los Baños; College, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 92929

Processing of starch and other binder products from plants


Ponciano, GV
Tarlac College of Agriculture Research Journal 19: 35-39 (1996-1997)

Abstract:
This study was conducted to extract and process the starch components of crops which are growing luxuriantly in Western Tarlac. Starch is being utilized as binder gelling agent, stabilizer and as major food additive in bakery products. About 10 plant species belonging to 3 different families have been collected. Chemical analysis on the components of the crops such as moisture ash, fat, protein, carbohydrates and crude fiber have been carried out. The starch contents were processed into quality flour, noodles, pasta and cellulosic plastics.

Availability :
Library; Department of Research and Development; Tarlac College of Agriculture; Camiling; Tarlac; Philippines; phone: (63) (45) 9340 216; fax: (63) (45) 9340 216
Email: tca@mozcom.com




NO. 90126

Host range and virulence of selected biovar isolates of Pseudomonas solanacearum E.F. Smith


Fandialan, MVC; Valdez, RB
Department of Plant Pathology, U.P. Los Baños; College, Laguna, Philippines

Philippine Phytopathology 25 (1&2): 59-60 (1989)

Abstract:
The host range and relative virulence of 9 selected biovar isolates of Pseudomonas solanacearum obtained from tomato (B3, 4), pepper (B3, 4), white potato (B2,3,4) and eggplant (B3,4) were studied in cross-inoculation tests to 7 crops and 9 weed species. The most virulent, in terms of percent mortality and infection were, in decreasing order: the biovar 4 isolates T6, P10 and E5 followed by biovar 3 isolates E18, T151, WP12 and P15. Among the 3 white potato isolates, WP12 (B3) was the most virulent followed by WP14 (B4) and the least virulent was the biovar 2 isolate WP112 which was highly specific to white potato and tomato. Among the 9 weed species cross-inoculated with the 9 isolates of Pseudomonas solanacearum, Vernonia cinerea, Emilia sonchifolia and Portulaca oleracea were the most susceptible hosts to all isolates, except to isolate WP112. Synedrella nodiflora, Ageratum conyzoides and Amaranthus spinosus were infected at a low degree only by T6 (B4), P10 (B4) and E18 (B3). Cleome rutidosperma was infected at a very low degree by WP12 (B3) only with no mortality. Okra, cassava, sweet potato, Trianthema portulacastrum and Commelina benghalensis were not infected by any of the isolates. All the test isolates were highly virulent to their original hosts. % infection was often higher than % mortality and some infected plants did not manifest the wilt symptoms.

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines Los Baños; College, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5362 326, 5362 235; fax: (63) (49) 3673
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 92008

Moist storage of agriculture products


Gutierrez, HM
Greenfields 22 (1): 40-45 (1994)

Abstract:
Fruits and vegetables can be stored up to eight months when storage temperature was kept between 1 °C to 15 °C. Storage life can be prolonged by controlling the concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the storage air. Under these conditions, the activities of microorganisms and enzymes, the rate of respiration, and product wilting and shivering can be reduced or eliminated.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, Library; Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 95789

Butterfly species and host plants in selected areas in Region XI


Balmocena; BJ; Guadalupe, A; Marquita, MA; Maningas, RC
Abstracts of Researches on Environment and Natural Resources in Region XI; Ecosystems Research and Development Service, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region XI, Davao City; 1999, p 19-20

Abstract:
A survey of endemic butterflies and host plants were conducted in: 1) Marilog District, Davao City, 2) Toril District, Davao City, 3) Tugbok District, Davao City, 4) ERDS-Nabunturan, Campostela Valley Province, 5) ERDS-Bislig Experiment Station, Maharlika, Bislig Surigao del Sur and 6) Marbel South Cotabato, to determine the species of butterfly that can be reared and mass-produced as livelihood in the upland farms of Region XI. Graphium agamemnon, Papilio rumanzovia (Papilioninae: Papilionidae, are existing in Region XI. These butterfly species with large wings can be reared and mass-produced (captive breeding) as livelihood in the upland farms in the region. Other beautiful butterfly species found in the region which can also be reared and mass produced are the following: Appias albina pancheia, Delias diphana diaphana, Paperonia boeboera (Pierinae, Pieridae), Catopsilia pyranthe pyranthe, Catopsilia scylla asaema, Catopsilia pomona pomona, Eurema alitha alitha (Coliadinae, Pieridae); Danaus (Anosia) chrysippus, Euploca mulciber, Parantica luzonensis luzonensis (Danaidae); Elymnias bezabeza, Mycalesis traedawayi, Pytcandra sp., Europa spp. (Satyrinae, Satyridae); Fauenis mindanaoansis (Amathusiinae, Satyridae); Precis orithya leucasia, Precis almana, Hypolimnas bolina philippinensis, Rhinopalpa polynice validice (Nymphalinae, Nymphalidae); Neptis spp. Lexias panopus (Limenitidinae, Nymphalidae) and Erionatha thrax (Hesperiinae, Hesperiidae). Buttefly nectar host includes santan (Ixora chinensis), bougainville (Bougainville sp.), makahiya (Mimosa pudica), kanding-kanding (Starchytapheta jamaicensis), baho-baho (Ageratum conyzoides), Doña aurora (Mussaenda philippica), gumamela (Hibiscus rosasinensis), rubia (Rubia cardifolia), atis (Annona squamosa), margarita flower, manila palm, lantana (Lantana camara), calopogonium (Calopogonium mocunoides), cosmos (Cosmos caudatus), marigold (Tagetes erecta), dahlia (Dahlia imperialis), camote (Ipomoea batatas), golden shower (Cassia fistula), ipil-ipil (Leucaena leucocephala), Ficus, banana (Musa xparadisiaca), kasopangil (Clerodendrum inerme) and two unidentified plant species found in the second growth forest, while adelfa (Nerium oleander) and calamansi (Citrus maxima) were observed as larval host plants.

Availability :
Library; Technology Transfer and Information Division; Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region 7; Mandaue City; Philippines




NO. 92664

Species alpha diversity of Pagbilao Grande Island vegetations, Quezon Province, Philippines


Gruezo, WSM
Asia Life Sciences 7 (1): 39-92 (1998)

Abstract:
Five vegetation types were recorded from Pagbilao Grande Island (PGI), Quezon Province, Philippines, namely: (1) remnants of limestone or molave forest; (2) grassland-parang type; (3) coconut plantation cum brushlands/ secondary forest; (4) mangrove-swamp forests, and (5) small strips of beach forest. A total of 251 vascular plant species belonging to 220 genera and 72 families were recorded from actual floristic surveys and vegetation analyses of PGI. This total number of species increased to 301 in 230 genera and 81 families with the inclusion of two study localities in mainland Pagbilao. About 41% of the island's total plant species belong to the weedy or ruderal types which are mostly annuals or biennials, hence their peak population densities were markedly seasonal in nature. These species are indicators of high level of disturbance of the landscape or ecosystem. Comparison among 26 study plots, 5 transect lines, 3 sites, and between 2 localities using the Shannon diversity index (H') revealed the following: (1) H' value ranged from 0.64 to 3.54 at plot level, the highest recorded in the ecotone of coconut plantation-secondary forest and grassland-parang type of vegetations; (2) at transect line level, H'value ranged from 2.51 to 3.90, the highest value recorded from same area with mixed vegetation types as in plot level; (3) at site level, H'value ranged from 2.51 to 4.26, the highest value was obtained from the island as a whole and (4) at locality level, H' value ranged from 3.15 to 4.26. The entire study area had highest H' value (=4.41) indicating a remarkably high level of plant diversity. Ten additional diversity indices- S, C, E, d, Dmg. Dmn, HB, HBe, N1 and N2, were used to evaluate the raw data obtained in this study. Majority of these measures supported the overall diversity trend shown by Shannon index. Additionally, the potential or actual uses and/or ecological roles of all taxa recorded in this study are also presented in this paper, including notes on some rare or endangered endemic taxa. A rare biological phenomenon involving formation of pistillate cones (megasporophylls) in Cycas revolutaan introduced cycad of temperate origin, is recorded for the first time. In the Philippines and probably elsewhere in the tropics, this cycad species is commonly asexually propagated by using plantlets or suckers from stem base of mature plants.

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines Los Baños; College; Laguna




NO. 101029

Alternative of technology for food crop cultivation on alang-alang land
Alternatif teknologi budidaya tanaman pangan pada lahan alang-alang

Zaini, Z; Hamid, Z
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF), Padang, Indonesia

Prosiding seminar lahan alang-alang [Proceedings of a Seminar on Alang-Alang Land], Bogor, September 1992; Sukmana, S et al. (eds); Bogor, Pusat Penelitian Tanah dan Agroklimat, 1993; p 71-102

Abstract:
In Indonesia, alang-alang area has been estimated to occupy 30 million hectares and may increase about 150,000 ha/year. This expansion is due to shifting cultivation practices and improper management of forest resources exploitation. Problems arising from alang-alang areas are how to clean and transform them into productive agricultural land for food crops sustainably and environmentally sound. Alang-alang is a notorious weed species in Indonesia that has the capability to grow and spread out through rhizomes and viable seeds (3000 seeds/plant) on any type of soil, at altitude of up to 3000 m above sea level and annual rainfall of 500-5000 mm. Alang-alang has the ability to predominate an area competitively by releasing chemical substance (allelopathic) from its leaves, roots and rhizomes which under optimum environmental conditions may produce 10 ton dry matter or 7 ton exclusively from rhizomes and roots. Despite its adverse effects on the environment, alang-alang is useful for many purposes, such as: raw material for pharmaceutical and paper industry, handicrafts, roof, ritual purposes and mulch material for controling weeds. Various methods of alang-alang land clearing for growing food crops are available; i.e. manual, mechanical, cultural, biological, and chemical methods. These methods are too complex or expensive for adoption, particularly by smallscale farmers. Relative cost of those methods may vary depending on availability and cost of labors and mechanization or from one region to another. The development of methods has been limited with accessibility and difficulty on selecting appropriate phytophagus insects or pathogenic microorganism to destroy underground portions (rhizomes). Small farmers usually clear the alang-alang land by manual methods which are safe and do not pollute the environment but are not effective for a long time. It requires about 168 man-days/ha for slashing, burning, plowing and harrowing until the land is ready for planting. Mechanical methods (animal drought and tractor) which are preceded by slashing and burning may be recommended for large and relatively flat areas. Animal drought and tractor respectively spends about Rp 384,000 and Rp 250,000/ha until the land is ready for planting. This method does not provide lasting result, it can be used only in areas where mechanization is possible, promotes mixing the top soil with subsoil and encourages soil erosion, a long time for the control achievement, and equipment has to be available in the same area for a long time. Meanwhile, cultural method using cover crops requires soil preparation work, either manually or mechanically, and provision of seeds ranges from Rp 90,000 to 120,000/ha. Cover crops may compete with main food crops, however, they suppress regrowth of alang-alang, improve soil structure, and organic matter, increase soil nitrogen, conserve soil from surface run-off, supply feed for livestock, and reduce fire risk of the area. The last alternative method, when the preceding methods are not effective, is chemical technology (systemic and non biological activity herbicide, glyphosate) either as single application on standing alang-alang or in combination with other methods at the rate of 5-6 l product/ha. This method is very effective in controlling alang-alang, but shifts to other secondary weed population. It requires about 27 man-days/ha and a set of sprayer "solo brand". It is much cheaper than other methods and may be applicable for small and undulating areas. Whatever alternative technology selected, once alang-alang has been eradicated, an appropriate cropping pattern suitable for soil type, climate and local preference should be established. The recommended or alternative cropping pattern may be : A: upland rice + maize/cassava - peanut or mungbean, B: maize + mungbean I + upland rice/cassava I - mungbean II + cassava II and C: maize + soybean - maize + sweet potato - cowpea, for a year round.

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research, Library
Email: csar@bogor.wasantara.net.id




NO. 111600

A comparative study on the yard farming of Food and Nutrition Diversification programme in Pengasih, Kulon Progo Regency
Studi komparatif usahatani pekarangan program Diversifikasi Pangan dan Gizi di Pengasih, Kabupaten Kulon Progo

Triyono
Fakultas Pertanian Universitas Muhammadiyah, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Agr. UMY (Jurnal Fakultas Pertanian Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta) [Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Muhammadiyah University, Yogyakarta] 8 (1): 17-23 (2000)

Abstract:
The development programmeof Food and Nutrition Diversification (FND) was carried out in an attempt to solve food and nutrition deficiency problem by optimal use of the land of yard. However, people's awareness to participate in this programme was still low. Therefore, an evaluation was made on the income of the yard farm and various factors influencing the farmer's decision to participate in this programme. Based on it, therefore a research was carried out to compare the yard farming between participant and non-participant farmers of FND in Pengasih, Kulon Progo Regency. The result indicated that the incomes of the yard farm of the FND participant farmers were higher than those of the non-FND participant farmers. Further analysis on the contribution of the yard income showed that the per capita income, prosperity and the income distribution of FND participant farmers were better than those of the non-FND participant farmers. The result of social economic analysis showed that significantly influencing factors were levels of education, number of people per family farmer, extent of the yard land, income, experience in attending course on FND. Inactivity of FND participant farmers to carry out the programme again resulted from the lack of farm advisor's attention to conduct visits and guidance, resulting in lack of communication between farm advisors and the farmers to settle the problem faced by the farmers. Among the difficulties was air package, less suitable to natural condition and potentials as well harvest-failure by the farmers.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 69038

Effects of various vegetables on the biomass of African snail (Achatina fulica)
Pengaruh berbagai sayuran terhadap biomassa bekicot (Achatina fulica)

Chumaidi; Insan, I; Nugroho, E
Buletin Penelitian Perikanan Darat [Inland Fisheries Research Bulletin] 12 (1): 76-81 (1993)

Abstract:
African snails were reared and fed with different vegetable leaves, i.e. chinese mustard (Brassica juncea), sweet potato (Ipomoea batata), papaya (Carica papaya), spinach (Amaranthus hybridus) and water-kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica). The snails with individual weights of 23-27 g were reared in 1 m² of bamboo box for four months. The result showed that feeding papaya leaf produced highest biomass of eggs (1238.7 eggs/m² or 64.9 g/m²), juveniles (1451.7 individuals/m² or 915.2 g/m², young snails (7.3 individuals/ m² or 451.2 g/m²), and brooders (1.3 individual/m² or 13.4 g/m²) and nest (10.7 nests/m²).

Availability :
Research Institute for Freshwater Fisheries (RIFF); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100313

Effects of tomato cultivars and kinds of fillers on tomato sauce quality
Pengaruh kultivar tomat dan jenis bahan pengisi terhadap mutu saus tomat

Marpaung, Listria
Lembang Research Institute for Horticulture (LERIH), Bandung, Indonesia

Buletin Penelitian Hortikultura [Horticultural Research Bulletin] 25 (2): 47-53 (1993)

Abstract:
A study was conducted with the objective to determine tomato cultivar and related filler which are acceptable for producing tomato sauce. The experiment was laid out following a Randomized Block Design (RBD) with two factors of treatment combinations and three replications. The experiment was carried out at the Laboratory of Lembang Research Institute for Horticulture from December 1991 to February 1992. The first factor was tomato cultivar (TW, Farmer, Gondol) and the second factor was the filler (sweet potato, carrot, papaya). The results showed that: (1) The best tomato cultivar for producing tomato sauce was the Farmer cultivar (highest total acid content, colour, taste, flavour and overall appearance, and low in pH); (2) The best kind of filler was papaya (highest in acid content, colour, taste, flavour, texture, overall appearance and lowest pH); (3) There was an interaction between tomato cultivar and filler treatment on the vitamin C, total acid, pH, colour, taste, texture and overall appearance of tomato sauce as shown by Farmer cultivar with papaya (highest in total acid content, colour, taste and overal appearance).

Availability :
Research Centre for Estate Biotechnology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 38155

Seed production of Townsville stylo (Stylosanthes humilis HBK)


Briones, FC; Mendoza, RC; Javier, EQ
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 1 (4): 214-216 (1976)

Abstract:
The slow-growing Townsville seedlings were easily overtaken by common weeds like Eleusine coracana cv. group Finger Millet (Synonym Eleusine indica), Rottboellia exaltata, Cynodon sp., Ipomoea triloba, Amaranthus sp., and Mimosa pudica. A total of 61 man days/ha were spent for handweeding. The bulk of the pods appeared in October and were ready for harvest in November. By late December, practically all pods have dropped to the ground. Handpicking, topping of terminals, cutting whole plant, and hand sweeping resulted in seed recovery of 119, 60, 88, and 110 kg/ha, respectively. Hand sweeping proved most economical and practical. Seeds of Townsville stylo can be produced locally in semi-commercial quantities using largely manual seed harvesting and processing methods. At a selling price of P30/kg seed, a farmer will make about P2000/ha which is comparable to returns a farmer normally expects from other upland crops like corn.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Baños; College, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 92906

Comparative antidiabetic activities of some medicinal plants


Villasenor, IM; Cabrera, MA; Meneses, RB; Rivera, VRR; Villasenor, RM
The Philippine Journal of Science 127 (4): 261-266 (1998)

Abstract:
The methanolic and aqueous extracts from popular, abundant and relatively cheap sources such as banana flowers, pipino fruits, and leaves of ampalaya, kangkong, kamote, makopa, and tanglad were tested for their comparative antidiabetic activities using albino mice as test animals. The blood glucose levels were determined using haemogluco test strips. The results of the bioassay of the aqueous extracts showed that the most potent antidiabetic plant is banana flowers while the comparative antidiabetic potencies of the other plants are: tanglad leaves > pipino fruits > kangkong leaves > makopa leaves > ampalaya leaves > kamote leaves. An infusion from mango leaves did not exhibit antidiabetic activity. The organic extract of makopa leaves is the most antidiabetic followed by kangkong and mango leaves. The organic extracts of banana flowers and kamote, ampalaya, and tanglad leaves exhibited low antidiabetic potentials.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, Library; Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; phone: (63) (49) 5360 014 - 20; fax: (63) (49) 5360 016




NO. 94764

Identification of annual crops suitable for lahar laden areas under rainfed condition


de Leon, JP; Gonzales, VM
Pampanga Agricultural College (PAC) Research Journal 21 (1): 27 (1997-1998)

Abstract:
A wet season trial was conducted at San Martin, Concepcion, Tarlac to test the suitability and profitability of annual crops under rainfed environment. Seven annual crops were tested as follows: bush sitao (Vignaunguiculata cv. group Unguiculata, synonym Vigna sinensis), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), okra (Abelmoschus esculentus), eggplant (Solanum melongena), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and cassava (Manihot esculenta). Plant survival, plant height, economic yield, yield components, and net monetary returns were measured in the trial. Yield and yield component data were numerically compared with the results on non-lahar experiments conducted elsewhere. Water logging during the early growth stages adversely affected plant establishment of eggplant and sweet potato. Among the seven crops tested, okra and bush sitao produced higher economic yield than those reported in irrigated non-lahar trials. Yields of peanut and sweet potato grown on lahar were 25-28% and 2-13% lower, respectively, than the yields obtained in well-watered trials in non-lahar soils. Yield recorded from tomato was 52% of the yield produced in ordinary soils. Lahar grown okra, however, produced higher yield than that reported in non-lahar soils. Low or no marketable yield was obtained from cassava and eggplant. Differences in economic yield in ordinary soils were associated with differences in number and size of economic organs. The most profitable crops on lahar were okra and peanut, followed by tomato. Crops which were found suitable although relatively less profitable were bush sitao and sweet potato. Net monetary losses were recorded in cassava and eggplant.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 95423

Comparative antidiabetic activities of some medicinal plants


Villasenor, IM; Cabrera, MA; Meneses, KB; Rivera, VRR; Villasenor, RM
The Philippine Journal of Science 127 (4): 261-266 (1998)

Abstract:
The methanolic and aqueous extracts from popular, abundant and relatively cheap sources such as banana flowers, pipino fruits, and leaves of ampalaya, kangkong, kamote, makopa and tanglad were tested for their comparative antidiabetic activities using albino mice as test animals. The blood glucose levels were determined using haemoglucotest strips. The results of the bioassay of the aqueous extracts showed that the most potent antidiabetic plant was banana flowers while the comparative antidiabetic potencies of the other plants are: tanglad leaves> pipino fruits> kangkong leaves> makopa leaves> ampalaya leaves> kamote leaves. An infusion from mango leaves did not exhibit antidiabetic activity. The organic extract of makopa leaves was the most antidiabetic followed by kangkong and mango leaves. The organic extracts of banana flowers and kamote, ampalaya, and tanglad leaves exhibited low antidiabetic potential.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 67502

Effects of processing and vitamin C content on the absorption of iron by in vitro method for several green leafy vegetables
Pengaruh pengolahan dan kandungan vitamin C terhadap penyerapan zat besi (Fe) dengan cara in vitro pada beberapa jenis sayuran daun hijau

Yahya, Y; Nasoetion, A; Anwar, F
Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Media Gizi dan Keluarga [Nutrition and Family Medium] 16 (1): 11-17 (1992)

Abstract:
Steam processing caused the lowest iron and vitamin C leaching. The range was 5.97%-17.78% for Fe and 4.34%-60.71% for vitamin C. The bio-availability of iron of sweet potato leaves was the highest above other vegetables, the range was 20.07% - 25.16%.

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68675

Agroecology and alternative development of agriculture in Sumatra
Agroekologi dan alternatif pengembangan pertanian di Sumatra

Amien, I; Sosiawan, H; Susanti, E
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research, Bogor, Indonesia

BIOTROP Special Publication 46: 179-207 (1992)

Abstract:
Sustainable agriculture can be realized if land-use management is done properly. The expert system can be used to determine agricultural system and plants suitable to a particular land and climate to support sustainable agriculture. An expert system needs data on slope, texture and soil pH for deciding the agricultural system and data on moisture content and temperature for deciding the suitable plants. To decide planting pattern and land management the expert system can be further developed by addition of data on water input and mineralogy. The region with inadequate data, the data can be predicted from the visible field characteristics. The expert system is made simple and user friendly, and can be operated easily. The computer needed is IBM computer or the compatible one with one or more drive, 640 kilobytes of RAM or just 252 kilobytes if completed with a macroprocessor. Many information on resources has been obtained by the national research centres but has not in fully used the planning of agricultural development. Through agro-ecological approach, relevant information obtained from soil maps and climatic conditions in Sumatra can be processed into the expert system, the borders of protection and production forests to determine of perrenial crops, and annual crops cultivation area. It can also be applied to determine appropriate planting pattern for annual crops, soil management such as fertilization with P and K and to choose species to be planted such as fibre plants, oil yielding plants, fruit trees, etc. The data input resulted in digitized maps in the geographical information system, that can be accessed, improved and edited. (Authors' abstract)

Availability :
Clearing House of Information, SEAMEO-BIOTROP
Email: info@biotrop.org




NO. 68974

Study on the application of components for controlling wild pigs
Uji terapan komponen pengendalian babi hutan

Rachman; Suwalan, S; Djuhani; Soejitno, J
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF), Bogor, Indonesia

Buletin Penelitian [Research Bulletin] (6): 69-76 (1993)

Abstract:
The major problem of pests in the transmigration areas was particularly wild pigs and rats. These animals may caused severe damage to various crops. Study on the component of controlling wild pigs was carried out at the transmigration area, Karang Agung Ulu tidal swamps during the period of October 1989 to February 1990. The control techniques tested were poisoned bait, local-made trap lapon and 'jerat kawat', trap hole and fencing. Poisoned bait had a good result in killing the pigs. Since poisoned bait might give a negative impact which caused a secondary hazard to human and to non target animals, so far pigs control using the poison were prohibited. Hunting pigs using lapon spiral trap, local-made pig trap, was the most succesful to capture pigs. Construction of a pig fencing with 'gelam' tree trunk could protect the crops from the pig violence, however this construction need expensive budget that the transmigrant farmers could not afford. A spiny bamboo (Bambosa bambos) or 'secang' (Caesalpinia sapan) trees could be used as life fence. From all of the methods, lapon spiral trap and local made trap can be recommended as tools for controlling wild pigs. (Revised authors' abstract)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication
Email: pustaka@calrec-aard.wasantara.net.id




NO. 67967

The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) distribution influenced by salinity gradient in a coastal tropical forest


Ragupathy, S; Mahadevan, A
Centre for advanced studies in botany, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Madras 600 025, India

BIOTROP Special Publication 42: 91-97 (1993)

Abstract:
Distribution of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM) along a longitudinal salinity gradient was studied in Kodikkarai Reserve Forest, Tamil Nadu, by line transect. pH, organic carbon, N, P and K did not relate to mycorrhizal infection and spore density in the soils. Salinity caused marked reduction in spore density. From the three zones, 37 species of VAM fungi belonged to 6 genera, i.e., Acaulospora, Entrophosphora, Gigaspora, Glomus, Scutellospora and Sclerocystis were isolated. In the soils of zones 1 and 3, which had a high salinity range (2-9.4 m mole/cm3, 2.2-9.8 m mole/cm3), VAM fungi were recovered from 30 m and 80 m onwards, respectively. In the soils of zone 2 that had low salinity (0.9-0.1 m mole/cm3) VAM population occurred right from 10 m onward. The spores of Gigaspora albida Schenk & Smith, Glomus clarum Nicolson & Smith, Glomus claroideum Schenk & Smith, Glomus fasciculatum (Thaxter sensu Gerd.) Gerd. & Trappe, and Glomus pubescens (Sacc.& Ellis) Trappe & Gerd. were present in all zones. (Revised authors' abstract)

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office
Email: info@proseanet.org|prosea@indo.net.id




NO. 100012

Insecticide residues on vegetables in the lowland vegetable production centres in Central Java and Yogyakarta Special Province
Residu insektisida pada tanaman sayuran di sentral produksi sayuran dataran rendah Propinsi Daerah Tingkat I Jawa Tengah dan Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta

Soeriaatmadja, RE; Dibyantoro, ALH; Sulastrini, I
Balai Penelitian Tanaman Sayuran (Balitsa) [Research Institute for Vegetable], PO Box 8413 Lembang, Bandung 40391, Indonesia

Buletin Penelitian Hortikultura [Horticultural Research Bulletin] 25 (3): 72-78 (1993)

Abstract:
A survey of insecticide residues on vegetables in the lowland vegetable production centres was carried out in July 1988. The results showed that insecticides were intensively used to control pests on vegetables in the lowlands of Central Java and Yogyakarta. The insecticides used were of higher dosages than those of the FAO standard.

Availability :
Indonesian Biotechnology Research Institute for Estate Crops, Library
Email: briec@indo.net.id




NO. 22891

The development of pureed baby food using local fruits and vegetable


Osman, H; Soleha, I; Suriah, AR; Norimah, AK
National University of Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia

Proceeding of the National IRPA Seminar (Agriculture), 6-11 January 1992, Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment, Kuala Lumpur; Vol. 2 (Livestock, Fisheries, Food and harvest, Forestry, General); p 594-595

Abstract:
A study was carried out with the objective to identify the agricultural commodity for further processing into pureed baby food and to obtain a range of baby formulation. Findings on the demands, the development of formulation and processing parameters are highlighted.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 92675

Ethnobotanical survey of edible aroids in the Philippines: II. Selection and conservation of and threats to genetic resources


Pardales Jr, JR
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 22 (1): 8-13 (1997)

Abstract:
The cultivation of edible aroids are usually in home gardens or marginal fields where it is common to observe two or more taro varieties growing together or taro with other aroids like yautia, giant taro or elephant foot yam. Good eating quality is the primary character considered by farmers in selecting taro variety to plant. In the availability of more superior taro variety, it is either that the variety in the garden with the least superior characteristic is eliminated to give way to the new variety or all the varieties in the garden are removed to make a space for a pure stand of the new variety. The genetic resources of edible aroids in farmers' fields are highly threatened by a number of factors which include the availability of new or improved varieties, diffusion of modern services to the rural areas, insurgency problem and erosion of traditional beliefs and loss of indigenous knowledge. Taro is the only edible aroid in the country that is conserved systematically (ex situ), while the rest of the edible aroids are relegated to the traditional planters (in situ).

Availability :
Main Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 106807

Development of the population of reniform nematode (Rotylenchus reniformis Linford & Olivera) on various vegetable crops
Perkembangan populasi nematoda bentuk ginjal (Rotylenchus reniformis Linford & Olivera) pada berbagai jenis sayuran

Marwoto, B
Central Research Institute for Horticulture, Jl. Ragunan 19, Pasarminggu, Jakarta, Indonesia

Jurnal Hortikultura [Horticultural Journal] 5 (2): 69-73 (1995)

Abstract:
A study was carried out to determine the population build up of Rotylenchus reniformis on various vegetable crops. This experiment was conducted at the laboratory of Nematology Department, Segunung Research Station for Horticulture from December 1991 to March 1992. The experiment was laid out following a Completely Randomized Design with five replications and ten treatments. The treatments were ten vegetable crops, i.e. (1) tomato cv. Gondol Putih, (2) red pepper cv. Tit Super, (3) shallot cv. Bima, (4) yard-long bean cv. Kp-1, (5) Ipomoea aquatica cv. Sutera, (6) amaranth cv. Kakap Hijau, (7) eggplant cv. LV-170, (8) caisin cv. LV-145, (9) cucumber cv. LV-1043, and (10 garlic cv. Lumbu Hijau. Each vegetable crop was inoculated with 1000 nematodes per pot. The results indicated that the population build up of Rotylenchus reniformis varied with vegetable crops tested. The highest reproductive factor of the nematode was obtained on Ipomoea reptan cv. Sutera. Eggplant and tomato seemed to be the host of nematode. Rotylenchus reniformis was not able to grow on the root of red pepper cv. Tit Super. Population build up of Rotylenchus reniformis on the remainder vegetable crops was relatively low. In order to suppress Rotylenchus reniformis population, the red pepper var. Tit Super can be used as rotation crop after vegetable crop.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library
Email: dir-riv@indo.net.id




NO. 111440

Farming analysis and adaptation trial of several vegetables in paddy field (after paddy) in Takalar regency
Analisis usahatani dan adaptasi beberapa jenis sayuran pada lahan sawah setelah padi di Kabupaten Takalar

Taufik, M
Research and Development Centre for Horticulture; Jakarta, Indonesia

Jurnal Hortikultura [Horticultural Journal] 9 (4): 353-365 (2000)

Abstract:
A research was conducted to study farmers' benefit level of planting vegetables after paddy. This research was conducted in the dry season from June to November 1995. The treatments were laid in a Randomized Block Design with 14 kinds of vegetable and three replications. The result showed that all introduced vegetables were well adapted. Farming analysis showed that B/C ratio were 1 to 27 except for Chili cv. Keriting, Tit Super LV, Jati Laba LV, and Kakap Raja amaranthus and Ratna tomato.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library
Email: dir-riv@indo.net.id




NO. 94642

The effect of the formulated jatropha product on selected cotton weeds


Paraoan, LC; Solsoloy, AD
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21 (sup. 1): 16 (1996)

Abstract:
The effect of the formulated product from physic nut (Jatropha curcas) against selected cotton weeds Ipomoea triloba, Portulaca oleracea and Echinochloa colonum was determined. The product was evaluated on weed seeds under laboratory conditions and on post-emerged weeds at the Crop Protection Screenhouse, Central Experiment Station, Cotton Research and Development Institute (CRDI), Batac, Ilocos Norte from January to February 1995. The product significantly affected Ipomoea triloba seeds at dosage rates of 0.75, 1.50 and 3.00 li/ha. The treated seeds had shorter shoots than normal ones. On the other hand, post-emerged Ipomoea triloba and Portulaca oleracea at 2-4-leaf stage were highly susceptible to the product at 3 li/ha but not Echinochloa colonum at 4-6-leaf stage. The product is a potential herbicide for controlling some weeds infesting cotton.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippine Country Office




NO. 13952

Preliminary study on the usage of seaside purslane meal and beach morning glory meal in laying quail rations
Kan suksa buangton kieokap kan chai phakbia-thale lae phakbung-thale nai ahan nok kratha

Laocharoensuk, S; Benchama, C
Abstract of the 31st Kasetsart University Annual Conference; Bangkok, Kasetsart University, 1993; p 183

Abstract:
A feeding trial was conducted to study the feasible utilization of seaside purslane meal (SPM), steamed seaside purslane meal (SSPM), and beach morning glory meal (BMGM) in laying quail rations raised for 14 weeks with adlibitum feeding. In the experiment, 320 eight weeks old bird-laying quails were divided into 8 treatments of 40 layers, each with 4 replications. Each treatment of the layer was randomly fed with one of experimental diets as follows: treatments 1,2,3 and 4: 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% of SPM, treatments 5 and 6: 10% and 15% of SSPM, and treatments 7 and 8: 5 and 10% of BMGM. SPM, SSPM and BMGM replaced corn in the rations up to 5%, 10% and 15% respectively. There was no significant effect to egg production rate, feed efficiency and feed cost (P > 0.05). (Author's abstract)

Availability :
Central Library; Kasetsart University; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 101955

Utilization of plants by the people surrounding the Gunung Halimun National Park, West Java
Pemanfaatan tumbuhan oleh masyarakat sekitar Taman Nasional Gunung Halimun, Jawa Barat

Panggabean, DOF; Ladjor, LN
Biological Science Club (BScC); Jakarta, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany], Yogyakarta, 24-25 Januari 1995; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Buku 2; Jakarta, Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia, 1995; p 372-376

Abstract:
The people living in and around the Gunung Halimun National Park have a specific conservation pattern to make their environment sustainable, which is attached to the belief of their ancestors. The uses of natural resources varied, e.g. for food, clothes, houses, medicine, and handicraft. The potential products are palm sugar (Arenga pinnata), fruits such as bananas (Musa sp.), and jackfruit (Arthocarpus heterophyllus), bamboo (Bambusa sp.), rattans (Calamus spp.), vegetables, kinds of local rice (Oryza sp.), traditional medicine and so on. To protect and increase the quality of the natural resources, some economic and ecological actions are needed which involve the community.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library




NO. 94479

The hypoglycemic effect of Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. on drug induced diabetes on albino rats


Aquas, MJG
Inventory of Health Researches: 139 (1994-1996)

Abstract:
Diabetes was induced in 60 albino rats by intraperitoneal injection of Alloxan. The rates were randomly assigned to two groups, the 1st group received NSS and the 2nd group was given kangkong decoction. Blood glucose level were measured using a spectrophotometer. The kangkong decoction produced an insignificant decrease in the blood glucose level of the Alloxan induced diabetic rats.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development (PCHRD); Department of Science and Technology (DOST):Bicutan, Tagig, Metro Manila




NO. 94004

Comparative hypoglycemic activities of some Philippine medicinal plants


Villaseqor, IM; Cabrera, M; Meneses, K; Rivera, VR
Inventory of Health Researches: 88 (1997-1998)

Abstract:
The methanolic and aqueous extracts from popular, abundant and relatively cheap sources such as banana flowers, pipino fruits, and leaves of ampalaya, kangkong, kamote, makopa and tanglad were tested for their comparative hypoglycemic activities using albino mice as test animals. The blood glucose levels were determined using haemoglucotest strips. The results of the bioassay of the aqueous extracts showed that the most potent hypoglycemic plant is banana flowers while the comparative hypoglycemic potencies of the other plants are: tanglad leaves, pipino fruits, kangkong leaves, makopa leaves, ampalaya leaves, kamote leaves. An infusion from mango leaves did not exhibit hypoglycemic activity. The organic extract of makopa leaves is the most hypoglycemic followed by kangkong and mango leaves. The organic extracts of banana flowers and kamote, ampalaya, and tanglad leaves exhibited low hypoglycemic potentials.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development(PCHRD); Department of Science and Technology(DOST); Bicutan, Tagig, Metro Manila




NO. 76357

Ipomoea pes-tigridis
Bim bip chan cop

Vo Van Chi
Tu dien cay thuoc Vietnam [A dictionary of medicinal plants of Vietnam]; Hanoi, Medicinal Publishing House, 1997; p 91

Abstract:
Ipomoea pes-tigridis grows in many places, edges of road and plain areas. the roots, seeds and leaves are harvested all year round for medicine to treat cough with blood, dropsy and pimples. The plant contains essential oil.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 76360

Ipomoea nil; Porana volubilis
Bim bip nam; Bim bip nui

Vo Van Chi
Tu dien cay thuoc Vietnam [A dictionary of medicinal plants of Vietnam]; Hanoi, Medicinal Publishing House, 1997; p 92

Abstract:
Ipomoea nil is common in Vietnam. Its seeds is used as medicine to treat inflammation of liver, dropsy, and ringworm. Porana volubilis grows in the edges of forests at 700 altitude; its leaves are used as medicine to treat inflammation of mouth.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 66907

Development and utilization of food crops in Indonesia
Pengembangan dan pemanfaatan tanaman pangan di Indonesia

Moeljoprawiro, S; Ibrahim, M
Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani [Proceedings of National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany], Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 February 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Perpustakaan Nasional R.I., 1992; p 288-299

Abstract:
In Indonesia, based on their production and utilization, food crops were classified into the following groups: (i) major commodities: rice, corn, soybean, peanut, mungbean, cassava and sweet potato: (ii) potential commodities: sorghum, wheat, cowpea, pigeonpea, taro and yam; and (iii) introduced commodities: pearl millet, sesame, arrowroot and lablab. The rapid spread of modern agriculture and technology such as variety had replaced the old mixed population of plant races. As a consequence it is getting more difficult to find traits such as resistance to emerging pests and diseases. Therefore, an extensive exploration and collection programme devoted to assembling as much of the germplasm as possible and its maintenance, once it is obtained, is a must.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 69765

Control of peanut bacterial wilt through crop rotation


Machmud, M
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF; Jl. Tentara Pelajar 3a, Bogor 16111, Indonesia

BIOTROP Special Publication 54: 253-260 (1994)

Abstract:
A three-year crop rotation study was conducted at Muara Experimental Farm, Bogor, in an effort to control bacterial wilt of peanut caused by Pseudomonas solanacearum. Two crops were grown annually i.e. the wet season (WS) and the dry season (DS) crops. The duration of rotations were one, two and three years. The crop combinations in each year were peanut- peanut: peanut-corn: lowland rice-lowland rice, soybean-soybean, corn-soybean and sweet potato-sweet potato. To eliminate variation due to planting season and crop combination, two trials were made, one was started in the WS 1987/88 and another in the DS 1988. A resistant peanut cv. Gajah was used in the rotation. Susceptible peanut cv. Kelinci and tomato cv. Gondol Hijau were used as indicator plants to assess the wilt intensity in each plot after the rotation. Three-year rotations could reduce wilt intensity from 64% to 12% on peanut cv. Kelinci and from 80% to 22% on tomato cv. Gondol Hijau. The longer the rotation period, the lower was the wilt intensity. Rotations of peanut with lowland or irrigated rice is the most effective in controlling the disease followed by corn-soybean, corn-peanut, soybean-soybean, sweet potato-sweet potato and peanut-peanut. A two-year rotation with a non-host crop, such as rice or corn would be sufficient to control the disease. However, it needed a longer rotation period when resistant hosts such as sweet potato, soybean, or peanut cv. Gajah were used. Crop sanitation from weed hosts, infected plant debris and avoiding contaminated irrigation water from the upstream also need to be done during the rotation. (Author's abstract)

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library
Email: perpubb@indo.net.id




NO. 67548

Utilization of forest resources for Talang Mamak tribe in Seberida, Riau
Pendayagunaan sumber daya hutan bagi suku Talang Mamak di daerah Seberida, Riau

Saim, A; Maryanto, I; Danielson, F
Research and Development Centre for Biology, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani [Proceedings of National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany], Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 February 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Perpustakaan Nasional R.I., 1992; p 381-389

Abstract:
Talang Mamak tribe is native to Seberida district, Riau Province who wholly depends upon gathering, hunting, and cultivation by shifting cultivation. An interview followed by sampling of 36 plant species indicated that the plants are used for treating human as well as animal diseases, for hunting material and so on.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 67637

Traditional agricultural system, environment understanding and utilization of plant resources by Dani tribe in Baliem valley
Sistem pertanian tradisional, pemahaman lingkungan dan pemanfaatan sumber daya tumbuhan oleh masyarakat Dani di lembah Baliem

Purwanto, Y; Waluyo, EB
Research and Development Institute for Botany, Research and Development Centre for Biology, LIPI; Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Hasil Penelitian dan Pengembangan Sumber Daya Hayati, Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI 1991/1992 [Proceedings of a Seminar on Research Finding and Development of Biological Resources, Centre for Research and Development in Biology - LIPI]; Bogor, 6 Mei 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Proyek Litbang SDH, Puslitbang Biologi - LIPI, 1992; p 112-123

Abstract:
The Dani tribe residing in Baliem valley is wholly dependant upon natural resources, and is kept in essential balance with nature through religious and cultural control on exploitation. It was found that, more than 214 species of plant were identified as sources of food (54 species), medicines (28 species), clothing material (8 species), dye stuffs (6 species), plants for social and ritual activities (16 species), timbers (56 species), rope material (7 species), material for tools (15 species) and others (7 species). Utilization of these plants in conjunction with their traditional agricultural systems and the management of environments was discusssed. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 101784

Alternative farming system package in the former alang-alang field
Paket sistem usahatani alternatif di lahan bekas alang-alang

Rachman, A; Aldis, G; Syahfrudin
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF), Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia

Risalah Seminar [Seminar Proceedings] 5: 142-147 (1994)

Abstract:
'Alang-alang' (Cogon grass = Imperata cylindrica) field is considered to be a critical and unproductive for food crop production in Indonesia. A series of experiment was conducted to evaluate: (1) an effective and efficient method to use alang-alang field for food crop cultivation, and (2) a suitable cropping pattern from economic and ecological point of view. The treatments given were: 1. Method of alang-alang control, i.e. (a) sprayed with non-selective herbicide (glyphosate), (b) farmer's habit (slash and burn); II. Soil tillage, i.e. (a) zero tillage, (b) minimum tillage, and (c) farmer's habit (plowed); III. Cropping pattern i.e. (1) pattern A (mungbean-corn+upland rice+cassava/peanut, (2) pattern B (mungbean I-corn+mungbean II/upland rice/cassava), (3) pattern C (cowpea-corn I+soybeans/sweet potato/corn II, and (4) farmer cropping pattern (mungbean-corn+peanuts-cowpea). The results showed that glyphosate was effective to eradicate alang-alang. The cost of zero tillage was cheaper than minimum tillage, particularly when compared to farmer's habit. These methods could also supress weed growth and gave higher crop yield. The cropping pattern A, B and C gave benefits of 414%, 449%, and 634% over the farmer's pattern. The experiment will be continued to improve the selected cropping pattern. (Authors' abstract)

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library
Email: dir-riv@indo.net.id




NO. 68685

Variation of ewe rearing by model 8-ewe farmers and development prospects in Wanaraja-Garut: A managerial aspect
Keragaman usaha ternak domba oleh peternak model dan prospek pengembangan di daerah Wanaraja-Garut; Aspek manajemen

Suparyanto, A; Djajanegara, A; Sudaryanto
Research Institute for Livestock; Ciawi, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Pengolahan dan Komunikasi Hasil-hasl Penelitian, Adopsi Teknologi Peternakan, 19-20 September 1991, Cisarua, Bogor; Sabrani, M; Kusnadi, U (eds); Bogor, Balai Penelitian Ternak, 1992; p 57-64

Abstract:
Observation on 8-ewe model introduced to farmers in Wanaraja, Garut district was carried out for 11 months. The model was aimed to produce baby lambs every month. Five farmers were given 8 ewes and 1 ram in January 1990. Feeding system, population and reproduction management practised by each farmer were monitored. Results showed that feeding system was carried out quite normally. However, suggested reproductive management of the model was not conducted properly. Therefore, regular lamb production was not achieved by the time of observation. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
Research Institute for Livestock




NO. 20025

Potential of tapioca (Manihot utilissima Pohl) as a livestock feed - A review


Mahendranathan, T
Veterinary Division; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The Malaysian Agricultural Journal 48 (1): 77-89 (1971)

Abstract:
This paper reviews some aspects of work carried out on tapioca roots and tops in Malaysia and elsewhere. Tapioca both as an export commodity and for local use as an animal feed has a great potential in Malaysia. Increased economic returns could be derived by intercropping, mechanisation, introduction of high-yielding varieties and by the better utilisation of tapioca refuse and tops as livestock feeds. The crude protein content of tapioca leaves is greater than many of the fodder grasses and legumes. The amino acid profile indicates high lysine content. The high hydrocyanic acid content has been a major deterrent to the extensive use of tapioca leaves as an animal feed. The widespread use of tapioca leaves made possible by periodic cuttings to yield more than 33,000 Ibs per acre per year, would enable the country to cut down its heavy dependence on imported ingredients for feeding livestock.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 94366

The better forage plants available in the Philippines for feeding livestock and poultry


Fariñas, EC
Araneta Journal of Agriculture 17 (4): 234-244 (1967)

Abstract:
The forage plants selected in this paper are selections from the large number of fodder plants introduced from overseas since about the end of 18th century, plus some of local species. They are arranged in three groups, namely (1) Grasses of which there are 41 species with their varieties; (2) legumes of which there are 44 species with their varieties or strains; and (3) non grass species and their varieties, which are recognized as nonlegumes of which there are 3 species. These 88 species and their varieties are tabulated to condense the description. Each species or variety is given a general assessment under 15 classification items.

Availability :
Rizal Library; Ateneo de Manila University; Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 94060

Iron absorption studies using isotopically labeled vegetables


Ortaliza, IC; Salamat, LA; Trinidad, TP; Jacob, FO; dela Cruz, B
Abstract Bibliography of FNRI Researches: 83 (1947-1997); Philippine Journal of Nutrition 27: 22-29 (1974)

Abstract:
Iron absorption from some local vegetables tagged biosynthetically with Fe-55 was evaluated using normal rats. The technique used was tagging the vegetables. Described mean iron absorption ranging from 4.5 to 9.1 was found with lettuce, camote tops, petsay, mustaza, kintsay and kangkong. When absorption values were computed in relation to the absorption of an iron slat, no statistically differences were found among the vegetables studied.

Availability :
Food and Nutrition Research Institute; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 197

Genetic variability of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) in Malaysia


Saad, MS; Yap, TC
Universiti Pertanian Malaysia; Sarawak; Kuching

Proceedings of the International Symposium on South East Asian Plant Genetic Resources; Jakarta; 20-24 August 1985; Mehra, KL(ed); Sastrapradja, S(ed); Bogor; National Biological Institute; 1985; p178

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 171

The sweet potato, an introduced species that has become a South East Asian treasure


Martin, FW
Tropical Agriculture Research Station; US Department of Agriculture; Mayaguez; Puerto Rico

Proceedings of the International Symposium on South East Asian Plant Genetic Resources; Jakarta; 20-24 August; 1985; Mehra, KL(ed); Sastrapradja, S(ed); Bogor; National Biological Institute; 1985; p112-121

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 498

Sweet potato


Cadiz, TG; Bautista, ODK
Vegetable production in Southeast Asia; Knott, JE(ed); Deanon JR, Jr(ed); College of Agriculture; UP Los Banos; 1967; p48-65

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 574

Development of vegetable research
Perkembangan penelitian sayuran

Anonymous
Berita Penelitian Pertanian [Agricultural Research News] 9(1/2): 5-10(1979)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 599

The potential of sweet potato as a source of fructose
Potensi ubijalar sebagai bahan baku gula fruktosa

Soenarjo, R
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Jurnal Penelitian & Pengembangan Pertanian [Agricultural Research & Development Journal] 3(1): 6-11(1984)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 836

Food research in Indonesia
Penelitian pangan di Indonesia

Somaatmadja, D
Chemical Research Institute; Bogor; Indonesia

Komunikasi Balai Penelitian Kimia Bogor [Communication of Bogor Research Institute for Chemistry] (176): 1-10 (1976)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 994

Descriptive list of food crop varieties available for the grower in 1955
Daftar uraian dari varietas-varietas tanaman makanan jang disediakan untuk praktek, tahun 1955

Research Institute for Agricultural Techniques; Bogor; Indonesia

Tehnik Pertanian [Agricultural Techniques] 4: 126-145(1955)

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 998

Interaction of some sweet potato characteristics
Hubungan sifat-sifat ubi djalar antara satu sama lain

Loebis, ATh
Research Institute for Agricultural Techniques; Bogor; Indonesia

Tehnik Pertanian [Agricultural Techniques] 4: 329-349(1955)

Availability :
Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1103

Response of sweet potato to liming and NK fertilizing on podsolic soil at Sitiung
Tanggap ubi jalar terhadap pengapuran dan pemupukan nitrogen dan kalium pada tanah podsolik Sitiung

Ridwan; Basri, IH
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Pemberitaan Penelitian Sukarami [Sukarami Research Contribution] (7): 16-19(1986)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1104

Manufacture of fructose syrup from the flour and starch of the sweet potato cvs. Borobudur, Daya and Prambanan
Pembuatan sirup fruktosa dari tepung dan pati ubi jalar varietas Borobudur, Daya dan Prambanan

Sastrodipuro, D
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Pemberitaan Penelitian Sukarami [Sukarami Research Contribution] (7): 20-23(1986)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1251

Investigations on the flower biology and compatibility of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Poir.) including some preliminary trials on the germination of the seed


Schreven, AC van
Institute for Botanical Research; General Agricultural Research Station; Bogor; Indonesia

Landbouw [Agriculture] 25(7-12): 305-346(1953); Contributions of the General Agricultural Research Station (139)

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops, Library




NO. 1263

Description of the sweet potato cv. Daya no.380
Deskripsi ubi jalar varietas Daya no.380

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Ciawi-Bogor [Ciawi Agricultural Information Bulletin, Bogor] (2): 2(1978)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1356

Potential of tubers as raw materials for alcohol production to overcome energy crisis
Potensi ubi-ubian sebagai bahan pembuatan alkohol untuk mengatasi krisis energi

Setyono, A; Hadiwiyoto, S
Karawang Research Station for Food Crops; Indonesia

Agritech 4(1): 29-33(1984)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1578

Palawija food crops other than rice in East Java agriculture


Brotonegoro, S; Laumans, QJ; Staveren, JPh van
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops (MARIF); Indonesia

Malang; Malang Research Institute for Food Crops; 1986; viiip; 111p

Availability :
UPSEA; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1844

Sweet-potato production potential in Rwanda


Ndamage, G
Institute des Sciences Agronomiques du Rwanda (ISAR); Butare

Proceedings of the Second Triannial Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Rootcrops Africa Branch; Douala; Cameroon; 1983; p189-192

Availability :
UPSEA; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1845

Comportment studies with sweet potatoes in the highland zone of Cameroon


Lyonga, SN; Ayuk-Takem, JA
Institute of Agronomic Research; General Delegation for Scientific and Technical Research; Ekona; Buea; Cameroon

Proceedings of the Second Triannial Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Rootcrops Africa Branch; Douala; Cameroon; 1983; p193-196

Availability :
UPSEA; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 1846

Effects of vescicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae, temperature, and phosphorus on Fusarium wilt of sweet potato


Ngeve, JM; Roncadori, RW
Institute of Agricultural Research; N'Kolbisson; Yaounde; Cameroon

Proceedings of the Second Triannial Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Rootcrops Africa Branch; Douala; Cameroon; 1983

Availability :
UPSEA; Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2074

Sweet potatoes as ethanol raw material and its problems
Ubi jalar sebagai bahan baku ethanol dan permasalahannya

Sigit, NW
Agency for Technological Development and Application (BPPT); Jakarta; Indonesia

Paper presented at the 9th Scientific Seminar and National Congress of Biology, Padang, July 10-12, 1989; Indonesian Biological Association; E-39; 8p

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office; Bogor




NO. 30394

Utilization of sweet potato germplasm by plant breeders


Villareal, RL; Lo, HF
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(3): 113-118(1983)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30413

Screening sweet potato roots for resistance to java black rot caused by Diplodia tubericola (EII & EV) Taubenh.


Dalisay, RF; Divinagracia, GG; Mendoza, EMT
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12(1): 33-37(1987)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31292

Sweet potato tuber rot disease in the Philippines


Palomar, MK; Solis, AD; Bandala, HS
Annals of Tropical Research 2(2): 111-121(1980)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31293

Infectivity and in vitro production of sweet potato scab fungus (Sphaceloma batatas Saw.) inoculum


Paningbatan, RA
Annals of Tropical Research 9(1): 24-33(1987)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31298

Effect of length of fermentation on alcohol production from sweet potato


Pielago, CV
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1982; 37p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31299

Intercropping sweet potato with legumes as a cultural management system


Quirol, BF; Escalada, RG; Manatad, FA
Annals of Tropical Research 6(? ): ?? (1984)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31301

Susceptability of vines and tubers of sweet potato (BNAS-51 variety) at different stages of growth to Cylas formicarius elegantulus Fabr.


Remoroza, VM
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1978; 34p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 2223

Effect of ground cover on the incidence of the white root disease in replanting areas of Hevea rubber
Pengaruh penutup tanah terhadap timbulnya cendawan akar putih di areal penanaman ulang karet

Soepadmo, B
Bogor Research Institute for Estate Crops; Indonesia

Menara Perkebunan [Estate Tower] 49(1): 3-7(1981)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2274

Research on the use of sweet potato and wheat flour in cake production
Penelitian penggunaan tepung ubi jalar dengan tepung gandum dalam pembuatan cake (kue)

Rohaman, MM; Novianis; Djubaedah, E
Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia

Warta IHP(Industri Hasil Pertanian)[Journal of Agro-based Industry] 5(1): 17-21(1988)

Availability :
Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2650

Agronomic performance of sweet potato of different planting methods
Penampilan agronomi ubi jalar pada cara tanam yang berbeda

Widodo, Y
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Penelitian Palawija [Secondary Crops Research] 1(1): 26-31(1986)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2696

Application of mulch, phosphates and lime on sweet potato
Pemberian mulsa, fosfat dan kapur pada ubi jalar

Djazuli, M
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Prosidings Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan [Proceedings of a Seminar on Food Crops Research]; Syam, M(ed); Yuswadi(ed); Sukamandi; 1986; Vol.1 Palawidja; p215-221

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2697

Dates of harvesting and manuring of sweet potato in the highlands
Umur panen dan waktu pemupukan ubi jalar di lahan dataran tinggi

Wargiono, J; Turhekih, E
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Prosidings Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan [Proceedings of a Seminar on Food Crops Research]; Syam, M(ed); Yuswadi(ed); Sukamandi; 1986; Vol.1 Palawidja; p222-227

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2700

Value of sweet potato P28 as a ration component for young pigs
P28 nilai ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas (Linn.)Moir), sebagai bahan penyusun ransum untuk anak babi sapih muda

Katiarso; Alcantara, PF
Faculty of Animal Husbandry; Bogor; Agricultural University; Indonesia

Proceedings Seminar Penelitian Peternakan [Proceedings of a Seminar on Animal Husbandry Research]; Ronohardjo, P et al.(eds); Cisarua; 1982; p8-11

Availability :
Bogor Botanical Gardens; Indonesia




NO. 2718

Response of sweet potato clones to nitrogen fertilizing
Tanggapan klon ubi jalar terhadap pemupukan nitrogen

Tuherkih, E; Wargiono, J
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Prosidings Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan [Proceedings of a Seminar on Food Crops Research]; Soejitno, J et al.(eds); Bogor; BORIF; 1986; Vol.2 Palawija; p79-93

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2719

Resistance of some sweet potato cultivars to weevil, Cylas formicarius F.
Ketahanan beberapa klon/varietas ubi jalar terhadap serangan Cylas formicarius F.

Suartini
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Prosidings Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman pangan [Proceedings of a Seminar on Food Crops Research]; Soejitno, J et al.(eds); Bogor; BORIF; 1986; Vol.2 Palawija; p214-218

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 2829

Effects of storage period at room temperature and methods of starch hydrolysis of sweet potato on the quality of syrup produced
Pengaruh lama penyimpanan ubijalar (Ipomoea batatas) pada suhu kamar dan cara hidrolisa patinya menjadi gula terhadap mutu sirop yang dihasilkan

Adidharma, I; Hardjo, S
Faculty of Mechanization and Agricultural Products Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia

Buletin Penelitian Teknologi Hasil Pertanian [Agricultural Products Technology Research Bulletin] (5): 13-17(1972)

Availability :
Research and Development Institute for Microbiology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3039

Investigations on the flower biology and compatibility of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Poir.), including some preliminary trials on the germination of the seeds


Schreven, AC van
Botanical Research Institute; General Agricultural Research Station; Bogor; Indonesia

Pemberitaan Balai Besar Penjelidikan Pertanian [Contributions of the General Agricultural Research Station] (139): 1-44(1954)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3256

Distribution of diseases of Cruciferae in West Java
Penyebaran penyakit pada tanaman Cruciferae di Jawa Barat

Suhardi
Segunung Research Station for Horticulture; Cianjur; Indonesia

Hortikultura [Horticulture] (11): 308-314(1980)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3272

Vegetable research programme
Program penelitian sayuran

Kusumo, S
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Risalah Lokakarya Hortikultura [Proceedings of a Workshop on Horticulture]; Sunaryono, H et al(eds); Lembang; 1982; p13-17

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3275

Some economic aspects of cassava in the province of East Java
Beberapa aspek ekonomi ubi kayu di propinsi Jawa Timur

Hadimuslihat, AS; Pasaribu, S
Centre for Research in Agro-Economy; Agency for Agricultural Research and Development; Jakarta; Indonesia

Forum Penelitian Agro-Ekonomi [Agro-Economy Research Forum] 1(1): 44-54(1982)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3277

Demonstration of forest intercropping for reforestation and the production of food crops (Case analysis of intercropping in Cepu Forest District)
Peragaan tumpangsari hutan dalam peremajaan hutan dan penghasil pangan (Analisis kasus tumpangsari di KPH Cepu)

Pakpahan, A; Irawan, B; Hendiarto
Centre for Research in Agro-Economy; Jakarta; Indonesia

Forum Penelitian Agro-Ekonomi [Agro-Economy Research Forum] 1(2): 19-36(1983)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3327

Sweet potato vine versus banana stem for pig raising


Nitis, IM
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Husbandry; Udayana University; Denpasar; Indonesia

Research Journal 2(2): 8-15(1968)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3328

Hydrolysis of sweet potato starch at atmospheric pressure


Agra, IB; Warnijati, S; Rijadi, RS
Faculty of Techniques; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Research Journal 2(3): 34-44(1969)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3338

Syrup processing from sweet potatoes
Pembuatan sirup dari pati ubi jalar

Djubaedah, E; Somaatmadja, D
Proceedings Seminar Teknologi Pangan III [Proceedings of the 3rd Seminar on Food Technology]; Soedarno, D et al(eds); Bogor; 1977; p424-441

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3347

Evaluation of sugarcane intercropping trials
Evaluasi hasil-hasil percobaan tumpangsari dengan tebu

Tjokrodirdjo, HS; Arifin, S; Santo, S; Darmodjo, S
Sugar Research Institute; Pasuruan; Indonesia

Prosiding Pertemuan Teknis Tengah Tahunan Tahun 1985 [Proceedings of the Semiannual Technical Meeting 1985]; Pawirosemadi, HM et al(eds); Pasuruan; Balai Penelitian Gula; 1985; p1-23

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3348

Intercropping system of the Indonesian Small-scale Sugarcane Plantations and some problems encountered in Gondang Baru sugar factory
Sistem TRI tumpangsari dan permasalahannya di pabrik gula Gondang Baru

Atmodjo, A; Susmiadi, A
Gondang Baru Sugar Factory; Indonesia

Prosiding Pertemuan Teknis Tengah Tahunan Tahun 1985 [Proceedings of the Semiannual Technical Meeting 1985]; Pawirosemadi, HM et al (eds); Pasuruan; Balai Penelitian Gula; 1985; p24-48

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3397

Requirements of NPK fertilizers by sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) on ultisols in Sukamandi
Kebutuhan pupuk NPK tanaman ubijalar (Ipomoea batatas (L.)Lam.) di tanah ultisols Sukamandi

Tangkuman, F; Fagi, AM
Sukamandi Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Media Penelitian Sukamandi [Sukamandi Research Media] (2): 11-15 (1986)

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia




NO. 3596

Research on food crops in support of agricultural development in South-east Sulawesi
Penelitian tanaman pangan menunjang penmbangunan pertanian Sulawesi Tenggara

Bahar, FA; Momuat, EO
Maros Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Prosiding Lokakarya Penelitian Pertanian Menunjang Gerakan Desa Makmur Merata (Gersamata) di Sulawesi Tenggara [Proceedings of the Workshop on Agricultural Research in Support of the Equally Prosperous Village Movement in South-east Sulawesi]; Bahar, FA et al(eds); Kendari; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Maros; 1986; p13-16

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3657

Giant sweet potato
Ubijalar raksasa

West Nusa Tenggara Agricultural Information Service; Indonesia

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Nusa Tenggara Barat [West Nusa Tenggara Agricultural Information Bulletin] (04): 12-13(1980-1981)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3660

Sweet potato as animal feed
Ubi jalar sebagai makanan ternak

Padang Agricultural Information Service; Indonesia

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Padang [Padang Agricultural Information Bulletin] (2): 23(1982-1983)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3664

Sweet potato at Penampung
Ubi jalar di Penampung

Padang Agricultural Information Service; Indonesia

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Padang [Padang Agricultural Information Bulletin] (6): 12-13, 31(1983-1984)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3672

Production increase of sweet potato
Peningkatan produksi ubijalar

Lampung Agricultural Information Service; Indonesia

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Lampung [Lampung Agricultural Information Bulletin] (02): 1-2(1981-1982)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3697

Substitution of wheat flour by sweet potato flour in bread making
Substitusi terigu dengan tepung ubi jalar dalam pembuatan roti

Yusuf, ED; Novianis; Budiarti, E
Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia

Proceedings Diskusi Teknologi Pangan VI [Proceedings of the 6th Discussion on Food Technology]; Bogor; 1985; pK1-K23

Availability :
Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3710

Usage of sweet potato as a dry 'tape' (fermented food)
Pemanfaatan ubi jalar sebagai tape kering

Ganjar, I; Slamet, DS; Oktania, N
University of Indonesia; Jakarta

Proceedings Seminar Teknologi Pangan V [Proceedings of the 5th Seminar on Food Technology]; Bogor; 1981; p173-180

Availability :
Research and Development Institute for Microbiology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 3940

Sweet potato for transmigration areas
Ubi jalar untuk daerah transmigrasi

Wargiono, J
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Tumbuh [Growing] 1(5): 53-56(1988)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 4728

Effect of NPK fertilization on the growth and the composition of organic contents of sweet potato
Pengaruh pemupukan NPK terhadap pertumbuhan dan komposisi kandungan organik tanaman ubijalar

Misutisna, D
BSc thesis; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1980; 57p

Availability :
Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 4730

Alcohol preparation from cassava and sweet potato starch
Pembuatan alkohol dari pati ubi kayu dan ubi jalar

Mamora, R
BSc thesis; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1980; 55p

Availability :
Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 5300

Plain vegetable but highly nutritious
Sayuran sederhana bergizi tinggi

Riskomar, D
Pikiran Rakyat, 4 November 1989

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 5954

Phosphorus and potassium fertilizer application on sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) on alluvial soil at Blitar


Basuki, N; Harwono, D
Brawijaya University; Malang; Indonesia

Agrivita 12(2): 11-13(1989)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 5955

Effects of nitrogen application and cowpea intercrops on sweet potato yield at alluvial soil


Soemarno
Faculty of Agriculture; Brawijaya University; Malang; Indonesia

Agrivita 12(2): 14-17(1989)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 5959

The effect of nitrogen fertilizer application and maize intercrop on sweet potato yield at alluvial soil


Soemarno
Faculty of Agriculture; Brawijaya University; Malang; Indonesia

Agrivita 12(2): 9-11(1989)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 6530

Consumption suitability of some leaf vegetables stored in the household using different methods of storage
Kelayakan konsumsi beberapa macam sayuran daun yang disimpan dengan berbagai cara penyimpanan di rumah tangga

Apriadi, BWH
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1984; 62p

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia




NO. 7289

Variation in planting, planting distance and stake application and their effect on the yield of cucumber and sweet potato
Variasi penanaman, jarak tanam dan pemberian lanjaran pada tanaman ketimun dan ketela rambat serta pengaruhnya terhadap produksi

Mudiyono
Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; 1978; 37p

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture Library, Gadjah Mada University




NO. 7569

Intercropping of maize, groundnut, sweet potato, Crotalaria with sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)
Tumpang sari tanaman-tanaman djagung, katjang tanah, ubi djalar dan Crotalaria dengan tanaman bunga matahari (Helianthus annuus L.)

Ibrahim, N
Thesis; Bogor; Department of Agronomy; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1967; 57p

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia




NO. 7741

Effects of volume of liquid, cooking utensil and method of vegetable cooking on the Fe leaching from amaranth (Amaranthus hybridus L.) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves
Pengaruh volume cairan, alat masak dan cara pengolahan sayuran terhadap leaching zat besi (Fe) pada sayur bayam (Amaranthus hybridus L.) dan daun ketela rambat (Ipomoea batatas L.)

Hardinsyah
Thesis; Bogor; Department of Community Nutrition anf Family Resources; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1982; 77p

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia




NO. 8048

Why should we eat vegetables and fruits ?
Mengapa kita harus makan sayuran dan buah-buahan

Aceh Agricultural Information Service; Banda Aceh; Indonesia

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Aceh [Aceh Agricultural Information Bulletin] 4(3): 8-9(1984/1985)

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 8065

Intensification of home gardens
Intensifikasi pekarangan

Yogyakarta Agricultural Information Service; Indonesia

Balai Informasi Pertanian Yogyakarta [Yogyakarta Agricultural Information Service]; 1978

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 13582

Sweet potato
Manthet phan huaisithon thon laeng pluk ngai hai hua lai rai dai di

Kayafaet, S
Chao Kaset [Farmers Magazine] 39: 4-17(1984)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 12142

Sweet potato
Man thet

Thitithiraphap, K
[Feed Quality Control News] 8(3): 20-22(1986)

Availability :
Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 9910

Response of six sweet potato genotypes on three methods of weed control using cultivation technique on volcanic soils
Tanggap enam genotipe ubijalar pada tiga macam pengendalian gulma secara kultur teknik di tanah vulkanik

Widodo, Y
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Prosiding 1 Konferensi HIGI [First Proceedings of the Tenth Conference of the Indonesian Weed Science Society]; Kuntohartono, T et al(eds); Malang; 1990; p358-366

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 10262

Study on 9 introduced sweet potato varieties
Manthet Phan tangprathet 9 phan

Nilphan, S; Thawikul, S
Land Development Department; Bangkok; Thailand

Warasarn phuetsuan [Horticulture Journal] 5(2): 17-31(1969)

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 30389

The use of polycross in sweet potato breeding at VISCA


Saladaga, FA
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 7(1): 63(1982)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 11205

Sweet potato
Kanpluk manthet

Phunpherm, N; Ratchabut, K
Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand

Department of Agricultural Extension, Extension Bulletin No.70; 1988; 30p

Availability :
Library; Department of Agricultural Extension; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 11286

Sweet potato
Kanpluk manthet

Department of Agricultural Extension; Bangkok; Thailand

Department of Agricultural Extension, Extension Bulletin No.70; 1978; 19p

Availability :
Department of Agricultural Extension; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 11590

Appropriate technology: sweet potato growing
Technology kan kaset phuen ban: kan pluk manthet

Wongsaman, C; Ayuwat, D
Faculty of Agriculture; Khon Kaen University; Thailand

Kaen kaset [Khon Kaen Agricultural Journal] 17(2): 82-90(1989)

Availability :
Field Crops Research Institute; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 11612

Sweet potato
Manthet

Lapphunphondi, S
Kheha Karn Kaset [House Agricultural Magazine] 13(10): 127-129(1989)

Availability :
Field Crops Research Institute; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 12427

Antimicrobial activities of some medicinal plants
Kan suksa phut samunphrai thi mi rit tham lai chua

Chaiyasothi, T; Roeksopha, W; Muanwongyat, P
Bot Khatyo Khrongkan Phiset [Abstracts of Special Research Project] 2518-2523; Bangkok; Mahidol University; p109

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 12505

Baby food from sweet potato
Kan tham ahan samrap dek on chak manthet

Linothai, S
Faculty of Food Science; Kasetsart University; Bangkok; Thailand

[Theses Abstracts 1979]; Bangkok; Kasetsart University; 1982; p345-346

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Centre; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 13382

Sweet potato cv. Huaisithon
Manthhet phan huaisithon thon laeng pluk ngai hai hua lai raidai di

Kayaphat, S
Chao Kaset [Farmers Magazine] 39: 4-17(1984)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 13549

Sweet potato
Manthet

Sawanyathipat, W
National Agricultural Extension and Training Center; Kasetsart University; Bangkok; Thailand

Kaset Wanni [Agriculture at Present] 9(100): 26-28(1989)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 13804

Growing fast-growing trees in agroforestry system for rural development
Kan pluk mai toriu doi rabop wanakaset phua kan phatthana chonnabot

Ekkasan kan songsoem kan pluk paekkachon [Private Reforestation Extension Report]; Office of Private Reforestation Extension; 1986; 72p

Availability :
Library; Royal Forest Department; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 13853

Backyard garden No.1
Suan lang ban No.1

Punnothok, S
[Backyard Garden No.1]; Bangkok; Phasit Publishing; 1979; 250p

Availability :
Library; Royal Forest Department; Bangkok; Thailand




NO. 14172

Study on the efficiency of the pheromone trap with Cylas formicarius
Kan suksa prasitthiphap khong kapdak san phet chanit tang tang kap duang nguang man-thet

Khienmisuk, P; Withayarak, W; Chayamanon, P; Bansit, K; Unchit, W, Thongchiam, M
Entomology and Zoology Division; Department of Agriculture; Bangkok

Warasan Kita Lae Sattawawithaya(Journal of Entomology and Zoology) 14(3): 143-151(1992)

Abstract:
From three kinds of trap viz. bamboo trap, plastic funnel trap and metal box trap, adults of Cylas formicarius were counted. The results showed that the metal box trap was the most effective one. The older plants (Ipomoea batatas) were more damaged than the younger ones.

Availability :
Thai National Documentation Center; TISTR; Bangkok




NO. 14549

Carbohydrate and sugar content of sweet potato varieties.
Pariman carbohydrate nai manthet phan tang tang

Prabuddham, S; Tantidham, K; Lertborwornwong, C; Poonperm, N
Department of Agriculture; Bangkok

Warasan wichakan kaset (Agriculture research journal) 5(1-3): 38-44 (1987)

Abstract:
Study on 75 variety of sweet potato for comparative carbohydrate sugar content for selected hight yield variety.

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 14603

Studies on concentration and timing of mepiquat chloride on growth and yield of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas) CV "TIS 8250"
Kan suksa khwam khemkhon lae raya wela kan hai mepiquat chloride to kan charoen toepto lae phonphalit khong man-thet phan 'TIS 8250'

Suanphairoch, S.; Rakkoarong, P.; Maneesuwan, R.; Chotsingh, C.; Boonyeang, R.
Faculty of Science and Technology, Surattani Teachers's College; Surat Thani 84100

The 33rd Kasetsart University Annual Conference; 30 January-1 February 1995; Kasetsart University; Bangkok; 1995; p59

Abstract:
Two experiments were performed on growth and partitioning in root of sweet potato CV. "TIS 8250". They were conducted at farm and experimental field of Agriculture Department, Surattani Teachers's college during February 1990-October 1991. Vine growth, number of branches, weight and volume of root were recorded to determine a suitable time and concentrations for mepiquat chloride application. It was found that sweet potato CV. "TIS 8250" had maximum vines length and number of branches after the 14 week. The number of storage roots were increased before enlarged in weight and volume during 12th and 14th weeks and could be harvested at 16th week. When mepiquat chloride at 3, 000 ppm was sprayed at 12th week in the second experiment, root weight and volume increased. Result showed that the trend in the yeild was linear and quadratic in response to concentration and time of application, respectively. (Authors' abstract)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 20037

Studies on some major pests of sweet potatoes and their control


Ho, TH
Division of Agriculture; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

The Malaysian Agricultural Journal 47(4): 437-452(1970)

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 20068

Notes on current investigations (Research) - October to December 1955


The Malayan Agricultural Journal 39(1): 63-68(1955)

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 20091

Notes on current investigations (Research), January to March 1954


Anonymous
Agricultural Division; Kuala Lumpur; Malaya

The Malayan Agricultural Journal 37(2): 91-99(1954)

Abstract:
Common names used

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 31596

Sweet potato as a substrate for nata production


Abastilla, RC; Ladilad, AG
MSAC Research Journal 2(1): 26-35(1978)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 20106

Notes on current investigations, January to March 1953


Agricultural Division; Kuala Lumpur; Malaya

The Malayan Agricultural Journal 36(2): 114-124(1953)

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 20111

Notes on current investigations, July to September 1953


Agricultural Division; Kuala Lumpur; Malaya

The Malayan Agricultural Journal 36(4): 247-260(1953)

Abstract:
4 species of Leguminosae; 3 Gramineae; 2 Liliaceae; 2 Palmae

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 20112

Notes on extension work, July to September 1953


Agricultural Division; Kuala Lumpur; Malaya

The Malayan Agricultural Journal 36(4): 266-274

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 20128

Notes on current investigations, April to June 1952


Agricultural Division; Kuala Lumpur; Malaya

The Malayan Agricultural Journal 35(3): 167-176(1952)

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 20775

Bacterial wilt


Navaratnam, SJ
Division of Agriculture; Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operation; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

The Malayan Agriculturist 7: 59-63(1966-67)

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 20875

Information on tuber vegetables
Maklumat sayur-sayuran jenis umbisi/rizom

Extension Branch; Department of Agriculture; Malaysia

Bingkisan Pertanian [Agricultural News] No.27h

Availability :
Department of Agriculture; Lundang; Kota Bahru; Kelantan; Malaysia




NO. 21231

IAA oxidase preparations from sweet potato roots


Imbert, MP
University of the West indies; St.Augustine; Trinidad

PhD thesis; Serdang; Agricultural Univrsity of Malaysia; 1973; 176p

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 22037

Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration in tissue culture of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas)


Liu, JR; Cantliffe, DJ
Korea Institute of Science and Technology; PO Box 131; Seoul; Korea

Plant Cell Reports 3: 112-115(1984)

Availability :
Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute; Serdang; Selangor




NO. 22040

High frequency somatic embryogenesis from cultured shoot apical meristem domes of sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas)


Liu, JR; Cantliffe, DJ; Simonds, SC; Yuan, JF
Korean Institute of Science and Technology; PO Box 131; Cheongryang; Seoul; Korea

SABRAO Journal 21(2): 93-102(1989)

Availability :
Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute; Serdang; Selangor




NO. 23230

Development of a cost efficient tillage system for cassava cultivation on peat


Tan, SL
MARDI; Serdang; Selangor; Malaysia

Proceeding of National IRPA [Intensification of Research in Priority Areas] Seminar [Agricultural Sector]; Ho, YW; Vidyadaran, MK; Norhani, A; Jainudeen, MR; Abd Rani, B (eds); 1992; p.125-126

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 23842

Conservation of tuber crops


Tan, SL
Horticulture Research Division; Malaysian Agricultural Research Development Institute; Serdang; Selangor

Proceedings of National Seminar on the Indigeous Food Crops Conservataion: 73-85(1995)

Abstract:
The current status of tuber crops in Malaysia was reviewed with regard to area planted and usage. The most important are cassava, sweet potato and cocoyam. Future potential of these crops include sources of starch for myriad uses, animal feed stuff and use in convenience foods. Local living collections of germplasm for sweet potato, cassava and edible aroids were reported, together with inherent problems in their maintenance. Alternative conservation systems include duplicate collections, in vitro genebanks, and cryopreservation, with some mention of storing pollen, true seed, storage roots, wild related germplasm and in situ conservation.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 30160

Determination of compatible groups in sweet potato


Bates, SC
MSc thesis; College; Laguna; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; 1984; 36p

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30171

Studies on the dehydration of petsay leaves, kamote tops and carrots


Eusebio, EC; Gonzales, JG; Tobias, JR; Soriano, LB; Peralta, EI; Marcelo, FS
NSDB Technology Journal 5(1): 48-60(1980)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30361

Control of sweet potato weevil after harvest by fumigation


Acedo, AL; Manoto, EC; Bautista, OK
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 6(1-2): 63(1981)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30418

Yield and chemical composition of root crops at different ages of harvest


Data, ES; Villamayor Jr, FG; Abenoja, EA; Dingal, AG; Reoma, VL; Anzano, DR
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 13(Supp.1): S4(1988)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30427

Genetic improvement of tropical and sub-tropical vegetable crops


Villareal, RL
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12(3): 131-138(1987)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30429

Intercropping sweet potato with legumes as a cultural management practice


Quirol, BF; Escalada, RG; Manatad, FA
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(2): 113-114(1983)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30457

Production and evaluation of cut sprouts from sweet potato roots


Villamayor, FG, Jr
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 13(Supp.1): S4(1988)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30520

Promising sweet potato lines developed at VISCA through polycross breeding technique


Saladaga, FA
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(2): 125(1983)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30523

Varietal responses of sweet potato to relay cropping


Villareal, RL; Hsu, YM
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 7(3): 134-136(1982)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30539

Insects attacking sweet potato (BNAS-51) at different stages of growth


Gapasin, DP
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 6(1-2): 51(1981)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30553

Cooking oil and storage relationship of sweet potato chips quality


Capitan, PS
Thesis; College; Laguna; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; 1974; 35p

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30579

Effects of number of nodes of tip cuttings and nodes buried on the yield of Georgia Red sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas)


Castro, RO
Thesis; College; Laguna; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; 1969; 35p

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30584

Potential feed substitutes for poultry and swine and its economic viability


Limcangco-Lopez, PD
Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna

PCARRD Book Series No.43; Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Production and Utilization of Nonconventional Feedstuffs for Livestock; Los Banos; Laguna; PCARRD Headquarters; 1986; p37-50

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 30616

Ecological and cultural requirements of sweet potato


Mariscal, AM
Philippine Root Crops Information Service; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Root Crops Digest 2(2): 1-4(1987)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30618

Sweet potato: its classification and description


Bartolini, PU
Philippine Root Crops Information Service; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Root Crops Digest 1(2): 1-4(1985)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30625

Effect of fly ash on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Devaras, LA; Escalada, RG; Quirol, BF
Annals of Tropical Research 4(2): 85-91(1982)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30626

Morphological and agronomic traits associated with yield performance of sweet potato


Bacusmo, JL; Carpena, AL
Annals of Tropical Research 4(2): 92-102(1982)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30633

Mycorrhiza - a possible adaptive mechanism of sweet potato in marginal soils


Tupas, GL
Annals of Tropical Research 5(2): 69-74(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30638

Resistance of fifty-two sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.)Lam.) cultivars to Meloidogyne incognita and M.javanica


Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 6(1): 1-19(1984)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30639

Intercropping sweet potato with legumes as a cultural management system


Quirol, BF; Escalada, RG; Manatad, FA
Annals of Tropical Research 6: 20-32(1984)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30642

Relationship between morphological characteristics and varietal resistance of sweet potato to scab infection caused by Sphaceloma batatas Saw


Basit, GB; Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 9(2): 75-83(1987)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30645

Effect of delayed processing on alcohol yield of fresh root crops


Tulin, EE; Data, Es
Annals of Tropical Research 9(4): 200-211(1987)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30647

Effect of time and frequency of topping on storage root and cutting production of a bushy sweet potato cultivar


Villamayor, FG, Jr; Perez, RD
Annals of Tropical Research 10(1): 26-36(1988)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30649

Phenolics involvement in sweet potato resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and M.javanica


Gapasin, RM; Valdez, RB; Mendoza, EMT
Annals of Tropical Research 10(2): 63-73(1988)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30655

Sweet potato kisses
Kamote kisses

Philippine Root Crops Information Service; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Baybay; Leyte; Philippine Root Crops Information Service; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1988; Leaflet Series Vol.7

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30657

Utilization of root crops for animal feeds


Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

REACT-VICARP Brochure No. 1; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1988; 14p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30677

Performance of sweet potato applied with Azolla as organic fertilizer


Gojoco, AS
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculutre; 1988; 66p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30680

Sprout production from fleshy roots of different sweet potato varieties


Moya, MB
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1986; 44p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30685

Response of sweet potato to varying time of planting cowpea as an intercrop


Otadoy, TS
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1985; 115p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30701

Effect of phosphorus and nitrogen fertilization and weed control method on weed incidence and mungbean production


Agarcio, BC, Jr
Annals of Tropical Research 7: 1-11(1985)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30704

Crop rotation of sweet potato, cassava, and gabi with legumes as a cultural management system


Escasinas, AB; Escalada, RG
Annals of Tropical Research 6: 63-76(1984)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30757

Root crop processing technology: recent developments


Van Den, T
Radix 8(1): 9-17(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30759

Sweet potato for growing-finishing pigs


Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

Development Forum 1(1): 11-13(1985)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30763

Effect of soil depth on the degree of sweet potato weevil infestation


Burdeos, AT; Gapasin, DP
Annals of Tropical Research 2(4): 224-231(1980)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30768

Root crops-legumes rotation at varying fertilizer levels


Escarinas, AB; Escalada, RG; Baliad, ME
Annals of Tropical Research 8(2): 87-95(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30769

Effect of pectinase, cellulase and nutrient addition on fermentation of sweet potato mashes


McArdle, RN; Bouwkamp, SC
Annals of Tropical Research 8(3): 107-114(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30774

Pre- and post-infectional resistance of sweet potato to Meloidogyne incognita and M.javanica


Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 8(4): 176-188(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30780

Root crops: a promise for sufficient food supply


Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

Development Forum 4(2): 11-12(1988)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30782

Boron and gibberellic acid for increased seed production in cassava and sweet potato


Galinato, MI
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

VICARP News 4(3-4): 19(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30784

Topping sweet potato for root and vegetable production


Bartolini, PU; Vertucio, R
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

VICARP News 4(3-4): 6-7(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31206

A program for varietal improvement of sweet potato in the Philippines


Saladaga, FA
VICARP News 4(3-4): 2(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30789

Pilot scale production and marketing of root crop-based soy sauce


Data, ES
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

VICARP News 8(4): 13(1987)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30791

Annual report PRCRTC 1987


Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Baybay; Leyte; Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1988; 110p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30792

How to store sweet potato


Philippine Root Crops Information Service; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; [year; page?]; PRIS Extension Bulletin

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30795

Sweet potato tuber rot disease in the Philippines


Palomar, MK; Solis, AD; Bandala, HS
Annals of Tropical Research [vol., no., pages, year ?]

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30796

Biology and host range of the taro planthopper, Tarophagus proserpina Kirk.


Duatin, CJY; De Pedro, LB
Annals of Tropical Research 8(2): 72-80(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30798

Soy sauce production utilizing root crop flour as substitute for wheat flour (100% substitution)


Data, ES; Diamante, JC; Forio, EE
Annals of Tropical Research 8(1): 42-50(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30800

Wheat flour substitution using sweet potato or cassava in some bread and snack items


Palomar, LS; Perez, JA; Pascual, GC
Annals of Tropical Research 3(1): 8-17(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30801

Postharvest fumigation of tubers for the control of sweet potato weevil


Acedo, AL, Jr; Manoto, EC; Bautista, OKK
Annals of Tropical Research 3(2): 127-135(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30803

Control of Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis and its effect on the yield of sweet potato and cassava


Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 3(2): 92-99(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30807

Effect of brown leaf spot disease on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Dela Cruz, CS; Loreto, FL; Palomar, MK
Annals of Tropical Research 3(3): 206-213(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30813

Inheritance of some characters for a proposed plant ideotype for sweet potato


Bernardo, RN
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1983; 74p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30880

The availability of carotene in some Philippine vegetables


Ortaliza, IC; Del Rosario, IF; Caedo, MM; Alcaraz, AP
Philippine Journal of Science 98(2): 123-131(1969)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 30910

Effects of gamma radiation on some morphological characters of sweet potato


Pido, NL; Engle, LM
Annals of Tropical Research 9(2): 84-95(1987)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30913

Effects of different portions and length of storage of cuttings on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Eronico, CA; Escalada, RG; Trenuela, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 3(2): 144-149(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 30915

State of the art abstract bibliography of sweet potato research


Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resources Research and Development; Los Banos, Laguna

Los Banos; Laguna; Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resources Research and Development; 1986; 78p; Crops Bibliography Series No.9

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 30918

Floral biology of selected cassava and sweet potato varieties


Department of Plant Breeding and Agricultural Botany; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1982; 27p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31054

Preliminary findings on the phytochemistry of the leaves of certain Philippine plants II


Gomez, L; Da Silva, P; Garcia, PP
Natural and Applied Science Bulletin 14(4): 296-311(1954)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31070

Effects of gamma radiation on buds of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.Poir)


Soriano, JD
Natural and Applied Science Bulletin 24(1-2): 41-54(1972)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31086

Uptake of fission products by certain vegetables crops


Pablo, FE
Natural and Applied Science Bulletin 29(1): 17-36(1977)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31129

Studies on the dehydration of petsay leaves, kamote tops and carrots


Eusebio, EC; Gonzales, JG; Tobias, JR; Soriano, LB; Peralta, EI; Marcelo, FS
NSTA Technology Journal 5(1): 48-60(1980)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31138

Survey and control of pathogens and insect pest attacking rootcrops


Divinagracia, GG
NSDB Technology Journal 3(2): 62-72(1978)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31183

Status of integrated pest management on root crops in the Philippines


Esguerra, NM
The Philippine Entomologist 5(3): 291-319(1982)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31187

Assessing yield losses in sweet potato due to the weevil, Cylas formicarius Fabr.


Corey, FM; Cadapan, EP
The Philippine Entomologist 6(3): 235-242(1985)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31198

Coconut-based cropping with annual crops in Eastern Visayas


Carcallas, CD; Aparra, NO
VICARP News 4(2): 2-7(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31202

Cropping pattern under young coconut


Aparra, NO
Abstract of Coconut Researches 1977-1980; Baybay; Leyte; Regional Coconut Research Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; p18

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31204

Floral biology of selected cassava and sweet potato varieties


Galinato, MI
VICARP News 4(3-4): 18(1983)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31207

Major pest problems of selected crops in Eastern Visayas and their control


VICARP News 8(1): 13-15(1987)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31230

Postharvest fumigation of tubers for the control of sweet potato weevil


Acedo, AL, Jr; Manoto, EC; Bautista, OK
Annals of Tropical Research 3(2): 127-135(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31234

Relationship between morphological characteristics and varietal resistance of sweet potato to scab infection caused by Sphaceloma batatas Saw


Bajit, GB; Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 9(2): 75-83(1987)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31244

Pre-harvest factors affecting quality of cassava and sweet potato at harvest and subsequent storage


Data, ES; Quevedo, MA; Esguerra, EB; Estioko, RR, Jr; Villegas, LG; Medellim, AC; Alama, CG; Itong, R; Gorgonio, M
Baybay; Leyte; Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; [year?]; 136p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31246

Effect of brown leaf spot disease on the growth and yield of sweet potato


De la Cruz, CS; Loreto, FL; Palomar, MK
Annals of Tropical Research 3(3): 206-213(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31250

Influence of foliage color and shape on the abundance of insect pests attacking sweet potato


Duatin, MAY
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1979; 51p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31255

Effect of ipil-ipil as organic fertilizer on root crops


Escalada, RG; Posas, MB; Javier, RR; Abit, SE; Ratilla, BC; Peque, EC; Tobias, R
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1986; 147p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31262

Effect of boron and gibberellic acid on flowering, pollen viability and seed production of cassava and sweet potato


Galinato, MI
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1987; 39p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31263

Effect of sanitation and preplant insecticide application on the infestation of the sweet potato weevil


Gapasin, DP
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1980

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31264

Biological studies of sweet potato pests and their natural enemies


Gapasin, DP
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1980; 210p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31265

Biology of the black and green leaf folders of sweet potato


Gapasin, DP; Rebadulla, LZ
Annals of Tropical Research 3(1): 37-50(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31266

Survey and identification of plant parasitic nematodes associated with sweet potato and cassava


Gapasin, DP
Annals of Tropical Research 1(2): 120-134(1979)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31267

Pre- and post-infectional resistance of sweet potato to Meloidogyne incognita and M.javanica


Gapasin, DP
Annals of Tropical Research 8(4): 176-188(1986)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31268

Control of Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchus reniformis and its effect on the yield of sweet potato and cassava


Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 3(2): 92-100(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31270

Pathogenecity of Meloidogyne spp. and Rotylenchulus reniformis on sweet potato


Gapasin, RM; Valdez, RB
Annals of Tropical Research 1(1): 20-26(1979)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31271

Phenolics involvement in sweet potato resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and M.javanica


Gapasin, RM; Mendoza, EMT; Valdez, RB
Annals of Tropical Research 10(2): 63-73(1988)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31273

Insect pests attacking the above-ground parts of sweet potato at different stage of growth


Gonato, RC
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1978; 34p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31277

Culture of the sweet potato scab fungus (Sphaceloma batatas Saw.)


Divinagracia, GG; Lao, FO
Annals of Tropical Research 1(1): 1-13(1979)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31285

Wheat flour substitution using sweet potato or cassava in some bread and snack items


Palomar, LS; Perez, JA; Pascual, GL
Annals of Tropical Research 3(1): 8-17(1981)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31286

Studies on a virus-like mosaic diseases of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott)


Palomar, MK
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1982; 54p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31287

Screening of sweet potato varieties/accessions for resistance to tuber rot


Palomar, MK
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1980; 41p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31312

Sweet potato as a culture medium ingredient for Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.


Trigo, DM; Palomar, MK
Annals of Tropical Research 1(1): 67-72(1979)

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31314

Chemical inducement of rooting in sweet potato seed pieces


Valida, AF
Thesis; Baybay; Leyte; Visayas State College of Agriculture; 1980; 52p

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 31328

Technique for evaluating sweet potato varieties for resistance to false spider mite, Brevipalpus californicus Banks (Tenuipalpidae, Acarina)


Moralde, NM; De Pedro, LB; Bernardo, EN
The Philippine Entomologist 5(4): 345-353(1982)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31396

Let's grow more sweet potato


Cadiz, TG
Agriculture at Los Banos 3(4): 14-15(1964)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31422

Liquor may be made from sweet potato


Bilumong, JC; Alicbusan, RV
Agriculture at Los Banos 10(2): 6(1970)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31623

On the isolation and in-vitro culture of sweet potato single cells


Payawal, PC; De Guzman, EV
Philippine Biota 3(4): 20-22(1969)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31693

The digestability by swine of sweet potato vines and tubers, cassava roots, and green papaya fruits


Zarate, JJ
Philippine Agriculturist 40(2): 78-83(1956)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31780

Sweet potato starch: Physicochemical properties of the whole starch


Madamba, LSP; Bustrillos, AR; San Pedro, EL
Philippine Agriculturist 58(9-10): 338-350(1975)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 31831

Composite flours I.The use of sweet potato, Irish potato and wheat flour mixtures in breadmaking


Tapang, NP; Del Rosario, RR
Philippine Agriculturist 61(3-4): 124-133(1977)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 32154

The prospects and problems of producing alcohol from root crops


Sarian, Z(ed)
Greenfields 13(10): 32-34(1983)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 32355

Sweet potato: ready for export


Urbanes, PO, Jr(ed)
Animal Husbandry and Agricultural Journal 19(10): 18, 38(1985)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 32598

Intercropping increases ginger yield


Deocadiz, LA
Philippine Farmers'Journal 20(3): 28(1978)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 32605

Major Philippine raw material sources for power alcohol: prospects, problems, directions


Zayco, HC; Rosario, EL
Crystallizer 3(3): 6-7, 19-21(1980)

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 32884

Processing of dried cassava and sweet potato chips for feed and food


Tan, DLS; Sanchez, SL; Lauzon, RD; Van Den, T
Philippine Technology Journal 15(1): 77-87(1990)

Availability :
Library; Science and Technology Information Institute; Bicutan; Taguig; Metro Manila; Philippines




NO. 33111

Two-stage process of ethanol production from sweet potato flour and rice bran using Aspergillus awamori and immobilized yeast


Bugarin, RMB; Alba, DM; Del Rosario, EJ
The Philippine Journal of Science 116(2): 205-218(1987)

Availability :
Library; Scientific and Technology Information Institute; Department of Science and Technology; Metro Manila; Philippines




NO. 33129

Rootcrops: viable energy source


Philippine Development 9(11): 12-19(1981)

Availability :
Library; Department of Environment and Natural Resources; Diliman; Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 33314

Use camote in making soy sauce


Corpus, VA
Bulletin of the Nutrition Foundation of the Philippines 22(5): 7(1982)

Availability :
Library; College of Medicine; University of the Philippines; Ermita; Manila




NO. 33318

Useful products you can make from sweet potato


Dy, ME
Asian Farms and Gardens 1(2): 26(1980)

Availability :
Library; College of Arts and Sciences; University of the Philippines; Manila




NO. 33396

The influence of storing cuttings on the yield of sweet potato tubers


Salvadico, BB; Marasigan, CM
MIT Research Journal 3(1): 1-6(1970)

Availability :
Library; University of Southern Mindanao; Kabacan; Cotabato; Philippines




NO. 33403

Yield and agronomic traits of BNAS-51 sweet potato cultivar (Ipomoea batatas (L.)Poir) as influenced by methods of planting, positions of vines and number of cuttings per hill


Wagbara, FO; Curayag, LJ; Pava, HM
CMU Journal of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition 6(1): 3-27(1984)

Availability :
Library; Central Mindanao University; Musuan; Bukidnon; Philippines




NO. 33408

The influence of legume intercrops on the production of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.)Poir.)


Carandang, JA; Curayag, LJ
CMU Journal of Science 2(2): 19-35(1989)

Availability :
Library; Central Mindanao University; Musuan; Bukidnon; Philippines




NO. 33451

When to harvest your sweet potatoes
Kailan dapat anihin ang kamoteng baging

Brodkast Digest 7(1989)

Availability :
Library; Department of Agriculture; Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 33485

Rootcrops


Padilla, GC
Communication Unit-University Extension Primer No.4; Series 1989; 4p

Availability :
Library; Northern Mindanao Consortium for Agriculture and Resources Research and Development; Central Mindanao University; Musuan; Bukidnon; Philippines




NO. 33550

Some medicinal plants and their known medical uses in Tubao, La Union: an explanatory study


Barros, CT
DMMMSU Research Journal 4(3-4): 65-67(1983)

Availability :
Library; Rural Development Research and Training Center; Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University; Bacnotan; La Union; Philippines




NO. 33577

Performance of three AVRDC sweet potato accessions grown under yemane (Gmelina arborea Roxb.) plantation


Saldaen, AB; Somera, JA
BSc thesis; Bacnotan; La Union; College of Agriculture and Forestry; Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University; 1987; 40p

Availability :
Library; Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University; Bacnotan; La Union; Philippines




NO. 33983

The uptake of T131 I by some hydroponically grown crops


Asprer, GA; Lansangan, LM; Dela Paz, LR
The Nucleus 20(1): 90-93(1982)

Availability :
National Library; Filipiniana and Asia Division; Ermita; Manila; Philippines




NO. 33996

Dehydration of rootcrops and tubers


De Leon, SY; Bravo, OC; Martinez, LO
Fruits and vegetables dehydration manual; [place ?; publisher ?]; 1988; p107-119

Availability :
National Library; Filipiniana and Asia Division; Ermita; Manila; Philippines




NO. 33702

Storability of sweet potatoes under highland condition


Bayogan, ERV; Salda, VB
MSAC Research Journal 18: 1-9(1985)

Availability :
Office of Research and Technology Refinement; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 33842

Four kinds of vegetables in the preparation of snack chips


Azurin, AF
BSc thesis; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Central Luzon State University; 1977; 20p

Availability :
Library; Central Luzon State University; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Philippines




NO. 33886

The effect of stored cuttings on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Sabio, CC
BSc thesis; Echague; Isabela State University; 1978; viip; 27p

Availability :
Library; Isabela State University; Echague; Philippines




NO. 33913

Weed control studies in wheat


Camacho, RF
Central Luzon State University Scientific Journal 5(1): 73-80(1984)

Availability :
Publication House; Central Luzon State University; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Philippines




NO. 34088

A survey of the antibacterial properties of some local plants


De Garcia, E
Centro Escolar University; Manila; Philippines

Graduate and Faculty Studies 5: 142-157(1954)

Availability :
National Library; Manila; Philippines




NO. 34185

Performance of sweet potato Ipomoea batatas L. planted after lowland rice under different levels of composted hagonoy, Chromolaena odorata L.R.M.King and H.Robinson


Garcellano, AMM
BSc thesis; Aborlan; Palawan National Agricultural College; 1981; 25p

Availability :
Palawan Agricultural Research Consortium; Aborlan; Philippines




NO. 34210

The effect of Sagana 100 and different levels of commercial fertilizer combined on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Abia, LO
BSc thesis; Aborlan; Palawan National Agricultural College; 1977; 20p

Availability :
Library; Palawan National Agricultural College; Aborlan; Philippines




NO. 34214

The effect of hagonoy (Chromolaena odorata) as green manure on the performance of sweet potato under gonoy infested area


Amanca, ND
BSc thesis; Aborlan; Palawan National Agricultural College; 1981; 33p

Availability :
Library; Palawan National Agricultural College; Aborlan; Philippines




NO. 34221

Comparative study on the effect of composted gonoy (Chromolaena odorata), cacawate (Gliricidia sepium Linn.) and ipil-ipil (Leucaena lastiliqua) on the performance of sweet potato


Palay, RT
BSc thesis; Aborlan; Palawan National Agricultural College; 1979; 16p

Availability :
Library; Palawan Agricultural Research Center; Palawan National Agricultural College; Aborlan; Philippines




NO. 63175

Effect of application of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus L.) and 'gletak' (Borrenia latifolia Schem.) on biological aspects of common cutworm (Spodopten litura Fabricus)
Pengaruh pemberian kedelai (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), bayam duri (Amaranthus spinosus L.) dan gletak (Borrenia latifolia Schem.) terhadap biologi ulat grayak (Spodopten litura Fabricus)

Desmawati
Thesis S1; Padang; Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; 1988; p.1-72

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 69594

Sweet potato weevil (Cylas formicarius fabricus) multiplication in storage
Perbanyakan hama lamas (Cylas formicarius fabricus) di gudang

Waluyo
Bogor Research Insstitute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 Februari dan 2 Maret 1992; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol I; 1992; p.33-35

Abstract:
Sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius Fabricius, is an important pest of sweet potato in the field and at storage. This pest damages the sweet potato stem and tuber. A trial rearing C. formicarius was done in a storage room. Using wooden boxes (75cm x 50cm x 25cm). Each box has nylon screen on its top. Box was infested with q 500 pairs of 7 day old cylas. The cylas population was harvested after 35 days to 40 days after infestations. The number of Cylas harvested from each box were between 3000-5000 adults.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69595

Procedure for virus indexing on sweet potatoes
Teknik deteksi virus penyebab penyakit pada tanaman ubijalar

Muhsin, Muhammad
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 Februari dan 2 Maret 1992; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol I; 1992; p.36-38

Abstract:
Procedure for virus indexing on sweet potatoes. Viruses that infect sweet potato () consist of several 'species', however they have a narrow host range, limited to the genus Ipomoea. Ipomoea nil and I. setosa are the common species used for virus indexing in sweet potatoes. The indexing procedure employed in this experiment was the grafting method. Results of the experiment which was conducted at the Department of Plant Pathology, BORIF in 1989/90, showed that some sweet potato clones grown at Muara Experimental Station, Bogor, were infected by virus (es). Leaves of the virus infected plants commonly exhibited slight mosaic, faint chlorotic spots and feathery mottle.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 102133

Effects of the addition of sweet potato and defatted soy flour to some of paste chemical characteristics
Pengaruh penambahan ubi jalar dan tepung kedelai tidak berlemak terhadap beberapa sifat kimia pasta

Pangloli, Philipus
Majalah BPPT [Journal of the Agency for Technological Study and Application] (LVI): 53-63(1993)

Abstract:
The objective of this experiment was to develop a high-protein and Beta - carotene containing pasta product from the mixture of all-purpose wheat flour, sweet potato and defatted soyflour (DSF). Paste was prepared with partial substitution of DSF (0, 5 and 10%) in combination with sweet potato flour (10%) or sweet potato puree (10 and 15%) for wheat flour based on the solid contents of the substitution ingredients and baker's percentage. The results indicated that added DSF and sweet potato either increased or decreased some particular chemical components of pasta. Substitution of sweet potato up to 15% in combination with DSF up to 10% produced paste with relatively high in protein, provitamin A, and dietary fiber contents. The average protein content of the paste was 15.5% and Beta-carotene (provitamin A) 577 retinol equivalents (RE) per 100 g or 57.7 of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for an adult male or 72.1% for an adult female.

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 102545

Quality of Taiwan/395-6 and Genjah Rante cultivars of sweet potato at various levels of harvesting time and fertilization
Kualitas ubijalar varietas Taiwan/395-6 dan Genjah Rante pada beberapa umur panen dan pemupukan

Antarlina, S.S.; Widodo, Yudi; Indiati, Wahyuni
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops (MARIF); Malang; Indonesia

Penelitian Palawija [Secondary Crops Research] 8(1): 1-14(1993)

Abstract:
The quality of sweet potato can be influenced by the difference cultivars, harvesting time and fertilizer application. An experiment to study the effect of harvesting time and fertilizer application on the quality of two sweet potato cultivars was carried out at Food Laboratory of MARIF from September to December 1993. The raw material was harvested regularly from the field experiment at Udanawu, Blitar during the dry season of 1993. A Randomized Completely Block Design, with two factors and three replications were used in this experiment. The first factor was two sweet potato cultivars (Taiwan/395-6 and Genjah Rante). The second factor was five fertilizer applications, namely 1) without fertilizer, 2) fertilized with 100 kg Urea/ha; 3) 10 t cattle manure/ha; 4) 100 kg Urea + 100 kg KCl/ha; and 5)100 kg Urea + 100 kg KCl and 10 t cattle manure/ha). Quality analyze of sweet potato in five harvesting times (80, 95, 110, 125, 140 days). The dry matter, flour rendement, water content, protein, total soluble solid, saccharose, starch, crude fiber content and weevil infestation were used as the principle parameters for sweet potato quality. There was no interaction between three factor tested on all characters observed. Interaction between cultivar and fertilizer application is merely found on fiber content. Interaction between cultivar, fertilizer and harvesting times was significant for starch content. The quality of sweet potato is separately affected by cultivar, harvesting time, and fertilizer application. Taiwan/395-6 its protein content (1.10%) and saccharose content (8.80%) are higher than that of Genjah Rante. However, the starch content of Genjah Rante (23.98%) is higher than Taiwan/395-6. Harvesting period 95 and 140 dap give better quality of sweet potato tuber. Among the fertilizer application, applying 100 kg urea/ha resulting better quality. Due to its lower weevil infestation (1.9%), therefore the quality of sweet potato tuber is not affected by weevil damaged.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 34865

Prospects of the varietal improvement program of the Philippines Root Crop Research and Training Center


Villanueva, MR
Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar-Workshop on Root Crops, Visayas State College of Agriculture, Baybay, Leyte, Philippines; 1978; p11-15

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources and Research Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 35504

Manuring and inorganic fertilization on bush sitao (Vigna sesquipedalis Fruw.), okra (Hibiscus esculentus L.) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Poir.)


Dongallo, RJ
MSc thessi; College; Laguna; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; 1979; xxvp; 161p

Availability :
Library; Department of Horticulture; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 35917

Incidence of pest on different vegetable crops grown in Bicol University College of Agriculture, Guinobatan, Albay


Ostonal, JR
BSc thesis; Guinobatan; Albay; College of Agriculture; Bicol University; 1980; viip; 24p

Availability :
Library; College of Agriculture; Bicol University; Guinobatan; Albay; Philippines




NO. 36239

Stomatal density, size and behavior at different intervals of harvesting selected vegetables


Langaoan, VB
BSc thesis; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna; 1986; 46p

Availability :
Library; Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 36727

Efficiency of different levels of potassium at different soil moisture levels on the yield of sweet potato


Pobre, RM
BSc thesis; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; College of Agriculture (Soil Science); Central Luzon State University; 1975; 22p

Abstract:
Study was conducted to determine the efficiency of fertilizer potassium applied at different levels of soil moisture on the yield of sweet potato. The soil moisture present was measured in terms of the tension registered by the soil moisture gauge. The levels of potassium applied in each moisture level were 0 (control), 30, 60, 90, and 120 kgs K2 per ha. Results showed increase in yield with decreasing soil moisture levels and increasing potassium levels. However, significant differences were observed between moisture levels on the number of tubers per subplot and among potassium levels on the dry matter yield.

Availability :
Scientific Literature Services (SLS) RET; Central Luzon State University; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Philippines




NO. 36802

Insect control in sweet potato with emphasis on the weevil (Cylas formicarius Fab.): Effect of type of cutting and insecticide treatment


Torres, DO
National Crop Protection Center; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; Laguna

NCPC [National Crop Protection Center] Research Abstracts 1978-1990; p25

Abstract:
Plants from cuttings dipped in insecticide solution before planting had lower weevil damage compared to untreated cuttings. In addition, terminal cuttings showed less damage and higher survival than non-terminal cuttings.

Availability :
NCPC Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 36851

Effect of burnt bagasso (sugarcane ash) on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Bolado, WM; Diamsay, AB, Jr; Rodriguez, DC
Department of Agriculture (DA)-Region III (Research Division); Philippines

Agency In-house R & D Review and Planning, DECS-Regional Education Learning Center, Pulung Bulo, Angeles City, 18-19 MAy 1993

Availability :
Department of Agriculture; Field Office III; San Fernando; Pampanga; Philippines




NO. 36764

Nature of resistance of two sweet potato genotypes to the weevil, Cylas formicarius (Fabr.)


Bernardo, EN; Rana, RL; Taylo, LD
Department of Entomology; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna

Abstracts of papers presented at the 24th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Pest Management Council of the Philippines Inc., Cebu City, May 4-7, 1993; p39

Abstract:
When sweet potato potted plants 28-91 days old were exposed together for a week to adult weevils in a big nylon cage, consistent infestation incidence in plants in various age group was noted on those at least 70 days old for the two resistant genotypes (PRS458 and PRS507). For the susceptible Kinbakab variety, it was observed on the 42-day old group and older plants. Fewer weevil emergence holes, larvae and pupae were recorded on the resistant plants when dissected 37 days after exposure to adult weevils, suggesting antibiotic effects of the host on weevil biology. Intensification of the adverse effects on the pest with prolonged host-weevil association was not demonstrated conclusively due to a limitation in experimental facility and adverse environmental conditions. With undisturbed soil on top, the deeply formed fleshy roots especially of the resistant genotypes remained free from weevil damage. When the soil cover was removed, the undetached roots were attacked also. Adult weevils preferred the roots over the vines of the same plant when offered together. It may be more practical to emphasize vine resistance in developing improved sweet potato varieties to reduce the weevil population that will infest the fleshy roots as they become available. Since internally damaged fleshy roots become non-usable, death of the larvae that caused the damage may no longer benefit the crop unlike earlier weevil mortality from feeding on the resistant vines. Among the criteria composed, number of adult emergence holes on vines appeared to be the most practical to use in general germplasm evaluation for weevil resistance.

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 36914

Development of sweet potato as an agro-base rural industry I. Sweet potato for nata and vinegar


Quindara, HL; Botangen, ET
NPRCRTC; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Philippines

NPRCRTC-BSU In-House Review, La Trinidad, Benguet, June 24-25, 1993

Availability :
NPRCRTC; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Philippines




NO. 36917

Establishment of sweet potato household nurseries in the highlands


Gayao, ST; Botangen, AT; Macario, V; Subli, N
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

NPRCRTC-Benguet State University In-House Review, La Trinidad, Benguet, June 24-25, 1993

Availability :
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 36918

Control of rodents in sweet potato field using the modified 'active barrier system' (ABS)


Gayao, ST; Botangen, AT; Macario, V; Subli, N; Tabdi, G, Jr
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

NPRCRTC-Benguet State University In-House Review, La Trinidad, Benguet, June 24-25, 1993

Availability :
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 36923

Highland sweet potato (Philippines: Varietal improvement Phase II)


Ganga, ZN; Badol, EO
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

NPRCRTC-Benguet State University In-House Review, La Trinidad, Benguet, June 24-25, 1993

Availability :
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 36924

Potential of growing sweet potato from single-node cutting


Gonzales, IC; Kiswa, CG; Demonteverde, VE; Torres, HB
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

NPRCRTC-Benguet State University In-House Review, La Trinidad, Benguet, June 24-25, 1993

Availability :
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 36925

Evaluation of traditional practices on sweet potato


Gonzales, IC; Kiswa, CG; Torres, HB; Pacuz, LM
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

NPRCRTC-Benguet State University In-House Review, La Trinidad, Benguet, June 24-25, 1993

Availability :
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 36929

Bioassay of Dioscorea hispida on some insect pests of sweet potato


Perez, JC; Pakipac, E
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

NPRCRTC-Benguet State University In house Review, La Trinidad, Benguet, June 24-25, 1993

Availability :
NPRCRTC-Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 36937

Technique for evaluating sweet potato varieties for resistance to false spider mite, Brevipalpus californicus Banks (Tenuipalpidae, Acarina)


Moralde, NM; De Pedro, LB; Bernardo, EN
The Philippine Entomologist 5(4): 345-353(1982)

Availability :
Library; Department of Entomology; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 37039

Screening of rootcrop germplasm collection for resistance to major postharvest diseases in the Philippines.


Sajise, CE
Baybay, Leyte: PRCRTC

RETRES Research Abstracts; PRCRTC; 1987; 110p; MISD; PCARRD

Abstract:
Studies on the resistance of sweet potato and cassava to postharvest diseases (Botryodiplodia theobromae (Pat.), Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) and Rhizopus sp.) were conducted. The effect of plant age on root resistance to postharvest diseases was also investigated.

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 37040

Screening of sweet potato germplasm collection and breeding lines for resistance to major postharvest diseases


Sajise, CE
Baybay, Leyte: PRCRTC

RETRES Research Abstract [Screening of Rootcrop Germplasm Collection for Resistance to Major Postharvest Diseases in the Philippines; 1987; pp1-60; MISD; PCARRD

Abstract:
A total of 437 sweet potato genotypes were screened for resistance to Botryodiplodia theobromae (Pat) and 434 genotypes for Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi). Most of the genotypes screened to both pathogens were moderately susceptible. Only 0.7% and 15.0% were highly resistant and resistant, respectively to B. theobromae, while 0.2% were highly resistant and 6.0% resistant to M. phaseolina. The effect of plant age on root resistance showed that roots from the three-month old plants were more resistant to either B. theobromae or M. phaseolina than those at four and five months old. Three types of lesions were observed namely: susceptible (rapid rotting of tissues due to faster spreading of mycelia causing disintegration of the tissues), moderately resistant (slow increase in internal diameter of lesions and slow penetretion of fungal mycelia), and resistant (necrosis of cells and formation of wood periderm that restricted infection at the point of inoculation).

Availability :
Library; Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 37052

Screening of sweet potato varieties/accessions for resistance to tuber rot


Palomar, MK
VISCA; Baybay; Leyte

Development of Control Methods for Sweet Potato and Cassava Pests; 1980; 41p; PCARR Proj No. 343

Abstract:
The study was conducted to: (1) record the incidence of tuber rot on stored sweet potato tubers; (2) identify the most prevalent fungal pathogens that cause tuber rot of stored sweet potato; (3) device methods of inoculating tubers with the pathogens causing tuber rot; and (4) screen for tuber rot resistance to the different sweet potato cultivars/varieties. Fresh sweet potato tubers were stored in a wooden box lined with newspapers in the screenhouse. Observation and visual readings were made periodically. Infected tubers with signs and symptoms of the disease were examined in the laboratory. Diplodia was the most prevalent fungus found on rots of stored sweet potato tubers. The occurrence of Aspergillus and Rhizopus was limited; these were only found in tubers colonized by Diplodia. Pathogenecity tests for Diplodia, Aspergillus, and Rhizopus on potted sweet potato using BNAS-S1 variety, produced negative results. Artificial inoculation of Diplodia theobromae to tubers from 169 sweet potato accessions revealed that 78 were resistant, 13 were moderately resistant and 78 were susceptible to tuber rot.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library




NO. 37254

Intercropping flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) with sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) under varying levels of NPK


Retales, RO
Central Luzon State University (CLSU); Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Philippines

MS thesis; Crop Science Department; Central Luzon State University; 1988; 118 p.

Abstract:
A study on intercropping flue-cured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) with sweet potato ( L.) under varying levels of NPK was conducted at the Mariano Marcos State University experimental farm, Batac, Ilocos Norte from January 1988 to May 1988. The study aimed to evaluate and compare the peformance of two flue-cured tobacco varieties (NC 82 and Delgold) when intercropped with sweet potato (VSP-2); determine the optimum level of NPK that can give the highest yield and good quality cured leaves; and assess the treatment combination that will result in highest net profit. The experiment was laid out in a strip plot design with three replications. Two varieties of flue-cured tobacco (NC 82 and Delgold) intercropped with sweet potato (VSP-2), monocrop NC 82 and Delgold and sweet potato served as the main plots while four levels of NPK (90-80-75, 150-110-105, and 180-140-135 kg/ha) as the subplots. Interaction between intercropping and the four levels of NPK did not significantly affect all the parameters gathered. However, as single factor, both intercropping had significantly affected the grade index, nicotine content, and reducing tobacco and sweet potato while the levels of NPK had significantly affected the grade index, crop value and reducing sugars. NC 82 and Delgold both with intercrop and monoculture NC 82 had comparable grade index which is significantly higher than monoculture Delgold. Nicotine content of both tobacco varieties was significantly increased by intercropping during the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th primings. During the 2nd priming, Delgold with and without intercrop had significantly higher nicotine content of both varieties significantly increased from the 2nd to the 4th primings. Reducing sugars of both tobacco varieties was, likewise , affeted by intercropping. Delgold and NC 82, both with intercrop consistently produced higher reducing sugars during the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th primings, while monoculture Delgold had the lowest. Furthermore, NC 82 intercropped with sweet potato had the highest combined crop value (PHP 20, 582) followed by monoculture sweet potato (PHP 18, 633) while monoculture Delgold had the least (PHP 11, 279). Likewise, NPK levels significantly affected the grade index, crop value, and reducing sugars of both tobacco varieties. NPK level at 90-50-45 kg/ha had the highest grade index and crop value. It was noted that an increase in the level of NPK from 90-50-45 to 180-140-135 kg/ha, grade index and reducing sugars and consequently the crop value of flue-cured tobacco was decreased. Based on the economic analysis, intercropping NC 82 with VSP-2 fertilized with 90-50-45 kg/NPK/ha had the highest net income. Land equivalent ratio of both varieties were greater than 1 which means that flue-cured tobacco and sweet potato are good crop combinations.

Availability :
Scientific Literature Services (SLS), RET; CLSU; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Philippines




NO. 37361

Soil amelioration and fertilizer management for mungbean sweet potato and corn


Molina, GC; Laranang, LB; Baquiran, JM
Central Luzon State University; Munos; Nueva Ecija; Philippines

Regional Symposium on R and D Highlights; Central Luzon State University; 1993; 19p

Abstract:
Result of the study showed that mungbean can be productively grown in lahar covered area. The addition of soil amelioration and fertilizers such as the combination of 50 compost and 50 percent inorganic fertilizer; 100 percent inorganic fertilizer and 100 percent compost significantly increased the yield of mungbean. The highest yield (906.6 kg/ha) was obtained from lants applied with the combination of 50 percent compost and 50 percent inorganic fertilizer. In terms of sweet potato; the addition of soil amelioration and fertilizers such as the combination of compost and inorganic fertilizer, 100 percent compost and 100 percent inorganic fertilizer showed an increase in yield. Corn plants applied with 100 percent inorganic fertilizer gave the highest computed yield with a mean of 2.25 tons/ha.

Availability :
Scientific Literature Services-RET; Central Luzon State University; Munos; Nueva Ecija; Philippines




NO. 37384

Screening sweet potato cultivars for resistance to sweet potato weevil (Cylas formicarius Fabs.) under Quirino condition


Garcia, FP
Quirino State College; Diffun; Philippines

BSc thesis; Quirino State College; Diffun (n.d.)

Abstract:
The study was conducted to establish the resistance of sweet potato cultivars in sweet potato weevil. There were seven sweet potato cultivars used namely; C1- 693-9, kinabakab, Tinipay, UPL SP5, Kabiti, VSP1- E and VSP2. Each cultivars was replicated four times and each plot consisted of thirty six (36) tip cuttings. The result showed that these was significant exhibited by the different cultivars on weevil damage. VSP2 was siginificant over the rest of of the cultivars used except UPL, SP5 and Kabiti. Results further showed that Kabiti, C1- 693-9, Tinipay, VSP-E and kinabakab differed significantly on weevil damage on tubers

Availability :
College Library; Quirino State College; Diffun; Philippines




NO. 37442

Improvement of the nitrogen status of leaves of VSP-2 sweet potato through foliar fertilization


Bautista, ET; Zamora, LP; Armecin, RB
Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte 6521-A; Philippines

International Sweet Potato Newsletter 5(2): ?; 1992

Abstract:
A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of foliar application of nitrogen fertilizer in prolonging the nitrogen status of leaves of VSP-2 sweet potato and in increasing root yield. Results of two croppings showed that fertilized pots significantly produced larger vines and higher root yield as compared to the control. However, timing of fertilization did not show any significant effect. The critical growth stage for application of foliar sprays was from 2 1/2 months after planting when the plants started to senesce.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37444

Characterization and documentation of sweet potato germplasm


Bacusmo, JL; Abogadie, E
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12(1): 43; 1988

Abstract:
Characterization on PRCRTC sweet potato germplasm collection was done. To date a total of 850 accessions had been (partially) characterized. Mark variations were observed in leaf character such as leaf shapes, size and color, and flowering habit of each accessions. For local collection most of the accessions flower late. Foreign introduction and new local varieties collected generally flower earlier. Variabilities on storage roots were also observed. Red and white skin color of storage roots were both common. Suspected duplicates were voted. These were planted side by side in rows for further cross examination before elimination.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37449

Effect of fertilizer application on the storage behavior and quality of sweet potato


Quevedo, M; Data, ES; Itong, RB
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12(1): 34; 1987

Abstract:
Weight loss percentage and severity of root decay and degree of shrivelling of sweet potato were significantly affected by fertilizer of sweet potato roots from unfertilized plants exhibited the highest weight loss, percentage and severity of decay and degree of shrivelling, while roots from plants fertilized with 45 kg K per hectare gave the least after 45 days of storage. On the other hand, the dry matter, sugar, starch and B-carotene contents of sweet potato at harvest and during subsequent storage were not significantly affected by fertilizer treatments. The sensory qualities of steamed sweet potato roots generally decreased with time of storage but were still acceptable based on hedonic scale. The effect of fertilizer, however, was not clearly delineated.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37459

Comparison of methods of determining stability and adaptation of sweet potato


Bacusmo, Jose; Collins, WW
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12(1): 18; 1987

Abstract:
Four methods were used to determine stability and adaptation of sweet potato (Ipamoea batatas (L) Lamk). Data from 14 sweet potato clones evaluated over 14 environments were used. Regression coefficients provided little information with regard to stability but did provide information on adaptation of individual clones. Stability parameters using three of the four methods were highly correlated. The fourth generally presented different ranking patterns of stability than the other methods. However, the top five stable clones identified by the four methods were almost the same. Two methods were more effective and convenient in discriminating sweet potato clones based on their stabilities. Clone WI51, Resisto' and WI92 were most stable for number 1 root yield. WI51 and WI92 were also stable for total root yields.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37460

Effects of fertilizer application on stability of yield and yield components of sweet potato clones


Bacusmo, J; Collins, WW
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12(1): 18; 1987

Abstract:
Fourteen sweet potato clones were grown in fertilized and unfertilized tests as four locations during two years. Significant effects of genotype environment interaction on yield components of sweet potato were found. Yields were generally higher in fertilized tests' Number of roots was higher in fertilized tests for most grades except for canners and total number of roots. Rank correlations of stability clones in fertilized and unfertilized tests were low for all traits measured. Implications of the results on testing and selection of sweet potato are discussed.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37472

Intercropping sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) with mungbean (Vigna Radiata) planted at different time intervals


Labiano, RL; Bongolan, FF
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12(1): 2; 1987

Abstract:
The result show that mungbean when planted simultaneously as intercropped with sweet potato yielded lesser than its monoculture. However, the sweet potato achieved the highest marketable yield when intercropped with mungbean and was even comparable to the sweet potato when planted alone. This has indicated, therefore that the system of intercropping mungbean with sweet potato is a profitable practice when planted at the same time. This prove to be four times more productive than the monocultured mungbean.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37475

Stored sweet potato vines


Balaki, ET; Dalang, PA
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Techno Tips 1(1): ?

Abstract:
It has been the practice of farmers in the Cordilleras to store sweet potato vine cuttings for 7 to 10 days before planting. A study conducted at the Benguet State University (BSU) proved that this practice is not beneficial. The study made use of 3 popular sweet potato varieties namely Kiangan and kalbo-oy as led crops. Results showed that kalbo-oy variety under treatment; no storage, no storage with three tip leaves intact and 9 days storage has a 5.36 T, 0.10 T and 1.54 T mean yield / ha as influence by vine storage of 3.48 T (no storage), 3.52 T (no storage with three tip leaves intact) and 3.50 T (9 days storage).

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37478

Effects of source of cutting, length of cutting and planting distance on sweet potato production


Dalang, PA; Gonzales, IC; Luis, JS; Pacuz, LM
Techno Tips 1(1): ?

Abstract:
Traditional sweet potato production practices for subsistence vary among the different tribes of the Cordillera Region. These are influenced by some beliefs or observations handed down from one generation to another or due to the scarcity of planting materials. An evaluation conducted to determine the effect of planting distance, source of cuttings and length of cuttings resulted to the following: 1) The tip, middle and basal cuttings did not have any effect on the survival as well as on herbage and root yields. However, the highest net return was derived from the middle cuttings. 2) The length of sweet potato cuttings does not affect herbage and root yield. However, the highest yield of marketable tubers and the highest net returned were derived from the use of 70 cm cuttings. 3) Planting distance, have no effect on the survival and yield of the plants.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37496

Assessment of postproduction and utilization practices in highland sweet potato


Bayogan, EV; Ticquingan, EB; Salda, VB
Northern Philippine Rootcrops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results Presented in a Series of Working Papers Northern Philippine Rootcrops Research and Training Center La Trinidad, Benguet, Philippines. 2: 73-86; 1989

Abstract:
One 137 sweet potato growers from 12 municipalities of Benguet, Mt. Province and Ifugao served as respondents, majority of whom have grown the crop for 11 to 30 years with minimal inputs. 39 % planted in June and July using Kalbo-oy, Guidayan, and Bi-it as the predominant varieties. Priming was generally practiced especially when food is needed. The suan' was the most common harvesting tool while sacks were commonly used as field and storage containers for fresh and processed sweet potatos. Rejects at harvest included decay and mechanical damage, nevertheless, these were used as food and/or feed materials. 1/2 of the respondent washed the tubers while the rest did not to minimize losses. Sorting was done according to quality. 69 % utilized any vacant space at home for sweetening and food supply. Majority stacked their produce from 1 to 3 weeks. Incurred losses were perceived at harvesting after sorting and during storage. Foods and feed are primary reasons for intensifying sweet potato production. Processing techniques must be developed and improved. Equipment must be low-cost for chip and flour production.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37501

Fertilizer application on sweet potato (cv. kiangan) planted in an old swidden field area


Tianza, GA; Marquez, WL; Gonzales, IC
Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results Presented in a Series of Working Papers Northern Philippine Root Crops Research ant Training Center La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 2: 67-72; 1989

Abstract:
Among the commercially fertilized plants, those added with P at 37.5 kg/ha had yielded higher than the plants with additional N and P at 12.5 and 50 kg/ha, respectively. Cost and return analysis showed that plants fertilized with sunflower compost gave the highest net income followed by those with inorganic P fertilizer.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37538

Postharvest loss assessment in sweet potato at various handling points


Bayogan, EV; Sagudan, CC; Baban, JD
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p115-127

Abstract:
In Sagubo, Kapangan where sweet potato is classified as a semi-subsistent crop, farmers plant two to eight varieties at one. Kangao is the most popular variety followed by Gayabangan and Kalbo-oy. At the second priming stage, decayed roots accounted for 1.47% of the harvest. After washing and sorting, rat damaged roots account for 1.62% of the quantify brought home for animal feed. Weight loss after transplanting in sacks ranged from 0.36 to 0.80% while moderate stainning (20 to 49% of root surface skinned) increased from 7.89 to 30.99%. Similarly, 2, 97% of the roots sustained breakage of root tips. At retail, weight losses in Kangao ranged from 8.45 to 14.14% for 7 to 8 days holding in the local market.

Availability :
Highland Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37539

Evaluation of various stores for sweet potato


Bayogan, EV; Mayocyoc, RB; Baban, JD
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p105-114

Abstract:
The traditional storage system for sweet potato in Bayyo, Bontoc, Mountain Province was assessed. Roots of Akkongs, Kalbo-oy and Ingitangit were stored for six months. Kalbo-oy roots deteriorated faster than the other two varieties which sprouted profusely starting one month of storage. Kalbo-oy was susceptible to decay and weevil infestation. In La Trinidad, Benguet, transported Kalbo-oy roots from Bontoc stored for another 30 days.

Availability :
Highland Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37540

On-farm fertilizer management for continuous sweet potato herbage supply


Gayao ST; Luis JS; Marquez WL; Macario VA
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p98-104

Abstract:
Sweet potato crops applied with various rates of nitrogen significantly produced higher yields than the control. The herbage yield increased as the N rates were increased but the ROI started to decline at 120 and 150 kg N/ha per application with only 26 and 8%, repectively. The optimum rate of N application every after herbage harvest was at 30 kg/ha. This rate gave 34% greater herbage harvest yield and 14% more on ROI than the control. Another on-farm trials should be conducted in 2 or more sites during the wet and dry seasons. The N rates and the frequency of N application may be reduced since its effect on herbage yield was not significant.

Availability :
Highland Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37542

Intercropping trials of sweet potato and bush beans


Marquez, WL; Tianza, GA; Gonzales, IC; Sano, EO
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p80-91

Abstract:
Generally, results proved that the use of bush bean as intercrop increases net return because of the proceeds made from herbage and non-marketable root yields of sweet potato. These can either be feed to pigs or sold to farmers who raise pigs that provide additional income. Although there are some disadvantages like higher sweet potato weevil incidence and additional inputs of the farmers buys bush beans seeds, teh computed cost and return analysis shows the net return from intercropping almost tripled.

Availability :
Highland Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37543

Evaluation of source of cuttings, length of cuttings and planting distance of sweet potato in the highlands.


Dalang, PA; Pacuz, LM; Gonzales, IC; Luis, JS
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p72-79

Abstract:
The top, middle or basal cuttings of sweet potato did not produce statistically different herbage and root yields. However the total revenue derived from the marketable and non-marketable roots including herbage yield was highest using the middle portion of the vine. Marketable yield and return on investment (ROI) were increased with further planting distance on sweet potato both differences were found not to be statistically significant. Marketable roots and returns on investments (ROI) were increased with further planting distance on sweet potato both differences were found not to be statistically significant. Plants grown from wider spacing gave a relatively high percentage of marketable root and ROI. However, differences in survival and yield percentage from those grown at various spaces were not statistically significant.

Availability :
Highland Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37544

Response of sweet potato to vine storage


Dalang, PA; Balaki, ET; Macario, VA; Kiswa, CG; Luis, JS; Torres, HB
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p63-71

Abstract:
Cuttings (30 cm) of Kalbo-oy were prepared and stored for various days for trial 1; trial 2 used Pacak and Kalbo-oy; and trial 3 used four cultivars: two NCTs (DPS-37) and G145-R 20A) and two local (Kalbo-oy and Kiangan). In terms of survival and yield, there were no significant differences among the response of cuttings prepared from various cultivars. For both stored (up to 9 days) and unstored, results were relatively comparable. Beyond the 9 day storage, reponse was negative. Where planting time has to be delayed, the farmer could store his cuttings in moist, shady, and grassy area for not more than 9 days to ensure good harvest this will provide him ample time to prepare the farm, transport/haul his cuttings or wait for the onset of rainy days.

Availability :
Highland Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37545

Preliminary yield trial on sweet potato


Baucas, MB; Badol, EO; Baucas, ZJ; Tandang LL
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p53-62

Abstract:
Of all the 357 accessions evaluated the percent hills harvested, total root yield, herbage yield and DMC ranged from 8.34 to 100% t/ha, 0.09 to 6.1 t/ha and 16 to 37.67% respectively. A total of 142 accessions (40.11%) was selected based on yield, root shape and color, maturity and adaptation. These will be entered in the general yield trial for verification.

Availability :
Highland Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37546

Collection, maintenance, characterization and documentation of sweet potato germplasm


Baucas, MB; Baucas, ZJ; Anselmo, BA; BAdol; IO; Tandang, LL
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1990; p45-52

Abstract:
There are 168 local names of common cultivars grown in the provinces of Benguet, Ifugao, Mountain. Out of the 885 total collection 759 accessions were characterized of which 25.82% are possible duplicates based on first priority characters such as twining, plant type, vine pigmentation, mature leaf shape, foliage color and axial pigmentation.

Availability :
Highland Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37554

Performance evaluation of root crop cabinet dehydrator


Bayogan, EV; Boban, JD
Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Researh results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines 2: 87-96; 1989

Abstract:
The dehydrator was tested under four treatments: 8-50 w bulbs facing down-control, 8-50 w bulbs facing up, 8 -100 w bulbs facing down and 8 -100 w bulbs facing up. Based on the results, the use of 8-100 watt bulbs positioned at the base of the drying chamber and positioned facing the materials being dried registered the highest drying temperature (73.37), highest drying rate (643.02 g H2O/h), shorter drying period (9.89 h) and lowest chip moisture content (0.99%). However, the computed drying cost based on the energy consumed (7.44 kw-h) was higher than treatments using 50 watt bulbs. Chip yield was influenced by the final moisture content. The use of 8-50 w bulbs positioned upward (D2) recorded the highest chop yield and moisture content at 2686.60 g and 3.21% respectively. Similarly, drying cost was influenced by energy consumed and drying time. O2 recorded the lowest energy consumed (5.40 kw-h) which was based on prevailing power rates (2.17/kw-h) and gave drying cost of P 23.631/kg dry chips.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37558

Sweet potato marketing in Benguet and Mountain Province


Gayao, BT; Sim, SM; Bayogan, EV; Baban, JD; Sagudan, CC; Alupias, EB; Badol, EO; Salda, VB
Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Assessment of Postproduction, Utilization and Processing Techniques, Losses and Problems in Highland Sweet Potatoes Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1990; p78-100

Abstract:
As part of an integrated survey on sweet potato production, post-production and utilization practices, an informal survey on sweet potato marketing in the highlands was conducted. Information gathered were sources of sweet potatoes retailed, seasonality of supply and demand, market handling practices, pricing, marketing expenses and problems. Observations on varieties, visual quality, sizes, buying patterns of consumers, prices and market size were also included. Year-round supply of sweet potato is available in Baguio, La Trinidad markets. It increases during the months of May to July and October to December as supply comes from the highlands and also increases from December to April. Buying and selling prices of sweet potatoes are usually on a per kilo basis. roots are commonly packed in sacks and carried manually or in pushcarts from the jeep/bus station to the market stalls. No actual sorting is done by traders since farmers sort them according to varieties, visual quality and tolerable because traders sell the crop immediately or consume whatever is unsold. Bruises, skinningand craking of roots are oftentimes encountered by traders. decay, short shelf-life, shrivelling, weevil- infestation and rejects by costumers are some of the problems encountered.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37559

Assessment of production, post production, utilization and processing techniques and problems in highland sweet potatoes


Bayogan, EV; Sagudan, CC; Baban, JD
Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Assessment of Postproduction, Utilization and Processing Techniques, Losses and Problems in Highland Sweet Potatoes; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1990; p1-77

Abstract:
The post production, utilization and processing practices and problems of 125 sweet potato growers of Benguet and Mountain Province Bontoc and Bauko were assessed from February to June 1990 using rural rapid appraisal (RRA) and a structured questionaires. Sweet potato in all the areas surveyed is an integral crop that is basic and essential. Farmers grow the crop in the in the home gardens, swidden field (kaingin or uma), ricefields, and embankments. Sweddening is the most common method of sweet potato production followed by ricefields. Only 35% of the respondents have gardens which serve as experimental areas for farmer crop testing and source of animal feeds. Practices observed include: choice of area, choice of varieties, land preparation, vine storage, planting, weeding, vine lifting, harvesting, handling of produce, storage and processing. Farmers use local tools, containers and storage structures to facilitate farm operations. Storage is practiced by 44% of the respondents. Storage of roots in rice granaries (alang) is a practice in Bayyo that is unmatched in the other sweet potato producing areas of the country. In this area, rice-sweet potato rotation in the field is extended up to storage. Farmers process the roots into chips (buku) and the broth from which it was boiled into a fermented product known as 'sabeng' or 'tingba'. Growers perceived losses in production, harvesting and storage. Common problems were low yields due to varieties, infestation, infection levels, and soil factors. Majority realize that more processing and marketing maybe done if yields were better and new varieties were available.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37604

Effect of indigenous fertilizer application on the tuber yield of sweet potato grown in acid soils


Saladaga, FA; Tabinas, MB; Villondon, AQ
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 14(1): 5; 1989

Abstract:
A study to determine the influence of rice ash, rice compost and NPK (14-14-14) application on the tuber yield of two sweet potato varieties (VSP-1 and VSP-2) grown on acid soil (pH 4.5) was conducted in Brgy. Milagro, Ormoc City. A split plot design with four replications was used. Application of rice ash (5t/ha) + NPK (14-14-14) as well as rice compost (5t/ha) + NPK (14-14-14) gave highest mean tuber yields across varieties at 13.65 and 13.64 t/ha, respectively. On the other hand, application of rice ash alone results in a mean tuber yield of 12.06 t/ha. Plants which did not receive any form of fertilizer application only yielded a mean of 6.04 t/ha. Based on the results of the study, application of rice ash at the rate of 5 t/ha is recommended for improving sweet potato tuber yield in acid soils.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37594

Nutrient uptake and response of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) to different levels of N-K combinations


Cosico, WC; Omay, AB
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Science 14(1): 21; 1989

Abstract:
A study to determine nutrient uptake and response of sweet potato VSP-4, to various levels of N-K combination was conducted on an Umingan sandy loam at the Experimental Station of the Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center, VISCA. AS early as 20 DAP, significant differences in LAI were observed among fertilizer treatments. Plants which received 90-90 kg/ha had the highest LAI (1.29) at 65 DAP but declined at 80 DAP. Plants fertilized with high rates of N-K combinations (90-90, 90-120 and 120-120 kg N-K/ha) produced longer vines and higher herbage yield. Heavy application of nitrogen and potassium (90-120 and 120-120 kg) tuber yields were obtained in treatments 30-60 and 30-120 kg N-K/ha (18.77 and 20.28 t/ha), respectively. Based on the results of the study, the 30-60- kg N-K/ha treatment is recommended as the optimum N-K level for tuber production in sweet potato.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37595

Response of sweet potato (VSP-2) variety to N fertilization


Armecin, RB; Bautista, AT; Gorgonio, MA; Zamora, LC
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Science 14(1): 22; 1989

Abstract:
A 4 X 5 CRD factorial pot experiments replicated 28 times were conducted to determine the response of sweet potato (VSP-2) variety to different and timing of N fertilization. The N levels used were 45, 90, 135 and 180 kg N/ha and these fertilizers were applied (a) all at planting; (b) all at one month after planting; (c)1/2 at planting and 1/2 at one month after planting; (d)1/2 at planting and 1/2 at two months after planting; and (e) 1/3 at planting, 1/3 at one month after planting and 1/3 at two months after planting. Control pots (without fertilization) were also used at the experiment. Results showed that the four fertilizer levels significantly affect the growth and yield of VSP-2 while timing of fertilization did not give any significant effect. The application of 135 and 180 kg N/ha were favorable for vegetative growth while maximum tuber yield was attained at 90 kg N/ha.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37649

Evaluating the growth and yield of sweet potato cutting planted in different positions


Olida, NA
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

BSc thesis; Mountain State Agricultural College; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1981

Abstract:
The growth and yield of potatoplanted in different positions have been evaluated from April to September, 1980. The Randomized Complete block Design (RCBD) was used to set up the treatment: namely, Slanting position, bent position, horizontal position and vertical position. Results revealed that the various planting positions of sweet potato cuttings had marked influence on growth and yield. The bent planting positions of cuttings appeared to enhance optimum growth and yield of sweet potato. The vertical planting position enhanced the elongation of the main vine stem and increased haulm weight of the expense of root development.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37667

Effect of vine cutting hardening on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Cabato, AG
BSc thesis; Mountain State Agricultural College; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1982

Abstract:
Five different periods of vine cutting hardening were evaluated for their influence on the growth and yield of sweet potato. The Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) was used in the study to set up the different treatments: 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 days of hardening periods. Results indicated that hardening vine cuttings before planting tends to reduce growth and yield and enhances susceptibility of sweet potato to [ests. However, hardening the cuttings for 15 and 20 days may enhance higher average weight of individual roots, and planting sweet potato vines immediately after cutting them from mother vine may effect better growth and increased yield.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet: Philippines




NO. 37702

Evaluating the growth and yield of sweet potato from slips, stems, tips and roots


Pamogas, MY
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

BSc thesis; Mountain State Agricultural College; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1982

Abstract:
The growth and yield of sweet potato produced from slips, stems, tips and roots were evaluated at Banengbeng, Sablan, Benguet. The different propagating materials had marked effects on the growth and yield of sweet potato. Tip and stem cuttings produced the greatest yield and the biggest and heaviest roots. Roots and slips tended to produce long, slender and deep penetrating root; and cuttings from slips tended to encourage the trailing of vines and produced numerous but small roots.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37714

Field evaluation of three sweet potato cultivars using two harvesting method


Yap, MT
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

BSc thesis; Mountain State Agricultural College; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1982

Abstract:
The yield of three sweet potato cultivars "Mabucag", "Enube" and "Calbo-oy" using two harvesting methods (pruning mature roots and harvesting the crop at one time) was evaluated at the Mountain State Agricultural College Experiment Farms, La Trinidad, Benguet. The split-plot design was used. Result revealed that the two harvesting methods of sweet potato greatly influenced yield, that priming mature roots enhanced optimum yield, market quality of roots and average weight of individual roots; that harvesting the crop at one time caused more unmarketable roots as several roots were still undeveloped at harvest; and that Calbo-oy and Mabucag responded better than Enube to the priming method of harvesting roots. There was no significant interaction between variety and harvesting methoda.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37727

Some factors affecting storability of sweet potatoes under La Trinidad, Benguet condition


Bayogan, EV; Sayudan, CC
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

Research results presented in a series of working papers; Northern Philippine Root Crops Research an Training Center; Mountain State Agricultural College; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1991-1992; volume 1 (16p)

Abstract:
This study was conducted to evaluate the storability of sweet potato roots in dark and diffused light. structure grown under La Trinidad, Benguet as influenced harvesting method and pre-harvest maleic hydrazide application. Storage in dark and diffused lights did not affect the storage performance of the five sweet potato entries. However, significant varietal differences were noted on dry matter content (DMC) moisture content, degree of shrivelling and decay and sprout formaion. Pruning at 11 ans 12 MAP, harvesting at the tuber gave the likewise showed a significantly lower degrees of shrivelling and decay at third month storage. pre-harvest MH application did not prolong the storability in cv Tuhiyan and Kalbo-oy. Weight losses in cv Kahiyan ranged from 26.49-41.92%. Most treatments in cv Kalbi-oy exceeded 50% weight loss after 3 months storage. DMC in cv Tohiyan and Kalbo or ranged from 1.00 to 2.07 and 1, 89 to 3.49, respectively. Incidence of sprouting in cv. Tohiyan was noted at 2 months from storage. Sprouting was absent in cv, kalbo-oy.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37756

Preliminary yield trial of sweet potato in the highlands


Nisperos, Z; Carpio, I; Sano, E
Compiled Abstract of Completed Researches; La Trinidad; Benguet; Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines; 1981-1985

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37791

Effect of available moisture on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Escalante, AR; Gonzal, LR
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science; 13(1): ?(31p); 1988

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37793

Light response as means of controlling sprout growth of different sweet potato cultivars


Data, ES
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science; 13(1): ?(38p); 1988

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37856

Effect of topping on sweet potato root yield


Gonzales, IC; Kiswa, CG; Torres, HB; Pacuz, LN
In-house Review; Northern Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; 1993; 7pp.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37857

Screening for resistance against sweet potato weevil


Ganga, ZN; Perez, J; Pakipac, J
In-house Review; Northern Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; 1993; 3pp.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37862

Vine lifting study on sweet potato


Pacuz, L; Palang, P; Torres, H; Balaki, E
In-house Review; Northern Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; 1992; 2pp.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37863

Growth and yield comparison between traditional planting material and single node cutting


Kiswa, CG; Gonzales, IC; Demonteverde, VE
In-house review; Northern Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; 1992; 4pp.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37865

Influence of number of nodes buried on the yield of sweet potato


Gonzales, IC; Kiswa, CG; Pacuz, L; Demonteverde, VE
In-house review; Northern Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center; 1992; 3pp.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37871

Agronomic survey of sweet potato farms in Leyte


Villamayor, FC; Euldan, N; Eronico, C
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science; Published by the Crop Science Society of the Philippines 12(1): 543 (1987)

Abstract:
One hundred sweet potato farms in Leyte were surveyed to determine the yield of sweet potato based on farmer's estimates and on actual yield sampling under farmers' field condition. 62.5% of the farmers estimated their yield at 0.1-2.0/ha; 23.5% at 2.1 - 4 t/ha and the rest estimated their yield either lower than 0.1 t/ha or higher than 4.0 t/ha. Actual yield sampling showed that majority of the farms (37%) yielded 2.1-4.0 t/ha; 19% yielded 0.1-2 t/ha and the rest yielded either lower than 0.1 t/ha or higher than 4.0% of the farmers planted sweet potato on gently sloping hands (18% slope); 14% on hilly lands (18-45% slope); and 0.5% on steep slopes (>45%). 82% of the farms were phosphorous deficient (1-5 ppm), and 92% of the farmers did not fertilize their farms. 48% of the farmers planted Siete Flores, a local variety.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37874

Postharvest characteristics of 15 local sweet potato cultivars


Salda, VS
Cordillera Techno Bulletin 1(1): 8-10(01-03, 1992)

Abstract:
Of the 15 varieties evaluated, five sweet potato varieties were identified to be high yielding. These are: Kalbo-oy (42 tons), Talong (35 tons), Kaasan (34 tons), Sampero (33 tons) and Pacac (31 tons). The poorest yielders are Abbao (8 tons) and Miracle (9 tons). More than 50% marketable roots were obtained from varieties Kettegan, Kalbo-oy, Talong, Pacac and Pangil. The percentage of non-marketable root is high in cultivars Abbao, Kiangan, Kaasan, Gayadi, Miracle and Sampero rendering these good for animal feeds. The cause of losses, are very small tubers, mechanical damage in the form of bruises and injuries at harvest and insect damage due to weevil and thrips. Very slight to slight bruises and cuts in sound roots are still considered marketable especially when cured. Cultivars with better storability at 2 months were Talong with 1 to 19% shrivelling, decay and greening followed by Kapangan and Kaasan with storability indices of 2.2, 2.7 and 2.9 respectively. Kalbo-oy and Miracle exhibited very poor storability. Eating quality at harvest and after one month storage showed no significant differences in mealiness and in flavor. Acceptability depended on cultivar and storage period. Kaasan was most acceptable when stored for a month while Pacac was highly acceptable when newly harvested. The reason is due to sweetening of the roots during storage.

Availability :
Regional Applied Communication Program(RACP); Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (HARRDEC) Library; BSU; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37978

Assessment of quality losses in carrots, white potato and sweet potato during harvest under La Trinidad conditions


Boyogan, EV; Salda, VB
Researches on Root Crops; 1982-1984; pp.110-120

Abstract:
Results of the assessments represent losses in large quantities of foods which are wasted from harvest up to the time of use. At harvest, losses incurred were 46.49% in carrots, 34.17% in sweet potatoes and 27.63% in white potatoes. These losses were due to disease, malformation, growth cracks, mehanical damage, greening, small-sized roots and the combination of one or more of these causes. The causes were traced back to same preharvest factors identified as poor sanitation practices in fields, prevalence of pests and dseases, poor irrigaton and fertilization regimes and harvesting operations. Oher observations showed that the variety grown was particularly related to the extent and type of damage found. Malformation in carrots depended highly on variety while in sweet potatoes, it was more on the lowland entries which were not thoroughly adapted to highland conditions.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 37982

White potato as substrate for nata production


Bayogan, EB; Ticquingan, EB
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines; 1982-1988; 1p

Abstract:
White potato was tested for its use as a) culture medium for nata production. Potato broth was prepared from boiled whole unpeeled tubers; boiled whole peeled, mashed; and boiled whole peeled with peelings. At harvest, there was a significant difference in thickness of nata among two potato broth preparations and coconut. However, there was no significant difference in weight of harvested nata, nata quality and acceptability. Potato broth prepared from whole peeled tuber peels was observed to be a very poor medium for nata.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38002

Yield evaluation of sweet potato hybrids under highland conditions


Gonzales, IC; Sano, EO
Researches on Root Crops; 1982-1984; pp.35-42

Abstract:
Results of three trials (preliminary, general and advanced) on sweet potato conducted at USAC, La Trinidad, Benguet, showed that Kalbo-oy (48.65 tons per hectare), a local variety with smooth white skin is still the best in terms of consumers preference even if it was outyielded by the VISCA entry (Y3-11) with 50.04 tons per hectare which have rough skin. Other high yielding entries were: V2-1 (44.93 t/ha), V2-72 (44.36 t/ha), and (V2-45 t/ha). Their rough skin and irregular roots, however, made this entries less acceptable in the market.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38003

Variety trial on local varieties of sweet potato under La Trinidad conditions


Carpio, IV
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; 1982-1988; 2pp

Abstract:
Results revealed that Kalbo-oy, yielded the highest giving 42.35 tons/ha as compared to the other varieties. Cultivars talong, kaasam, sampero and Pacal with yields of 34.98, 34.10, 32.74, 31.11 tons per hectare, respectively. Abbao gave the lowest yield of 1.96 tons per hetare. With regards to their acceptability, kalbo-oy and talong gave the highest taste score of 4.50 followed by Kapangan

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38004

Varietal evaluation of sweet potato cultivars for yield and adaptation under highland condition


Gonzales, IC; Sano, EO; Nisperos, ZC
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; 1982-1988; 2pp

Abstract:
Results showed that V3-11, a hybrid from VISCA yielded the highest giving 59.83 tons per hectare. The roots have high test score but itys skin is rigid making it less acceptable to consumers. Also 122-2, which is from AVRDC yielded 58.19 tons/ha but with irregular and ridged roots, which is not acceptable in the market. It was also less preffered by the taste panel due to its high water content. It could, however, be utilized as animal feeds or for industrial purposes. On the other hand, kalbo-oy (local variety) yielded 54.60 tons/ha with big, fusiform, smooth roots are usually preferred by the consumers especially in the highlands. Other cultivars showed good potential either for consumption or industrial feeds because of their adaptability and high yielding ability under highland conditions.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38005

Philippine seedboard regional trial on sweet potato


Gonzales, IC; Ganga, ZN
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; 1982-19881p

Abstract:
Among the 20 entries evaluated, Kinabakab, which is the check entry was still the highest yielder (21.29 tons per hectare) and also had the highest weight and number of marketable roots. However, its roots were mishapened (irregular in shape). 24-37, a VISCA entry was the second yielder with 18.79 tons/ha. In previous trials, this entry showed high yields but disliked by taste panels because of its low sugar content. CI 693-9, a BPI entry was the third highest yielded with 17, 32 tons/ha. Again in previous trials it gave high yield, however, it is not acceptable because of its low dry matter content.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38006

Stem density study on sweet potato during (July-December 1985) wet season


Gonzales, IC
Abstracts of Researches on Root Crops; Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center; Benguet State University; La Trinidad, Benguet; 1982-1988; 1p

Abstract:
Results revealed that three stems per hill gave the highest yield followed by two stems per hill then one stem per hill. One stem per hill produced many medium roots.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center Library; La Trinidad, Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38026

Nutritional analysis of supplementary food from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) for pre-schoolers


Saro, LW
ME thesis; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1990; xi p; 87pp

Abstract:
This study utilizing yellow sweet potato as base for protein enriched snack food, aimed at establishing sweet potato preparations and testing their acceptability: analyzing the amount of food energy, vitamin A and protein in each preparation; determine how much of this nutrients supplement the food required for age 4-6. Pre schoolers and knowing the cost of each preparation per serving. Four products were formulated from yellow sweet potato with four locally produced protein-rich food prepared into supplementary food for pre-schoolers. The products were fritter, chips, candy and muffin enriched with fish powder, mongo grits, peanut grits and eggs, respectively. Results of the acceptability test showed general acceptance to the four supplementary food. The rank for acceptability to the four snack recipes were as follows: first, candy; second, fritter; third, muffin; and fourth, chips. Food energy was highest in fritter and lowerst in candy. Protein was also highest in fritter and lowest in chips. Candy had the most vitamin A compared to the other recipes. In terms of cost, fritters was the mst expensive and chips, the cheapest. Candy and muffin recipes had average costs. It can be concluded that the four products are good supplements for protein and vitamin A for first and second degree malnourished child.

Availability :
Graduate School Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 38078

Effect of different rates of fertilizer and time of application on sweet potato under highland condition


Badua, ED; Balaoing, JC
BSc. thesis; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1981; (?p)

Availability :
Benguet State University Library




NO. 38093

Variety trials and evaluation of the sweet potato under highland conditions


Pagaoa, CL; Mamaril, EK
BSc. thesis; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; 1979; (?p)

Availability :
Benguet State University Library




NO. 38129

The Philosophy in the tomato and sweet potato breeding programs of the Asian Vegetable Research Development Center


Villareal, RL
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 1(1): ?p (1976)

Abstract:
The uses of single seed descent (SSD) and intergenotypic competition avoidance (ICA) in the tomato and sweet potato breeding programs, respectively, of the Asian Research and Development Center are presented. The breeding of varieties for intensive cropping systems, for tolerance to low levels of nitrogen and for widely varied soil pH conditions are also presented. The implications of the above philosophies on plant improvement in tropical Asian countries are discussed.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP Los Banos; College, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38176

Effects of topping and fertilization on the yield and protein content of three varieties on sweet potato


Gonzales, FR; Cadiz, TG; Bugawan, MS
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 2(2): 97-102(1977)

Abstract:
Twenty four combinations of two fertilizer levels, three sweet potato varieties and four topping frequencies were tested to determine the possibility of obtaining great quantities of root and protein by harvesting not only the roots, but also the tips. Topping reduced root yields. Highest root production was obtained from no topping treatment followed by topping one every three weeks. Sp-45 and Georgia Red had statistically high root yields while BNAS 51 was poor yielder. With 150 kg.N per hectare, protein content of roots and fresh tips increased twice as much as the fertilized crops. The protein content of tips was low at the early stage, increased in the middle (except for BNAS 51) and finally decreased in the last topping stage.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38177

Interplanting catch crops with ginger under semi-water soils


Quimio, MJ; Cadiz, TG; Aycardo, HB
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 2 (2): 103-108 (1977)

Abstract:
The maximum number and best combination of intercrops that could be relay planted with ginger in a poorly drained area during the rainy season was studied. The crops used were cabbage, mungo, tomato, soybean, sweet corn, and sweet potato. Results showed that a maximum of three intercrops could be planted with ginger. Yield data of the test crops suggest that mungo and soybean are best used as first crops, sweet potato as second crop, and cabbage, sweet corn and tomato as third crops. The yields of ginger from intercropped plots with the exception of the ginger-sweet potato-soybean-tomato plot, were significantly higher than that of the control plot i.e., ginger without the intercrop. The highest yield and consequently the highest return was obtained from the ginger-soybean-sweet corn-cabbage plot which showed a total rhizome yield of about 100 % more than the control plot. The soluble solid contents of ginger from intercropped plots were also significantly higher than that of the control. The highest estimated total income per plot or per hectare was noted in the ginger-sweet potato-soybean-tomato cropping pattern followed by ginger-soybean -sweet corn-cabbage. However, the former gave the lowest, while the latter had the highest yield of ginger among the cropping patterns tested. Also, in these schemes more than 50 and 80 % of the total income were contributed by cabbage and tomato, respectively.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38179

Annual productivity of crops grown as monoculture and as intercrops


Cruz, FC; Cadiz, TG
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 2(2): 126-132(1977)

Abstract:
Eight cropping systems involving 5 crops were planted continuously in 1974 to determine the annual productivity of each cropping system. The intercropped systems produced higher dry matter than monocultures. The most productive system was corn + sweet potato and the lowest dry soybean alone. Among the crops, corn produced the highest dry matter yield, while green soybean intercropped with sweet potato had the lowest. Corn grain yield was reduced by 20% when intercropped with peanut, and 42% when intercropped with sweet potato. Sweet potato root yield was reduced by 12% when intercropped with green soybean, and 5% with corn. Peanut pod yield was reduced by 31% when intercropped with corn.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38189

Screening sweet potato varieties for adaptability to paddy field cultivation


Carpena, AL; Rebancos, ET Jr.; Estolano, MP
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 2(4): 209-215(1977)

Abstract:
Several varieties of sweet potato were tested for their yield performance in terms of both roots and vegetable parts in uncultivated lowland paddies before and after rice cultivation. The post-rice screening was done for two successive years, involving a total of eighty-seven varieties. The post-rice screening yielded nine varieties with performance comparable to what is usually obtained under normal upland culture. In the pre-rice screening involving fifty-three varieties, all varieties gave vegetative yields similar to those obtainable under upland conditions. None, however, gave what can be considered respectable root yield.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38203

The effects of various water table depths on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Pardales, JR Jr; Escalante, MC
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 3(1): 58-59(1978)

Abstract:
The study was conducted at the Philippine Root Crop Research Training Center to evaluate the effects of different levels of water table on the growth and yield of sweet potato and to determine the yield performance of sweet potato under shallow water table. The results showed that water table affected the growth and yield of sweet potato variety BAS-51. The deeper the water table the more vines there were per week. Similarly, there were more vines at maturity in deeper water table. In terms of yield, the deepest water table produced the highest number of marketable tubers while the shallowest water table produced the lowest number of marketable tubers. Conversely, the lowest number of non-marketable tubers was obtained in the deepest water table and the highest number in the shallowest.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College.; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38216

Stability of yield performance of some sweet potato cultivars


Carpena, AL; Rebancos, ET Jr.; Manguiat, PH; Salameda, MM; Sajise, GE Jr.; San Pedro, JL
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5(1): 30-33(1980)

Abstract:
The combined analysis of variance of root yield of ten sweet potato varieties under eight growing conditions indicated the presence of genotype- environment interaction for this character in the crop. The interaction was, however, shown to be more due to the deviations from regression than to the regressions of somew genotypes on the environment. Five of the ten varieties appeared to be stable for root yield based on Eberhart and Russel's criteria for stability. Three of these five gave above average yields in the eight enrivonments indicating that in addition to stable performance, these varieties have general adaptability.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38235

Mutational effects of Co60 gamma ray and ethyl methane sulfanate on sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.)


Quirol, P; Bernardo, FA
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5(2): 78(1980)

Abstract:
A study on the comparative mutational effects of CO60 gamma radiation and ethyl methane sulfunate (EMS) on sweet potato was conducted at the Visayas State College of Agriculture experimental area, Baybay, Leyte, from August, 1979 to January, 1980 to 1) observe and compare the mutational effects of gamma radiation and ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) on sweet potato, 2) determine the optimum and lethal doses and concentrations of gamma radiation and ethyl methane sulfonate, respectively, on sweet potato cuttings, and 3) produce mutant sweet potato plants which can be used for further studies and varietal improvement programs. The study consisted of two experiments, one using ionizing radiations (Co60-gamma rays) and the other, a chemical mutagens (EMS). Two node cuttings of BNAS 45 sweet potato were used as planting materials. The different treatments applied were 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 kR doses of CO60-gamma radiation for Experiment I and 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8% concentrations of EMS for experiment II. Results showed that gamma radiation was in general relatively more effective and efficient in inducing mutations in sweet potato compared with EMS. Inhibition of growth on the treated portion of the cuttings was the only pronounced effect of EMS. This was manifested by the germination of untreated instead of the treated node of the cuttings. However, there were significant differences effected by EMS on the germination percentage, lethality and the weekly growth increments of vine length of the plants from the treated cuttings compared with the control. These results may not be considered conclusive as far as the purpose of the study is concerned due to some environmental factors such as the prevalence of water logging which could have masked, even to a limited extent, the effects of the treatment. Gamma radiation affected the germination, lethality, and other plant characteristics significantly. Among the treatments applied, 3 kR was relatively, while 9 kR and higher doses were lethal. The variations effected through radiation treatments were abnormalities in form, shape and pigmentation of leaves, plant height, and flowering habit. Some of the mutants showed potentials for early maturity while others for high yield.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding, U.P. at Los Banos; College, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38257

Effect of organic (ipil-ipil leaves) and inorganic (ammonium sulfate) fertilizers on the growth and yield of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.)


Urdaneta, LA; Javier, RR
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5(2): 83(1980)

Abstract:
A comparison is made on the effect of ipil-ipil leaves and ammonium sulfate as source of nitrogen on the growth and yield of BNAS-51, Bakabakahan and Bulacan sweet potato varieties and the variety giving the optimum yield when fertilized with ipil-ipil leaves and ammonium sulfate is determined. Nitrogen application either with the use of ammonium sulfate or ipil-ipil leaves significantly improved the yield and yield components of the different varieties of sweet potato except in the number of non-marketable tuber. Among the varieties tested, BNAS-51 yielded the highest marketable tubers with an average of 11.7 tons/ha, followed by Bakabakahan and Bulacan with average yields of 8.03 tons/ha and 6.6 tons/ha, respectively. The first two varieties produced more and heavier marketable tubers/plant, longer and heavier fresh weight of vines/plant. BNAS-51 had fewer but heavier non- marketable tubers than the other two varieties. Plants which received N from ipil-ipil leaves produced more and heavier fresh vines/plant than those without N. A lower percentage of dry matter content was observed in treated plants. In terms of tuber yield and plants which received 60 kg of N/ha either from ipil-ipil leaves or ammonium sulfate, yielded more with 3 tons/ha and 6 tons/ha, respectively, than those plants which did not receive H. However, despite the equal rate of N application from ipil-ipil leaves and ammonia sulfate, the plants which were applied with inorganic N fertilizer produced a significantly higher yield than plants which received organic fertilizer.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38276

Asparagus production involving cropping pattern and some vegetables


Balaoing, CJ; de Venecia, J
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5 (2): 90 (1980)

Abstract:
A study was conducted to: 1) gather basic data that will improve asparagus culture under Benguet condition; 2) develop agronomic technique in producing high quality of spears similar to spears in temperature countries; 3) establish a good companion crop of asparagus; and 4) develop a good method of pest and disease management for asparagus. The different treatments were - no T1 - intercropping with sweet pea; T2 - intercropping with cabbage; T3 - intercropping with tomato; T4 - intercropping with sweet potato. Application of fertilizer was distributed equally to asparagus plant at 120-120-180 NPK per hectare. Fertilizer rates of different intercropped plants were also applied respectively. The physical characteristics of the soil such as bulk density, particle density, porosity, water holding capacity and moisture content were recorded during the conduction of the study. The intercropped plants did not show any significant effect on the number and diameter of the spears of asparagus from the second and third months. No significant effect was observed on the weight of the spears, percent moisture content and the length of spears as affected by intercropping. However, yield of intercrops were found highly significant among treatments. It was noted that there was significant relationships in yield among intercropped plants. Asparagus intercropping had a highly significant difference to asparagus without any intercrop.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38288

Preliminary studies on the morphological and biochemical bases of weevil resistance in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Poir)


San Pedro, JL; Villareal, RL
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 5(2): 93(1980)

Abstract:
Morphological characters and chemical components correlated with weevil resistance were studied among seven cultivars and one breeding line of sweet potato. Weevil infestation was used as a dependent variable to detect its relationship with some morphological characters and chemical components. Of the 16 characters studied, only seven were found correlated with weevil infestation; four were positively correlated whereas three were negatively correlated. Characters correlated with weevil infestion and were contrastingly different between weevil resistant and susceptible cultivars were moisture, dry matter, (see special character p. 93)-carotene, starch, protein and trypsin inhibitor activity. The weevil resistant cultivars had longer roots, low in moisture, protein, (see special character p. 93)-carotene content and trypsin inhibitor activity. The (see special character p. 93) -carotene content appeared to be the most reliable and practical selection index for weevil resistant.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38319

Rainfed cropping pattern testing in Zamboanga del Sur


Baltonado, R; Mendoza, H; Bongolan, F; Cogger, RJ
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(2): S3(1983)

Abstract:
Fifteen cropping patterns were compared over a three year period (l980- 1982) on a red-blown volcanic soil at Betinan Research Station, Zamboanga del Sur. Patterns varied in the total number of crops (2 to 5) and the number of legume crops (0 to 3) sown per year. Crops included were upland rice, corn, sorghum, sweet potato, mungo, peanut, soybean and cowpea. Highest net returns were obtained from three crop patterns commencing with mungo, followed by peanut, followed either soybean or sorghum. In general three crop patterns commencing with mungo, followed by either soybean or sorghum resulted in negative net returns from the late season plantings. During 1981 and 1982 a number of patterns were tested on 0.1 ha plots on farmer fields. The mungo- peanut-corn pattern proved to be both manageable and most profitable. Three and four crops patterns commencing with either corn or rice proved to be less successful due to failure of the third or fourth crops to achieve profitable yields. The prospects for intensifying the traditional two crop patterns are discussed.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College, Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38325

Yield response of sweet potato (CV. BNAS-51) to different levels of missing hills


Villamayor, FG; Perez, RD
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(2): S5(1983)

Abstract:
Experiments were conducted for two seasons to determine the effect of different lvels of mising hils on the yield of sweet potato (cv.BNAS-51). During the first season, the treatments consisted of 0, 10, 25 and 30% and the plant spacing used was 1 m x 0.33 m. During the second season, the distance of planting was 1 m x 0.25 and the levels of missing hills were 0, 10, 20 30 and 40%. In both seasons, yield of sweet potato was not significantly reduced by any of the treatments. This suggests that even in the presence of up to 40% missing hills, yield should be computed on an area basis. The yield of plants adjacent to missing hills were greater than those with complete surrounding plants.

Availability :
The Secretariat; Crop Science Society of the Philippines (CSSP); Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College, Laguna, Philippines




NO. 38359

Post production technology research and development for cassava and sweet potato. Study 2. Soil storage of cassava


Data, ES; Quevedo, MA; Villegas, RJA; Barreda, MDB; Flores, PN
Terminal Report; IDRC-PCARRD Funded Research Project; PRCRTC; ViSCA; Baybay; Leyte; 1983

Abstract:
The adaptability of the cassava soil storage technique to Philippine condition using locally available soil materials under several months of storage was investigated. Roots of eight-month old "Golden Yellow" cassava variety was used in this study. Soil storage pits measuring 0.75 m x 3.0m x 0.5 M deep were prepared using four types of soil namely: seasand, riversand, clayloam and clay. Tubers were buried 50 cm deep below the ground level an then covered with soil in a conical shape. Regardless of soil type, monthly decay incidence increase with storage duration. Variations within treatments with respect to percentage decay was significant with the riversand stored having the least value. Percent vascular streaking was not significantly different among the soil storage used. Gains in weight was highest in the clayloam stored roots. Clayloam had lower moisture content and higher dry-matter content than seasand and riversand. Crude fiber content clay and clayloam stored roots were significantly higher as compared to those of riversand and seasand. Compared to newly harvested samples, all stored tubers gave significantly lower sensory ratings with regard to general acceptability, color, texture, flavor appearance, however, the ratings up to five months were still considered acceptable in all the sensory quality tested. Relative humidity and temperature readings within the four different types of soil stored and did not have differences. Outside RH and temperature and rainfall somehow had some effect with respect to maintaining low soil moisture tension within soil stores. Time factor in storage was very important because all the data gathered varied significantly with months in storage. Results revealed that any of the four types of soil can be used for cassava storage and that storage period for cassava could be done up to seven months but for the purpose of palatability and acceptability for food it must be kept up to five months only in storage

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library




NO. 38360

Post production technology research and development for cassava and sweet potato. Study 3. Packaging medium for cassava storage


Data, ES; Quevedo, MA; Villegas, RJA; Barreda, MDB; Flores, PN
Terminal Report; IDRC-PCARRD Funded Research Project; PRCRTC; ViSCA; Baybay, Leyte; 1983

Abstract:
In preliminary I of the study, boxes with removable lids were constructed to contain 20 kg of cassava tubers (dimensions: 1.5 x 2.0 x 1.0 feet). Boxes made of marine plywood were reusable. Different packaging media; sand, sawdust and rice hull were moistened and were separately placed in the crates. Weight loss in the stored tubers increased as the duration of storage progressed. Tuber weight loss was lower at the lower layer of the crate. Cassava stored in different packaging materials showed variable rates in losing weight depending on the position in the container. Cassava all position in the container which can be attributed to the high microbial activity and physiological deteriorations at that time. High percentage of decay incidence was shown by cassava stored in rice hull while cassava stored in sawdust showed the least. However, it seemed that cassava stored in the different packaging materials did not differ much in the number of cassava tubers which showed physiological deterioration. Results also showed that sand used as packaging medium would protect the tubers from too much stress caused by changes in environmental moisture. In preliminary II of the study, all the crates used in preliminary I were used with the addition of 2 crates with the same dimension and capacity as of the former crates. Sawdust, ricehull, sand and soil used as packaging media were sundried until the minimum moisture content of each were attained. These were then moistened with equal amount of water before use. Progressive decrease in weight was observed in the tuber without any packaging material regardless of placement in the container. However, tubers packed with sawdust and seasand increased weight during storage which implied that the tubers had lower moisture content than in the packing media which accounted for the absorption of moisture from the medium especially those located in the middle and lower layer of the crate. Seasand and sawdust were good for storage since both are not easily affected by the changes in temperature. Highest decay incidence was observed in tubers stored in crate without any packing media followed by rice hull, soil sawdust and the least with sand. Changes in weight of the tuber were substantially affected by the packaging materials. Sawdust and sand minimized loss of the tubers because of its lower temperature. Temperature changes affected the weight loss of the crop as well as the behavior of the crop. Sand and sawdust gave promising results as packing media. It also gave low decay incidence.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library




NO. 38365

Indigenous technologies in home processing of root crops: A survey and economic analysis


Alkuino, JM Jr; Truong Van Den
Ann. Trop. Res. 11(1-4): p? (1989)

Abstract:
This study analyzed the income generating potential of indigenous technologies in processing sweet potato and cassava roots in the rural areas. Twenty-three indigenous root crop processing products were studied and classified as fried, steamed, based and dried. Of the 23 products monitored, nine have positive net returns namely maruya, bitsu-bitso, cassava doughnut, pilipit, sinaging, pinisi, cacharon, slice and tinitim. The use of inefficient indigenous tools and equipment, unstandardized product formulation and high labor input greatly contributed to the high production cost, hence the losses in the other products.

Availability :
Library; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38409

Residual nitrogen from legumes and its effect on the succeeding crop of sweet potato


Acedo, AL; Javier, RR
Ann. Trop. Res. 2(2): p? (1980)

Abstract:
Three legumes (mungbean, bushbean, and soybean) and sweet potato (control) were planted during the first cropping. After harvesting each crop, the residues except those of sweet potato were plowed under and incorporated into the soil. The final planting of sweet potato was done subsequently after the legume in the weight and length of vines of the three legumes. Weight and number of marketable tubers, weight of non-marketable tubers, and total tuber yield greatly increased in plots previously planted to bushbeans and soybeans while the said parameters had no effect on mungbean. Tuber yield and other agronomic characters were positively influenced by the different fertilizer levels. Fertilizer level of 0-30-60 kg/ha increased considerably the tuber yield of sweet potato planted after bushbeans or soybeans. Cost and returns analysis revealed that, regardless of the level of fertilizer applied, higher net profits were obtained from plots previously planted to bushbeans or soybeans. The best result was noted in the continuous sweet potato cropping treated with 60-60-60 kg/ha on both croppings. Considering net returns per unit time, however, alternate cropping of sweet potato with bushbeans or soybeans gave greater output in addition to the improved physical conditions of the soil.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38410

Adventitious bud formation from detached sweet potato leaves treated with nitrate-nitrogen


Maranguit, ME; Saladaga, FA
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(2): S9 (1983)

Abstract:
Leaves from the basal, middle and apical portion of the Sweet Potato (cv. BNAS-51) vines were detached and planted in seedbeds inside the greenhouse and subsequently treated with different levels of nitrate-nitrogen. Most of these detached plant leaves remained green through the 4th to the 8th weeks from planting. Some nitrate-nitrogen-treated leaves produced buds starting on the 4th week and by the 8th week some had already produced fleshy tubers. Apical leaves appeared to be the best material for use in bud formation studies and/or propagation as compared to either basal or middle leaves. Of the nitrate-nitrogen leaves used in the study which ranged from 0 to 250 ppm, formation and growth of buds and roots were best at 250 ppm.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38411

Response of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) to varying levels of shade: I. Yield and yield components


Mwanga, ROM; Zamora, OB
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science ? vol, no, p, y ?

Abstract:
A study to determine agronomic response of sweet potato to varying levels of shade was conducted at the University of the Philippines Los Basymbol 164 f "MS LineDraw" s 10os, January to May, 1986. Three sweet potato varieties, VSp-1, BPI Sp-2 and UPL Sp-1, varying in certain traits were used to determine the case of yield differences under shade. The study was conducted as a multi-location experiment with 0 (full sunlight), 31, 43, 52 and 67% shading treatments as the "locations". Standing coconut palms imposed the 43% shade while the other shade levels were imposed by fish nets. Sampling was done at approximately two-week intervals after planting. Relative to full solar radiation, shading by 31 to 67% reduced tuberious root yield, total and marketable root numbers M-2 by 11 to 97%. Marketable root number influenced root yield more than total tuberious root number m-2, suggesting that the former trait may be more useful in selecting for high tuberious root yield under partial shade.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38412

Physiological basis of low tuber yield from basal sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] cuttings


Nzima, MDS; Del Rosario, DA
The Philippine Agriculturist 65(2): 119-129 (1982)

Abstract:
The study determined the physiological basis of the lower yield in sweet potatoes (I. batatas) grown from basal cuttings compared to those grown from terminal cuttings. Sweet potatoes grown from basal cuttings produced significantly less dry matter than those grown from terminal cuttings. In basal cuttings, the initial absence of meristem and the few leaves may account for initial differences in the amount of endogenous growth regulators and subsequently fewer leaves in basal compared to terminal cuttings. These differences resulted in fewer roots produced per node (1.15) and per cutting (6.75) from basal cuttings than those from terminal cuttings (5.54 and 41.44, respectively). Roots from basal cuttings were also shorter and less branched and had less leaf area per plant. As a result basal cuttings produced less dry matter. Nutrient uptake and distribution were not generally affected by the type of planting materials.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38413

Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] response to fertility amendment in a shifting cultivation system of Nueva Vizcaya


Barker, TC; Sajise, PE
The Philippine Agriculturist 68(3): 369-378 (1985)

Abstract:
Sweet potato (I. batatas) yield response to phosphorus, potassium, and lime treatments was assessed during two seasons at Imugan, Santa Fe, Nueva Vizcaya, on Annam clay loam soil. Five treatments consisted of N-only (92 kg N/ha), N+P (50 kg P/ha), N+K (150 kg K/ha), N+lime (14.6 mt lime/ha), and N+P+K+lime at the above rates. during the first season, root and top yields from the complete treatment were significantly greater than those from the other treatments. Root yield response to N+P was significantly greater than N+lime, N+K, and N only. Top yield response to N+P and N+lime was also significant. In the second season, no additional fertilizer was added in order to evaluate residual nutrient response. No significant differences among treatments were found for root yield or top yield during the second season. It was concluded that available phosphorus was yield-limiting at the study site. Liming to approximately pH 6.0 was beneficial, probably in terms of releasing some labile P and/or preventing added P from being fixed in an unavailable form.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38415

An agro-economic assessment on-white potato production trials


Poots, MJ; De Los Santos, AB; Paguz, LM
The Philippine Agriculturist 66(3): 304-310 (1983)

Abstract:
A further series of 45 trials was conducted to investigate some aspects of seed quality and manuring practices on the yield and returns from white potato. The response to the use of certified seed in place of the farmers' own seed of the same cultivar varied, being primarily dependent on the quality of the farmers' seed. The use of larger seedpieces (35 to 55 mm) in place of the farmers' small seed gave a positive improvement in yields and monetary returns. The use of whole seed in place of cut seeds for the dry season gave no improvement in yields or returns. The use of alternative organic fertilizers (McLife and Sagana 100) gave no consistent beneficial effects whether considered agronomically or economically. Commercial fertilizer applied to the seedbed instead of as a sidedressing at hilling-up showed beneficial agronomic and economic effects as did the use of additional nitrogen and potash as side-dressings at hilling-up. The use of life gave contradictory results.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38421

Light interception and total biomass productivity in sugarcane intercropping


Mendoza, TC
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 11(3): 181-187 (1986)

Abstract:
In this study involving sugarcane intercropped with soybean, mungbean, peanut, corn, sweet potato and cassava, the observation that intercropping leads to significantly higher total productivity was found to be true under the following conditions: (a) computed on a per month basis, the dry matter productivity was only higher during the full growth duration of the intercrop. This was attributed to the slow growth feature of sugarcane within the first 2-3 months. The early built-up of LAI due to the faster growth of intercrops shortened considerably the time for the crop canopies to intercept incoming radiation; (b) even in compatible intercrop combinations, greater biomass productivity was only true under low to average fertilizer and cultivation input application for sugarcane but not in the medium high to high level of input application.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38589

Effects of different portions and length of storage of cuttings on the growth and yield of sweet potato.


Eronico, CA; Escalada, RG; Trenuela, RM
Annual Tropical Research 3(2): 144-149 (1981)

Abstract:
Storing cuttings of BNAS-51 variety of sweet potato for 15 days caused significant decrease in leaf area index (LAI) during the first two months after planting. However, there were no significant variations in LAI and fresh herbage at harvest. Generally, plants that originated from unstored cuttings produced significantly higher marketable roots, total yield, and harvest index than those which developed from stored cuttings. Yield of non- marketable roots was not significantly affected. Based on source of cuttings, plants that developed from unstored apical cuttings produced significantly higher LAI, marketable roots, had total yield than those from middle and basal cuttings except in weight of fresh herbage. Nevertheless, plants from stored apical, middle and basal cuttings assumed similar LAI during the entire growth of the crop and produced the same yield and yield components.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38620

Store sweet potato of good quality in hut


Barreda, MDM
Paper presented during the First Farmers' Training Workshop on Postharvest Tech of Root Crops; IDRC-PCARRD Funded Res. Proj. PRCRTC, Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; 1983

Abstract:
Temperature, relative humidity, and ventilation are three important factors to consider in storing sweet potato. Storing sweet potato roots in huts can assure farmers and consumers quality and more palatable roots; lessen exposure to insect pests and diseases; enable farmers to harvest the crop at one time; and add income since farmers can wait for better prices.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library




NO. 38622

Soy sauce production utilizing root crop flour substitute for wheat flour (100% substitution)


Data, ES; Diamante, JC; Forio, EE
Ann. Trop. Res. 8(1): ?p (1986)

Abstract:
Soy sauce yield was not affected by the substitution of wheat flour with root crop flour as carbohydrate source for the fermentation microorganisms. The titratable acidity, pH and NaCl content were not significantly affected by flour substitution while the protein content and amino nitrogen of root crop-based soy sauce were lower than that of sauce produced from wheat flour. Sensory evaluation showed that when soy sauce was used in preparing beef steak or as dip for broiled fish, root crop-based soy sauce was comparable to one commercial brand based on general acceptability scores. Cooked sweet potato-based soy sauce was comparable to two commercial brands when served as pure soy sauce based on color, aroma, consistency and flavor.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38624

Wheat flour substitution using sweet potato or cassava in some bread and snack items


Palomar, LS; Perez, JA; Pascual, GL
Ann. Trop. Res. 3(1): ?p (1981)

Abstract:
Cassava and sweet potato flour were processed and used to substitute wheat flour from 20 to 100% level in some yeast breads (pan de sal and hot rolls); quick breads (paborita, cheese crackers and coconut cookies) and snack items (polvoron, gollorias and doughnut). Cassava and sweet potato flour have a coarser texture than wheat flour; however, cassava flour approximates the color of wheat flour. Cassava flour has almost similar chemical properties as wheat flour except for protein and crude fiber; sweet potato flour differed in protein, texture and color. Preference tests showed that products with root crop flour, except doughnut, were preferred by consumers. Based on cost analysis, root crop flour is a good substitute for wheat flour.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38664

Determination of the nutrient content and nutrient availability of green mussels, oysters, dilis and sweet potato


Sembrano, AGT
BSc Thesis; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; 1983; ?p

Abstract:
The nutrient contents and available nutrients of green mussels, oysters, dilis, and sweet potato were determined using the chemical and biological methods. Proximate analysis showed that green mussels, oysters, and dilis had high protein contents, and can therefore be potential sources of proteins. On the other hand, sweet potato was found to have the lowest protein content, but had the highest percentage of NFE (soluble carbohydrate), which was made the basis for its evaluation in terms of energy value. The biological method of analysis indicated that green mussels, oysters, and dilis had high digestibility value, and net protein utilization. Green mussels had the highest digestibility and net protein utilization, while dilis has the highest biological value. Oyster had comparatively the lowest TD, BV, and NPU value. Meanwhile, the energy of sweet potato was found to be highly digestible as reflected by its TDN value.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38665

Effects of ipil-ipil and ammonium sulfate as nitrogen sources of sweet potato


Urdaneta, LA; Javier, RR
Ann. Trop. Res. 2(2): 122-128 (1980)

Abstract:
Nitrogen application, either with the use of ammonium sulfate or ipil-ipil leaves, significantly improved the yield components of the three varieties of sweet potato, except in the number of non-marketable roots. Among the varieties tested, BNAS-51 yield the highest amount of marketable roots with an average yield of 11.7 t/ha, followed by Bakabakahan and Bulacan, with 8.03 and 6.6 t/ha respectively. BNAS-51 and Bakabakahan produced more and heavier marketable roots per plant, and longer and heavier fresh weight of vine per plant. BNAS-51 had fewer, but heavier, non-marketable roots than the other two varieties. Plants which received nitrogen (N) from ipil-ipil leaves produced more and heavier fresh vine plant than those without N. A lower percentage of dry matter content was observed in N-fertilized plants. In terms of root yield, plants which received 60 kg N/ha, either from ipil- ipil leaves or ammonium sulfate, yielded more, with 3.0 and 6.0 t/ha, respectively, than those plants which did not receive N. Despite the equal rates of N application, plants with ammonium sulfate produced significantly higher yields than plants with N from ipil-ipil leaves.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38783

Intravarietal yield variability of sweet potato


Aparra, NO; Mamicpic, NG
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

Ann. Trop. Res. 2(3): ?p (1980)

Abstract:
BNAS 51, Centennial and Kinangkong yielded 27.42, 14.32 and 5.41 t/ha of tubers, respectively, with a corresponding coefficient of variation (C.V.) of tuber yield among hills of 41.92, 46.02 and 107.65%. Yield among hills was slightly more uniform at a spacing of 60 x 75 cm (C.V. = 56.39%) than at 30 x 75 cm (C.V. = 74.01%), although the difference in variability was not statistically significant. A high C.V. of tuber yield among hills (80.66%) was obtained by applying 200-190-230 kg/ha of N-P2O5-K2, while a low C.V. (54.81%) was observed at zero fertilizer application. Vine weight, vine number, vine diameter, leaf weight and leaf area were significantly and positively correlated to root yield. Variability in vine weight, vine number and leaf weight were significantly and positively correlated to the variability in root yield.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38784

Morphological and agronomic traits associated with yield performance of sweet potato


Bacusmo, JL; Carpena, AL
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

Ann. Trop. Res. 4(2): ?p (1982)

Abstract:
Leaf area index, crop growth rate, leaf angle of young leaves, internode length, number of roots per plant and mean root weight showed a positive correlation with root yield. Specific leaf weights, net assimilation rate at 30 to 60 days after planting and moisture content showed negative correlation with yield. Compensatory relationship between mean root weight and number of roots per plant was demonstrated in high yielding varieties of sweet potato. The extent of direct and indirect effects of shoot characters and 5 root components on root yield was determined using path-coefficient analysis.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38785

Sweet potato breeding and varietal improvement at PRCRTC


Bartolini, PU
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines

Radix 2(1): 3-4 (1980)

Abstract:
The paper outlines the sweet potato breeding work and varietal improvement program being carried out at the Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center (PRCRTC). To come up with a high yielding variety with high nutritional qualities as well as a high starch content acceptable to both small farmers and industrial starch processors, meticulous screening, evaluation and selection are being done. Selective hybridization is accomplished by rearranging the parental population base with genetic potentials and highly desirable agronomic characteristics. Polycross or open pollination and controlled, discriminate hand pollination of selected parental genotypes are used, followed by screening, evaluation and selection.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 38786

Genotype X environment interaction for yield in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.)


Nasayao, LZ; Saladaga, FA
Crop Science Society of the Philippines; c/o Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 13(2): 99-104 (1988)

Abstract:
Data from 1982 to 1985 on genotype X environment interaction in sweet potato were analyzed for stability and adaptability using the methods of Plaisted and Peterson (1959), Finlay and Wilkinson (1963) and Eberhart and Russel (1966). Plaisted and Peterson's method showed that VSP-2 was the most widely adapted (stable) variety with the least symbol 115 f "Symbol" s 102VL (special character) value contribution to the overall genotype X environment (G X E) interaction variance. G145R-4 contributed the highest symbol 115 f "Symbol" s 102VL value to the G X E interaction variance in the 1984 dry season but contributed the least in the 1985 dry season. Finlay and Wilkinson's method which used the regression coefficient (b) and mean yield to test adaptability revealed that the values of almost all entries, i.e. VSP-1, VSP-2, VSP-3, Kinabakab, and V7-27, were not significantly different from b=1.0 except for two entries, G145R-4 with b=0.62 and LO-323 with b=1.6 indicating that they are adapted to lower and higher yielding environments, respectively. Strictly applying Eberhart and Russesl's method, none of the varieties/breeding lines studied was classified as stable. However, VSP-2, VSP-3 and V3-180 have their respective s2d values below the mean s2d of all entries, with b not significantly different from 1.0 and with considerably high mean yields.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 38843

A comparative study of the agronomic characteristics and yield of three varieties of sweet potatoes


Cuanang, CR
Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC)

Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983); ILARC; MMSU; Batac; Ilocos Norte; 1973; p12

Abstract:
Varieties of sweet potatoes used were: German, Miracle and Native. Results showed that German variety was no well adaptive to Ilocos Norte Institute of Technology conditions. Native variety exhibited shortest vines however, in terms of yield, it produce the highest. It was followed closely by the Miracle variety.

Availability :
Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC); MMSU; Batac, Ilocos Norte




NO. 38787

Heritability and expected gain from selection for yield, weight loss in storage and sprouting in field bed of sweet potato


Saladaga, FA; Hernandez, TP
Ann. Trop Res. 3(1): ?p (1981)

Abstract:
True seeds of sweet potato were collected from a sample of genotypes entered in the Master Polycross Nursery at Louisiana State University, grown into seedlings and vegetatively propagated. Frequency distribution and heritability estimates were prepared for yield, weight loss in storage and sprouting in field bed. In general, for all the maternal parents, the distribution of the individual progeny seedlings was skewed to the lower yielding classes. Heritability estimate for yield was low, but with a magnitude of 0.241 which indicates the possibility of selecting (by culling) for yield at a relatively early stage of the screening process. While seedling genotypes within each maternal parent differed (i.e., some had no appreciable weight loss), the genetic variance was negative, thus heritability was negative or zero. Sprouting in field bed also had low genetic variance and, subsequently, low heritability. These low heritability values indicate that either the population under study has already attained its potential limit for these two traits or that these traits are largely influenced by the environment.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39058

Starchy materials as binders in fresh sausages


Sison, EC; Almira, EC
The Philippine Agriculturist 58(9-10): 360(1975)

Abstract:
Binders such as cornstarch wheat, flour, cassava flour, camote starch and non-fat dry milk (control) were added at different levels ranging from 3.5% to 15% to frmsh pork sausage formulations, and the products were cooked and evaluated for eating quality. Statistical analyses of the sensory evaluation scores showed significant differences among the treatments for flavor, juiciness and general acceptability scores. However, there were no significant differences among the average scores for the binders for appearance, juiciness and tenderness. The non-fat dry milk was significantly better than all the other binders except cassava flour, in flavor and general acceptability scores. Results showed that the starchy materials tested can be used up to 10% as binders in fresh pork sausages.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 39060

A comparative study of varying amounts of sweet potato flour used in the preparation of chiffon cake


Buyayo, UP
IATC Research Journal 1(7): 30(1977)

Abstract:
This study was conducted to determine the quality of chiffon cake using 100 percent sweet potato flour (treatment A), 75 percent sweet potato flour mixed with 25 percent all-purpose flour (treatment B), and 50 p%rcent sweet potto flour mixed with 50 percent all-purpose flour (treatment C). The three products were evaluated as regards quality in terms of shape, size, color, crust, grain, texture and flavor. Results of the sensory evaluaation indicated that the chiffon cake prepared utilizing 100 percent sweet potato flour (treatment ) ranked the highest with an average men of 4.18, followed by those in treatments C and B with an average means of 3.89 and 3.51, respectively.

Availability :
Library; Ifugao State College of Agriculture and Forestry; Nayon; Lamut; Ifugao; Philippines




NO. 39061

Formulation, development and evaluation of sweet potato products


Madamba, LSP; Barba, CVC; Burgos, M; Borja-Domingo, T
NSDB Technology Journal 2(2): 60-70(1977)

Abstract:
The data on chemical and sensory evaluation of sweetpotato during storage indicate that acceptability of boiled and fried sweetpotatoes decreased with storage. Starch degradatyon accompanied by sugar accumulation occured during storage. The rates of starch degradation and sugar accumulation were greater at cold temperature (10oC) than at room temperature (25-30oC). The amount of accumulated sugar was independent of the initial starch content. In the product development experiments, it has been shown that sweetpotato flour can be used as sweet(extender in making various bakery products. Substitution of 10-20% sweetpotato flour in pan de sal gave acceptable product. Good quality chips can be prepared from sweet potatoes. A preference for chips prepared without pre-heating was noted. Students, particularly males, favored barbecue flavored chips while females liked the chips with sugar. Storage of sweetpotato flour for six months did not affect the quality of the baked products.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39064

Starchy materials as binders in salami sausages


Sison, EC; Alimira, EC; Naval, AB
The Philippine Agriculturist 58(9-10): 367(1975)

Abstract:
Salami sausages prepared with various binders such as camote flour, cassava flour, wheat flour, rice flour and potato flour at different levels ranging from 5% to 15% were cooked and evaluated for eating quality. Statistical analyses of the sensory evaluation scores showed significant differences among the treatments for appearance, flavor and general acceptability scores but no significant differences for juiciness and tenderness. Among binders, rice flour and wheat flour where significantly better than the other for flavor and general acceptability. Among levels, there were significant differences for appearance, flavor and general acceptability scores with 5% to 10% receiving the higher scores. These results indicate that among binders tested camote and potato flour can be used up to 10% level only while cassava, rice and wheat flour can be used up to 15% as fillers in salami sausages.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; UP at Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 39099

Critical periods for weed control in sweet potato (BNAS-51)


Talatala, RL; Mariscal, AM; Pardales, JR jr; Secreto, AC
Annales of the Tropical Research ?vol(?no): ?p(1976)

Abstract:
The response of BNAS-51 to two sets of weed control treatments were determined using two planting distances. The plots were kept weed free for specified periods and then weeds were allowed to grow for specified periods and were then eradicated. The two-plant spacings used failed to produce significant effects on all agronomic characteristics considered in this study. However, the various weed control treatments significantly affected marketable and non-marketable root yield and total yield but not the number of roots. DMRT showed that T1 (weed-free for the first two weeks) and T6 (weed-free two weeks after planting until 100% cover) with 10.78 and(9.84 t/ha, T5 (hand weeded check) with 10.25 t/ha. Results indicate that sweet potato is greatly influenced by the presence of weeds and is susceptible to weed competition during the early stages of development. Early weeding is very essential to ensure high root yield.

Availability :
Visayas State College of Agriculture (VISCA); Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39151

Biological study of Aspidomorpha miliaris (Fabricus) (Chrysomelidae, Coleoptera), with a consideration of its host range and natural enemies


Baltazar, EP
Philippine Entomological Society; Department of Entomology; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna

Philippine Entomologist 1(5): 365-376(1970)

Abstract:
Aspidomorpha miliaris (Fabricius) is a serious sweet potato pest which feeds heavily on the succulent leaves, often times stripping the leaves thus causing a reduction in the growth and vitality of the plant. Aside from sweet potato, it also fed on I. purpurea, M. tuberosa, I. aquatica, I. alba, M. gamella, and C. frustescens. The life history of the insect includes an incubation period of 9 to 10 days.The larva underwent 5 instars for a total duration of 18 to 22 days; the pupal period was 5 to 7 days. Egg laying to emergence was 32 to 38 days. Differences in duration of growth occurred when A. miliaris was fed with different varieties of sweet potato. The natural enemies observed were a Hymenopterous egg parasite, Tetrastichus sp., and a spider, Rhizoglyphus sp.

Availability :
Library; UP at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 39152

Effects of soil depth on the degree of sweet potato weevil infestation


Burdeos, AT
Annals Tropical Research 2(4): 224-231(1980)

Abstract:
The highest weight of infested tubers (204.01 g) was obtained from the control (without soil added) while the lowest weight (21.18 g) was obtained at 26 cm soil depth. Similar trend was observed on weevil population in roots, that is, the highest number (9.225) was obtained from treatment where no soil was added and the lowest (1.65) was obtained at 26 cm soil depth. Statistical analysis showed that soil depth significantly affected the non-infested root yield and the degree of infestation by the sweet potato weevil. The greater the depth, the fewer the infested roots but there are more weevils per infested root. High population of weevils (3.5) in the stem of the control plants was observed and very low population was obtained in T4 (26 cm soil depth).

Availability :
Library; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39153

Stem and tubers for rearing sweet potato weevil


Vasquez, EA; Gapasin, DP
Annals of Tropical Research 2(2): 80-88(1980)

Abstract:
Sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius elegantulus Fabr. was successfully reared on mature stems using longitudinal halves and on tubers using thin chips held between plastic rearing blocks. There were no differences in size and behavior of larvae, pupae and adults but there was only slight difference in duration of life cycle and mortality of weevils reared on tubers and mature stems. Results showed that mature stems were as suitable as tubers in rearing sweet potato weevil. However, the use of tuber chips was the most suitable and economical method of rearing sweet potato weevil in the laboratory.

Availability :
Library; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39156

Preliminary study of the biology of potato tuber moth, Phtorimaea Operculella Zeller (Gelechiidae Lepidoptera), under storage condition


Pera, BV; Molistas, LP
Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines

MSAC Research Journal 2(1): 61 (1978)

Abstract:
The larva causes serious injury to the tuber by feeding on the tissue. Mines, galls and frasses are produced inside the tuber rendering it unfit for seed and food purposes. The longevity of both sexes varies from egg to adult stage. The incubation period of the eggs that hatched into females ranged from 3 to 7 days and 2 to 9 days in the male. There were four larval instars. The first stadium ranged from 3 to 7 days; second stadium, 2 to 6 days; third stadium ranged from 3 to 6 days; fourth stadium, 4 to 6 days in the female. In the male, the first stadium ranged from 2 to 6 days: second stadium, 3 to 9 days; third stadium, 3 to 7 days; and fourth stadium, 3 to 8 days, the total larva development in the female ranged from 12 to 25 days and 11 to 30 days in the male. In the pupal stage, the female ranged from 4 to 11 days, and 5 to 12 days in the male. The female adult was observed to live longer than the male for as long as 4 to 21 days and 2 to 14 days, respectively. The total life cycle ranged from 23 to 64 days to 20 to 65 days, in the female and male respectively. A female adult can lay 3 to 4 times with a total range of 20 to 78 days. The percentage of hatchability was high ranging from 71.42 to 100%. The eggs are laid singly at a time usually in the eyes of the potato tubers.

Availability :
Library; Benguet State University; La Trinidad; Benguet; Philippines




NO. 39174

Plant parasitic nematode associated with sweet potato and cassava in the Philippines


Castillo, MB; Maranan, LR
Philippine Phytopathology 10(1&2): 56-70(1974)

Abstract:
Survey conducted in 25 provinces in the Philippines revealed the association of Tortylenchulus, Meloidogyne, Helicotylenchus, Hoplolaimus, Tylenchorhynchus, Aphelenchus, Pratylenchus, Ditylenchus, Criconemoides, and Hemicycliophora, with sweet potato. Except Hemicycliophora, which was replaced by Scutellonema and Aphelenchoides, these same genera were associated with cassava. Feeding and reproduction on both crops were manifested by Meloidogyne and Rotylenchulus, but galling due to the former was the only apparent root damage. Rotylenchulus, Helicotylenchus, and Meloidogyne were the most widely distributed, most prevalent and most frequently occurring plant parasitic nematodes on both crops. Except in a few sampling areas, the population densities of plant parasitic nematodes were generally low. In pot experiments, per plant inoculations with about 7, 000 larvae of R. reniformis and with 50 and 100 egg masses of M. arenaria resulted in significantly higher (P=.01) root and top weights of sweet potato and significantly higher (P=.05) top weight of cassava, respectively. Inoculations of cassava with up to 175 egg masses of M. arenaria and sweet potato with up to 200 egg masses of M. incognita acrita did not cause significant growth reductions, although galls containing egg masses formed on roots.

Availability :
Library; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 39210

Unreported virus diseases of upland and root crops in the Philippines


Benigno, DA; Quebral, FC; Pua, DR; Soria, JA
Philippine Phytopathology 10(1&2): 1(1974)

Abstract:
Peanut mottle, peanut rosette, mungbean yellow mosaic, cassava mosaic, cassava witches' broom, sweet potato mosaic and sweet potato green dwarf are the seven unreported virus diseases of upland and root crops in the Philippines. Their symptoms, modes of transmission, physical properties and host ranges are discussed.

Availability :
Library; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 39436

Effects of spacing and fertilizer rate on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Bonilla, AB
Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983). MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC); 1981; p259-260

Abstract:
Three spacings (20 x 75, 30 x 75 and 40 x 75) and four fertilizer rates (0-0-0, 45-80-80, 60-90-90 and 75-100-100 kg NPK/ha) were studied to know the proper distance of planting as well as the level of fertilizer in the attainment of high yield. Highly significant differences were obtained on the weight of vines per plant and yield per hectare. It was found that plants at a wider distance produced the heaviest vines. Plants spaced at 20 x 75 cm and fertilized with 75-100-100 kg NPK/ha produced the highest yield of 25 t/ha. Among the fertilizer rates, the plants applied with higher amount of fertilizer gave the highest yield. No significant differences were obtained from the spacings used with regards to the number of vines and number of roots.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39433

Influence of buried nodes on the yield of sweet potato


Agudelo, RP
Ilocos Agricultural Research Center; Batac; Ilocos Norte

Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983); MMSU; Batac; Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center; 1982; p365-366

Abstract:
Treatments were 3 nodes with one buried node; 4 nodes with 2 buried nodes; 5 nodes with 3 buried nodes; 6 nodes with 4 buried nodes; 7 nodes with 5 buried nodes and 8 nodes with 6 buried nodes. Length of vines, number of marketable roots, and yield in tons per hectare increased significantly as the number of buried nodes increased. Treatment with 5 nodes buried gave the highest yield of 5.66 tons and net profit per hectare of P4, 857.00.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39435

Sweet potato production in the Philippines


Bartolini, PU
Proceedings of the International Seminar on Root Crops in Southeast Asia (ISRC-SEA): Production and Utilization. 10-15 November, Visayas State College of Agriculture and University of the Philippines at Los Banos; 1983; p112-125

Abstract:
Sweet potato is grown throughout the year in many areas in the Philippines. Average area planted to sweet potato is 0.64 ha; farm size ranges from 0.5 to 2.0 ha. Varieties grown are chosen for the following characteristics/reasons: high yield, early maturity, availability of planting materials, resistance to pests and diseases, ease to market the produced and good eating quality. The major problems and constraints affecting sweet potato production in the Philippines are: lack of capital insect pests and diseases, poor transportation facilities, low production, low price of farm products, poor soil fertility, presence of weeds, drought and typhoons. Various areas in sweet potato research such as varietal improvement, cultural management, crop protection and many others were already conducted. At present, emphasis is the processing and utilization of sweet potato for food and animal feed.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39434

Effect of time of setting sweet potato as relay crop to corn


Ancheta, VM
Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983). Batac, Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC); 1983; p407

Abstract:
The study was conducted to determine the proper time of setting sweet potato as relay crop to corn to obtain the best yield of both crops. Sweet potato was relay cropped 20, 30, 40 and 50 days before harvesting the main crop. The results of the study revealed that the time of setting sweet potato as relay crop to corn significantly affected the agronomic characteristics and yield of both crops. Sweet potato relayed two days before harvesting corn produced the longest vines (1.49), the highest number of roots per plant (7.8) and the highest yield of 14.84 tons per hectare. Corn monoculture, however, obtained the highest yield of 6.74 tons per hectare. Likewise, the highest combined net profit of P36, 537.00 per hectare was obtained from corn plants relayed with sweet potato 20 days before harvesting corn.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39438

Critical weed control for maximum production of sweet potato and cassava


Escalada, RG
PCARRD Research Highlights; p43-44; also VICARP News 3(2): 9 (1982)

Abstract:
During the first year; the duration of weed control necessary for maximum production of sweet potato and cassava was determined while on the second year, the development of weed control methods with the use of local implements was done. The experimental design used was split plot with three replications. The distance of planting was designated as the mainplot and the weed control treatments, as the subplot. When the best period of controlling weeds for maximum production of the two roots crops was determined the succeeding years were devoted on studying the methods of weed control with the use of local implements. The same planting distance for both sweet potato and cassava was used. Results revealed that weeding from two to six weeks after planting was the best for controlling weeds for optimum production of sweet potato; 2-8 weeks after planting was best for cassava. With the use of local implements, the highest net income was obtained in closer spacing of sweet potato when plot was weeded with the use of hoe at three weeks after planting with the bolo at three weeks after planting and then mulching immediately. In a wider planting distance, mulching at two weeks after planting resulted in highest income.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library




NO. 39439

Effects of growth regulators on sweet potato


Fallet, CP
Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983). MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC); 1981; p267

Abstract:
The growth regulators were NAA (Napthalene acetic acid) and 2, 4-D (2, 4-D Dechlorophenoxy acetic acid). The different rates of concentrations were control, 100 ppm, 150 ppm, and 200 ppm. Comparable results were observed on the number of flowers, number and weight of shoots, length and weight of vines, root size, number of harvestable roots and yield per plant and per hectare between the 2, 4-D and NAA treated and untreated plants. With regards to concentration, differences were also obtained on the percentage of survivial of plants, shoots and harvestable roots, length of vines, weight of shoots and vines and yield. However, 200 ppm produced more flowers and 200 and 150 ppm produced bigger roots.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39440

Effect of length of storage of sweet potato cuttings on yield


Josue, SL
Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983). Batac, Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center; 1982; p379

Abstract:
Treatments were: S1 - vine cuttings planted immediately after gathering; S2 - vine cuttings stored one day before planting; S3 - vine cuttings stored for two days before planting; S4 - vine cuttings stored for four days before planting. Overall results of the study revealed that cuttings stored for two days before planting gave the highest yield with a mean of 10.17 tons per hectare or an increase of 3.59 tons over cuttings planted four days after storing which produced the lowest yield with a mean of 6.55 tons. The highest net income was obtained from sweet potato cuttings stored for 2 days before planting with a mean of P16, 793.50. The lowest was registered by the plants planted from cutting stored for four days before planting.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39441

Effects of organic fertilizer on sweet potato


Lagazo, ER
Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983). MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC); 1981; p272

Abstract:
The manures used were: A - carabao, B - cow, C - horse, D - hog, E - chicken, F - guano and G - compost. The application of different manures to sweet potato influenced the agronomic characteristics of the crop. Plants applied with guano at the rate of 5 t/ha had the longest vines, produced more tubers, heavier tubers and highest yield per hectare of 20.03 tons. This was followed by plants however, not significantly different from plants applied with chicken manure having average yield of 20.03 t per hectare. Lowest yield was exhibited by plants under the control.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39442

Yield response of BNAS sweet potato variety to different length of cuttings under TCA conditions


Manuel, TM
TCA Graduate Journal 1: 4-13 (1981)

Abstract:
This study was conducted to determine the best length of vine cuttings used in planting sweet potato (BNAS variety) at the Tarlac College of Agriculture during the 1981 dry season. The treatments (lengths of cuttings) used wre TA - 20 cm long, TB - 30 cm long, TC - 50 cm long, TD - 60 cm long. There were four replications and the Randomized Complete Block Design was used. The results of the study revealed that the different length of vine cuttings did not give significant effect on the rate of growth of vines, length of vines at maturity, weight of forage, number and diameter of storage roots, and root yield per treatment. Ranking the means of the above data, however, showed that the 30 cm long cutting produced the best result. Analysis of variance of the length of harvestable roots showed that the 30, 40, and 50 cm long cuttings produced significantly longer roots than the 60 cm long. The 30 cm long cuttings gave the highest net return per peso cost among the treatments hence, the author recommends this cutting length in planting sweet potato under TCA conditions during the dry season.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39443

Response of sweet potato to decomposed guano


Pasion, JA
Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983). MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC); 1981; p281

Abstract:
Levels of application were: 5, 10, 15, and 20 t of guano per hectare. Results showed that application of higher levels of guano to sweet potato resulted to higher yield. Plants applied with 20 t of guano per hectare were the tallest, produced the heavier tubers and highest computed yield per hectare. Also, highest net income of P11, 412.76 per hectare was obtained from this treatment.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39444

Effect of hill spacing on sweet potato


Quirante, CR
Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983). Batac, Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center; 1982; p387-388

Abstract:
Spacing used were: 20 cm; 30 cm; 40 cm; 50 cm ; and 60 cm. Plants spaced 60 cm produced the longest vines, highest number of roots per plant, broadest root diameter but gave the lowest yield of 9.18 t/ha. The highest net income of P31, 407.42 was obtained from plants spaced at 20 cm. Analysis showed that yield of sweet potato can be profitably increased by closer hill spacing.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39445

Response of sweet potato to varying levels of NPK fertilizers under the Isabela State University (ISU) conditions


Raymundo, PP
Nucleus 3(1 & 2): 19 (1989-1990)

Abstract:
Based on the result of the study, application of 30-30-30 kg NPK/ha increased the tuber yield, length of vines, weight of leaves and number of marketable tubers. Furthermore, the result revealed that when applied fertilizer was increased to 120-120-120 kg NPK/ha decreased tuber yield was observed.

Availability :
Library; Isabela State University; Echague; Isabela




NO. 39446

Effects of ipil-ipil leaves applied as green manure combined with different rates of potassium on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Raroque, CB; Collante, AL
TCA Research Journal 9(1): 113-121 (1987)

Abstract:
Soil incorporation of fresh ipil-ipil leaves during the final harrowing at the rate of 2 tons per hectare significantly improved the root yield of sweet potato. However, application of additional potassium to plots applied with ipil-ipil leaves failed to improve the root yield. Moreover, plants grown in plots with ipil-ipil leaves along gave the highest monetary advantage of 2.92 return per peso cost.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 39447

Comparative evaluation of traditional methods and recommended practice of planting sweet potato


Saladaga-Eronic, P; Escaladam, RG
Annals of Tropical Research 9(2): ?p (1987)

Abstract:
Generally, no significant differences in agronomic characters and yield components of sweet potato were observed using either the traditional methods or the recommended practice of planting. Varying the number of cuttings per hill significantly influenced only the fresh vine weight of Kaimay, BNAS-51 and Samar Big Yellow sweet potato varieties. Plants that developed from one cutting per hill produced heavier herbage than the other treatments. Root yield was likewise not markedly affected by the number of cuttings per hill although the varieties significantly differed in this parameter. Among the varieties, Kaimay obtained the higher value in yield and nearly all yield components.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39448

Effects of different N: K and NPK levels on sweet potato


Sarong, LQ; Quirol, BF; Villanueva, MR
Annals of Tropical Research 8(2): ?p (1986)

Abstract:
Generally, plants that received NPK, fertilizer had better stand that those that did not received either N or K. However, nitrogen had greater influence than potassium on the vegetative growth of the plant. Root formation and yield were significantly improved as the amount of potassium was increased up to 90 kg/ha with nitrogen at 30 kg/ha. In this treatment where N: K ratio is 1: 3, the highest root yield of 6.52 t/ha was obtained. Altering the N: K ratio from 1: 1 to 3: 2 led to maximum leaf development and vine elongation while reducing the ratio from 3: 2 to 1: 3 favored storage root formation.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39449

Effect of stage of decomposition of green manure on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Sevenorio, PL; Escalada, RG
Annals of Tropical Research 5 (2): ?p (1983)

Abstract:
The use of either soybean or mungo as a green crop did not significantly affect the agronomic characters, yield and yield components of sweet potato except the number of marketable tubers. Stage of green manure decomposition greatly influenced vine length and leaf area index during the second and third months of sweet potato growth including the length and diameter of tubers, weight and number of marketable tubers/ha, total tuber yield, and harvest index. No significant effects on fresh and dry weights of vines as well as number and weight of non-marketable tubers were noted. Higher yield was obtained when sweet potato was planted 21 days after soybean residue had been plowed under the soil.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39450

Verification of sweet potato technology for farms in the Ilocos


Sugui, FP; Ruguian, RC; Alcoy, AB
6thPCARRD-ILARRC Integrated Regional Research Review and Development Planning Workshop: Proceedings. Batac, Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; 1987; p67-68

Abstract:
The study was conducted to verify recommended cultural management practices of sweet potato for farms in the Ilocos. The production technolgy developed by PRCRTC at VISCA, Baybay, Leyte was quite suitable for the Ilocos farms. Although lesser number of marketable tubers was produced, the technology resulted in bigger and heavier tubers, thus higher yield per hectare. On the other hand, the farmer's technology resulted in lower yield due to the production of smaller tubers. Cost and return analysis showed that the PRCRTC technology gave a net ROI of P2.50; the farmer's technology, P3.24.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39451

Effects of napthalene acetic acid and complete fertilizer on sweet potato


Taglicud, TA
Agriculture Research Compendium (1971-1983). MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC); 1981; p292

Abstract:
Napthalene acetic acid and complete fertilizer were tested to determine their effects on shoot and root production on sweet potato. Comparing the effectiveness of NAA and 14-14-14 in all the data gathered, the different treatments gave comparable results on the length of vines, number and weight of roots per plant and yield per hectare but gave significant result on the number and weight of tops, stover yield, number of flowers, length and diameter of roots. All the treatments treated with NAA and 14-14-14 were significantly different over the control but NAA and 14-14-14 alone were not significant to each other but significantly different over the combination of NAA and 14-14-14. The combinations of NAA and 14-14-14 (200 ppm + 200 kg/ha) was found to be more effective based on the yield of roots per plant (272.8 gm). Moreover, 14-14-14 gave highest yield of roots (236.7 gm) than NAA alone (226.7 gm).

Availability :
Ilocos Agricultural Research Center; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte




NO. 39452

Effect of vine clipping on the performance of sweet potato under a newly established guayabano plantation


Taylan, FM; Pascua, GS; Alcoy, AB; Aoalin, JT
Ilocos Research Abstracts; Batac, Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; 1987; p46

Abstract:
Sweet potato was planted under a newly established guayabano plantation in Dingras, Ilocos Norte from December 11, 1986 to March 23, 1987, to determine the effects of vine clipping on yield. The experiment used the SRO variety and employed the randomized complete block design with three replications. Three clippings were made starting from after planting up the harvest time. The clipping of sweet potato vines increased the yield herbage by 28.28% but reduced the yield of tubers by 16.52%. Clipped sweet potato gave a net income on P19, 297.00, which is lower by 13.86% than the P25, 503.24 net income from unclipped plants.

Availability :
Ilocos Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte




NO. 39459

Cropping system for root crops in marginal hilly areas


Jamito, LV
Graduate Research Abstracts. Baybay, Leyte: Visayas State College of Agriculture. Vol. 1; 1983; p82-83

Abstract:
Agronomic characters of cassava plants such as herbage yield and harvest index increased significantly by the ground environment. An herbage yield of 19.48 kg/plot was obtained in area with ipil-ipil buffer strips (A1) which was higher than that obtained in area without ipil-ipil (A0) yielding 16.94 kg/plot. However, ground environment did not significantly affect the herbage yield of sweet potato plants. Harvest indeces of cassava and sweet potato plants, 0.16 and 0.06 respectively, were found to be superior in an open ground environment, while those obtained in area with ipil-ipil strips were 0.54 and 0.04, respectively. For cassava, a total tuber yield of 13.10 t/ha was obtained in an open ground environment (A1) with a yield of 3.49 t/ha. For sweet potato, tuber yield was 3.49 t/ha in an open ground environment and 2.15 t/ha in an area with ipil-ipil buffer strips. Statistical analysis indicated that almost all yield components of cassava and sweet potato were significantly affected by the ground environment. Open ground environment (A0) consistently indluenced the yield components more than that with ipil-ipil buffer strips (A1). The legumes intercrop used did not significantly affect the herbage yield and yield components of cassava plants. However, time of planting the legume intercrops significantly affected herbage yield, size (diameter) of marketable tubers, weight of marketable tubers and total yield of cassava plants. Planting the legumes after cassava plants had been planted consistently resulted to the higher tuber yield, while planting these legumes intercrops ahead of the root crops resulted to higher yield of the intercrops. Time of planting did not significantly affect the agronomic characters, yield and yield components of sweet potato plants. Interaction effects between ground environment and legume intercrops used as well as ground environment and time of planting the legume intercrops used were noted on both cassava and sweet potato influence total tuber yields of two root crops when they were planted in a ground environment (A0). Soybean intercrops, on the other hand influenced the diameter of both marketable (4.15 cm) and non-marketable (1.75) tubers with sweet potato.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39838

Assessment of inoculation techniques and evaluation of fungicides against potato Fusarium dry rot


Borines, LM; Natural, MP
Annals of Tropical Research 10 (3 & 4); 1988

Abstract:
Five methods of inoculating Fusarium spp., the causal organisms of potato dry rot, were assessed to find the most suitable technique to evaluate the effectiveness of fungicides against the disease. Depositing 0.2 mL of spore suspension (105 spores/mL) of Fusarium spp. into holes in the tubers was the best inoculation. Seven fungicides were evaluated for their effectiveness in controlling the disease in stored potato tubers. Benlate at the rate of 3 tbsp/19 L water was most effective in minimizing tuber infection and lowering the rate of lesion development. Dithane M-45 and Captan were also effective in controlling the disease and are good alternatives for Benlate.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39580

Performance of cowpea, mungo, corn and sweet potato planted after cowpea


Marcos, DL
Ilocos Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte

Agriculture Research Compendium; MMSU; Batac; Ilocos Norte: Ilocos Agricultural Research Center (ILARC); p. 275; 1981

Abstract:
Differences among treatments were found insignificant except corn ear length. Corn planted after cowpea produced longer ears than corn alone.

Availability :
Ilocos Agricultural and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte




NO. 39840

Screening sweet potato roots for resistance to Java black rot caused by Diplodia tubericola (Ell. & Ev.) Taubenh


Dalisay, RF; Divinagracia, GG; Mendoza, EMT
Philippine Phytopathology 22 (1 & 2): 7; 1986

Abstract:
Out of 34 sweet potato crosses screened for resistance to Java black rot (Diplodia tubericola) only G8ir-8a was resistant whereas, 3, 22 and 28 were moderately resistant, susceptible and very susceptible, respectively. Susceptible and very susceptible roots exhibited extensive rotting of the infected tissues 7 days after inoculation. Moderately resistant roots produced limited lesions without distinct wound periderm typically observed in resistant G8 ir-8a. In vitro assays of the different crude extracts from infected resistant G8ir-8a and susceptible G52-5 roots revealed the presence of inhibitory factors not found in newly harvested and stored roots. Moreover, extracts from infected resistant G8ir-8a roots inhibited spore germination and mycelial growth of tuberricola.

Availability :
Main library; University of the Philippines; Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 39653

Effect of different cropping systems on the growth and yield of sweet corn and sweet potato in southern Philippines


Evangelio, LA; Rosario, EL
Annals of Tropical Research 3(4); 1981

Abstract:
Sweet corn and sweet potato were grown under three different cropping treatments. Double rows spaced at 0.3m with interval row spacing of 1.0m appeared to be the optimum treatment combination with a mean yield of 21.99 t/ha. Under this scheme, yield increases of 75% and 66% were noted in sweet potato, respectively. Land equivalent ratio (LER) was significantly affected by cropping systems. Both alternate croping scheme and double row arrangement had LER greater than 1. The LER values obtained on yield as fraction of monoculture checks for sweet corn and sweet potato indicated a net positive effect between the two cropping patterns. LER notably decreased as the interval row spacing was increased from 1.0m to to 2.0m for double rows spaced at 0.3m and 0.5m. Growth and yield parameters of sweet potato that were significantly affected by the different cropping treatments were: leaf area per plant, leaf area index (LAI), length of vines at harvest, yield of marketable tubers per hectare, yield of tubers per hectare, yield of tubers per plant, total dry matter (TDM) per plot, and harvest index (HI). On sweet corn, leaf area per plant, LAI, date to green maturity, weight of ears per plant, LAI, date to green maturity, weight of ear per plant, TDM per plant and HI were the growth and yield parameters that were significantly effected by the cropping treatments. Parameters that were not significantly affected by the cropping treatments used for sweet potato were: length of vine 30 days after planting, number of marketable and non-marketable tubers per plant, and yield of non-marketable tubers per hectare. Cropping systems did not have a significant effect on plant height of sweet corn 30 and 60 days after planting.

Availability :
Library; West Visayas State University; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39842

Screening sweet potato roots for resistance to Java black rot caused by Diplodia tubericola (Ell. and Ev.) Taubenh


Dalisay, RF; Divinagracia, GG; Mendoza, EMT
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 12 (1): 33-37; 1987

Abstract:
Thirty four sweet potato crosses were screened for resistance to Java black rot (Diplodia tubericola (Ell. & Ev.) Taubenh.). Only G81r-8a was rated resistant whereas 3, 2 and 28 were found moderately resistant, susceptible and very susceptible, respectively. Susceptible and very susceptible roots exhibited extensive rotting of the infected tissues 7 days after inoculation. Moderately resistant roots produced limited lesions but no distinct wound periderm was formed as was typically observed in resistant G81r-8a. In vitro assays of the different crude extracts from resistant G81r-8a and susceptible G52-5 roots revealed that inhibitory factors were present in infected and not in newly harvested and stored roots. Moreover, extracts from infected resistant G81r-8a roots inhibited spore germination and mycelial growth of D. tubericola.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; University of the Philippines; Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 39852

Effect of different levels of Helicotylenchus nematode infestation on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Lopez, EA; Gapasin, RM; Palomar, MK
Annals of Tropical Research 3 (4): 275-280; 1981

Abstract:
A low population density of Helicotylenchus stimulated plant growth. Weight of tops, roots and tuberous roots at a population of approximately 1, 000 nematodes per plant were higher than those of the control. Plant growth was not retarded at low levels of nematode population. However, as the population was increased 10, 000 per plant, weights of tuberous roots, roots and tops decreased; but only the difference in root weight was statistically significant. Helicotylenchus spp. tended to be parasitic, instead of pathogenetic to sweet potato.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39655

Effect of different cropping systems of the growth and yield of sweet corn and sweet potato in southern Philippines


Evangelio, LA; Rosario, EL
Annals of Tropical Research 3(4); 1981

Abstract:
Sweet corn and sweet potato were grown under three different cropping treatments. Double rows spaced at 0.3m with interval row spacing of 1.0m appeared to be the optimum treatment combination with a mean yield of 21.99 t/ha. Under this scheme, yield increases of 75% and 66% were noted in sweet potato, respectively. Land equivalent ratio (LER) was significantly affected by cropping systems. Both alternate cropping scheme and double row arrangement had LER greater than 1. The LER values obtained on yield as fraction of monoculture checks for sweet corn and sweet potato indicated a net positive effect between the two cropping patterns. LER notably decreased as the interval row spacing was increased from 1.0m to 2.0m for double rows spaced at 0.3m and 0.5m. Growth and yield parameters of sweet potato that were significantly affected by the different cropping treatments were: leaf area per plant, leaf area index (LAI), length of vines at harvest, yield of marketable tubers per hectare, yield of tubers per plant, total dry matter (TDM) per plot, and harvest index (HI). On sweet corn, leaf area per plant, LAI, date to green maturity, weight of ears per plant, TDM per plant and HI were the growth and yield parameters that were significantly effected by the cropping treatments. Parameters that ere not significantly affected by the cropping treatments used for sweet potato were: length of vine 30 days after planting, number of marketable and non-marketable tubers per plant, and yield of non-marketable tubers per hectare. Cropping systems did not have a significant effect on plant height of sweet corn 30 and 60 days after planting.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39726

Note: Arthropods of sweet potato in the Philippines


Amalin, DM; Vasquez, EA; Vander Zaag, P
The Philippine Agriculturist 74(1): 39-50; 1991

Abstract:
Field sampling of arthropods in sweet potato agroecosystems during the wet (1988) and dry (1989 and 1990) seasons utilizing different techniques revealed a wide array of species. The dominant pest species were the root feeder. Cylas formicarius Fab. and foliage feeders such as Brachmia convolvuli Wals, Attractomorpha psittacina de Haan, Phaneroptera furfifera Stal., Halticus minutus Reuter, Aphis gossypii Glover, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), Chaetocnema basalis Baly, Scymnus sp., Helopeltis collaris Stal, and eriophyiid gall mite. Insect predators, parasites, predatory spiders and entomogenous pathogens were also encountered, however, their efficacy as natural enemies of insect pests of sweet potato remain to be evaluated.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 39727

Cells and chromosomes of the sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius (Fabr.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) sampled from Laguna and Ilocos Norte


Barrion, AA; Amalin, DM; Casal, CV; Mantoya, VM; Dela Cruz Ma, PR
Philippine Association of Entomologists; c/o Department of Entomology; Institute of Biological Sciences; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna

Philippine Entomologist 9(2): 168-174; 1993

Abstract:
Lacto-aceto-orcein preparations of Carnoy-fixed testicular tissues of newly emerged males of Cylas formicarius Fab. revealed variations in cells and chromosomes of local populations infesting sweet potato in Los Baqos, Laguna and Batac, Ilocos Norte. Meiotic index of weevils from Los Baqos ranged from 40 to 65%, those from Batac exhibited 30 to 52%. Relative lengths of labile autosomes and sex chromosomes at a-pachytene and diakinesis were different in the two local populations. Frequency of telomere joints was higher (32%) in Batac weevils than Los Baqos weevils (12%).

Availability :
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NO. 39728

Comparative pathogenicity of Metarhizium anisopliae and Paecilomyces lilacinus to adult sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius (F Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)


Burdeos, AT; Villacarlos, LT
Philippine Association of Entomologists; c/o Department of Entomology; Institute of Biological Sciences; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna

Philippine Entomologist 7(6): 561: 571; 1989

Abstract:
Five isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae and Paecilomyces lilacinus and two isolates of Beauveria bassiana were tested against adult sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius (F.) under laboratory conditions. All the 12 isolates proved pathogenic to the insect at different degrees. BPI Tiaong isolate of M. anisopliae gave the lowest LC50 of 8.42 x 105 spores/m1. B. bassiana was found to be moderately virulent (LC50 = 1.54 x 107 spores/m1) while P. lilacinus caused very low weevil mortality even at high spore concentration (LC50 = 3.0 x 108 spores/m1). M. anisopliae and B. bassiana at spore concentration of 1 x 108 spores/m1 caused 50% weevil mortality at 3 and 4 days, respectively. Influence of soil properties on the pathogenicity of M. anisopliae was also evaluated. A positive correlation (r = 0.99) was obtained between soil moisture and mortality of Metarhizium-treated adults. Soil pH showed no significant effect on the pathogenicity of the fungus unlike soil sterilization.

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NO. 39730

Identification of sweet potato accessions with resistance to weevil (Cylas formicarius elegantulus Fabr.) and analysis of the mechanisms involved


Gerona, RG
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

VISCA Graduate Research Abstracts 1: 92; 1993

Abstract:
Investigations were directed towards identifying sweet potato lines/accessions with resistance to weevil (Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Fabr.) and analysis of the possible mechanism(s) of resistance to the said pest. Out of the 40 promising lines/accessions tested, only sic (V3 -8, V7 -7, V5 -55, PRS #458, PRS #507 and PRS #508) consistently showed resistance to weevil throughout the 4 trials; the rest showed varied reactions. Comparing the three evaluation criteria used, internal damage seems to reflect more accurately the reaction of a variety to weevil. However, external damage and weevil counts could add useful information on the probable mechanism of resistance. Ovipositional non-preference and some antibiosis were the mechanisms of resistance observed in the six most resistant lines/accessions selected especially PRS #458, PRS #507 and PRS #508. However, the chemical basis of these two mechanisms were not covered in the study. Vine and fleshy root reactions of a resistant accession were parallel. Results of damaged-tissue transplant suggested that newly hatched weevil larvae were most susceptible to antibiotic effects of a resistant host plant.

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Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte




NO. 39731

Effect of Metarrhizium anisopliae (Metch.) Sorokin infection of the fecundity and survival of the sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius (Fabr.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)


Rana, RL; Villacarlos, LT
Philippine Association of Entomologists; c/o Department of Entomology; Institute of Biological Sciences; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna

Philippine Entomologist 8(3): 963-972; 1991

Abstract:
The effects of Metarhizium-infected adult sweet potato weevil (Cylas formicarius Fabr.) on the survival and fecundity of previously healthy weevils were evaluated. The effectiveness of Metarhizium-infected male and that of Metarhizium-inoculated palay as inoculum source were also compared in the screenhouse. When 30% of the male population were infected with Metarhizium percent mortality of previously healthy weevils was highest (40.33%) within 14 days at a male-to-female ratio of 3: 1. On the other hand, contamination from 70% of the infected male population resulted in 48.5% weevil mortality within the same period, at 1: 1 weevil sex ration. Mortality due to M. anisopliae infection occurred as a result of insect aggregation and/or copulation with infected males. In general, daily female fecundity was not affected by the presence of treated male, however, her shorter longevity after contracting the disease could adversely affect her otal fecundity. Although application of Metarhizium-inoculated palay initially resulted in higher percent of weevil mortality due to mycosis compred with treated males as inoculum source, they had comparable effect on weevil mortality at harvest.

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NO. 39839

Effect of brown leaf spot disease on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Cruz, CS dela; Loreto, FL; Palomar, MK
Ann. Trop. Res. 3 (3): 206-213; 1981

Abstract:
Polybagged sweet potato plants were inoculated with conidia of Cercospora batatas taken from sweet potato leaves infested with brown leaf spot. Leaves inoculated at different ages showed varying responses to infection with significant differences in the number and size of lesions and percentage of defoliation.Leaves inoculated at 15-21 days old were found most susceptible to the disease. Initial symptoms of the disease appeared as light green lesions approximately 0.5 mm in diameter two weeks after inoculation. The lesions increased gradually until they reached 3-4.2 mm in diameter 32 days after inoculation.Coalition of lesions was observed at his stage followed by subsequent defoliation. Inoculated plants decreased in yield resulting from the adverse effects of the disease on yield components. The two trials yielded 9.5%, 5.05% and 26.23% reduction in weight of tuberous roots, roots, and tops, respectively. The number of fleshy roots also decreased in inoculated plants. Analysis of variance of weight of tops showed a significant differences form the un-inoculated ones. There were no significant differences on the other parameters.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39841

Biochemical bases of resistance to Java black rot caused by Diplodia tubericola (Ell. & Ev.) Taubenh. in sweet potato root (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk)


Dalisay, RF; Divinagracia, GG; Mendoza, EMT
Philippine Phytopathology 22 (1 & 2): 15-28; 1986

Abstract:
Solvent fractionation and thin layer chromotography revealed 9 furanoterpenes, 3 coumarins and 5 polyphenols as stress metabolities in roots infected with Diplodia tubericola. These metabolities were synthesized more in infected resistant than susceptible roots, qualitative and quantitatively. However, furanoterpenes were produced more than coumarins and phenols based on chromatographic and time-course studies. Furanoterpenes (LD50 = 169.92 uL or 1.37 A/g) and polyphenols (LD50 = 3.91 mg/g) caused 50% spore inhibition after 22.30 and 55.84 hr. respectively. Coumarin synthesis was negligibly low to cause any substantial spore inhibition. In vitro assays showed that with the exception of coumarin A and polyphenol A, most furanoterpenes - ipomeamarone, dehyfroipomeamarone, ipomearonol, substances B, C, and D to be most toxic to D. tubericola. These substances strongly inhibit spore germination and mycelial growth with the subsequent production of abnormal spores and variants of the normal hyphal morphology. Thus, accumulation of these metabolities are responsible for the defense reaction of the sweet potato root to D. tubericola.

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NO. 39843

Effect of brown leaf spot disease on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Dela Cruz, CS; Loreto, FL; Palomar, MK
Annals of Tropical Research 3(3): 206-213; 1981

Abstract:
Polybagged sweet potato plants were inoculated with conidia of Cercospora batatas taken from sweet potato leaves infested with brown leaf spot. Leaves inoculated at different ages showed varying responses to infection with significant differences in the number and size of lesions and percentage of defoliation. Leaves inoculated at 15-21 days old were found most susceptible to the disease. Initial symptons of the disease appeared as light green lesions approximately 0.5 mm in diameter two weeks after inoculation.The lesions increased gradually until they reach 3-4.2 mm in diamater 32 days after inoculation. Coalition of lesions was observed at his stage followed by subsequent defoliation. Inoculated plants decreased in yield resulting from the adverse effects of the disease on yield components. The two trials yielded 9.5%, 5.05% and 26.23% reduction in weight of tuberous roots, roots and tops, respectively. The number of fleshy roots also decreased in inoculated plants. Analysis of variance of weight of tops showed a significant differences from the uninoculated ones. There were no significant differences on the other parameters.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39844

Relationship between morphological charateristics and varietal resistance of sweet potato to scab infection caused by Sphaceloma batatas Saw


Gahit, GB; Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 9 (2); 1987

Abstract:
The morphological characteristics of sweet potato cultivars which are resistant and susceptible to Sphaceloma batatas Saw. were determined. Susceptible cultivars have thinner cuticle, more stomates in the leaves, and more lenticels in the petioles and stems than resistant cultivars. The scab pathogen had longer incubation period, lower infection frequency and smaller lesions in resistant than in susceptible cultivars. Highly significant positive correlation was found between thickness of cuticle and incubation period as well as between number of stomates and lenticels, and infection frequency.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39851

Sweet potato sucrose agar: An inexpensive culture medium for fungal growth


Ilag, LL; Pua, AR; Marfil, VA
Philippine Phytopathology 18 (1 & 2): 78-88; 1982

Abstract:
Sweet potato sucrose sugar or SPSA (composed of sweet potato, 200 g; sucrose from brown sugar, 17 g; agar bar or "gulaman" 15 g; tap water allowed to stand for 24 hours, to make one liter) was found to be an excellent substitute for potato dextrose agar (PDA).Seven test fungi exhibited better mycedial growth and higher sporulation in SPSA than in PDA. The fungi tested were Stemphylium lycopersici (Enjoji) Yam, Collectotrichum gloeosporioides Penz., Pythium debaryanum Hesse, Rhizopus nigricans Ehr., Aspergillus flavus Lk. ex Fries, Volvariella volvacea (Bill. ex Fr.) Sing. and Fusarium moniliforme Sheldon. SPSA not only supported good fungal growth, its ingredients are inexpensive and are readily available locally.

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Main library; University of the Philippines; Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 39845

Efficacy of Paecilomyces lilacinus isolates for the control of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in sweet potato


Galano, CD; Gapasin, RM
Philippine Phytopathology 28: 58-59; 1992

Abstract:
The application of different P. lilacinus isolates grown in water hyacinth subtrate, 50 days after M. incognita egg inoculation increased fresh vine and fibrous root weights by 32.6-36.2% and 29.6-35.1%, respectively, over that of the untreated control. On the other hand, chicken manure and ethoprop-treated plants had an increase of 43.0 and 37.9% and 29.9 and 18.6%, respectively. The mean number of root galls, egg masses and nematode population in fibrous roots and soil produced in plants applied with P. lilacinus isolates ranged from 27.8-42.0, 40.9-58.1, 8.4-11.5 and 392.0-800.8, respectively. The Matalom isolate gave the lowest mean root galls (27.8) and egg masses(40.9) produced per root system and the highest percent egg mass reduction of 55. However, it did not significantly differ from the rest of the isolates. Chicken manure-treated plants had mean root galls of 28.8 and egg masses of 40.3.Egg mass reduction was 55.7%. Ethoprop gave the lowest number of galls (4.2) and egg masses (6.2) compared to other treatments.Percent reduction based on egg masses produced was 93.2. The results showed that the efficacy of P. lilacinus in reducing root-knot galls, egg masses and nematode population was comparable to chicken manure but not with ethoprop.

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NO. 39846

Control of Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchus reniformis and its effect on the yield of sweet potato and cassava


Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 3 (2): 92-100; 1981

Abstract:
Pre-plant treatment of the different nematicides, in pot experiments, using the manufacturer's recommendationrates had variable effects on the growth of sweet potato and cassava and on the population of Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis 4 months after application. Low gall and egg mass ratings were obtained in chemical-treated plants, except those treated with Hostathion 5G. In all cases, the application of Nemagon 75 E.C. and Temik 15 G increased the root, tuber and top weights of sweet potato and cassava gave from 65-85% reduction in nematode population compared to Furadan 5G and Bunema 40 E. C. which gave from 45-70% reduction. Hostathion 5G was the least effective among the chemicals tested.The application of chicken manure significantly increased roots, tubers and tops of sweet potato and cassava compared to those obtained nematicides. However, there was no apparent correlation between growth response and percent control.

Availability :
Library Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines; Scientific Literature Services; PCARRRD; Los Banos; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 39847

Resistance of 52 sweet potato Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. cultivars to Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica


Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research Vol. 6; 1984

Abstract:
Of the 52 sweet potato cultivars screened 13, 4, 7 and 28 were susceptible, moderately susceptible, moderately resistant, respectively, to M. incognita. With M. javanica only one cultivar was found susceptible, one was moderately susceptible, there were moderately resistant and 47 were resistant.Based on egg mass rating index, the most resistant cultivar to M. javanica was W-86 followed by L4-89, BPA-4 and Sinibastian whereas whereas Gold Rush, Binicol, C1596-9, Catanduanes and BNAS-51 were most susceptible. UPR was the only cultivar found susceptible to M. javanica. Highly significant positive linear correlation was observed between resistance rating and the parameter used, viz., number of egg masses and root galls, nematode population in roots, egg mass and gall indices.Egg mass index was the main criterion used in assessing resistant since galling index was adequate because galls produced in sweet potato were small and indistinct.

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Library Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines; Scientific Literature Services; PCARRRD; Los Banos; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 39848

Pre- and post-infectional resistance in sweet potato to Meloidogyne spp.


Gapasin, RM
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Philippine Phytopathology 21 (1-2): 8; 1985

Abstract:
Pre- and post-infectional phenomena as mechanisms of resistance occur in sweet potato cultivars.Fewer nematodes penetrated the resistant cultivars Jasper, Jewel and W-86 compared to the susceptible cultivars binicol and UPR. Post-infectional resistance was indicated by delayed or retarded development of nematodes after penetration in Jasper and Jewel or to non-development to maturity of nematodes in W-86. In susceptible cultivars, root-knot nematodes developed normally and second larval stage of the second generation were observed 35 days after inoculation. The number of eggs per egg mass and size of egg laying females obtained from susceptible cultivars were significantly greater compared to those from the resistant cultivars.

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NO. 39849

Phenolics involvement in sweet potato resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica


Gapasin, RM; Valdez, RB; Mendoza, EMT
Annals of Tropical Research 10 (2); 1988

Abstract:
The possible involvement of phenols in sweet potato resistance to rootknot nematode was shown by the reduced number of eggs hatched and high larval mortality of Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica exposed to root extracts of the resistant cultivars even as low as 10% concentration. The compounds present in the extracts were heat resistant, of low molecular weight and water soluble. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) revealed two distinct groups of blue flourescent spots in susceptible and resistant sweet potato extracts with Rf values coressponding to chlorogenic acid, scopoletin and esculin. More phenolics accumulated in root extracts of resistant sweet potato cultivars following infection as indicated by the stronger color intensity of the flourescent spot.

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NO. 39853

Seaweed (Eucheuma sp.), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) and gabi (Colocasia esculenta Schott) as culture medium ingredients for some fungal pathogens


Montesclaros, LB
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte

Philippine Phytopathology 24: 57; 1988

Abstract:
The suitability of seaweed of "gozo" carrageenan as a substitute for commercial agar in the preparation of culture media for Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., Helminthosporium maydis Nish. Miy., Pestalotiopsis sp., Cercospora henningsii Allescher, and Sphaceloma batatas Saw. was examined. The potential of sweet potato and gabi as substitutes for white potato in PDA with selected "gozo" carrageenan concentrations was also determined. Seaweed carrageenan was found to be an excelent substitute for commercial agar in the preparation of PDA and Onion Agar. S. rolfsii., H. maydis, C. henningsii, S. batatas and Pestalotiopsis sp., exhibited the best mycelial growth in 30, 45, 25, 20 and 45 g/li "gozo" carrageenan, respectively.For food sporulation/sclerotial formation and high percent spore germination, 30 g/li "gozo" carrageenan was superior for S. rolfsii and H. maydis; for S. batatas, 20 g/li; and for Pestalotiopsis sp., 40 g/li. C. henningsii, grown in PDA and in medium with "gozo" carageenan substitute, did not sporulate. Sweet potato at 300 g/li can replace white potato in PDA for culturing i while gabi at 500 g/li can be used for Pestalotiopsis sp.

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NO. 39854

Effect of stem and foliage scab disease on the growth and yield of VSP-1 sweet potato variety


Nayga, JG; Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 8 (3); 1986

Abstract:
Sweet potato plants inoculated with scab at 2 and 4 weeks after planting (WAP) were severely infected as shown by deformation of leaves and stunted plant growth. Scab infection also caused early death of main vines. However, this was not observed in plants inoculated at 6 and 8 WAP. Significant differences in disease severity ratings, leaf area and number and weight of marketable roots were observed among the different treatments but not in fresh vine weight, and number and weight of non-marketable roots. Total root yield of plants inoculated with scab at 2 and 4 WAP was reduced relative to the control by 27.8%, respectively. Eight week old inoculated plants had a yield reduction of only 4.4%.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39855

Detection of feathery mottle virus in sweet potato


Nazarea, AP; Dolores, LM; Malabanan, MJCC; Valencia, LD; Bajet, NB
Institute of Plant Breeding and Dept. of Plant Pathology; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna

Philippine Phytopathology 27 (1 & 2): 50; 1991

Abstract:
Few plants in the 1990 sweet potato trial by the Institute of Plant Breeding, UPLB showed symptoms like mild mosaic/mottle, downward curling/leaf distortion, and vein clearing. Leaves of the regenerated cuttings obtained from those plants maintained in the greenhouse showed the same symptoms. Fertilization induced more pronounced symptoms and were similar to those expressed by the non fertilized plants. Results of transmission tests showed that leaf extracts did not induce disease when rubbed onto I. batatas, C. amaranticolor, D. metel, D. stramonium, L. esculentum, N. glutinosa, N. rustica, N. tabacum, O. basilicum, G. globosa, and Petunia x hybrida, Myzus persicae Sulz. but not Aphis gossypii Glover was able to transmit a virus to I. batatas with the cuttings as source plants. In indirect enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay, extracts of the cuttings reacted to anti-feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) serum but not to antiserum to sweet potato latent virus. Our results indicate that SPFMV or a serologically related to SPFMV is associated with, if not the cause of the observed disease syndrome on the sweet potatoes. Further studies on the isolate and its distribution in the Philippines are in progress.

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NO. 39857

Infectivity and in vitro production of sweet potato scab fungus (Sphaceloma batatas Saw.) inoculum


Paningbatan, RA
Annals of Tropical Research 9 (1); 1987

Abstract:
Sweet potato stem agar and exposure to continuous darkness supported the most abundant conidial production of Sphaceloma batatas Saw. Sweet potato stem agar produced 19 times more conidia than sweet potato tuber agar and almost 3 times more conidia than potato dextrose agar. Sporulation in carrot agar peaked at 12-15 days after seeding and harvestable conidia generally declined after 18 days of incubation. Multipoint seeding of agar slants hastened sporulation and increased conidial product by almost 6 times compared to single-point seeding.Infectivity of conidia decreased with age of agar culture probably due to the drastic decline in conidial viability with age. Conidia from 1-week old agar cultures were most infected on sweet potato internodes and leaves.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 39858

Pathogenic variation of Sphaceloma batatas Saw in sweet potato


Sajise, CE; Capuno, MB
Philippine Phytopathology 26: 36-41; 1990

Abstract:
Eight isolates of Sphaceloma batatas were obtained from stem and foliage samples of sweet potato collected from Baybay and Abuyog, Leyte. The differential cultivars, IVSP2, VSP3, G145r-4, BNAS51, V3-158 and CI693-9, were inoculated with spore suspension from each isolate two weeks after planting, then evaluated for disease reaction 16 days later. The data obtained showed that S. batatas isolates varied in their ability to incite disease as reflected in the variation in relative number of lesions produced and the differential reactions of the host varieties. Of the eight isolates tested, the most virulent isolate was PRS182 followed by V11-148 with respective mean lesion density of 43.78 and 38.45. Isolates V11-253, Q145r-4, PRS387, V3-153, BNAS51 and V11-398 were found least virulent with mean lesion densities of 27.7, 23.2, 23.2, 22.5, 22.1 and 21.2, respectively.

Availability :
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NO. 39859

Some factors affecting the pathogenicity of Diplodia tubericola (Ell. & Ev.) Taubenh on sweet potato rot


Sardsud, V; Divinagracia, GG
Dept. of Plant Pathology; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna

Philippine Phytopathology 22 (1 & 2): 4; 1986

Abstract:
Moist chamber was needed for disease development. Incubation for 48 hours in moist chambers and exposure under room condition for 24 hours was recommended for diseaseinduction. Disease development was favored at 30 C. The storage roots became more susceptible when inoculated at 6 or more days after harvest than when they were newly harvested or at 3 days after harvest. Injured surface of storage roots inoculated 3 days or more after harvest formed wound periderm which protected the healthy tissues from mycelial penetration.

Availability :
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NO. 39860

Ingress and internal spread of Diplodia tubericola (EU> & Ev.) Taubenh on sweet potato root


Sarsud, V; Divinagracia, GG
Dept. of Plant Pathology; U.P. Los Banos; College; Laguna

Philippine Phytopathology 22 (1 & 2): 10; 1986

Abstract:
The fungus was artificially inoculated successfully to sweet potato roots through a hole (5 mm in diameter and 8 mm deep) made by cork borer. Mycelial agar discs induced disease development faster than spore suspension. The mycelia could not penetrate through the well formed periderm of sweet potato storage roots 12 days after harvest. Only newly harvested storage roots with loosely formed periderm, the mycelia invaded intercellularly and were restricted in the cork layer.A periderm was formed in response to the penetration. This periderm separated the healthy tissues from the penetrated cells and some cortical cells which collapsed ahead of mycelial penetration. Penetration both inter and intracellularlythrough wound was first observed at 6 hours after inoculation. The fungus preferred to penetrate and concentrate in the xylem vessel, anomalus cambium and vascular cambium layers. The pycnidia were formed at the cork cambium layer at about four days after inoculation and pycnidiospores were released after 6 days. On resistant varieties, the infected area were limited by a wound periderm which was formed in response to injury and infection.

Availability :
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NO. 39861

Potential of Metarhizium anisopliae for the control of the sweet potato weevil, Cylas fornicarius (F.) (Curculionidae: Coleoptera)


Villacarlos, LT; Granados-Polo, MFU
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 14 (3): 109-114; 1989

Abstract:
The efficacy of Metarhizium anisopliae for the control of the sweet potato weevil was evaluated in the screenhouse and the field in 1986 to 1988 in VISCA, Baybay, Leyte. Screenhouse tests showed that potted plants treated with the fungus produced higher percent uninfested tuberous roots than the untreated plants which was comparable with the carbofuran treatment. Higher percent infect weevils were collected from pots treated with the fungus at 3 weeks after planting than in the other treatments. On the other hand, field application of M. anisopliae either a conidial suspension at 4 weeks after planting or as conidia and mycelia on palay substrate applied at 3 weeks after planting during the rainy months reduced infested roots by 9%. Adult weevils collected from infested marketable roots were also lower by 48% than in the untreated plots. The same trend was observed during the slightly dry months, but there was lower percent uninfested roots than the planting in the rainy months.

Availability :
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NO. 40027

How important a food is winged bean in Papua New Guinea?


Claydon, A
Department of Chemistry; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Science in New Guinea 6(3): 144-153(1978-1979)

Availability :
Library; National Herbarium; Division of Botany; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40054

Sweet potato little leaf


Pearson, MN
Department of Biology; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Harvest 7(1): 50-51(1981)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40068

Cultivation practices with sweet potato


Kimber, AJ
Highlands Agriculture Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 1(1): 31-33(1971)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40078

Preventing seasonal shortages of root crops


Siki, BF
Highlands Agriculture Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 6(2): 61-64(1980)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40082

Growing sweet potato for sale in the highlands


Bourke, RM
Highlands Agriculture Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 47-58(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40085

Comparison of single and progressive harvesting of sweet potato


Rose, CJ
Piwa Agricultural Station; Department of Primary Industry; Tari; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 30(4): 61-64(1979)

Availability :
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NO. 40092

Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) fertilizer trials on the Gazelle peninsula of New Britain: 1954-1976


Bourke, RM
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 28(2-4): 73-95(1977)

Availability :
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NO. 40106

Observations in time of maturity of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas)


Jamieson, GI
Department of Primary Industries; Rockhampton; Queensland; Australia

PNG Agricultural Journal 20(1-2): 15-24(1968)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40125

'Little leaf', a virus disease of Ipomoea batatas in Papua New Guinea


Velsen, RJ van
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 18(4): 126-128(1967)

Availability :
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NO. 40128

Some cultural practices observed in the Simbai administrative area, Madang province


Burnett, RM
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Aiome; Milne Bay Province; Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea Agricultural Journal 16(2-3): 79-84(1963)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40161

Patrol of upper Chimbu cencus division, Eastern highlands


Montgomery, DE
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Bainyik; East Sepik Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 13(1): 1-9(1960)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40168

The cultivation of native food crops


Green, EC
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 7(1): 44-49(1941)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40172

A report on the possibility of producing power alcohol in Papua New Guinea


Hutchinson, RC
Department of Agriculture; Rabaul; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 7(2): 141-165(1941)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40184

Institutional food production and consumption in Eastern highlands and the Enga provinces


Calcinai, BL; Bourke, RM
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 1; p184-190

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40188

Taro (Colocasia esculenta) in the New Guinea Highlands


Smith, TB
Department of Geography; University of Cambridge; UK

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 1; p134-147

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40195

Subsistence gardening in the Hoskins oil palm scheme


Benjamin, C; Wapi, I
Department of Primary Industry; West New Britain Province; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 1; p168-175

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40197

Utilisation of organic wastes in crop production


Thiagalungan, K; Bourke, RM
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 2; p218-226

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40198

Traditional leafy vegetables of Papua New Guinea: Aibika (Hibiscus manihot)


Westwood, V; Kesevan, V
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 2; p391-395

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40200

Food cropping systems in the Tari Basin


Wood, AW
Geography Department; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 2; p256-267

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40204

Crop introduction and their consequences in the upper Kaironk valley, Simbai area, Madang province


Bulmer, R
Department of Anthropology; University of Auckland; New Zealand

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka, 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 2; p282-288

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40205

Review of the prospects for food processing in Papua New Guinea


Thomas, GS
Department of Primary Industry, Food Processing and Preservation Unit; Chemical Technology Department; University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka, 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 2; p408-420

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40209

Research work on food crops at the University of Papua New Guinea


Kesevan, V
Department of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Proceedings of the Second Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference, Goroka, 14-18th July 1980; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1982; Part 3; p551-552

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40211

Subsistence agriculture and Papua New Guinea economy


Shaw, B
National Centre for Development Studies; Australia National University; city?

Agriculture in the Papua New Guinea economy; Institute of National Affairs Inc. Discussion Paper No.20; 1985; p13-26

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40214

Large scale agriculture in Papua New Guinea


Shaw, B
National Centre for Development Studies; Australia National University; city?

Agriculture in the Papua New Guinea economy; Institute of National Affairs Inc. Discussion Paper No.20; 1985; p57-70

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40216

Some factors influencing the protein content of sweet potato


Kimber, AJ
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p63-74

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40217

Food crops farming systems used on the Gazelle peninsula of East New Britain


Bourke, RM
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p81-100

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40218

The role of plant breeding in the improvement of food crops in Papua New Guinea


Khan, TN
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p117-125

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40224

Storage of sweet potato tubers


Aldous, T
KUK Tea Research Station; Mt.Hagen; Western Highlands province; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p229-236

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40225

Some thoughts on fruit


Wilson, KC
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p237-239

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40226

Diseases of some of the major food crops in Papua New Guinea and some aspects of quarantine


Shaw, DE
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p251-256

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40229

Training for food crop production


French, BR
Vudal Agricultural College; East New Britain Province; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p275-286

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40230

Costs and returns from growing sweet potato


Kimber, AJ
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Proceedings of the 1975 Papua New Guinea Food Crops Conference; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1976; p313-316

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40232

The crops grown for food


Powell, JM; Kulunga, A; Moge, R; Pono, C; Zimike, F; Golson, J
Department of Geography; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Agricultural traditions of the Mount Hagen area; University of Papua New Guinea Occasional Paper No.12; 1975; p15-32

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40234

Agricultural implements


Powell, JM; Kulunga, A; Moge, R; Pono, C; Ziminke, F; Golson, J
Department of Geography; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Agricultural traditions of the Mount Hagen area; University of Papua New Guinea Occasional Paper No.12; 1975; p13-14

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40238

Sinasina


Shand, RT; Straatmans, W
New Guinea Research Unit; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Transition from subsistence: cash crop development in Papua New Guinea; New Guinea Research Bulletin No.54; 1974; p35-62

Abstract:
Article on agricultural activities in Sinasina area, Chimbu province

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40239

Boana


Shand, RT; Straatmans, W
New Guinea Research Unit; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Transition from subsistence: cash crop development in Papua New Guinea; New Guinea Research Bulletin No.54; 1974; p8-34

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40240

Tubers


Sillitoe, P
Social Anthropology; La Trobe University; USA

Roots of the earth: crops in the highlands of Papua New Guinea; Section 1; Washington; 1983; p29-52

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40261

Special report on the diet of the Sepik river people


Henry, T; Muia, G
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Sepik District; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 12(1): 41-43(1959)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40263

Analysis of growth and tuber yield in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) cultivars


Enyi, BAC
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Journal af Agricultural Science 88(2): 421-430(1977)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40264

Fresh water plants of Papua New Guinea


Leech, GJ; Osborne, PL
Department of Biology; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Port Moresby; University of Papua New Guinea; year?; XVp; 254p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40278

Crops; traditional vegetables


Twohig, A(ed)
Appropriate Technology Development Institute; Lae; Papua New Guinea

Liklik buk; a sourcebook for development workers in Papua New Guinea; Lae; Liklik Buk Information Centre; PNG University of Technology; 1986; p74-81

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40286

Subsistence agriculture in Milne Bay subdistrict


Cheung, P
Department of Primary Industry; Milne Bay province; Papua New Guinea

Six studies in subsistence agriculture; Department of Primary Industry Extension Bulletin No.11; 1980; p9-14

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40288

Notes on traditional cultivation and subsistence crops


Godyu, DL; Godyu, ME
Department of Primary Industry; Eastern Highlands province; Papua New Guinea

Six studies in subsistence agriculture; Department of Primary Industry Extension Bulletin No.11; 1980; p25-30

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40292

Matching plants and land: development of a general broad scale system from a crop project for Papua New Guinea


Hackett, C
Division of Water and Land Resources; CSIRO; Canberra; Australia

Natural Resources Series No.11; Canberra; Division of Water and Land Resources; CSIRO; 1983; ixp; 82p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40302

Agricultural systems in Papua New Guinea: Adapting to humid tropics


Vasey, D
Department of Primary Industry; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

A history of agriculture in Papua New Guinea: a time to plant and a time to uproot; City?; Institute of Papua New Guinea Studies; year?; pp?

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40319

A study of site X variety interactions for sweet potato in the highlands of Papua New Guinea


Kanua, MB; Floyd, CN
Agricultural Field Trials, Studies, Extension and Monitoring Unit(AFTSEMU); Mendi; Papua New Guinea

Department of Primary Industry Technical Report 85/17: 1-36(1985)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40325

A survey of central province yam (Dioscorea sp) gardens


King, GA
Laloki Plant Introduction and Horticultural Research Station; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Department of Primary Industry Technical Report 86/7: 1-7(1986)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40331

Composting and crop production on volcanic ash soils in the southern highlands of Papua New Guinea


Floyd, CN; D'Souza, EJ; Lefroy, RDB
Agricultural Field Trials, Studies, Extension and Monitoring Unit (AFTSEMU); Mendi; Papua New Guinea

Department of Primary Industry Technical Report 87/6: 1-64(1987)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40333

Phosphate and potash fertilization of sweet potato on volcanic ash soils in the southern highlands of Papua New Guinea


Floyd, CN; D'Souza, EJ; Lefroy, RDB
Agricultural Field Trials, Studies, Extension and Monitoring Unit; Mendi; Papua New Guinea

Department of Primary Industry Technical Report 87/7: 1-28(1987)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40350

Production of bananas by the Amele in Madang province and the Vanapa river and Kabadi areas of Central province, Papua New Guinea


King, GA; Banag, J; Kambuou, RN; Ovia, K; Ovia, A; Heywood, PF; Hide, RL
Department of Agriculture and Livestock; Bubia Agricultural Research Centre; Lae; Papua New Guinea

Department of Agriculture and Livestock Research Bulletin No.44; 1989; 92p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40361

Social setting: The Eastern highlands


Moulik, TK
New Guinea Research Unit; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

New Guinea Research Bulletin No.53; 1973; p50-65

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40362

Social setting: Madang


Moulik, TK
New Guinea Research Unit; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

New Guinea Research Bulletin No.53; 1973; p35-49

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40363

Social setting: Milne Bay


Moulik, TK
New Guinea Research Unit; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

New Guinea Research Bulletin No.53; 1973; p20-34

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40365

Siwai: The environment stage


Connell, J
Development Studies Centre; Australian National University; Canberra

Taim bilong mani: The evolution of agriculture in a Solomon Islands society; Canberra; Australian National University; Development Studies Centre; 1978; Monograph No.12; p1-22

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40367

Some environmental factors affecting earthworm populations and sweet potato production in the Tari basin, Papua New Guinea highlands


Rose, CJ; Wood, AW
Piwa Agricultural Station; Department of Primary Industry; Tari; Southern highlands province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 31(1-4): 1-13(1980)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40373

Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) production and research in Papua New Guinea


Bourke, RM
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Eastern Highlands province; Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 33(1-4): 89-108(1985)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40383

Recent development in Kovae agriculture


Ploeg, A
University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

History of agriculture; Port Moresby; University of Papua New Guinea/ Department of Primary Industry; Working Paper No.26; 1979; 16p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 50004

Sweet potato in Viet Nam; production and markets


Bottema, JWT; Binh, PT; Ha, DT; Hoanh, MT; Kim, H
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia

Bogor; ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; 1991; 113p

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 40390

Papua New Guinea food problems: time for action


Bourke, RM; Carrad, B; Heywood, P
Department of Primary Industry; Kainantu; Eastern Highlands province; Papua New Guinea

Department of Primary Industry Research Bulletin No.29; 1981; 42p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40407

Sweet potato


Department of Primary Industry; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Department of Primary Industry Farming Notes No.9 ((revised edition); 1977; 10p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40431

Studies on performance of polycross hybrids and compatibilty relationships among selected sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.)Lam.)clones


Kukuhang, T
Department of Agriculture; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea

Thesis; Lae; Department of Agriculture; PNG University of Technology; 1988; 52p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40432

The evaluation of polycross hybrids of sweet potato


Tumana, CW; Kesavan, V
Department of Agriculture; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea

Science in New Guinea 13(3): 132-139(1987)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40436

Conservation of plant genetic resources


Kesavan, V; Aburu, K
Department of Agriculture; University of Papua New Guinea; Lae

Port Moresby; Institute of Applied Economic & Social Research; 1982; Monograph 16; p379-384

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40464

Sweet potato production guide for the dry Papuan lowlands


King, GA
Laloki Plant Research Quarantine Station; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 59-62(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40465

Sweet potato releases from Aiyura


Akus lungat, W
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 63-66(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40466

Promising varieties of sweet potato at Kerevat


Kurika, LM
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 67-70(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40467

Fertilizing sweet potato on mineral soils in the highlands


Kimber, AJ
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 71-76(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40468

Growing sweet potato on organic soils in the highlands


Kimber, AJ
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 77-80(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40469

The effect of pig manure on sweet potato yields


Kimber, AJ
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 81-82(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40470

Maintaining fertility by putting compost into sweet potato mounds


Leng, AS
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 83-84(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40471

Mechanizing sweet potato production


Fooks, L; Groedl, E
Highlands Agricultural College; Mt.Hagen; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 8(2): 85-89(1982)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40473

Cultivation practices with sweet potato


Kimber, AJ
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal (Harvest) 1(1): 31-33(1971)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40476

Food crop cultivation


Calcinai, BL
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Papua New Guinea

Agriculture - Grades 7 & 10 teachers resource book; Port Moresby; Department of Education; Papua New Guinea; 1982; 81p

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40492

Grow food crops under your coconuts


Gallasch, H
Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Kerevat; Papua New Guinea

Lowlands Agricultural Experiment Station Information Bulletin No.12: 1-5(1977)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40508

Growing food crops under coconut


Gallasch, H
Lowlands Agricultural Research Station; Kerevat; East New Britain; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 6(2): 72-75(1980)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40515

Insect pests of Coffea arabica in the New Guinea highlands


Barrett, JH
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Aiyura; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 18(3): 83-100(1966)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40517

Implications of further cash cropping on the settlement blocks of the Hoskins oil palm scheme


Benjamin, C
Department of Primary Industry; Rabaul; East New Britain Province; Papua New Guinea

Agriculture in the tropics; Tenth Waigani Seminar, Lae, PNG University of Technology, May 2-8, 1976; Port Moresby; University of Papua New Guinea; 1977; p46-53

Availability :
Library; Matheson; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40519

Production and processing of food crops at village level - a study of a community project in the Western Highlands


Stephenson, RA; Kemelfield, GJ; Wood, AW; Power, AP; Khan, TN; Parfitt, R
Agriculture in the tropics; Tenth Waigani Seminar, Lae, PNG University of Technology, May 2-8, 1976; Port Moresby; University of Papua New Guinea; 1977; p76-87

Availability :
Matheson Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40532

Post harvest handling 1. Harvesting perishable produce


Brum Sr., M; Atkinson, G
Post Harvest Laboratory; Department of Primary Industry; Laloki; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 11(3): 94-98(1985)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40534

Intensification of subsistence agriculture on the Nembi plateau, Papua New Guinea 1. General introduction and inorganic fertilizer trials


D'Sonza, E; Bourke, RM
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Department of Primary Industry; Aiyura; Kainantu; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 34(1-4): 19-28(1986)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40535

Intensification of subsistence agriculture on the Nembi plateau, Papua New Guinea 3. Sweet potato cultivar trials, crop rotation trials, and crop introduction


D'Sonza, E; Bourke, RM; Akers, WL
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Department of Primary Industry; Aiyura; Kainantu; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 34(1-4): 41-48(1986)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40543

Post harvest handling 2. Getting your produce safely to market


Atkinson, G; Brum Sr., M
Department of Primary Industry; Konedobu; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 11(3): 99-104(1985)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40557

Northern Province


Baxter, MWP; Dakeyne, RB
Department of Geography; University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Encyclopedia of Papua and New Guinea, Vol.2(L-Z); Melbourne; Melbourne University Press in association with the University of Papua New Guinea; 1972; p861-867

Availability :
Library; Matheson; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40566

Indigenous technologies and recent advances in sweet potato production, processing, utilization and marketing in Papua New Guinea


Kanua, MB; Rangaii, SS
Auyura Research Station; Department of Agriculture and Livestock; Goroka; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

Port Moresby; Department of Agriculture and Livestock; 1988; 20p; DAL Discussion Paper No.88/5

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40568

The commodity export sector in Papua New Guinea


Lam, NV
Institute of Applied Social and Economic Research; Boroko; Papua New Guinea

Boroko; Institute of Applied Social and Economic Research; 1984; 237p; Monograph 22

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40579

Review of research on bananas, cassava and yam in Papua New Guinea


King, GA
Laloki Plant Introduction and Horticultural Research Station; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Technical Report 86/6; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1986; 17p

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae




NO. 40585

Whole soyabeans, a protein supplement for sweet potato in pig rations


Molynicz, GL
Tropical Pig Breeding Research Centre; Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Goroka; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 25(1-2): 15-17(1974)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40587

The sweet potato in subsistance agriculture


Kimber, JA
Highlands Agricultural Experiment SStation; Aiyura; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

PNG Agricultural Journal 23(3-4): 80-101(1972)

Availability :
Library; PNG University of Technology; Lae; Papua New Guinea




NO. 40651

The Land Resources of Upper Mendi (Volume 2)


Radcliff, DJ
Department of Primary Industry; Konedobu; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Research Bulletin No.37; Port Moresby; Department of Primary Industry; 1986

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40653

A Simple how to make local chips manual


Paskua, M
Appropriate Technology Development Institute (ATDI); Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe

ATDI Series; Appropriate Technology Development Institute; University of Technology; 1989; 31p

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40655

Agriculture year at Yabob village


Vicary, JR
District Agriculture Officer of Madang; Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea Agriculture Journal 12(4): 180-191 (1960)

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40659

Dietary intake surveys


Harvey, PWJ; Heywood, PF
Simbu Land Use Project; Chimbu Province; Papua New Guinea

Nutrition and Growth in Simbu; Boroko; Port Moresby; Institute of Applied, Social and Economic Research; 1983; pp95-114; Research Report of the Simbu Land Use Project Volume 4

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40663

Nutritional adaptation among the Enga-Agriculture


Sinnett, PF
University of Papua New Guinea; Port Moresby

Subsistence and survival-Rural Ecology in the Pacific; Academic Press; London; 1977; pp63-70

Availability :
Papua New Guinea University of Technology Library; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40674

Indigenuos technologies and recent advances in sweet potato production processing, utilization and marketing in Papua New Guinea


Rangaii, SS; Kanua, MB
Laloki Research Station; Department of Agriculture and Livestock; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Paper presented at the International Sweet Potato Symposium; VISCA: Philippines Root and Crop Research and Training Centre; May 20-26; 1987 Philippines in DAL Discussion paper 88/5; 1988; Port Moresby; 20p

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40676

The effect of oxygen, humidity and temperature on sprouting and deterioration in sweet potato and taro tubers


Kuso, J
Apropriate Technology and Development Institute; University of Technology; Lae; Morobe

Appropriate Technology and Development Institute; University of Technology; 1989; 23p

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40708

Sago for food in a changing economy


Moranta, L
Institute for Applied Social and Economic Research; Port Moresby; Papua New Guinea

Sago Research In Papua New Guinea; IASER Discussion Paper No.44; Boroko; Institute of Applied Social and Economic Research; 1982; pp39-75

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40709

Insect pests of Coffea arabica in the New Guinea Highlands


Barrett, JH
Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries; Aiyura; Eastern Highlands Province Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea Agriculture Journal 18(3): 83-100 (1966)

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40710

Sweet Potato in Papua New Guinea


Bourke, RM
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Kainantu; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

Kainantu; Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; 1982; 57p

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40717

Cassava for fuel alcohol


Holmes, B
Kuk Agricultural Research Station; MT Hagen; Western Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 6(1): 18-22 (1980)

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 40777

Coffee pulp as manure on sweet potato


Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea
Highlands Agricultural Experiment Station; Aiyura; Eastern Highlands Province; Papua New Guinea

Harvest 6(1): 1-4 (1980)

Availability :
Library; Papua New Guinea University of Technology; Lae; Morobe




NO. 50001

Sweet potato; Proceedings of the First International Symposium


Villareal, RL(ed); Griggs, TD(ed)
Institute of Plant Breeding; College of Agriculture; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna

Shanhua; Tainan; Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center; 1982; xiip; 481p; AVRDC Publication No.82-172

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 50006

Sweet potato in Northern Vietnam; present status and constraints


Hoanh, MT; Chien, DH; Quang, TK; Yen, NT; Nguyet, NT; Hoang, TD; Lieu, NB; My, TQ
Food Crop Research Institute; Haihung; Vietnam

Palawija News 7(4): 6-11(1990)

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 50008

Newly developed appropriate low cost technologies for sweet potato processing in Vietnam


Nghiem, Q
Department of Biochemistry and Food Technology; INSA; Vietnam

Palawija News 6(4): 5-8(1989)

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 50009

Sweet potato in Central Viet Nam; A survey of farmers' practices and constraints


Kim, H; Hoanh, MT; Thuy, NT; Tuan, VV; Quang, TV; Zaag, P vander
Institute of Agricultural Sciences of South Vietnam

Palawija News 7(3): 1-9(1990)

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 50010

Sweet potato production, variety selection and development in Vietnam


Hoanh, MT
Food Crop Research Institute; Vietnam

Palawija News 5(2): 4-7(1988)

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 50014

CGPRT crops in Indonesia: 1960-1990; A statistical profile


Bottema, JWT(ed); Broto, H(ed)
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia

Bogor; ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; 1990; xvp; 63p; Working Paper 4

Availability :
ESCAP/CGPRT Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 50106

Proceedings of the International Symposium on South East Asian Plant Genetic Resources, Jakarta, Indonesia, 20-24 August 1985


Mehra, KL(ed); Sastrapradja, S(ed)
Bogor; Lembaga Biologi Nasional-LIPI; 1985; vip; 211p

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 60804

Scientific contribution on studying materials containing carotene
Sumbangan pengetahuan penyelidikan bahan-bahan yang mengandung carotene

Fadriah, M
Thesis; Jakarta; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; University of Indonesia; 1977; 42p

Availability :
Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; University of Indonesia; Depok; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 61262

Vitamine A source vegetables cultivated at homegardens
Sayuran sumber vitamin A di pekarangan

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Kalimantan Selatan [South Kalimantan Agricultural Information Bulletin] (10): (1990)

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 61300

Utilization of nutritious foodstuffs
Pemanfaatan bahan makanan bergizi

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Lampung [Lampung Agricultural Information Bulletin] (10): (1988)

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 63115

Effect of some inoculation methods of Fusarium batatis on the development of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) stem rot diseases
Pengaruh beberapa cara inokulasi jamur Fusarium batatis terhadap perkembangan penyakit busuk batang panili (Vanilla planifolia Andrews)

Azizah
Thesis S1; Padang; Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; 1989; p.1-52

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 63122

Effect of some concentrations application of mixtalol plant growth regulator on the growth of pepper (Piper nigrum Linn.) seedlings
Pengaruh pemberian beberapa konsentrasi zat pengatur tumbuh mixtalol terhadap pertumbuhan bibit lada (Piper nigrum Linn.)

Sondang, Y.
Thesis S1; Padang; Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; 1987; p.1-71

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Andalas University; Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 63351

Effect of weeding time on tuber of sweet potato cv. Georgia Red
Pengaruh saat penyiangan terhadap umbi ubi jalar varietas Georgia Red

Husas, S.H.
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1985; 68p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 63395

Effects of post length and application of Hyponex foliar fertilizer on the growth and yield of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.)
Pengaruh panjang turus dan pemberian pupuk daun Hyponex terhadap pertumbuhan dan hasil tanaman kecipir (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.)

Hidjroh, R.S.H.
Thesis; Surabaya; Faculty of Agriculture; National 'Veteran' University; East Java Branch; 1989; 70p

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; National 'Veteran' University; East Java Branch; Surabaya; Indonesia




NO. 63457

Introduction of Canna edulis Kerr. as alternative carbohydrate source
Mengenal Canna edulis Kerr. sebagai sumber karbohidrat alternatif

Anonimus
Aku Tahu [I Know] (84): 72-73(1990)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 63459

Intensification on effort of secondary crops and yard crops in tidal areas lowland rice field
Intensifikasi pengusahaan tanaman-tanaman palawija dan pekarangan di persawahan pasang surut

Isbandi, D.; Reksowidjojo, D.; Ronoprawiro, S.
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

The third symposium on tidal swamp land development aspect Palembang, February 5-10, 1979; 1-17p

Availability :
Gadjah Mada University, Central Library




NO. 63461

Root and tuber crops in Indonesia
Tanaman akar-akaran dan ubi-ubian di Indonesia

Harsono, S.; Sudikno, TS.; Mardjuki, A.
Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Faculty of Agriculture; Gadjah Mada University; Yogyakarta; 34p

Availability :
Gadjah Mada University, Central Library




NO. 63504

Introducing various stadia of six species of Cassidinae beetles
Mengenal berbagai stadia enam jenis kumbang Cassidinae

Noerdito, W.A.
Proceedings of the 1st National Seminar of the Basic Biology; Bogor; 1990; p.133-124

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 63526

Potency of agricultural lands for developing secondary crops in Lampung
Potensi lahan pertanian bagi pengembangan palawija di Lampung

Rachmat, M.
Forum for Research in Economic Agro 5 (1&2): 31-37 (1987)

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 64239

Effect of the turning up canopy of sweet potato on growth and yield of sweet potato
Pengaruh pembalikan kanopi ubi jalar terhadap pertumbuhan dan produksi ubi jalar

Marsandi; Sarjito, A.
Faculty of Agriculture; Jendral Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia

Prosiding I Konperensi X HIGI [Proceedings of the Tenth Conference of Indonesian Weed Science Society, Vol.1]; Malang March 13-15, 1990; p343-349

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 64301

Effect of calsium chloride (CaCl2) solution and storage duration on physical characteristic and nutritional composition of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk) tubers
Pengaruh larutan kalsium klorida (CaCl2) dan lama penyimpanan terhadap sifat fisik dan komposisi zat gizi umbi ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk)

Badruzsaufari
Department of Biology; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Laporan Praktek Lapang Jurusan Biologi F-MIPA IPB [Field Practice Report of the Department of Biology; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; Bogor Agricultural University]; 1989; 79 p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 64311

Effects of liquid volume, cook tool and kind of processing of vegetable on ferrum leaching in dish of amaranth (Amaranthus hybridus L.) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) leaves
Pengaruh volume cairan, alat masak dan macam pengolahan sayuran terhadap leaching zat besi (Fe) pada sayur bayam (Amaranthus hybridus L.) dan daun ketela rambat (Ipomoea batatas L.)

Hardinsyah
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Laporan Masalah Khusus Fakultas Pertanian IPB [Report on the Special Issues in the Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University]; Jurusan Gizi Masyarakat & Sumber Daya Keluarga; 1982; 77 p

Availability :
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia




NO. 64504

Effect of shade on yield and nutrient content of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk)
Pengaruh naungan terhadap hasil dan kandungan gizi ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk)

Chairuna, R.
Department of Geophysical and Meteorology; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Special Problem Report; Department of Geophysical and Meteorology; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science; Bogor Agricultural University; Indonesia; 1987; 111 p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 64505

Effect of storage on beta-caroten content in flour of red sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.)
Pengaruh penyimpanan terhadap kandungan beta-karoten tepung ubi jalar merah (Ipomoea batatas L.)

Septimurni, R.R.
Department of Society Nutrient Value and Family Resources; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Department of Society Nutrient Value and Family Resources; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1984; 53 p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 64723

Sweet potato in South Vietnam; productivity, labour and market channels
Ubi jalar di Vietnam Selatan: Produktivitas tenaga kerja dan jalur pemasaran

Pham Thanh Binh; Bootema, J.W. Taco
CGPRT Centre; Jalan Merdeka 99, Bogor; Indonesia

Palawija News [Secondary Crops News] 6 (4): 1-4 (1989)

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 64725

Newly development of effective technology which low cost for sweet potato processing in Vietnam
Pengembangan baru teknologi tepat guna yang murah untuk pengolahan ubi jalar di Vietnam

Quach Nghiem
CGPRT Centre; Jalan Merdeka 99, Bogor; Indonesia

Palawija News [Secondary Crops News] 6 (4): 5-8 (1989)

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 64734

Role of CGPRT crops in developing economies
Peranan tanaman CGPRT dalam mengembangkan ekonomi

Anonymous
CGPRT Centre; Jalan Merdeka 99, Bogor; Indonesia

Palawija News [Secondary Crops News] 5 (4): 4-7 (1988)

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 64747

Culture factor in the diets of the South-West Pacific
Faktor budaya dalam menu di Pasifik Baratdaya

Doumenge, J.P.; Villenave, D.; Chapuis, D.
CGPRT Centre; Jalan Merdeka 99, Bogor; Indonesia

Palawija News [Secondary Crops News] 5 (2): 10-12 (1988)

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 64749

Sweet potato production, cultivar selection and its development in Vietnam
Produksi ubi jalar, seleksi varietas dan pengembangannya di Vietnam

Mai Thach Hoanh
CGPRT Centre; Jalan Merdeka 99, Bogor; Indonesia

Palawija News [Secondary Crops News] 5 (2): 4-7 (1988)

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 65135

Traditional agroforestry at Gunung Bunder II village, Cibungbulang subdistrict, Bogor district, West Java
Agroforestri tradisional di desa Gunung Bunder II, Kecamatan Cibungbulang, Kabupaten Bogor, Jawa Barat

Priarso, S.R.
S1 Thesis; Jakarta; Faculty of Biology; Nasional University; 1986; 56 p

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office




NO. 66890

Dani, an ethnic group dwelling the Baliem valley, Irian Jaya: a case study of the knowledge and utilization of plant resources
Etnobotani suku Dani di lembah Baliem-Irian Jaya: Suatu telaah tentang pengetahuan dan pemanfaatan sumber daya alam tumbuhan

Purwanto, Y.; Walujo, E.B.
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 Februari 1992; Editors: Nasution, R.E. et al p. 132-148 (1992)

Abstract:
Dani, an ethnic group dwelling the Baliem valley, Irian Jaya, is wholly dependance upon gathering, hunting and plant growing near their dwelling sites. Among 180 plant species utilized, 64 species were for house construction, 30 species for traditional medicine, 36 species for food, 15 species for ritual ceremonies, while the rest were for dyeing stuff, clothing and others. Almost 80% of the plants needed were solely depend upon their availability in the surrounding forests

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 67151

Description of superior cultivars of "palawija" (corn, sorghum, pulses and tuber crops), 1918-1992
Deskripsi varietas unggul palawija (jagung, sorgum, kacang-kacangan dan ubi-ubian), 1918-1992

Kasim, H.; Djunainah
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Bogor; Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Pangan; 1993; 155 p.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 67461

Effects of inoculum and sugar concentration on alcohol production from sweet potato
Pengaruh inokulum dan kadar gula terhadap produksi alkohol dari ubi jalar

Karsini
Balai Besar Penelitian dan Pengembangan Industri Palembang (Research Institute and Development for Industry Palembang); Indonesia

Edisi khusus BIPA (BIPA Special Edition); 1992 p.37-45

Availability :
Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 67610

Farming and possibilities of secondary crops development in paddy fields of South Sulawesi
Usahatani dan peluang pengembangan tanaman palawija dilahan sawah Sulawesi Selatan

Djamaludin
Bajeng Sub Station of The Research Institute for Tobacco and Fibre Crops; South Sulawesi

Prosiding seminar sehari peningkatan pemanfaatan lahan sawah bero untuk kapas sesudah padi; Balittas Malang; Seri Pengembangan (6): 33-49(1992)

Availability :
Research Institute for Tobacco and Fibre Crops Library; Malang; Indonesia




NO. 67626

Control of peanut bacterial wilt through crop rotation


Machmud, Muhammad
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Jl.Tentara Pelajar 3A; Bogor 16111, Indonesia

Biology and control of crop pathogens; BIOTROP Special Publication (54): 253-260(1994)

Abstract:
A three-year crop rotation study was done at Muara Experimental Farm, Bogor, in an effort to control bacterial wilt of peanut caused by Pseudomonas solanacearum (Smith 1896) Smith 1914. Two crops were grown annually, i.e., the wet season (WS) and the dry season (DS) crops. The duration of rotations were one, two and three years. The crop combinations in each year were: peanut-peanut; peanut-corn; lowland rice-lowland rice, corn-soybean, and sweet potato-sweet potato. To eliminate variation due to planting season and crop combination, two trials were made, one was started in the WS 1987/88 and another in the DS 1988. A resistant peanut cv. Gajah was used in the rotation. Susceptible peanut cv. Kelinci and tomato cv. Gondol Hijau were used as indicator plants to assess the wilt intensity in each plot after the rotation. Three year rotations could reduce wilt intensity from 64% to 12% on peanut cv. Kelinci and from 80% to 22% on tomato cv. Gondol Hijau. The longer the rotation period, the lower was the wilt intensity. Rotations of peanut with lowland or irrigated rice is the most effective in controlling the disease followed by corn-soybean, corn-peanut, soybean-soybean, sweet potato-sweet potato, and peanut-peanut. A two year rotation with a non-host crop, such as rice or corn would be sufficient to control the disease. However, it needed a longer rotation period when resistant hosts such as sweet potato, soybean, or peanut cv. Gajah were used. Crop sanitation from weed hosts, infected plant debris and avoiding contaminated irrigation water from the upstream also need to be done during the rotation. (Author's abstract)

Availability :
SEAMEO-BIOTROP Library




NO. 68578

Government farmers credits (KUT) for food crops in NTB, with particular emphasis on South-Eas Lombok (gogo rancah area)


Meindertsma, J.D.; Hartojo, Koes
Malang Research Station for Food Crops; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Sistem Usaha Tani di Nusa Tenggara Barat [Proceedings of a Seminar on the research Results of Farming System in West Nusa Tenggara]; Mataram; 22-26 October 1991; Suyamto, H(ed); Winarto, A(ed); Sugiono(ed); Sunardi(ed); 1992; p122-144

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biotechnology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68583

Farmers' criteria in the selection of varieties of palawija crops implementation of field work in Lombok and Sumbawa


Dorp, Marianne van; Rulkens, Ton
ATA-272 Nutritionist; ATA-272 Germplasm specialist

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Sistem Usaha Tani di Nusa Tenggara Barat; Mataram; 22-26 Oktober 1991; Suyamto, H(ed); Winarto, A(ed); Sugiono(ed); Sunardi(ed); Malang; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan; 1992; p191-202

Abstract:
During 1991 field work for the "Farmers Criteria Study" was conducted in Lombok and Sumbawa. Four palawija crops were addressed; soybean, maize, sweet potato and cassava. Through interviews with farmers, traders, processors etc., information was collected on differences between varieties/landraces regarding agronomic characteristics, use, post harvest aspects, marketing, taste and cooking qualities. At the same time, 168 samples of local varieties were collected for inclusion into MARIF's genebank. Preliminary results are presented as well as some proposals for follow up research.

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biotechnology; Cibinong; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68588

Physical and socio-economical description of FSR-Pilot area Lombok


Meindertsma, J.D.; Suyamto
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Sistem Usaha Tani di Nusa Tenggara Barat [Proceedings of a Seminar on the Research Results of Farming System in West Nusa Tenggara]; Mataram; 22-26 October 1991; Suyamto, H(ed); Winarto, A(ed); Sugiono(ed); Sunardi(ed); 1992; p240-273

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biotechnology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68613

Application of fresh forage as supplement feed of pigs
Penggunaan hijauan segar sebagai tambahan makanan babi

Aritonang, D.; Silalahi, M.
Research Institute for Livestock; Ciawi; Bogor; Indonesia;

Prosiding Pengolahan dan Komunikasi Hasil-hasil Penelitian Unggas dan Aneka Ternak; Bogor, 20-22 Februari 1992; Iskandar, S(ed); Syahgar, S(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Ternak; 1992; p160-166

Availability :
Research Institute for Livestock




NO. 68623

Potentials and prospects of forage in Barru district
Potensi pakan ternak di Kabupaten Barru dan kemungkinan pengembangan

Idris, Thamrin; Borahima, Aisyah
Fakulty of Animal Husbandry; Hasanuddin University; Ujung Pandang; Indonesia

Prosiding Pertemuan Pengolahan dan Komunikasi Hasil Penelitian Peternakan di Sulawesi Selatan [Proceedings of a Seminar on Processing and Communicating of the Research Results of Animal Husbandry in South Sulawesi]; Ujung Pandang, 4 March 1992; Prabowo, A(ed); Bulo, D(ed); Tikupadang, A(ed); Bahar, S(ed); Winugroho, M(ed); Salam, R(ed); 1992; p85-93

Availability :
Research Institute for Livestock




NO. 68640

Research on the development of soybean in rice fields
Penelitian pengembangan kedelai dilahan sawah

Adnyana, Made Oka; Sudana, Wayan; Saenong, S.; Noor, M.N.; Makmun, Y.
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Risalah Penelitian Pengembangan Sistem Produksi Pertanian [Proceedings of a Seminar on Research and Development of Agricultural Product System]; Bogor; 1993; Musaddad, A(ed); Kasim, H(ed); Adyana, M.O(ed); 1993; p13-35

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesian




NO. 68750

Biodiversity as food resources and for plant genetic improvement
Keanekaragaman hayati sebagai sumber pangan dan perbaikan genetik tanaman

Harahap, Z.; Dimyati, A.; Moeljoprawiro, S.; Silitonga, T.S.
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Kinerja Penelitian Tanaman Pangan; Prosiding Simposium Penelitian Tanaman Pangan III [Proceedings of a Symposium on Food Crops Research III]; Jakarta/Bogor; 23-25 August 1993; Syam, M.(ed); Hermanto(ed); Kasim, H.(ed); Sunihardi(ed); 1994; p229-244

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 68754

Analysis of research result of tuber crops for supporting the production increment and agroindustrial development
Telaah hasil penelitian ubi-ubian untuk mendukung peningkatan produksi dan pengembangan agroindustri

Dimyati, Achmad; Hartijo, Koes; Djazuli, M.; Malian, A.Husni
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Kinerja Penelitian Tanaman Pangan; Prosiding Simposium Penelitian Tanaman Pangan III; Jakarta/Bogor, 23-25 Agustus 1993; Syam, M.(ed); Hermanto(ed); Kasim, H.(ed); Sunihardi(ed); Bogor; Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Pangan; Buku I Kebijaksanaan dan Hasil Utama Penelitian; 1994; p308-337

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 68725

Response of three sweet potato promising clones to nitrogen fertilizing in the drylands
Tanggap tiga klon harapan ubijalar terhadap pemupukan nitrogen dilahan kering

Sunardi; Widodo, Yudi
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Tahun 1992, Malang; 26-27 Februari 1992; Kasno, A(ed); Hendroatmodjo, KH(ed); Winarto, A(ed); Malang; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Malang; 1993; p288-292

Abstract:
Lack of nutrient, especially nitrogen, is assumed as the crusial factor which contributes to the low sweet potato yield level in the drylands. To study the response of three sweet potato promising clones to N fertilizer application, a field experiment was carried out during the dry season of 1991 at Jatikerto Experimental Farm of Brawijaya University. The treatment was designed due to a factorial and laid at Randomized Block Design with three replications. The first factor was the three sweet potato clones, i.e. Taiwan/395-6, Ciceh-32, and TIS 5125-26. The second factor was the four levels of N fertilizer, i.e. 22, 5; 45; 67, 5; 90 kg/ha. Urea was used for the source of nitrogen. Phosphate and potash were used as standard. Apical vine cutting of the three clones with 25 cm length, planted at the spacing of 100 x 25 cm at the plot size of 5 x 4 m. The harvesting was done at 120 days after planting. Interaction between sweet potato clones and N fertilizer occured on tuber yield. All of the clones indicated a linear response to N fertilizer until the amount of 67, 5 kg/ha. However, the higher N fertilizer application, 90 kg/ha, only TIS 5125 which was able to increase the tuber yield up to 26, 17 t/ha. While the two other clones declined in its tuber yield at the N application higher than 67, 5 kg/ha each.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 68728

Optimizing the density of sweet potato promising clones in young volcanic soils
Optimasi kerapatan tanam klon-klon harapan ubijalar dilahan vulkanik muda

Widodo, Yudi
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Tahun 1992, Malang; 26-27 Februari 1992; Kasno, A(ed); Hendroatmodjo, KH(ed); Winarto, A(ed); Malang; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Malang; 1993; p308-314

Abstract:
To determine an optimum population of the sweet potato promising clones, a field experiment was carried out in the volcanic soils of Blitar during the dry season of 1991. A strip plot design with three replications was used in this study. Five sweet potato clones (Genjah Rante, Tw/395-6, Lapis-30, Lapis-34 and Ciceh-35) was considered as horizontal factor, planted in the four levels of plant population which was implemented in the plant spacing (100 x 25 cm, 100 cm x 20 cm, 100 cm x 15 cm, 100 cm x 10 cm). The fertilizer application at amount of 100 kg Urea + 100 kg KCl/ha, was applied per plant basis. Harvesting was done at four months after planting. On volcanic soils, population of sweet potato could be increased until 66, 666 plants/ha (at the spacing of 10 cm x 15 cm), the tuber yield obtained from this population was 19.36 t/ha. It means that this yield was 15% higher than that of the previous recommended population (40, 000 plants/ha). The increased population of sweet potato in higher level up to 100, 000 plants/ha did not increase tuber yield, contrary to the higher population that the vine fresh weight increased significantly. Clones Lapis-30 and Ciceh-35 gave higher tuber yield than that of local Genjah Rante.

Availability :
PROSEA Network Office




NO. 68741

The efforts on breeding pesquet's parrot (Psittrichas fulgidus) in captivity


Prijono, Siti Nuramaliati; Mananseng, Jansen
Zoology Division of the Research and Development Centre for Biology-LIPI; Bogor; Indonesia

Proceedings of the Third Annual Conference of South-East Asian Zoological Parks Association; Bogor 11-15 August 1993; Jakarta, Indonesian Zoological Parks Association; 1993; p88-99

Abstract:
Pesquet's parrot (Psittrichas fulgidus) is very rare and unusual parrot from the forested mountains of Irian Jaya (Indonesia) and Papua New Guinea. This bird is protected in Indonesia. The objective of this study was to know the normal behaviour of this bird, to find the right bond of the bird, and to determine the feed preferences in captivity. To develop succesful methods of animal captive breeding often required a detailed knowledge of basic biology of a species, including its behaviour and nutrition. Furthermore the captive breeding of threatened species was becoming a necessary part of conservation efforts world wide. Four birds in two aviaries in Indonesian Safari Park were used in this study. Each aviary content of two birds. The size for each aviary was 400 cm x 250 cm x 270 cm. The birds were fed three kind of fruits, sweet potatoes and high protein diets. Time sampling method was used for observing their maintenance behaviour and feeding activities. The results showed that the maintenance behaviour was more active during the day (12: 00-12: 30) than in the afternoon and in the morning. While the feeding activities in the tree of different time was not significant different. The average time of courtship feeding of a pair birds has been formed a right bond was 4 min. 10 sec. per hour. The birds in captivity tend to get feed lack of protein. It suppose that the birds need enough protein in their diets for their growth, maintenance and reproduction. Therefore, to meet the requirement of protein in the diets of Pesquet's Parrot, the birds fed high protein diets (mixed: Dog food, egg yolk, apple juice and honey), besides fed guava, bananas, papaya, and cooked sweet potatoes. The result showed that the feed preferences of Pesquet's parrot was as follows: papaya (39.9%), bananas (22.6%), guava (11.1%), while sweet potatoes (9.9%), diets high protein (8.7%) and red sweet potatoes (7.8%). (Authors' abstract)

Availability :
Indonesian Safari Park; Cisarua; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68746

Pests and diseases of plants in the farming system of tidal zones and efforts for their control
Hama dan penyakit tanaman dalam sistem usaha tani lahan pasang surut serta usaha-usaha pengendaliannya

Sastraatmadja, Suwalan; Zakiah; Mukelar, Amir; Rochman; Sujitno, J.
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Risalah Pertemuan Nasional Pengembangan Pertanian Lahan Rawa Pasang Surut dan Lebak [Proceedings of a National Seminar on the Agricultural Development in Tidal Swamp Lands and in Valleys]; Bogor; 3-4 March 1992; 1992; p157-167

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68941

Adaptability of sweet potato and potato to low potassium soils


Djazuli, Muhamad
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Penelitian Pertanian (Agricultural Research) 12(2): 71-74(1992)

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 68999

Sweet potato; production, utilization and marketing in commercial centers of production in Java, Indonesia


Watson, G.; Dimyati, Ahmad; Malian, A.Husni; Bahagiawati; Wargiono
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia

Central Research Institute for Food Crops and International Potato Center; 1992; 25p

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68948

Effect of planting mix clones of sweet potato on the intensity of scab (Elsinoe batatas Saw) and crop yield
Pengaruh penanaman campuran klon ubijalar terhadap penyakit kudis (Elsinoe batatas Saw) dan hasil

Zuraida, Nani; Bari, Abdul; Wattimena, C.A.; Amir, Mukelar; Soenarjo, R.
Central Research Institute for Food Crops (CRIFC); Bogor; Indonesia

Penelitian Pertanian [Agricultural Research] 12(3): 119-122(1992)

Abstract:
Nine clones of sweet potato were planted as 27 two-line blends with 1: 1 ratios of each line, and as nine pure clones at Cikeumeuh Experimental Farm, Bogor from January until June 1986 in a Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications. The nine clones consisted of three resistant clones: Daya, Borobudur, and Prambanan; three moderately resistant: TIS 5016-2, TIS 5125-4, and TIS 5125-8 and three susceptible ones: TIS 3247-4, TIS 3247-5, and TIS 5125-15. Blending of resistant clones with moderate clones and susceptible clones increased the intensity of scab significantly on the resistant clones, by 7, 3% and 6.0%. Blending of susceptible clones with resistant clones and moderate clones decreased the intensity of scab on susceptible clones, by 9, 9% and 8, 9% but the intensity is still high, more than 50%. Blending of Daya and moderate clones yielded significantly higher than the best pure clones, by 16%. Blending of Prambanan and susceptible clones yielded significantly higher than means pure clones. Therefore, the blending of clones showed over compensation. Resistant clones were stronger competitors than those of moderate and susceptible clones. Susceotible clones were the weakest competitor.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 68988

Main results of the food crops research 1987-1991
Hasil utama penelitian tanaman pangan 1987-1991

Manwan, Ibrahim
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops; Indonesia

Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Tanaman Pangan Bogor [Central Research Institute for Food Crops; Bogor); 1992; 95p

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops (CRIFC); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 68990

Main results: 1988-1992 Maros Research Institute for Food Crops
Hasil Utama: 1988-1992 Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Maros

Hasanuddin, Andi
Maros Research Institute for Food Crops (MORIF); South Sulawesi; Indonesia

Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Maros [Maros Research Institute for Food Crops]; 1993; 60p

Availability :
Center for Agricultural Library and Research Communication; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 69220

Study on several chemical characteristics of various tuber species during fermentation processes by yiests
Kajian beberapa sifat kimia selama fermentasi beberapa jenis umbian oleh ragi

Hanafiah, H.
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Agriculture; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Agriculture; University of Agriculture; 1992; 82p

Availability :
University of Agriculture; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 69588

The response of middlemen to sweet potato cv. Bis 183 and SQ 27 in Yogyakarta area, in 1990
Respon pedagang terhadap ubijalar jenis bis 183 dan Southern Queen (S.Q.) 27 di daerah Yogyakarta, 1990

Bagyo, Al Sri; Dimyati, A.; Waluyo
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Balittan Bogor; Bogor 19-20 Februari 1991; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; 1992; Vol.III; p.579-590

Abstract:
The plant breeding division of the Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF) has released a big and red sweet potato variety temporarily named Bis 183. Together with cv. Southern Queen 27 (S.Q.27) wich has been widely accepted by consumers, Bis 183 was planted in a 5 ha land area at Magelang, Central Java. Farmers in Magelang and consumer in Yogyakarta were not familiar with both varieties. The local varieties such as Magelang Sumbawa and Jarem have been popular in the market for a long time. Therefore, to be accepted by consumers, Bis 183 and S.Q.27 have to compete with the local varieties which already have good marketing channel. The objective of the study was to determine the response of middlemen to cv. Bis 183 and S.Q.27, which will be widely distributed in Yogyakarta and Central Java area. Results of the study showed that Bis 183 which is similar to local variety Magelang was attractive for its skin and flesh color, size and form. Similarly, cv. S.Q.27, which was similar to local variety Sumbawa also attractive to the consumers eventhough small number of middlemen were not interested due to its small size and form. Depending on the middlemens selling scale, they were willing to buy cv. Bis 183 and S.Q.27, between 1000-2000 kg per day. cv. Bis 183 has a better price prospect than S.Q.27. Based on taste test, low level consumers prefered S.Q.27, while medium and high level consumers were more interested in Bis 183.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69589

Meristem culture of sweet potato
Kultur meristem tanaman ubijalar

Masyudi, Mohammad Fatchurochim
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 Februari dan 2 Maret 1992; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol I; 1992; p.1-8

Abstract:
A meristem culture experiment of sweet potato was conducted at the laboratory of Biotechnology, Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF) in 1990/91 using 4 varieties of sweet potato, namely Southern Queen (SQ)27, Borobudur, Prambanan and Daya. Apical meristem of sweet potato plants were grown in vitro on MS (Murashige and Skoog) medium with a combination of hormon IAA (0.05 and 0.1 mg/l) and Kinetin (0.05, 0.1 and 0.5mg/l). Objectives of the experiment were to study the best hormon combination level in the MS medium for the growth of meristem in vitro and to obtain sweet potato plants free from pathogen (virus and bacteria). The results indicated that plantlet formation was affected by genotypes and hormonal combinations. The highest percentage of plantlet formation was attained by SQ 27 (83%) variety on MS media + 0.1 mg IAA/l + 0, 5 mg Kinetin/l. Prambanan variety produced the highest planlets (60%) on MS media + 0.05 mg/l IAA + 0.05 mg/l Kinetin, while Borobudur (45%) and Daya (70%) varieties on MS media + 0.1 mg IAA/ l + 0.05 mg Kinetin/liter. Genotypes and combinations of hormon concentrations influenced the formation of plantlets on meristem cultures of sweet potato. Electron microscopic observation indicated that sweet potato plants produced by in vitro cultures of meristems were free from virus and bacterial infections.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69896

Resistance of sweet potato clones and varieties to scab disease
Ketahanan klon harapan ubi jalar terhadap scab (Elsinoe batats Saw)

Nasrun, D.; Jaswandi; Jusuf, M.d
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar [Seminar Treatise] II: 138-144(1993)

Abstract:
The experiment was carried out at Rambatan Experimental Farm, West Sumatra during the wet season of 1991/92. A Randomized Completely Block Design with three replications was designed in this experiment. Thirty eight sweet potato clones and varieties were tested for their resistance to scab as well as their performance on yield and yield components. The data collected were scab infection, large and small tuber number, large and small tuber weight per hill, and yield. Five varieties and clones namely Gowi Karya 1, Gowi Kifa 2, Pelo Talua Putiah, BIS 183 (OP)-Sr-140 and Tamburin Merah were resistant to scab. The highest yield was found on BIS 192(OP)-Sr-238 as high as 3.46 kg/m2.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 69590

Effect of stem pruning on sweet potato yield
Pengaruh pemangkasan tajuk klon ubijalar terhadap hasil

Dimyati, A.; Zuraida, N.
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 Februari dan 2 Maret 1992; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol I; 1992; p.9-12

Abstract:
Effect of pruning sweet potato plants on yield was investigated at Lembang in the dry season of 1990. The experiment was arranged in a Split Plot Design with three replications. The mainplot factors were stem pruning at every two months and no interval pruning. Ten sweet potato clones were used as the subplot factors. Harvest was done six months after planting. Pruning did not affect yield of the clones nor the ranking order of the clones. Clone Bis 175 produced the highest yield (22.76 t/ha) followed closely by BIS 151, Bis 186, Bis 113-8 and Prambanan. The lowest yield was given by Tumpluk (13.62 t/ha), followed by Bis 173, Bis 183, Bis 214 and Bis 182-81. This study demonstrated the possibility of farmers in high altitude areas to obtain good sweet potato root yield, as well as using stems and leaves of the plant for their animal feed.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69591

Yields response of sweet potato promising lines to two level of fertilizers
Hasil klon harapan ubijalar pada dua takaran pupuk

Zuraida, N.; Dimyati, A.
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 Februari dan 2 Maret 1992; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol I; 1992; p.13-17

Abstract:
Yields response of sweet potato promising lines to two level of fertilizers Response of two sweet potato fertilizer was investigated at Karanganyar in the dry season of 1990. The experiment was arranged in a Split-Plot Design with three replications. The main plot factors were two farmers level of fertilizer applications (70 kg N and 70 kg P2O5/ha) and 'BPP' (Agricultural Extention Institute) recommendation (90 kg N, 20 kg P2O5 and 30 kg K2O/ha). Nine sweet potato clones were the sub plot factors. The method of fertilizer application on two levels fertilizers were 1/3N, 1/3K2O and all of P2O5 applied at planting time and 2/3N, 2/3K2O were applied at one month after planting. The levels of fertilizers applied did not affect yield of the clones nor the ranking order of the clones. Clone Bis 113 OP 3 produced the highest yield (42.2 t/ha) which was significantly different from the other clones. Cultivar Prambanan produced 28.3 t/ha, followed by Bis 182 OP 81, Bis 182 OP 50, Bis 151 OP 4, Bis 157 OP 4 and Bis 113 OP 48. The lowest yield was found on Bestak (15.7 t/ha) and Bis 182 OP 29.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69592

Screening for adaptability of sweet potato cultivar to acid soil
Skrining varietas ubijalar pada lahan masam

Djazuli, Muhammad
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 Februari dan 2 Maret 1992; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol I; 1992; p.18-27

Abstract:
Screening for adaptability of sweet potato cultivar to acid soil. Adaptability of sweet potato to aluminum toxicity and nutrient deficiency varies among clones or cultivar. Study on the tolerant levels of sweet potato clones/cultivar to acid soils of Jasinga was carried out under field and green house conditions in the dry season of 1991 and wet season of 1991/92. The field trial was conducted at the farmers field in Jasinga, while the pot experiment was conducted in the green house by using soil from the same area. Neither lime nor fertilizers were applied to the soil in the field experiments. In the pot experiment, 0 and 24 g CaO/pot were applied to the soil among 78 clones/cultivars tested, three local varieties, namely; Deli, Ceret B and Biru, were relatively tolerant to aluminum toxicity and nutrient deficiency. There was no clear correlation between the tolerance of the clones/cultivars and nutrient status of the plant tissue, especially N, P, K and Fe. In pot experiment, clones/cultivar B0065, B0066, B0100 and Prambanan, showed better growth and more tolerance to acid and nutrient deficient soils than Calolo, Lampung and Kasenggeng. Lime application, improved plant growth of the tolerant varieties, except for Prambanan.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69596

Economic analysis of controlling sweet potato weevil trial and its response of the sweet potato formes in Bogor area, in 1989/1990
Analisa ekonomi percobaan pemberantasan hama lamas serta respon petani ubijalar didaerah Bogor, M.T. 1989/1990

Bagyo, Al Sri; Dimyati, A.; Waluyo
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 Februari dan 2 Maret 1992; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol I; 1992; p.39-47

Abstract:
Weevil is an important pest of sweet potato. Various means of weevil control have been practiced, but weevil is still a latent pest in several sweet potato production centres. The resistance of a sweet potato variety to pests and diseases is influenced by some environmental factors. An experiment was conducted at Leuwiliang Bogor, to control weevil by soaking sweet potato cuttings in a 0.1% Triazophos 25EC suspension and spraying the sweet potato plant in the field. The results showed that soaking the sweet potato cuttings followed by spraying the plant with Triazophos 25 EC at 2, 3 and 4 months after planting respectively, gave the highest additional benefit of Triazophos 25EC. Unfortunately most farmers were not familiar with this pesticide. However if this pesticide can control weevil effectively and available in the market, farmers will be willing to buy and use it. The farmers also realize that soaking of sweet potato cutting stimulates sweet potato growth and increase yield.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69597

Prospect of sweet potato development in rainfed rice area at Kuningan
Prospek pengembangan ubijalar pada lahan sawah tadah hujan di Kabupaten Kuningan Jawa Barat

Malian, A.Husni; Djazuli, M.; Dimyati, A.
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Balittan Bogor, Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan, Bogor, 29 Februari dan 2 Maret 1992; Hardjosumadi, S(ed); Machmud, M(ed); Tjokrowinoto, S(ed); Pasaribu, D(ed); Sutrisno(ed); Kurnia, A(ed); Mulyono, N(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Bogor; Vol I; 1992; p.48-57

Abstract:
Prospect of sweet potato development in rainfed lowland rice at Kuningan. Program of increasing rice productions in Kuningan, West Java has lead to the reductions in area grown with sweet potato Kuningan is one of the sweet potato production centers, and in 1990 the areas grown with this crop has been reduced by 1200 ha, particularly the irrigated lowland area. Survey on the sweet potato cropping system at Kuningan showed the presence of tendency to move the sweet potato cropping into rainfed lowland area. Several improvement on production technology however, need to be implemented in the area cropping pattern, such as; the use of early maturing rice varieties; the use of sweet potato cultivars that fulfill the demand of food sauce industries and consumers who use sweet potato for food supplement, and specific technology for lowland rainfed area. To avoid price reduction in farmers level, managements on planting time, varieties to be grown in the region need to be implemented by considering the annual rainfall distribution and the market demands.

Availability :
Central Research Institute for Food Crops Library




NO. 69950

Planting and harvesting methods of sweet potato
Cara tanam dan panen ubi jalar

Ridwan; Irfan, Zul
Sukarami Research Insitute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil-hasil Penelitian Balittan Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar on Research Results of Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops] 1: 155-161(1992)

Abstract:
Two experiments were carried out in Koto Hilalang, Bukittinggi (1984/85) and Rambatan, Batusangkar (1988/89), West Sumatra. The first experiment was dealt with the planting methods on 3 genotypes (Daya, Local Batagak, and I 307 (cp)-st-10). The harvesting methods were evaluated using 3 genotypes (Daya, karya and Local Rambatan). The results showed that planting methods did not significantly affect the number of tubers produced by each genotype. The yield, however, was slightly by the planting methods. Genotypes differed in yield for each planting method. The half-circled planting method gave the highest yield for Daya and I 307 (cp)-st-10. The best yield from local variety Batagak was obtained with horizontal planting method. Two or tree harvesting done periodically gave higher total production compared to once harvest only.

Availability :
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia




NO. 70361

Preliminary study on the protein and amino acid contents of sweet potato
So bo nghien cuu ve ham luong protein axit amin trong mot so giong khoai lang

Le Duc Dien; Nguyen Thi Thinh; Nguyen Quoc Khang
Hanoi University; Vietnam

Tap chi Sinh vat - Dia hoc [Journal of Biology and Geography] 7(1): 11-16 (1968)

Abstract:
Through the study on the content of sweet potato, the authors show that the sweet potato forma lim contain 19 common amino acids and 8 other amino acids. Their tubers are mainly used as food for human and raw material for production of starch and alcohol. In Vietnam, shoots are used as vegetable and most of the plant parts are for livestock feed.

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 71075

Preliminary processing and preserving sweet potato and manioc
So che va bao quan khoai san

Rural Publishing House, Hanoi, 1978; 56p

Availability :
National Library of Vietnam




NO. 80024

Analysis of tuber yield in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) cultivars


Enyi, B.A.C.
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Papua New Guinea

Regional Meeting on the production of root crops (24-29 October 1975, Suva, Fiji) - Collected papers. Technical Paper No. 174; South Pacific Commission, Noumea, New Caledonia

Abstract:
Seven cultivars were tested. Improvement programmes are recommended.

Availability :
International Agrarian Centre (IAC), Lawickse Allee 11, 6701 AN Wageningen, the Netherlands




NO. 90656

Factors affecting household demand for sweet potato in two regions of the Philippines


Alkuino, JM Jr
Annals of Tropical Research 5(1); 1983

Abstract:
Factors affecting the demand for sweet potato were determined through a consumer survey of 1200 households from 2 regions of the Philippines. Using regression technique, the demand functions were generated and the demand coefficients estimated. Separate regression analysis was made using the double log form for low income and high income households. The four relevant variables found to affect household demand for sweet potato included income of the head of the household, household size, retail price of sweet potato and age of the principal shopper. Sweet potato was found to be a superior good for lower income groups and inferior good at higher income levels.

Availability :
Western Visayas Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Department of Agriculture; Hamungaya; Jaro; Iloilo City; Philippines




NO. 90657

Consumption of secondary food crops by low- and high-income households


Alkuino, JMJr
Annals of Tropical Research 9(1); 1987

Abstract:
The study attempted to identify the kinds of secondary food crops consumed by households when the normally consumed staple food is scarce or when such households experience an income squeeze. One thousand two hundred households in the Visayas region were included in the survey. The respondents were divided into high- and low-income groups based on the median income of the groups. Four secondary food crops, namely: sweet potato, plantain banana, cassava and taro were usually bought by respondents to supplement their staple food consumption. In general, more respondents in the low-income group bought plantain bananas than those who bought sweet potato and vice versa in the high-income group. Low-income households showed higher preference for cassava than high income households most notably because of its low price. Most respondents preferred sweet potato due to its easy preparation.

Availability :
Western Visayas Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Department of Agriculture; Hamungaya; Jaro; Iloilo City; Philippines




NO. 90658

Economics of sweet potato production in Sta. Barbara, Iloilo


Baldevia, RV
West Visayas State University; La Paz; Iloilo City; Philippines

WVSU Research Abstracts (1955-1985) Vol. 2: 41; 1984

Abstract:
This study sought to determine the economics of sweet potato production in area of not less than 1, 000 sq m using the interview schedule of 24 farmer-respondents. Area planted to sweet potato by 24 respondents, totalled 4.58 ha giving an average of 0.19 ha/farmer. Common varieties grown were Cemarinay (83.33%), Miracle (16.67% and Mindanao (8.33%). Labor requirements was 14.72/farm or 77.10 mandays/ha. Average price of sweet potato was P= 64.51/sack. Average production per farm was 18.53 sacks valued at P=1, 089.64 or 97.10 sacks valued at P= 5, 575.07/ha. On the average, production cost was P= 470.85 andP= 2, 467.23 per farm and per hectare, respectively. Average return wasP= 627.81/farm and P=3, 298.88/ha.

Availability :
Western Visayas Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Department of Agriculture; Hamungaya; Jaro; Iloilo City; Philippines




NO. 90659

Cost and return analysis of various sweet potato varieties/cultivars


Pascual, NP; Laguna, MS
Ann. Trop. Res. 11(1-4); 1989

Abstract:
The high yielding varieties/cultivars used in four experimental stations were BNAS-51, Catanduanes 3, Daja, I8-328, I8-498, Kabiti, Kadja, Kinabakab, Lo-323, Tinipay, VSP-1, VSP-2 and VSP-3. Of the 13 entries, VSP-1 (a variety developed by VISCA) yielded 19.7 t/ha. The other VISCA varieties, VSP-2 and VSP-3, yielded 18.6 and 15.3 t/ha, respectively. Cost-return analysis indicated that VISCA sweet potato (VSP) varieties yielded a return to land and management ranging from P13, 785 to P22, 438 per hectare when grown under experimental field conditions. Under farmers' field conditions, these varieties yielded a net return ranging from P3, 085 to P7, 927 per hectare only. Compared with other major crops, net returns of VSP varieties grown in farmers' fields (with no commercial fertilizers) were lower than those obtained from mungo, peanut and lowland rice. However when these varieties were planted in experimental stations (with fertilizer and other inputs)m the net returns of the VSP varieties were more than twice of the other crops (rice, mungo and peanut).

Availability :
Western Visayas Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Department of Agriculture; Hamungaya; Jaro; Iloilo City; Philippines




NO. 90660

Assessment of the postharvest practices and loses in cassava and sweet potato in Region VIII (provinces of Leyte and Southern Leyte, Philippines)


Data, ES; Villegas, RJA; Barreda, MD
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Los Banos; Laguna

IDRC-PCARRD Funded Research Project Terminal Report p.74; 1982

Abstract:
The traditional postharvest practices of root crop farmers were identified and assessed by interviewing farmers in 19 crop-producing municipalities in Leyte and Southern Leyte provinces. Almost all farmers grew sweet potato and cassava as a stable food supplement. Farmers plant root crops at any time of the year. Owing to their inability to store root crops, growers staggered their harvesting over a certain period. Harvesting was carried out in response to the family food need, over an indefinite time, gathering only enough for three or four meals at one time without strict regard to maturity. Estimates of losses at harvest due to cutting of damaged, decayed, or insect infested roots varied from 10 to more than 30%. The most common estimates were, however, based on a single harvesting only.

Availability :
Scientific Literature Service, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 90743

Growth of sweet potato as influenced by different potassium levels in three soil types


Bautista, AT; Santiago, RM
Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines

Annals of Tropical Research 3(3); ?p (1981)

Abstract:
Both silt loam and sandy loam media were significantly superior than clay loam in enhancing the length of vines and increasing the number of nodes and branches produced on the primary vines of sweet potato plant. Plants grown in silt loam produced the highest average weight of marketable tubers of 0.499 kg/pot, while those in clay loam had the lowest (0.453 kg/pot). In general, there was an increased response of sweet potato as the potassium levels in the soil were increased. This was manisfested by longer vines, more nodes produced on the primary vines, and more secondary branches. The highest weight of marketable tubers (0.5688 kg/pot) was obtained at 600 ppm K, while the lowest (0.3606 kg/pot) in the control. Interaction effects of soil types and potassium levels were significant on the growth and yield of sweet potato. Interactions between silt loam and sandy loam media with the 4 potassium levels were found to be significantly better than the interaction effects of clay loam and the 4 potassium levels.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 90744

Effect of fly ash on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Devaras, LA; Escalada, RG; Quirol, BF
Annals of Tropical Research 4 (2); __; 1982

Abstract:
Fly ash application at the rate of 5 t/ha enhanced early root bulking, resulting in the development of more tubers per plant of sweet potato. Application of higher levels of fly ash did not increase its tuber yield but promoted the vegetative growth of the crop. Plants from plots manured with 5 t/ha of fly ash significantly produced more marketable tubers and consequently resulted in higher tuber yield compared to those in the control plots. On the other hand, herbage yield was significantly higher in plots treated with 20 t/ha of fly ash. Soil parameters such as pH, manganese and zinc markedly increased with fly ash application while potassium, magnesium and aluminum decreased. No significant effect of fly ash application was observed on the nitrogen, calcium and organic matter content of the soil.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 90745

Calibration of recommendable nitrogen rate for sweet potato production based on some soil and climatic factors


Forio, AF
Graduate Research Abstracts; Baybay, Leyte: Visayas State College of Agriculture 1: 76-77; 1993

Abstract:
This study was conducted to calibrate optimum (recommendable) nitrogen rate for sweet potato production based on soil organic matter and available nitrogen and to find out the influence of soil pH, texture, CEC, rainfall, solar radiation, relative humidity and temperature on optimum nitrogen requirement of sweet potato. Nitrogen fertility studies were conducted in 10 upland areas having different organic matter content and other soil properties. Growth parameters of sweet potato like leaf area index, number of major branches and yield of fresh vines and leaves significantly responded to added nitrogen in areas with only low organic matter. Optimum leaf area index for sweet potato production was from 2.0 to 3.5. Total number and number of marketable tubers/plant were less responsive to nitrogen fertilizer application. It was only content (1.24%) where significant variation in the aforementioned parameters among nitrogen levels were detected. Marketable and total tuber yield of sweet potato responded more to added nitrogen in soil with lower organic matter content than in soil with higher organic matter content. No response was observed in soil with low organic matter in acidic and calcareous soil. Climatic factors such as rainfall, solar radiation, temperature and relative humidity have no significant influence on the amount of nitrogen fertilizer required for sweet potato. Yield levels of sweet potato varied from 7.22 to 33.51 t/ha under the different experimental areas. Of all soil and climatic factors considered, pH and rainfall influenced the yield of sweet potato. Percent dry matter of sweet potato tubers was higher in fields with low yield levels. Although nitrogen fertilizer application increased tuber yield of sweet potato in areas with low organic matter content, % dry matter of tubers was not affected by different nitrogen levels.

Availability :
c/o Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 90746

Response of sweet potato var VSP-3 to NPK combination in sand dune areas


Pascua, SRJr; Alcoy, AB; Tinguil, MM
Ilocos Research Abstracts (1986-19887); Batac, Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 46; 1987

Abstract:
Planting was done on June 20, 1986 in the sand dune area of Paoay, Ilocos Norte to find out the growth and yield responses of sweet potato to NPK combinations. The treatments were 60-60-60, 120-30-30, 60-30-120 and 45-45-90 kg NPK/ha. There were no significant differences on vine length, number of branches, number of marketable tubers, marketable and unmarketable yield, fresh vine yield and tuber and tuber dry matter yield. Sweet potato applied with 120-30-60 kg NPK/ha produced the least number of unmarketable tubers. Tuber yield ranged from 349 to 903 kg/ha.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Batac; mariano Marcos State University; Ilocos Norte; Philippines




NO. 90747

Mycorrhiza - A possible adaptive mechanism of sweet potato in marginal soils


Tupas, GL
Annals of Tropical Research 5(1); __; 1983

Abstract:
Root samples of sweet potato were examined for possible microbial association. Examination of roots from relatively open marginal soils exhibited evidence on mycorrhizal infection particularly the vesicular- arbuscular type. The capability of sweet potato for mycorrhizal association could be one of its adaptations for growth and productivity in marginal soils.

Availability :
Library; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; 6521-A Leyte; Philippines




NO. 90825

An ecological survey of the weed flora in the major root crop areas in the Philippines


Galinato, MI; Sajise, PE
Annals of Tropical Research 3(3); 1981

Abstract:
Different root crop-growing areas in the Philippines were surveyed during the wet season to determine the weed species associated with different root and tuber crops, namely, sweet potato, cassava, yam and white potato. Wet season quantitative vegetation analysis of weed species associated with root crops in the Philippines has shown the existence of 8 weed community types, namely: C. rotundus, P. conjugatum, A. adenophora, P. polystachyon, D. ciliaris, D. aegyptium, E. tenella; and D. triflorium. A total of 70 weed species was encountered in the quantitative vegetation analysis. Some environmental factors such as pH, climatic type, soil type, weed control practices and elevation were determined to explain the community patterns.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 90824

Critical weed control for maximum production of sweet potato and cassava


Escalada, RG
VICARP News 3(2): 8; 1982

Abstract:
This study was conducted at VISCA, Leyte. The experimental design used was split plot with three replications. The distance of planting was designated as the main plot and the weed control treatments, as the subplot. When the best period of controlling weeds for maximum production of the two rootcrops was determined, the succeeding years were devoted on studying the methods of weed control with the use of local implements. The same planting distance for both sweet potato and cassava was used. Results revealed that weeding from two to six weeks after planting was the best for controlling weeds for optimum production of sweet potato; two to eight weeks after planting was best for cassava. With the use of local implements, the highest net income was obtained in closer spacing of sweet potato when plot was weeded with the use of hoe at three weeks after planting and with bolo at three weeks after planting and then mulching immediately. In a wider planting distance, mulching at two weeks after planting resulted in highest income. In cassava, the use of bolo at four weeks after planting followed by mulching is the most economical.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 90876

Light interception and total biomass productivity in sugarcane intercropping


Mendoza, TC
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 11(3): 181-187; 1986

Abstract:
In this study involving sugarcane intercropped with soybean, mungbean, peanut, corn, sweet potato and cassava, the observation that intercropping leads to significantly higher total productivity was found to be true under the following conditions: (a) computed on a per month basis, the dry matter productivity was only higher during the full growth duration of the intercrop. This was attributed to the slow growth feature of sugarcane within the first 2-3 months. The early built-up of LAI due to the faster growth of intercrops shortened considerably the time for the crop canopies to intercept incoming radiation; (b) even in compatible intercrop combinations, greater biomass productivity was only true under low to average fertilizer and cultivation input application for sugarcane but not in the medium high to high level of input application.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; University of the Philippines; Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 91172

Adaptibility of sweet potato under Ilocos conditions


Alcoy, AB; Tinguil, MB; Layaoen, HL; Obien, SR
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte

6th PCARRD-ILARRC Integrated Regional Research Review and Development Planning Workshop: Proceedings. Batac, Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University. p. 68; 1987

Abstract:
Twelve sweet potato cultivars obtained from the Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center (PRCRTC) were grown at MMSU from January 11 to May 20, 1986, to assess their adaptability under local conditions and evaluated their growth and other agronomic characters. Varieties 10-95 and VSP-2 produced generallly high tuber yields, i.e., 23.4 and 23.3 t/ha, respectively. High tuber yield was associated with the development of more and larger size. On the other hand, cultivar 3-180 had the lowest yield due to the production of many small tubers. Tuber size was generally related to the number of tubers per plant such that when fewer tubers developed, there was greater percentage of larger tubers (300 g). Most of the tubers produced in all the varieties fell within the small size classification (10 to 100 g) where they did not differ significantly.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte; Philippines




NO. 91171

NCT on sweet potato in the Ilocos


Alcoy, AB; Tinguil, MB; Obien, SR; Villamayor, FG, Jr.
Ilocos Research Abstracts (1986-1987); Batac; Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p.40; 1987

Abstract:
Eighteen sweet potato varieties and lines were tested under Ilocos conditions from October 1986 to January 1987 to determine their yield and agronomic performance. The entries were arranged in RCBD with four replications. Highest tuber yields were obtained from varieties/lines VSP 5, 11-400 and VSP 4 (25.8, 24.7 and 23.8 t/ha, respectively), while the lowest was produced by 3-190 (10.20 t/ha). High tuber yield was observed to be associated with the production of larger and more tubers. Tuber yield increased when the harvest period was delayed from 97 to 132 DAP. However, percent marketable tuber declined due to sweet potato weevil infestation. Most of the varieties produced small tubers (10 to 100 g).

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; batac; Ilocos Norte; Philippines




NO. 91173

Sweet potato breeding and varietal improvement at PRCRTC


Bartolini, PU
RADIX 2(1): 3-4; 1980

Abstract:
The paper outlines the sweet potato breeding work and varietal improvement program being carried out at the Philippine Root Crop Research and Training Center (PRCRTC). To come up with a high yielding variety with high nutritional qualities as well as a high starch content acceptable to both small farmers and industrial starch processors, meticulous screening, evaluation and selection are being done. Selective hybridization is accomplished by rearranging the parental population base with genetic potentials and highly desirable agronomic characteristics. Polycross of open pollination and controlled, discriminate hand pollination of selected parental genotypes are used, followed by screening, evaluation and selection.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91174

Morphological and agronomic traits associated with yield performance of sweet potato


Bacusmo, JL; Carpena, AL
Annals of Tropical Research 4(2); 1982

Abstract:
Leaf area index, crop growth rate, leaf angle of young leaves, internode length, number of roots per plant and mean root weight showed a positive correlation with root yield. Specific leaf weights, net assimilation rate at 30 to 60 days after planting and moisture content showed negative correlation with yield. Compensatory relationship between mean root weight and number of roots per plant was demonstrated in high yielding varieties of sweet potato. The extent of direct and indirect effects of shoot characters and 5 root components on root yield was determined using path-coefficient analysis.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91175

Performance test of sweet potato cultivars


Baquiran, AU
CVIARS Research Abstracts. p. 14; 1981

Abstract:
During the first cropping of November to February 1979, Acc No. 10 (BNAS-51) with a yield of 16.70 tons/ha was the highest yielded among the entries. And for the second cropping from June to September 1980, ACC No. 87 (Anon-San Isidro) gave the highest yield with 13.70 tons/ha. However, of the eleven varieties, study four (4) showed promising yield potentials. The varieties were: ACC. No. 87 (Anon-San isidro), ACC. No. 10 (BNAS-10), ACC, No, 12 (R-Bohol).

Availability :
Cagayan Valley Agriculture and Resources research and development Consortium; Isabela State University; Echague; Isabela; Philippines




NO. 91176

Screening of sweet potato varieties by subsistence farmers in Basey, Samar, Philippines a case of traditional experimentation in upland agriculture


De Pedro, R, Jr; Lightfoot, DA; Cabiling, J
Annals of Tropical Research 8(4); 1986

Abstract:
Seventeen varieties of sweet potato (I. batatas) were grown and evaluated by subsistence upland farmers of Basey, Samar, Philippines. The 14 local and three improved varieties were described by leaf shape and color as well as by the color of their storage root skin and flesh. The farmers' screening criteria consisted of storage root size: taste and yield; harvest duration; maturity period; vine growth; and resistance to weevils. The upland farmers prefer sweet potato varieties which are early maturing, high yielding, resistant to weevils, with sweet dry taste and rapid vine growth, and which allow prolonged sequential harvesting with good storage root yield on the creeping vines.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91177

Genetic variation in a wide gene base population of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam)


Mariscal, AM; Carpena, AL
Annals of Tropical Research 10(2); 1988

Abstract:
Design mating system was used to estimate the components of genetic variation of sweet potato base population. Characters studied were total root yield, weight and number of marketable roots, total number of root yield, weight and number of marketable roots, total number of roots, fresh weight of vines, harvest index, scab rating and dry matter content of roots. Significant additive and dominance genotypic variances were observed in the population with high magnitudes and additive genetic variance for scab rating and dry matter content obtained suggest that the population may be improved using any available intrapopulation selection procedure line mass selection and full-sib family selection for the characters mentioned. Selected inviduals or full-sib families can be intercrossed to utilize the high dominance variation in the population. Dry matter content of the roots with its very low coefficient of variability is considered the most reliable basis for selection in this population.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91178

Genotype X environment interaction for yield in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.)


Nasayo, LZ; Saladaga, FA
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 13(2): 99-104; 1988

Abstract:
Data from 1982 to 1985 on genotype X environment interaction in sweet potato were analyzed for stability and adaptability using the methods of Plaisted and Peterson (1959), Finlay and Wilkinson (1963) and Eberhart and Russel (1966). Plaisted and Peterson's method showed that VSP-2 was the most widely adapted (stable) variety with the least *2VL (special character) value contribution to the overall genotype X environment (G X E) interaction variance. G145R-4 contributed the highest *2VL value to the G X E interaction variance in the 1984 dry season but contributed the least in the 1985 dry season. Finlay and Wilkinson's method which used the regression coefficient (b) and mean yield to test adaptability revealed that the values of almost all entries, i.e. VSP-1, VSP-2, VSP-3, Kinabakab, and V7-27, were not significantly different from b=1.0 except for two entries, G145R-4 with b=0.62 and LO-323 with b=1.6 indicating that they are adapted to lower and higher yielding environments, respectively. Strictly applying Eberhart and Russesl's method, none of the varieties/breeding lines studied was classified as stable. However, VSP-2, VSP-3 and V3-180 have their respective s2d values below the mean s2d of all entries, with b not significantly different from 1.0 and with considerably high mean yields.

Availability :
Library; Institute of plant Breeding; University of the Philippines; Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 91179

Sweet potato trial


Padua, SB, Jr.
Nucleus (1 & 2): 20; 1989-90

Abstract:
The study was conducted to determine which of the ten sweet potato varieties namely: VSP-2, BNAS-51, Manila Red, Noriniego, V-30, Palawan, V-154, AVRDC-9, Violet and SPACC 097182 thrives best under Quirino State College conditions. Three sweet potato cultivars namely: BNAS-51, Violet and Palawan were regarded as high yielders giving tuber yields of 28.28, 19.83 and 17.71 t/ha respectively. Palawan gave the highest vegetative yield while V-30 produced the least.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91180

Effects of gamma radiation on some morphological characters of sweet potato


Pido, NL; Engle, LM
Annals of Tropical Research 9(2); 1987

Abstract:
Inherent variations were observed in the leaf shape of sweet potato cultivars Kinabakab and UPLB Acc. 624 and in the root skin pigmentation of BNAS-51 cultivar. Doses of 2000 and 3000 rads produced wrinkled and deformed leaves in vM1 plants of all three cultivars with the latter dose giving the higher percentage of aberrant leaves and plant with such leaves. Among the cultivars, Kinabakab apparently has the most radio sensitive leaf shape and leaf rugosity. Only Kinabakab had some some vM2 plants which retained the wrinkled leaves observed in vM1 plants. The same cultivars exhibited the highest mortality of cuttings obtained from vM1 plants which showed wrinkled and deformed leaves. One Kinabakab vM2 plant treated with 3000 rads produced a secondary branch that was an apparent genetic variant. Vine length at maturity and internode length of vM2 plants of the three cultivars were not significantly affected by various doses of gamma radiation.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91181

Heritability and expected gain from selection for yield, weight loss in storage and sprouting in field bed of sweet potato


Saladaga, FA; Hernandez, TP
Annals of Tropical Research 3(1); 1981

Abstract:
True seeds of sweet potato were collected from a sample of genotypes entered in the Master Polycross Nursery at Louisiana State University, grown into seedlings and vegetatively propagated. Frequency distribution and heritability estimates were prepared for yield, weight loss in storage and sprouting in field bed. In general, for all the maternal parents, the distribution of the individual progeny seedlings was skewed to the lower yielding classes. Heritability estimate for yield was low, but with a magnitude of 0.241 which indicates the possibility of selecting (by culling) for yield at a relatively early stage of the screening process. While seedling genotypes within each maternal parent differed (i.e., some had no appreciable weight loss), the genetic variance was negative, thus heritability was negative or zero. Sprouting in field bed also had low genetic variance and, subsequently, low heritability. These low heritability values indicate that either the population under study has already attained its potential limit for these two traits or that these traits are largely influenced by the environment.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; Visayas State College of Agriculture; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91182

Screening and evaluation of new accessions and varieties of sweet potato for drought resistance in the Ilocos


Tinguil, MB; Alcoy, AB; Obien, SR; Villamayor, FS, Jr.
Ilocos Research Abstracts (1986-1987); Batac; Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 46; 1987

Abstract:
Fifty-six sweet potato varieties and lines obtained from PRCRTC were grown under Ilocos conditions in October and November 1986. The yield and agronomic performance of the varieties were determined. Tuber yield obtained from the October planting was generally higher than that of the November planting due to more available moisture for the plants. Sweet potato line 16-12 had the highest tuber yield and this was exhibited in both October and November plantings (20.3 and 13.6 t/ha, respectively). Comparable yields were obtained from SP 20-209 and SP 20-218, which produced 18.3 and 18.2 t/ha, respectively, from the Ocotober planting, but apparently lower yields were obtained from the November planting (9.7 and 11.4 t/ha, respectively). High tuber yield was due to the development of a higher percentage of large tubers. On the other hand, line SP 11-255 had the lowest yield due to its production of a high percentage of small tubers. Generally, most of the entries tested produced significantly higher yield than Kiringkit, the check variety.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte; Philippines




NO. 91183

Performance of promising sweet potato varieties under Ilocos conditions


Tinguil, MA; Alcoy, AB; Real, E
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte

6th PCARRD-ILARRC Integrated Regional Research Review and Development Planning Workshop: Proceedings; Batac; Ilocos Norte: Mariano Marcos State University; p. 68; 1987

Abstract:
Twelve promising sweet potato varieties were grown at MMSU, Batac, Ilocos Norte from December 1985 to March 1986. The study aimed to identify varieties with high yield potentials and evaluate their growth and other agronomic charateristics. The varieties responded differently on the number of developed branches, length of vines produced, number of tubers per plant and tuber yield. VSP-I and 7-11 produced the highest tuber yields, i.e., 22.5 and 22.0 t/ha, respectively. On the other hand, viny varieties like Kinabakab and Karingkit and lower yields, i.e, 11.41 and 10.99 t/ha, respectively. Other parameters like marketable and non-marketable tubers and percent dry matter were not significantly different among the varieties tested.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Mariano Marcos State University; Batac; Ilocos Norte




NO. 91184

Utilization of sweet potato germplasm by plant breeders


Villareal, RL; LO; HF
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(3): 113-118; 1983

Abstract:
The major existing collections of sweet potato germplasm at different institutions all over the world are listed. The problems that beset the wider utilization of sweet potato germplasm are (a) constitutional, such as lack of funds and technical manpower and (b) technical, such as narrow genetic base, mutations, distribution and flowering. Significant results have been achieved in improving disease and pest resistance and beta-carotene content of sweet potato. The AVRDC sweet potato breeding program is discussed.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; University of the Philippines; Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 91185

Inheritance of skin and flesh color, size, shape and smoothness of skin of Ipomoea batatas L.


Villordon, AG
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(2): S14; 1983

Abstract:
In general, the distribution of the genotypes were skewed toward the lower yielding classes. Among the 12 parents studied, LO-323, Centennial, Accessions 9-12, 13-30, and 16-6 appeared to be the best parents to be retained in the polycross, if selections will be based on the progeny means. The estimates of heritability for most root traits studied were relatively high, except for skin smoothness which was low. Root characters and their estimates of heritability were: skin color, 0.62; fresh color, 0.29; skin smoothness, 0.07; root shape, 0.37; and fleshy root weight, 0.49. These indicate that individual or mass selection can be practiced.

Availability :
Library; Institute of Plant Breeding; University of the Philippines; Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 91484

Indigenous technologies in home processing of root crops: A survey and economic analysis


Alkuino, JM; Den, TV
Annals of Tropical Research 2; 1989

Abstract:
This study analyzed the income generating potential of indigenous technologies in processing sweet potato and cassava in roots in the rural areas. Twenty-three indigenous root crop processing products were studied and classified as fried, steamed, baked and dried. Of the 23 products monitored, nine have positive net returns namely: maruya, bitsu-bitso, cassava doughnut, pilipit, sinaging, pinisi, cacharon, slice and tinitim. The use of inefficient indigenous tools and equipment, unstandardized product formulation and high labor input greatly contributed to the high production cost, hence the losses in the other products.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91486

Two stage process of ethanol production from sweet potato flour and rice bran using Aspergillus awamori and immobilized yeast


Bugarin, RMB; Alba, DM; Del Rosario, EJ
The Philippine Journal of Science 116(2): 205-217; 1987

Abstract:
A two-stage process was developed for producing ethanol from sweet potato flour and rice bran. The first stage consisted of starch saccharification by amylolytic mold Aspergillus awamori NRRL 3112. The latter was used to saccharify powdered sweet potato tuber (15% w/v) and rice bran (6% w/v) after thinning with bacterial alpha-amylase using a 3.5 liter airlift fermenter. Saccharification efficiencies of 90.13-90.20% were observed 12-48 hours of batch fermentation under the following optimized conditions: pH 5.5, 21% (w/v) solids level and 10% (v/v) inoculum size. After 48 hours of batch culture, 90% of the starch in the potato flour substrate was converted into sugars at pH 5.5 and 30oC. Glucose was the major constituent of the hydrolysate. Continuous fermentation of the centrifugal hydrolysate in the second stage with a local yeast isolated immobilized on "ipil-ipil" (Leucaena leucocephala (Lamk) de Wit) sawdust and shavings at 42oC, at a dilution rate of 0.13h-1 resulted in an alcohol content of 5.2% w/v, with a fermentation efficiency of 79.5%. A maximum ethanol level of 5.6% (w/v) was obtained in the `beer' after 19 hours of fermentation with a cell loading of 4 x 1010 cells per gram of immobilizing material corresponding to a fermentation efficiency of 85.0%. Shorter fermentation times resulted in lower ethanol yields.

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines; Los Banos; College; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 91487

Soy sauce production utilizing root crop flour substitute from wheat flour (100% substitution)


Data, ES; Diamante, JC; Forio, EE
Ann. Trop. Res. 8(1); 1986

Abstract:
Soy sauce yield was not affected by the substitution of wheat flour with root crop flour as carbohydrate source for the fermentation microorganisms. The titratable acidity, pH and NaCl content were not significantly affected by flour substitution while the protein content and amino nitrogen of root crop-based soy sauce were lower than that of sauce produced from wheat flour. Sensory evaluation showed that when soy sauce was used in preparing beef steak or as dip for broiled fish, root crop-based soy sauce was comparable to one commercial brand based on general acceptability scores. Cooked sweet potato-based soy sauce was comparable to two commercial brands when served as pure soy sauce based on color, aroma, consistency and flavor.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91488

Wheat flour substitution using sweet potato or cassava in some bread and snack items


Palomar, LS; Perez, JA; Pascual; GL
Annals of Tropical Research 3(1); 1981

Abstract:
Cassava and sweet potato flour were processed and used to substitute wheat flour from 20 to 100% level in some yeast breads (pan de sal and hot rolls); quick breads (paborita, cheese crackers and coconut cookies) and snack items (polvoron, gollorias and doughnut). Cassava and sweet potato flour have a coarser texture than wheat flour; however, cassava flour approximates the color of wheat flour. Cassava flour has almost similar chemical properties as wheat flour except for protein and crude fiber; sweet potato flour differed in protein, texture and color. Preference tests showed that products with root crop flour, except doughnut, were preferred by consumers. Based on cost analysis, root crop flour is a good substitute for wheat flour.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91489

Indigenous technologies in home processing of rootcrops: A survey and economic analysis


Alkuino, JM, Jr.; Van Den, T
Annals of Tropical Research 11(1-4); 1989

Abstract:
This study analyzed the income generating potential of indigenous technologies in processing sweet potato and cassava roots in the rural areas. Twenty-three indigenous root crop processing products were studied and classified as fried, steamed, based and dried. Of the 23 products monitored, nine have positive net returns namely maruya, bitsu-bitso, cassava doughnut, pilipit, sinaging, pinisi, cacharon, slice and tinitim. The use of inefficient indigenous tools and equipment, unstandardized product formulation and high labor input greatly contributed to the high production cost, hence the losses in the other products.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program; VISCA; Baybay; Leyte; Philippines




NO. 91496

Effect of delayed processing on alcohol yield of fresh root crops


Tulin, EE; Data, ES
Annals of Tropical Research 9(4); 1987

Abstract:
Delayed processing significantly affected the starch and total sugar contents of cassava and sweet potato roots. However, there is no apparent trend to show the relationship between delayed processing and starch or sugar content of the roots. Alcohol production was significantly influenced by late processing in sweet potato but not in cassava. The highest alcohol content was obtained from sweet potato roots processed 2 days after harvest and fermented for 96 hours. In cassava, the amount of alcohol produced did not significantly vary even if the roots processed were fresh or stored up to 5 days under ambient conditions.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 100340

Performance of potato intercropped with corn, sweet potato and yard long bean


Asandhi, Azis Azirin
Lembang Research Institute for Horticulture; Bandung; Indonesia

Buletin Penelitian Hortikultura [Horticultural Research Bulletin] 24(4): 26-34 (1993)

Availability :
Research Centre for Estate Biotechnology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100687

Effects of cultivars and control methods of Cylas formicarius on sweet potato
Pengaruh varietas dan cara pengendalian Cylas formicarius pada ubi jalar

Nonci, Nurnina; Sriwidodo
Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Maros [Maros Research Institute for Food Crops (MORIF)]; Ujung Pandang; South Sulawesi; Indonesia

Kumpulan Makalah Seminar dan Pertemuan Tahunan Perhimpunan Entomologi Indonesia Cabang Ujung Pandang, Perhimpunan Fitopatologi Indonesia & Himpunan Perlindungan Tumbuhan Indonesia Komda Sulawesi Selatan, Ujung Pandang; Baco, D(ed); Saranga, A.P.(ed); Kusnang(ed); Rosmana, A.(ed); Firdaus(ed); 15 Januari 1994; Ujung Pandang; PEI, PFI & HPTI; 1994; 7pp.

Availability :
Perhimpunan Entomologi Indonesia [Indonesian Entomological Society]; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100692

Evaluation of the resistance of local cultivars of sweet potato to Cylas formicarius
Evalusi ketahanan varietas lokal ubi jalar terhadap Cylas formicarius

Sriwidodo; Nonci, Nurnina
Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Maros [Maros Research Institute for Food Crops (MORIF)]; Ujung Pandang; South Sulawesi; Indonesia

Kumpulan Makalah Seminar dan Pertemuan Tahunan Perhimpunan Entomologi Indonesia Cabang Ujung Pandang, Perhimpunan Fitopatologi Indonesia & Himpunan Perlindungan Tumbuhan Indonesia Komda Sulawesi Selatan, Ujung Pandang; Baco, D(ed); Saranga, A.P.(ed); Kusnang(ed); Rosmana, A.(ed); Firdaus(ed); 15 Januari 1994; Ujung Pandang; PEI, PFI & HPTI; 1994; 9pp.

Availability :
Perhimpunan Entomologi Indonesia [Indonesian Entomological Society]; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100846

Morphological diversity of sweet potato clone of Irian Jaya planted in Bogor
Keanekaragaman morfologi klon ubi jalar Irian Jaya yang ditanam di Bogor

Sulistijawati, Ridha; Alex Hartana; Trenggono Kusumaningrat; Endah Woro wiryani
Department of Biology; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Hayati; Jurusan Biologi FMIPA; IPB [Department of Biology; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; Bogor Agricultural University] 1(2): 59-63(1994)

Abstract:
Irian Jaya is one of the diversity center of sweet potatoes in the tropic, in which several thousands indigenous sweet potato cultivars could be found. This study was performed to evaluate 91 sweet potato clones from Irian Jaya planted in Bogor. The clones showed tremendous variabilities in plant type, leaf shape and size, flower shape, and tuber shape and colour. However, most of these Irian Jaya sweet potato observed had spreading plant type, triangular and one lobe leaves without lateral lobes but with foothed central leaf lobe. The size of the leaves was mostly medium (8-15 cm) with short petiole (20 cm). Both surfaces of immature leaves were purple but mature leaves and main vines were green. The vine internodes were short (2-5 cm) and their diameters were thin (4-6 mm), shapes of limb flowers were mostly rounded. The tuber shape was elliptic with white skin colour and white or yellow flesh colour.

Availability :
Windadri, Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100898

Role of homegardens in the effort of increasing family incomes
Peranan pekarangan dalam usaha meningkatkan pendapatan keluarga

Rahayu, M.; Siagian, M.H.
Herbarium Bogoriense; Research and Development Centre for Biology; Bogor; Indonesia

Majalah Ilmiah Universitas Widya Gama; Pusat Penelitian dan Pengabdian kepada Masyarakat Universitas Widya Gama; [Widya Gama University Science Bulletin] Malang 3(1): 19-29 (1994)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100966

Distribution of planting pattern on several lands in eight districts of the northern coast lines of West Java
Penyebaran pola tanam pada beberapa lahan di delapan kabupaten jalur pantura Jawa Barat

Mulyani, Anny; Soekardi, M.; Bahri, Sjaeful; Syansulbahri, R.
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Pertemuan Teknis Penelitian Tanah dan Agroklimat Bidang Potensi Sumber Daya Lahan; Bogor; 18-21 February 1993; Karama, A.S.(ed); Suhardjo, H (ed); Djamuddin, D(ed); Suwarto(ed); Mulyani (ed); Bogor; Pusat Penelitian Tanah dan Agroklimat; 1993; p253-267

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100973

Effects of urea and ZA at right dosages and the effect of K fertilizer on the yield of sweet potato
Takaran pupuk urea dan ZA yang tepat dan pengaruh pupuk K terhadap hasil ubi jalar

Tangkuman, Freddy; Dimyati, A.; Noch, M.; Lesmana, O.
Sukamandi Research Institute for Food Crops; Cikampek; West Java; Indonesia

Reflektor [Reflector] 6(1-2): 8-12 (1992)

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100975

Study on the consumption pattern and diet of people in several areas of Indonesia
Studi pola konsumsi dan tata menu masyarakat di beberapa daerah di Indonesia

Soejadi; Purwani, Endang Yuli; Damardjati, Djoko S.
Sukamandi Research Institute for Food Crops; Cikampek; West Java; Indonesia

Reflektor [Reflector] 6(1-2): 18-25 (1992)

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 100985

Critical period of competition between sweet potato cv. BIS 183 and cv. Citok and the weeds
Periode kritis persaingan antara ubi jalar varietas BIS 183 dan Citok terhadap gulma

Tangkuman, Freddy; Pane, Hamdan; Noch, Moch.
Sukamandi Research Institute for Food Crops; Cikampek; West Java; Indonesia

Reflektor [Reflector] 5(1-2): 29-35 (1992)

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101042

Evaluation of milk fat content and milk production of the FH rural dairy cows breed in Pangalengan
Evaluasi kadar lemak susu dan produksi susu sapi perah FH pada peternakan rakyat di Pangalengan

Sugiarti, T.; Hidayati, N.
Research Institute for Livestock; Ciawi; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Nasional Sains dan Teknologi Peternakan, Pengolahan dan Komunikasi Hasil-Hasil Penelitian [Proceedings of the National Seminar on the Science and Technology of Animal Husbandry, Processing and Communication of Research Results], Ciawi Bogor 25-26 Januari 1994; Bakrie, B(ed); Haryanto, B (ed); Wina, E(ed); Kompiang, I.P.(ed); Dwiyanto, K(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Ternak; 1994; Vol.1; p. 133-140

Availability :
Research Centre for Livestock; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101148

Consumption pattern of staple food in several provinces in Indonesia
Pola konsumsi pangan pokok di beberapa propinsi di Indonesia

Arifin, Mewa; Saliem, Handawi P.
Research Centre for Agricultural Socio-Economics; Bogor; Indonesia

Forum Penelitian Agro Ekonomi [Agro-Economy Research Forum] 9 (2)&10 (1): 86-95 (1992)

Availability :
Research Centre for Agricultural Socio-Economics; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101160

Role of organic substances, N and K fertilizers on the yield of sweet potato on podsolic soils
Peranan bahan organik, pupuk N dan K terhadap produksi ubi jalar pada tanah podsolik

Wiguna, I.G.Putu; Purnomo, Joko; Prawirasumantri, Jusuf
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Pertemuan Teknis Penelitian Tanah dan Agroklimat [Proceedings of the Technical Meeting on Soil and Agroclimate Research]; Bidang Kesuburan dan Produktivitas Tanah; Bogor, 18-21 February 1993; Karama, AS(ed); Suhardjo, H (ed); Soepartini, M(ed); Santoso, D(ed); Irawan(ed); Prawirasumantri, Y(ed); Bogor; Pusat Penelitian Tanah dan Agroklimat; 1993; p.65-73

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101214

Characterization and documentation of sweet potato germplasm
Karakterisasi dan dokumentasi plasma nutfah ubi jalar

Minantyorini; Zuraida, Nani; Supriyadi, Hendi; Dimyati, A.
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Koleksi dan karakterisasi plasma nutfah pertanian [Collection and Characterization of Agricultural Germplasm]; Review hasil dan program penelitian plasma nutfah pertanian, Bogor, 26-27 Juli 1994; Sunihardi (ed); Musaddad, A(ed); Ruhendi (ed); Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Pertanian; 1994; p.129-144

Abstract:
The amount of 129 accession of total 500 sweet potato clones, which were planted in the WS of 1993/94, were characterized according to IPBGR standard, and were computerized into D base IV programme. Every accesion was planted as many as 10 plants. Morphological evaluation were achieved by observation upon three representative plants of every accession, on the characters of twining, plant type, vine internode, vine tip pubescent, shape of mature leaves, size of mature leaves, abaxial leaf vein color, foliage color, color and length of petiole. The evaluation of storage roots were observed through a sample of root, including shape and defect, cortex, skin and flesh color. The results showed that there were 11 variations of mature leaves' shapes. Start from bigger to a small variations, the types were moderately lobed, lobed with slightly lobed, cordate teeth, deeply lobed, reniform, triangular, slightly hastate, very deep lobed, lobed, slightly cordate, and moderately hastate. According to shape and defect of storage root, 11 accesion had round shape without defect. Seven of these have creamy skin color without secondary color. The variation in flesh color followed that six accessions were cream with secondary color, and one accession had pale yellow color. Twenty three accesions had elliptic shape, ten of them were without defect. Nine accesions of elliptic shape had creamy flesh, the others were orange. Eight accessions were ovate in shape, 11 accesions oblong, 6 accesions were linear oblong, 18 accesions elliptic, and 10 accesions irregularly long.

Availability :
Research Centre for Estate Biotechnology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101215

Evaluation and rejuvenation of sweet potato germplasm
Evaluasi dan regenerasi plasma nutfah ubijalar

Munip, Modul
Bogor Research Institute for Food Crops (BORIF); Bogor; Indonesia

Koleksi dan karakterisasi plasma nutfah pertanian [Collection and Characterization of Agricultural Germplasm]; Review hasil dan program penelitian plasma nutfah pertanian, Bogor, 26-27 Juli 1994; Sunihardi (ed); Musaddad, A(ed); Ruhendi (ed); Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Pertanian; 1994; p.145-159

Abstract:
Sweet potato germplasm in a form of living collection should be conserved continuously in order to maintain the genetic diversity of each entry. Those germplasm consisted of local, national and introduced as the results of germplasm exchange were urgently needed in the attemps to create the new hybrids in breeding programme. Two hundred forty one entries of sweet potato germplasm are well maintained at Muneng Experimental Farm, Probolinggo at the planting season of 1993/94. Each entry was planted in the ridge, with plant spacing of 100 cm between ridge and 25 cm within ridge, one plant per hole. Fertilizer was applied at amount of 100 kg Urea + 100 kg KCl per hectare given twice (one third at planting time and two third at 45 days after planting). Weeding, pest and disease protection were carried out intensively. From 241 entries evaluated, indicated that 42 entries produced higher tuber yield in the rainy seasons. Three genotypes among them were AIS 295-4, Binowang and White Star with its potential of 40.16, 29.10 and 20.16 t/ha respectively. The selected genotypes from the evaluation at the rainy season of 1993/94 were rejuvenated together with 222 genotypes for further evaluation. Among the genotypes evaluated, clones produced by MARIF breeding programme indicated as the promising clones with high tuber yield and better quality.

Availability :
Research Centre for Estate Biotechnology; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101235

Study of bloat disease on goat and sheep
Studi penyakit kumbang pada kambing dan domba

Agustin, Ulfah T.; Yuningsih
Research Institute for Veterinary Science (RIVS); Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar Nasional Teknologi Veteriner untuk Meningkatkan Kesehatan Hewan dan Pengamanan bahan pangan asal ternak [Proceedings of the National Seminar on Vaterinary Technology to Increase of Animal Health and Protection of Food from livestock], Bogor 22-24 Maret 1994; Parto Utomo, S(ed); Ronohardjo, P (ed); Bahri, S(ed); Sudarisman(ed); Sani, Y(ed); Bogor; Balai Penelitian Veteriner; 1994; p.396-403

Abstract:
A study on bloat was carried out in goats and sheep both under a field and a laboratory investigation. The field study was undertaken in Srogol and Cigombong villages, Cijeruk subdistrict, Bogor. This study showed that the incidence rate of bloat was 3.6 per 100 per 2 months, the true mortality rate was 1, 12 per 100 per 2 months, and the case fatality rate was 33%. The cause of bloat appeared to be due to the consumption of fresh cassava leaves or to the consumption of wet cassava leaves. The animals those were the fist time to consume these leaves were being the most sensitive suffering from bloat. Coconut oils are the most commonly used to treat bloat in goats and sheep in these areas. Eighteen goats were used in the laboratory investigation. They were divided into three groups of treatments and were fed on: a) cassava leaves containing 300 ppm and 400 ppm of cyanide; b) heterogenous grasses containing 4000 ppm nitrates and was called as the highest level of nitrates in the feed; and c) homogenous grasses containing 1000 ppm as the lowest nitrates content. The animals were feed daily in the morning and afternoon. The results showed that cassava leaves and grasses with high level of nitrates both in fresh and wet condition appeared to induce bloat in goats.

Availability :
Research Institute for Veterinary Science (RIVS); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101271

Morphological diversity of sweet potatoes clone from Irian Jaya planted in Bogor
Keanekaragaman morfologi klon ubi jalar Irian Jaya yang ditanam di Bogor

Sulistijawati, Ridha; Hartana, Alex; Kusumaningrat, Trenggono; Wiryani, Endah Woro
Department of Biology; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; Bogor Agricultural University; Jl.Raya Pajajaran; Bogor 16144; Indonesia

Hayati [Biology] 1(2): 59-63(1994)

Abstract:
Irian Jaya is one of the diversity center of sweet potatoes in the tropic, in which several thousands indigenous sweet potatoes cultivars could be found. This study was performed to evaluate 91 sweet potatoes clones from Irian Jaya planted in Bogor. The clones showed tremendous variabilities in plant type, leaf shape and size, flower shape, and tuber shape and colour. However, most Irian Jaya sweet potatoes observed had spreading plant type, triangular and one lobe leaves without lateral lobes but with toothed central leaf lobe. The size of the leaves was mostly medium (8-15 cm) with short petiole length (20 cm). The both surfaces of immature leaves were purple but mature leaves and main vines were green. The vine internode length and diameter were short (3-5 cm) and thin (4-6 mm), shapes of limb flowers were mostly rounded. The tuber shape was elliptic with white skin colour and white or yellow flesh colour.

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101439

Screening test of sweet potato clones on scab (Sphaceloma batatas Saw) disease
Pengujian klon-klon ubijalar terhadap penyakit kudis (Sphaceloma batatas)

Hardaningsih, Sri; Rahayuningsih, St.A.
Indonesian Phytopathological Society; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Risalah Kongres Nasional XII, dan Seminar Ilmiah Perhimpunan Fitopatologi Indonesia [Proceedings of the 12th National Congress and the Scientific Seminar on Indonesian Phytopathological Society]; Yogyakarta, 6-8 September 1993; Book I; p. 595-601

Abstract:
Scab (Sphaceloma batatas Saw) is an important fungal disease on sweet potato, therefore a study to test 78 high-yielding, sweet tasting and dry tuber sweet potato clones was conducted to know their resistance on scab disease. The test took place in Genteng Agricultural Facility from June to November 1992 using natural infection source in a Randomized Block Design with two replications. There were 42 clones which showed resistance with average disease intensity under 12 percent. The higher the disease intensity, the lower the yield of dry tuber clones, but this was not true for the high yielding and sweet tasting clones.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101763

Yield test of several sweet potato clones and cultivars on andosol Gadut, Bukittinggi
Pengujian daya hasil beberapa klon dan varietas ubijalar ditanah Andosol Gadut, Bukittinggi

Adriyaswar; Mulyasdi; Jusuf, M.
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar [Seminar Treatise] 4: 139-144(1994)

Abstract:
This experiment was carried out in Gadut farmer's field, Bukittinggi from May to November 1992. The purpose of this study was to determine the yield potential and agronomic performances of sweet potato clones and cultivars at Andosol Gadut, Bukittinggi. A Randomized Completely Block Design with three replications and 15 clones and cultivars as the treatments was used in this experiment. It was found that Gowi Jerjet, Gowi Bunga 4, Gowi Kasiran 2, and Tamburin Merah gave better yield than Prambanan, but there was no significant different from Bogor sweet potato (local check). Fresh tuber yield of those selected clones were 30.6; 30.7 and 28.8 t/ha, respectively.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101573

Tetraploid sweet potatoes and their prospect as germplasm for pentaploid sweet potato breeding programme
Ubi jalar tetraploid dan prospeknya sebagai sumber genetik dalam program pemuliaan ubi jalar pentaploid

Renwarin, Jan; Hartana, Alex; Hambali, G.G.; Rumawas, F.
Indonesian Society of Breeding Science; Bogor; Indonesia

Zuriat 5(2): 8-15(1994)

Abstract:
Six sweet potato clones, BIS-157, BIS-192, Papota, BIS-183, BIS-168 and BIS-214 as female parents, and two tuberous diploid Ipomoea trifida clones from Citatah, West Java, as males were used to produce tetraploids by artificial hybridization. Only two clones, Papota and BIS-214 were cross compatible to both males with the cross-ability of 6.7% and 13.2%, respectively. A total of 66 tetraploid progenies were produced. More than 56% of the progeny formed edible tuberous roots and exhibited wide variation in plant type, tuber initiation, root yield and quality but none of them out yield the female parents. Thirteen tetraploids exhibited earliness, five genotypes formed tubers at 15-20 days after planting. The tuber yield ranged from 102.6 - 363.7 g per plants. The number of tubers/plant ranged from 3.2 - 13.7 tubers. Root quality exhibited 21.8% - 43.6% DM, and 9.6% - 29.4%, and Carbohydrate, 2.0% - 4.4% crude protein (DM base) and 1.6% - 12.0% fiber content. The results suggest that tetraploid sweet potatoes gave prospective role in sweet potato improvement by breeding pentaploids.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101632

Resistance test of sweet potato cultivar/lines to Cylas formicarius F in the field
Uji ketahanan varietas/klon ubi jalar terhadap hama lanas (Cylas formicarius F.) di lapangan

Waluyo
Indonesian Entomological Society; Bandung Branch; Indonesia

Prosiding Simposium Penerapan Pengendalian Hama Terpadu [Proceedings of the Symposium on Applied of Integrated Pest Control], 3-4 September 1992; p.158-161

Abstract:
Weevil (Cylas formicarius F.) is the most important pest of sweet potato in Indonesia, both in the field and in the store/house. This pest infestation is characterized by small spots (holles) on the tuber surface. One of the effective method to control this pest is using tolerant cultivar. The research was conducted in the wet season of 1991, at Muara-Bogor. The amount of 48 clones/cultivars of sweet potato were tested under the field condition with 3 replications. Each clone/cultivar was grown in 5x1 m ridges. Each ridge was invested with artificially 25 adults of Cylas sp. (male and female) 3 times, since 2, 3 and 4 month after planting. The objective of this study is the screening of several clones/cultivars which resistance to weevil attack under the field condition. Result of screening showed that 5 cultivars/clones were infested under 20% weight and number of symptom. Those cultivars/clones are Mantang (B 0002), P.B. (B. 0033), Papola (B 0052), Mantang Austrial (B 0086) and Mantang Putih (B 0106). Seven cultivars/clones which were infested among 20-30% were B0063, B0076, B0084, B0089, B0113 and B0125. And the highest degree of infestation were found on Bis 174 (B 0056) and B 0123.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101635

A feeding monitor, its application in identification of the resistance cultivars to pests
Feeding monitor, penggunaannya dalam mengidentifikasi varietas resisten terhadap hama

Bahagiawati, A.H.
Indonesian Entomological Society; Bandung Branch; Indonesia

Prosiding Simposium Penerapan Pengendalian Hama Terpadu [Proceedings of the Symposium on Applied of Integrated Pest Control], 3-4 September 1992; p.170-173

Abstract:
Insects living hidden within seeds, wood, and certain other fibrous plant materials often with no external evidence of their presence. Purdue University scientists developed a device that can detect the feeding of insect living hidden within the seed through ultrasonic emission. With this device feeding activities were detected from early first instar larva through the last instar. This device not only can be used to monitor the feeding behaviour of the insects but also can be used to identify resistant plants to their pests.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101780

Preliminary yield trial of sweet potato
Pengujian daya hasil pendahuluan ubi jalar

Bahri, Len; Burhanizar; Yulimasni
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar [Seminar Treatise] 5: 109-116(1994)

Abstract:
This experiment was conducted at Rambatan Experimental Station from October 1989 to February 1990. The objective was to find out the yield potential and agronomic characters of sweet potato selected clones. The experiment was arranged in a Randomized Completely Block Design using 35 clones of sweet potato with three replications. Fertilizers were applied at the dosages of 100 kg Urea, 50 kg TSP and 125 kg KCl per hectare. Result of this study indicated that 15 clones produced the yield more than 35 t/ha, but only five clones which posessed good quality of tubers. Those clones could be tested in advanced yield trial.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101781

Advanced yield trial of sweet potato clones
Pengujian daya hasil lanjutan klon-klon ubi jalar

Nasri, M.; Zulkifli; Yusuf, Amrizal
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar [Seminar Treatise] 5: 117-123(1994)

Abstract:
The experiment was carried out at Rambatan from May to September 1992. The purpose of this study was to determine the yield potential and agronomic characteristics of sweet potato clones. The treatments were arranged in a Randomized Completely Block Design with three replications using 16 clones as the treatments. Result of this experiment indicated that all parameters observed were significantly different among treatments (clones). The highest yield was achieved by BIS 183 (OP)-Sr-18, followed by Gowi Hafia and Gowi Bunga 6 with the yield 60.4 t/ha, 55.1 t/ha, and 48.4 t/ha respectively. Those three clones also produced high tuber dry matter (>35%).

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101782

Yield trial of several sweet potato clones with and without fertilizer
Daya hasil beberapa klon ubi jalar dengan dan tanpa pemupukan

Jonharnas; Asmaniar; Yusuf, M.
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar [Seminar Treatise] 5: 124-133(1994)

Abstract:
This experiment was conducted at Sungai Tarab (Tanah Datar). The purpose of this study was to determine the yield potential and agronomic characteristics of sweet potato clones as the effect of fertilizer. The experiment was arranged in a Split Plot Design with three replications. The dosages of fertilizer as the main plot consisted of without and with fertilizer, while the sub plot was thirteen sweet potato clones. Result of this study indicated that there was interaction effect of clones and dosages of fertilizer on root yield and marketable root weight/plant. In general, root yield of clones with fertilizer was higher than the yield of without fertilizer. Clones BIS 186, BIS 187, BIS 214, BIS 183 and Vapota responsed to fertilizer. While improved cvs. Prambanan and local of Tamburin Merah were less responce. The highest yield was achieved by Vapota and BIS 175 (OP)-Sr-289 on both fertilizer treatments with root yield 44.7 t/ha and 39.2 t/ha (with fertilizer) and 36.7 t/ha and 36.6 t/ha (without fertilizer), respectively.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101783

Chemical properties and organoleptic of several clones and cultivars of sweet potato
Sifat kimia dan organoleptik beberapa klon dan varietas ubi jalar

Afdi, Edia; Nunuk S.; Yusuf, M.
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar [Seminar Treatise] 5: 134-141(1994)

Abstract:
The experiment was conducted at Food Technology Laboratory of Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops from November 1992 to March 1993. Twenty genotypes of sweet potato were arranged in a Completely Randomized Design with three replications. Result showed that Bis 192 (OP)-Sr-144 was the best clone to be used for food and food industry due to low water content, high carbohydrate and amylose contents, and more favourable than the others.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 101791

Five years of research and development in agriculture 1987-1991; support in welcoming the Take-off Era
Lima tahun penelitian dan pengembangan pertanian 1987-1991 sumbangan dalam menyongsong era tinggal landas

anonymous
Agency for Agricultural Research and Development (AARD); Ministry of Agriculture; Pasarminggu; Jakarta; Indonesia

Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Pertanian [Agency for Agricultural Research and Development]; Departemen Pertanian; 1992; 118 p

Availability :
Agency for Agricultural Research and Development (AARD); Ministry of Agriculture; Pasarminggu; Jakarta; Indonesia




NO. 101793

Five years of main research results of Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops, 1988-1992
Lima tahun hasil penelitian utama Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami 1988-1992

Kasim, Firdaus; Jusuf, M.; Kaher, Abdul; Hasan, Nusyirwan; Sastrodipuro, Darsono; Jalid, Nursal; Hamzah, Zadry; Daniel, Moeha
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); 1992; 45pp.i-ivp

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101829

Effect of pretreatment on quality of sweet potato flour
Pengaruh perlakuan pendahuluan terhadap mutu tepung ubijalar

Jastra, Yulmar; Sastrodipuro, Darsono; Azman; Iswari, Kasma
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar on Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops]; Jusuf, A(ed); Jusuf, M. (ed); Irfan, Z(ed); Rusli, I(ed); Buharman, B (ed); Marzampi(ed); Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami; 1994; Vol.3; p.130-134

Abstract:
The experiment was conducted at Rambatan, Tanah Datar district, West Sumatra on September 1992. Tuber of sweet potato used was cv. Bogor. The treatments were arranged in a Completely Randomized Design with two factors. The first factor was with and without blanching in hot water (80oC) and the second factor was preservative (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5% sodium bisulfite solution). After pealing and washing, the tuber was rusphed. It was bleaching at 80oC for five minutes, so sweet potato was soaked in sodium bisulfite solution for five minutes. Blanching gave low total acidity, but it did not improve the colour of flour. The rusphed sweet potato soaked in 1% of sodium bisulfite solution gave quite white colour of flour.

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101873

Role of land resources research in supporting the increase of food crop production
Peranan penelitian sumberdaya lahan dalam menunjang peningkatan produksi tanaman pangan

Adiningsih, J.Sri; Sudarman, Kurmen; Siswanto, Agus B.; Kasno A.; Rochayati, Sri
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanah dan Agroklimat [Proceedings of the Seminar on Research Result of Soils and Agroclimate]; 1: 89-104 (1994)

Availability :
Center for Soil and Agroclimate Research (CSAR); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101979

Food plant resources diversity of Dani society, Irian Jaya and its conservation perspective
Keanekaragaman sumberdaya tumbuhan bahan pangan masyarakat Dani, Irian Jaya dan perspektif pelestariannya

Purwanto, Y.; Walujo, Eko B.
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); LIPI; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia; Jakarta; Buku 2; 1995; p500-510

Abstract:
The traditional life of Dani people who residing in Balim valley was wholly depend on their surrounding natural resources. A review of the diversity of plants used for food resources is discussed based on the ethnobotanical data. Utilization, conservation and management knowledge was also presented.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 101933

Possibility of the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) dye matter used as natural dyes for food at the present and in the future
Kemungkinan pemanfaatan bahan pewarna umbi (Ipomoea batatas) sebagai pewarna alami untuk makanan masa kini dan masa depan

Hartana, Alex; Renwarin, Jan
Department of Biology; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani II [Proceedings of the 2nd National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany]; Ikatan Pustakawan Indonesia; Jakarta; Buku 2; 1995; p213-218

Abstract:
Plants as natural dye sources for food have been known by Indonesian for long time. However, plant dyes for food have been hardly used any more and replaced by artificial dyes recently. Furthermore, some synthetic dyes used in Indonesian foods, had been forbidden in their producer country due to unhealthy for human consumption. Therefore, dyes which are safe for human consumption have to be explored. To explore sweet potato potentially as food sources for the future, 253 sweet potato clones from Java, Sumatra, and Irian Jaya, had been evaluated in Bogor and Manokwari for their tuber productivity, quality, and colours. The main flesh colour of sweet potato tubers evaluated were white (69.5%, yellow (16.3%), orange (10.7%) and purple (3.5%). Flesh tuber colour percentage orders in each island followed that percentage order, except that in Java, orange flesh tuber percentage a little bit higher than yellow ones. Beta carotene and sugar content of orange sweet potato clones were higher, but their protein content were lower than those of purple ones. In developed countries, such as USA, high vitamin A baby food from orange sweet potato have been produced and sold. To produce higher intensity of orange and pink flesh sweet potato tube colour, hybridization had been done among orange and among purple sweet potato clones. Some hybrid progenies of those crossed showed darker colour than their parents. The long run objective of this study is to produce sweet potato which can be used as dye sources for food industry in the future.

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 102142

Some physical characteristic and organoleptic of paste from mixture of wheat flour, sweet potatoes and deffated soy flour
Beberapa sifat fisika dan organoleptik pasta dari campuran terigu, ubi jalar, dan tepung kedelai tidak berlemak

Pangloli, Philipus
Majalah BPPT [Journal of the Agency for Technological Study and Application] (LXI): 54-64(1994)

Abstract:
Selected physical properties including color and cooking loss and sensory attributes of paste prepared with all-purpose wheat flour, sweet potato, and defatted soy flour (DSF) were investigated. Paste formulations were 100% wheat flour as control sample and 9 experimental formulations in which a portion of wheat flour was replaced with sweet potato flour (10%) or sweet potato puree (10 and 15%) in combination with DSF (0, 5 and 10%) based on the solid contents of the substitution ingredients and baker's percentage. Added sweet potato and DSF affected either color intensity or color lightness and tended to increase cooking loss of paste. Paste prepared with 10% sweet potato flour was more preferred to all other paste samples. Both sweet potato and DSF had no effect on paste tenderness but the sweet potato tended to decrease paste stickness.

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 102171

Effects of usage level of urea and steaming time of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) on the biosynthesis of rumen microbe proteins biosintesis of 'microba rumen' protein
Pengaruh tingkat penggunaan urea dan waktu pengukusan ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas) terhadap biosintesis protein mikroba rumen

Prasetyono, Bambang Waluyo Hadi Eko
Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

S2 Thesis; Bogor; Bogor Agricultural University; 1992; 70p.

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 102261

Virulence of some Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae isolates on the sweet potato pest (Cylas formicarius)
Virulensi beberapa isolat Beauveria bassiana dan Metarrhizium anisopliae terhadap hama lanas ubijalar (Cylas formicarius)

Priyatno, T.P.; Kardin, M.K.; Waluyo
Risalah Seminar Biologi XIV dan Kongres Nasional Biologi XI [Proceedings of the 14th Seminar and the 11th National Congress on Biology]; Depok, 24-26 Juli 1995

Availability :
University of Indonesia; Depok; Indonesia




NO. 102423

Study of heavy metal content on kangkong (Ipomoea reptans), spinach (Amaranthus tricolor) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) in Ciliwung and Sunter river flood plain
Studi kadar logam berat pada kangkung darat (Ipomoea reptans), bayam (Amaranthus tricolor) dan selada (Lactuca sativa) di bantaran sungai Ciliwung dan Sunter

Indrawati, Dwi
Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Thesis; Bogor; Bogor Agricultural University; 1993; ?p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 102525

Chain and margin marketings of sweet potato in Mojokerto district, East Java
Rantai dan marjin pemasaran ubijalar di Kabupaten Mojokerto, Jawa Timur

Effendi, Gunawan; Hariyanto
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops (MARIF); Malang; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan [Proceedings of the Seminar on the Research Result of Food Crop] tahun 1994; 1995; p.332-339

Abstract:
Understanding in sweet potato marketing problems is one of the successfull key of the sweet potato development and increasing the farmers income. The main objective of this research is to study the transaction systems and the marketing flow, and to estimate the marketing margin distribution of sweet potato commodity. For this purpose, 120 farmers who had planted sweet potato after rice in irrigated areas were selected by stratified random sampling for interviewed. And special for marketing study the purposive sampling methode was used to get marketing informations. Research results indicated that in the farmers gate price of sweet potato was Rp.22.50/kg; farmers get profit only around Rp.1.20/kg, but they spent 6-8 months. The big seller of sweet potato could get the biggest marketing margin (52.6%) with their profits was Rp.25/kg, although they paid for marketing cost was 21%. Transaction between the farmer and the trader, they paid cash, or the advanced money was around 5-50% of the transaction values, and the rest should be paid 5-60 days after harvest (if the price down until Rp.2.50/kg). Reduce the gap of marketing margin distribution, the price policy of sweet potato at the farmer gate should be set up, in order to have a profit.

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Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 102532

Control of tuber borer Cylas formicarius by using insecticides on several sweet potato cultivars
Pengendalian hama penggerek ubi Cylas formicarius dengan insektisida pada beberapa varietas ubi jalar

Noci, Nurnina; Sriwidodo; Muis, Amran
Maros Research Institute for Food Crops (MORIF); Ujung Pandang; South Sulawesi; Indonesia

Agrikam, Buletin Penelitian Pertanian Maros [Maros Agricultural Research Bulletin] 9(3): 139-146(1994)

Abstract:
An experiment to control tuber borer Cylas formicarius by using insecticide on three sweet potato cultivars was conducted at Sidrap, District of Watang Pulu, South Sulawesi during the dry season (April-August) of 1994. The experiment was arranged in a Factorial (2 factors) with 3 replications. The first factor was 3 sweet potato cultivars: Kawarasang, Kalasan, and Local Sidrap. The second factor was insecticide applied: (A) Furadan 3G applied at planting time and 60 days after planting (dap), (B) Furadan 3G applied at 60 dap, (C) Hosthathion 40EC applied at 40 dap, followed by Furadan 3G at 60 dap, and (D) Control (without any insecticide). The research result showed that there was an interaction between sweet potato cv. Kalasan and application of insecticdes (either Furadan 3G or Hosthathion 40EC) to C. formicarius in terms of the number of pupae and weevil. Analysis of variance also showed that cv. Kalasan yielded significantly higher than Karawasang but slightly higher than the local Sidrap cultivars. In term of quality, local Sidrap was very low, due mainly to the total of larvae, pupae and weevil accumulated in the tuber.

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Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 102537

Impact of changes in land use pattern of food crops at Maros district, South Sulawesi
Dampak perubahan pola penggunaan lahan tanaman pangan di Kabupaten Maros, Sulawesi Selatan

Margaretha SL.; Djamaludin
Maros Research Institute for Food Crops (MORIF); Ujung Pandang; South Sulawesi; Indonesia

Agrikam, Buletin Penelitian Pertanian Maros [Maros Agricultural Research Bulletin] 9(3): 111-117(1994)

Abstract:
A study was conducted at Jenetaesa, Maros district in South Sulawesi to assess the impact of changes in land use pattern for food crops during ten-year consecutive periode (1982-91). The site was selected purposively for the study, by taken 100 sampling farmers based on 4 changed land status groups. Data were collected through questionnaires and personal interview and supported by secondary data from respective institutions. Results of the study showed that there were changes in the pattern of land use as the consequence of agricultural development; a change of 27.47 ha from rainfed into irrigated or pumped areas, from bushed and upland as well as dry areas into irrigated areas, covered 12.75 and 20.35 ha, respectively. Age and experience in farming of upland farmers which were changed into irrigated areas were relatively younger with relative small of family number. Such fenomena indicated a bright future for food crops farming in Maros, in addition to its natural circumstance and favourable infra structure. Growing food crops such as rice, and secondary crops for industrial purposes and soybean to increase people nutritional status is quite possible mainly due to the market assurance and support by the government policy. Application of production inputs such as fertilizer, seed certified, and insecticide were able to increase farmers income; another indicator that farmers have adopted technologies.

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Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 102550

Response of sweet potato clones on weevil at drylands and wetlands
Tanggapan klon ubijalar terhadap hama boleng pada lingkungan kekeringan dan kecukupan air

Trustinah; Basuki, Nur; Nasrullah; Sumarno
Malang Research Institute for Food Crops (MARIF); Malang; Indonesia

Penelitian Palawija [Secondary Crops Research] 8(1): 57-67(1993)

Abstract:
A total of 100 sweet potato (I. batatas) clones were evaluated for their response to weevil (Cylas formicarius) at Muneng and Kendalpayak Experimental Station during the late dry season, from August to December 1993. The field experiment was conducted using a Split Plot Design with 3 replications. Two irrigation regimes (P0=the crops were irrigated since the planting time until 6 weeks after planting in 2 weeks interval, and P1=the crops were irrigated 7 times since planting time until 14 weeks after planting in 2 weeks interval) were assigned as the main plot, and the subplots were 100 sweet potato clones. Yield and yield losses due to weevil were used as the criteria of evaluation. Feeding puncture of adults weevil on the surface of the tuber was used as criterion to crop resistance to weevil. Among clones of sweet potato tested varied greatly for their yield. Genetic variance for tuber free from weevil infestation in drought condition was lower than that in normal condition with low mean yield. Clones responses to weevil varied from resistance to susceptible. Clone x irrigation interaction was significant for tuber free from weevil and yield loss from weevil. Drought stress indicated by the soil water content of 15% during the tuber formation stage associated with weevil infestation. Intensity of weevil damage, increase from 26% in normal condition to 49% in drought condition, and significantly reduced the tuber yield 42, 7% by drought and 63, 3% by drought and weevil. This conditions could be considered as the critical level for sweet potato selection for drought and weevil tolerance. The use of selection index was more effective for selection sweet potato for drought and weevil tolerance rather than using a direct selection, as indicated by greater gain. The selected clones were suggested to be further tested for the consistency of their performance at various drought environments, to determine whether the selected clones could be released as weevil tolerance cultivars.

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Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 102908

Resolution of carotenoids in fruit and vegetables by gradient elution high performance liquid chromatography


Nurdin, H.
Andalas 4(9): 105-111(1992)

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Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 103269

Performance of sweet potato promising clones
Keragaan klon-klon harapan ubijalar

At.A.Rahayuningsih
Risalah Seminar Hasil Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Tahun 1993 [Proceedings of the Seminar on the Research Result of Food Crops 1993]; Balittan Malang 1994; p.350-355

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office




NO. 103350

Prospect and opportunity of sweet potato establishment in East Java
Prospek dan peluang pengembangan ubijalar di Jawa Timur

Widodo, Yudi; Rahayuningsih, S.A.; Antarlina, S.S.
Risalah Lokakarya Komunikasi Teknologi untuk Meningkatkan Produksi Tanaman Pangan di Jawa Timur [Proceedings of the Workshop on Technological Communication to Increase Food Crops Production in East Java]; Edisi Khusus Balittan Malang (1): 166-175(1994)

Abstract:
Sweet potato from East Java contributes arround 10% to national sweet potato production. Five districts in East Java including Magetan, Mojokerto, Malang, Pasuruan and Sampang are considered as potential producing centers of sweet potato. Sweet potato from those districts goes to fresh market which is ultimately used for supplemental food, and transported to factory to be processed as sauce. Although from the utilization aspect of sweet potato indicates a progressive trend, however the price fluctuation and market difficulties dis courages farmers to produce a better yield. This paper is directed to discuss a problem encountered and its endeavor to alleviate based on research accomplishment.

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PROSEA Network Office




NO. 103516

Response of three sweet potato cultivars on some kinds of stable manure
Tanggap tiga varietas ubijalar terhadap berbagai macam pupuk kandang

Darjanto; Amirudin
Faculty of Agriculture; Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia

Research Report; Purwokerto; Faculty of Agriculture; Jenderal Soedirman University; 1993; 80p

Abstract:
In increasing sweet potatoes production in diversification programme of food, an experiment on the response of three cultivars of sweet potato on some kinds of stable manures had been carried out. This experiment was field orientation and conducted in Grendeng village, North Purwokerto subdistrict, Purwokerto, Central Java Province, the soil type was latosol at elevation of 110 m above sea level. This research used a Split Plot Design with three replications. Sweet potato cultivars were used as sub treatment included V1 (cv. Sarjono), V2 (cv. Wanadri) and V3 (cv. Pangkur Merah). Stable manure was used as main treatment included K0 (without stable manure), K1 (Chicken stable manure), K2 (Goat stable manure), K3 (Cow stable manure) and K4 (Buffalo stable manure). Each stable manure was applied in a dosage of 10 ton/ha. The results showed that three cultivars of sweet potatoes had significant to highly significant response on stable manure applications. There were different response on the growth but not on the yield. Chicken stable manure showed on the highest increase of tuber yield (28.63%), followed by buffalo stable manure (25.89%), cow stable manure (10.51%) and goat stable manure (5.89%. There was no interaction between cultivars and the kinds of stable manure for all the tested cultivars.

Availability :
Library; Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia




NO. 103575

Effects of residue of chicken stable manure and immersation of straw mulch residue on the growth and yield of sweet potato
Pengaruh residu pupuk kandang ayam dan pembenaman residu mulsa jerami padi terhadap pertumbuhan dan hasil tanaman ubi jalar

Darjanto; Iqbal, Achmad
Faculty of Agriculture; Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia

Research Report; Purwokerto; Faculty of Agriculture; Jenderal Soedirman University; 1992; 65p

Abstract:
Sweet potato (I. batatas) is one of secondary food crops which has a good prospect. It can be developed as foodstuff. One of the factors that can influence the yield of sweet potato is soil organic. It can be overcome by fertilizing with chicken stable manure and organic matter in the soil. In the soil, the stable manure and organic matter are able to increase the nutrient and are able to improve the soil physics so that the sweet potato get the nutrients and get good soil condition especially for root growth and tuber growth. The aim of this research is to know the effect of residue of chicken stable manure and residue of straw mulch on growth and yield of sweet potato. This field experiment was conducted from April to July 1992, in the Experimental Field of faculty of Biology, Jenderal Soedirman University with the altitude is about 113 m above sea level. The factors tested were residue of chicken stable manure (K0=without residue of chicken stable manure, K1=5 ton/ha residue of chicken stable manure, K2=10 ton/ha residue of chicken stable manure and K3=15 ton/ha residue of chicken stable manure) and residue of thick of straw mulch (M0=without residue of thick of straw mulch, M1=2.5 cm, M2=5 cm and M3=7.5 cm residue of thick of straw mulch). The result of this research showed that the residue of chicken stable manure gave significant effect on plant length and width of leaf with the best dosage was 15 ton/ha, and gave significant effect on yield component of sweet potato with the best dosage was 10 ton/ha. Residue of straw mulch did not give significant effect on growth component and only gave significant effect on mount of tuber per plant and amount of tuber cannot be for sale per effective plot.

Availability :
Library; Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia




NO. 103576

Weeds control by straw mulch and chicken stable manure application for increasing sweet potato productivity
Pengendalian gulma dengan cara pemberian mulsa jerami dan pupuk kandang ayam untuk meningkatkan produksi ubijalar

Iqbal, Achmad; Darjanto
Faculty of Agriculture; Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia

Research Report; Purwokerto; Faculty of Agriculture; Jenderal Soedirman University; 1992; 68p

Abstract:
Sweet potato (I. batatas) is one of the secondary food crops which has a good prospect. It can be developed as foodstuff. One of the factors that can influence the yield of sweet potato is the appereance of weed. It can be controlled by applied straw mulch. Besies that, it is necessary to fertilized with chicken stable manure in the soil to reduce the competation of crops to get nutrient from soil. Giving straw mulch and chicken stable manure able to increase land productivity, so that the yield of crops can also be increased. Unfortunatelly, the effect of straw mulch and chicken stable manure on growth of weed and yield of sweet potato did not know so much. The aims of this research was to know the effect of straw mulch and chicken stable manure on growth of weed and yield of sweet potato. It was also to know kinds of weed which can be controlled by applied straw mulch on sweet potato. This field experiment was conducted from June 28, 1991 until October 27, 1991, in the Experimental Field of Faculty of Biology, Jenderal Soedirman University. The altitude is about 113 m above sea level. The factors tested were thick of straw mulch (M0=without straw mulch, M1=2.5 cm, M2=5 cm and M3=thick of mulch 7.5 cm) and dosage of chicken stable manure (K0=without chicken manure, K1=5, K2=10 and K3=15 ton/ha). The result of this experiment showed that the straw mulch can emphasize the growth of weeds, can emphasize the appearance of two weed species (Eleusine indica (L.) Gaertner and Emilia sanchifolia). Land covering by applied straw mulch gave highly significantly positive effects on yield of sweet potato and the highest yield of sweet potato can be reached by applied in a thick of straw mulch 2.5 cm as amount as 22.2 tons of tuber per hectare. The chicken stable manure gave highly significantly positive effect on yield in a dosage 0f 10 ton/ha and 21.4 tons of tuber per hectare.

Availability :
Library; Jenderal Soedirman University; Purwokerto; Central Java; Indonesia




NO. 103859

Potency and prospect of tuber crops in diversification programme
Ubi-ubian potensi dan prospeknya untuk dimanfaatkan dalam program diversifikasi

Widodo, Y.
Media Komunikasi dan Informasi Pangan [Media of Communication and Information of Food] 6(22): 46-55(1995)

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Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 104044

Free time of weeds on sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) plant
Waktu bebas gulma pada tanaman ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas L.)

Ichwan, Budiyati
Majalah Ilmiah Universitas Jambi [Jambi University Scientific Journal] (35): 40-50(1993)

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Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 104059

Growth analysis of three sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.Lam) cultivars planted on barren land and land under coconut planting
Analisis tumbuh tiga varietas ubijalar (Ipomoea batatas L.Lam) yang ditanam pada lahan terbuka dan lahan di bawah pertanaman kelapa

Warouw, Johny R.
Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

S2 Thesis; Bogor; Bogor Agricultural University; 1992; 71p

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Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 104102

Analysis of physical characteristic and chemical composition on some sweet potato cultivars for agroindustry
Analisis sifat fisik dan komposisi kimia beberapa varietas ubi jalar untuk agroindustri

Sinuraya, Arinta R.
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1994; 61p

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Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104108

Effect of nitrogen fertilization on sweet potato-clones Brs-186 on nutrient uptake of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium
Pengaruh pemupukan nitrogen pada ubi jalar klon Brs-186 terhadap serapan hara nitrogen fosfor dan kalium

Djery
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1994; 42p

Availability :
Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104110

Effect of nitrogen fertilization on sweet potato cv. SO-27 on nutrient uptake of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium
Pengaruh pemupukan nitrogen pada ubi jalar varietas SO-27 terhadap serapan hara nitrogen, fosfor dan kalium

Wijaya, Frankie
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1994; 50p

Availability :
Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104111

Effect of nitrogen fertilization on sweet potatoes cv. Ciceh on nutrient uptake of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium
Pengaruh pemupukan nitrogen pada ubi jalar varietas Ciceh terhadap serapan hara nitrogen, fosfor dan kalium

Harjono
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1994; 45p

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Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104115

Effect of drought on nutrient element status of some sweet potato clones
Pengaruh kekeringan terhadap status unsur hara beberapa klon ubi jalar

Marletty
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1994; 57p

Availability :
Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104120

Analysis of land suitability for sweet potatoes plantation
Analisis kesesuaian lahan bagi pertanaman ubi jalar

Yohanawati, Rina
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1994; 79p

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Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104124

Analysis of physico-chemical characteristics on nine sweet potato cultivars from Waimena
Analisis sifat fisik dan kimia 9 varietas ubi jalar asal Waimena

Roulina R.M.Siagian
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1994; 38p

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Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104125

Effect of potassium fertilization on sweet potato cv. SO-27 on nutrient uptake of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium
Pengaruh pemupukan kalium pada ubi jalar varietas SO-27 terhadap serapan hara nitrogen, fosfor dan kalium

Sebayang, Silvia I.
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1994; 57p

Availability :
Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104144

Effects of nitrogen, potassium fertilization and grafting on starch contents in sweet potatoes
Pengaruh pemupukan nitrogen, kalium dan grafting terhadap kadar pati di dalam tanaman ubi jalar

Widiastuti
BSc Thesis; Bogor; Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry; 1993; 43p

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Bogor College of Analytic Chemistry Library




NO. 104639

Study on growing and harvesting time of some cultivars of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.)
Uji tumbuh dan saat pemungutan hasil dan beberapa varietas ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas L.)

Prijanto, B.
Majalah Ilmiah Pembangunan [Foundation Scientific Journal]; UPN 'Veteran' Jawa Timur 5(6): 206-215(1995)

Abstract:
Sweet potato (I. batatas) area at the first planting was inspected good growing because with this condition could resulted high yield. Beside that there are some factors are needed to care. f.1: Harvesting time, plant variety, climate, soil fertility etc. But it has no a clear criteria about the certain time of harvesting each cultivar of this plant has different optimal of the harvest age and if harvesting was done at over matured feared will decrease yield either in quality or quantity. That is why in result of this experiment was hoped has information about influence of the harvest age at some cultivars of sweet potato on the field some cultivars/clan which were treated in this experiment are ciceh-32; CN-1108; Lapis-3; TIS 5125-38 and 395/TW-6 each cultivar is harvested in a difference age; 110 days, 120 and 130 days. The result from some parameters after analyzed there were some significant (p=0.05) among cultivars which were treated on the length of plant, number of branch and member of leaves even the weight of tuber 15 showed by cultivar of ciceh 32 in every harvest age. The percentage degree of starch insignificantly different between cultivars which were treated and harvesting time.

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 104832

Technological packages for sweet potato cultivation on dryland
Paket teknologi budidaya ubi jalar di lahan kering

Jusuf, Amrizal; Adriyaswar; Hirwan; Syofial
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar on Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops] 7.........

Abstract:
A verifying trial of five alternative technology packages was conducted at the farmer's field Pasaman (West Sumatra) and Nias (North Sumatra) from April to August 1993. These experiments were arranged due to a Randomized Completely Block Design with four replications. The results showed that the highest yield of sweet potato was achieved by the application of 135 kgs/ha Urea, 50 kgs/ha TSP, 130 kgs/ha KCl, 2.5 t/ha cow manure, 3.0 t/ha rice straw, and the used of tip cuttings which planted horizontally, 2 rows/ridge with plant spacing 40x30 cm and ridge sizes 60 cm height and 100 c width. That technological package (package C) yielded 14.15 t/ha at Nias and 26.40 t/ha at Pasaman, respectively.

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Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 104641

Effects of dolomit application and pre-emergence herbicide on the population of weed and the benefit of the dryland sugarcane farming system
Dinamika populasi gulma dan keuntungan usahatani tebu lahan kering akibat pemberian herbisida pra-tumbuh dan dolomit

Sembodo, D.R.J.; Setiawan, K.; Soeleman, A.; Rachmat
Faculty of Agriculture; Lampung University; Lampung; Sumatera; Indonesia

Jurnal Penelitian Pengembangan Wilayah Lahan Kering [Dryland Research and Development Journal] (13): 14-25(1994)

Abstract:
One of the efforts to increase dry-land productivity is by dolomite application. The growth condition improved by dolomite would effect both plant growth and weeds. The objectives of this study was to evaluate the effect of dolomite application and pre-emergence herbicide and to predict the benefit farming system of sugarcane plantation by R/C ratio. Material used in this study were sugarcane BW-3065, dolomite, and pre-emergence herbicide. The treatments were arranged by factorial (4x8) in a Strips-Plot Design with three replications. The first factor was dolomite application, consisted of four levels (0, 0.75, 1.50 and 2.25 t/ha). The second factor was weed management systems, consisted of eight levels (without application, conventional management, Diuron 1.5 kg a.e./ha, Diuron 3.0 kg a.e./ha, Ametrin 1.5 kg a.e./ha, Ametrin 3.0 kg a.e/ha, 2, 4-D Amin 1.5 kg a.e./ha, and 2, 4-D Amin 3.0 kg a.e./ha). Weed population dynamic was affected by dolomite on the first six weeks plant age. Ametrin 3.0 kg a.e/ha was able to control weed growth better than that of the other systems of weed management. Additionally, the high value of R/C (2.80) was achieved in sugarcane plantation treated without dolomite application together with Diuron 1.5 kg a.e./ha application. The highest income (3.02 million rupiah) was achieved in sugarcane plantation treated with dolomite 1.5 t.ha together with Ametrin 3.0 kg a.e./ha applications.

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 104830

Performance of some sweet potato clones in acid dryland
Penampilan beberapa klon ubi jalar di lahan kering masam

Jonharnas; Jusuf, M.
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar in the Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops] 7: 11-18(1995)

Abstract:
Two experiments were conducted at Pasaman (West Sumatra) and Martapura (South Sumatra) during the dry season of 1993. Each experiment was arranged due to a Randomized Completely Block Design with two factors and four replications, with eight sweet potato clones as the treatments. Plot size was 4.5 x 5.0 m with plant spacing 40 x 25 cm and fertilized with 100 kgs Urea, 50 kgs TSP and 100 kgs KCl per hectare. Results of these studies indicated that interaction between genotypes and location significantly affected yield of sweet potato. The average yield at Pasaman and Martapura were 12.2 and 9.9 t/ha, respectively. The highest yield on both locations were achieved by BIS 183 (OP)-Sr-18 with the average yield 24.4 and 22.0 t/ha respectively.

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Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 104831

Determination of physico-chemical characteristic of sweet potato clones and organoleptic test of their Kremas
Penentuan sifat fisikokimia klon-klon ubi jalar dan uji organoleptik produk kremasnya

Afdi, Edial; Jusuf, M.
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar on Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops] 7: 19-25(1995)

Abstract:
The experiment was conducted at Food Technology Laboratory of Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF) during the wet season of 1993/94. The objective of the experiment was to determine the sweet potato clones which posses good physical and chemical characteristics and acceptable organoleptic of their "kremas". The experiment was arranged according to a Completely Randomized Design using 13 clones as the treatment (where as Tamburin merah was used as the standard) with three replications. Results of this experiment indicated that most of sweet potato clones tested had the physical characteristic closely or the same with Tamburin Merah, Lambau (Op)-Sr-6 and TIS 9465 (OP)-Sr-20 had higher starch content and more acceptable organoleptic than Tamburin Merah. There was no clone that had higher protein content and lower free sugar than Tamburin Merah.

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Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 105001

Yield trial of sweet potato clones on the dryland
Pengujian daya hasil klon-klon ubi jalar di lahan kering

Nasri, M.; Zulkifli
Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops (SARIF); Padang; West Sumatera; Indonesia

Risalah Seminar Penelitian Balai Penelitian Tanaman Pangan Sukarami [Proceedings of the Seminar on Research of Sukarami Research Institute for Food Crops] 8: 1-7(1995)

Abstract:
The experiment was carried out at Rambatan Experimental Farm (500 m above sea level) from April until August 1993. The treatments were arranged due to a Randomized Completely Block Design with four replications. Fifteen sweet potato clones were tested in this trial. Plot size was 4x5 m2 and plant spacing 100x25 cm. Fertilizers were applied at the dosages of 100 kg Urea, 50 kg TSP and 100 kg/ha KCl. Results of the experiment indicated that the yield of clones ranged from 13.8 to 30.7 t/ha, while tubers dry weight ranged from 22.1 to 42.0%. Based on their yield tubers dry weight and other agronomic characters, four clones were selected for further evaluation. Those clones were: TIS 9465 (op)-Sr-3, TIS 9465(op)-Sr-41, BIS 192 (op)-Sr-144 and BIS 183 (op)-Sr-18.

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Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 106243

Xantan production from starch of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) using mixed cultures
Produksi xantan dari pati ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas) menggunakan biakan campuran (mixed culture)

Prasetyo, G.
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; 1995; 94p

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Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 106472

Study on the effect of heating of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) on the bio availability of Beta-caroten-provitamine A in the blood plasms and livers of mise
Mempelajari efek pemanasan ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas) terhadap bio availability beta karoten provitamin A pada plasma dan hati tikus

Rumondang, E.
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; 1993; 141p

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Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 106485

Study on the processing of dry candy of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk.) and the observation of its properties
Mempelajari pembuatan manisan kering ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) dan pengamatan sifat-sifat manisan yang dihasilkan

Widrasono, W.
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; 1993; 102p

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Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 106528

Utilization of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) extract as a lactic acid beverage containing vitamine-B12 through fermentation process
Pemanfaatan ekstrak ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas) sebagai minuman asam laktat bervitamin B12 melalui proses fermentasi

Saepullah, A.
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; 1996; 65p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 106535

Effect of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) cultivars, additon of sodium benzoic acid and storage duration on the physico-chemical characteristics of sweet potatoes jelly produced
Pengaruh varietas ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas) penambahan natrium benzoat dan lama penyimpanan terhadap sifat fisiko-kimia selai ubi jalar yang dihasilkan

Sumayong, M.
Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Bogor Agricultural University; 1992; 102p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 106678

Increasing of vitamin B12 content in yoghurt of sweet potato and Kidney bean using yogurt starters combined with Propionibacterium freudebrechii
Peningkatan kadar vitamin B12 dalam yogurt ubi jalar dan kacang merah melalui kombinasi starter yogurt dengan Propionibacterium freudebrechii

Kusumaningrum, Harsi D.; Anggraeni, Meira; Saefullah, Asep
Publication of the Association of Indonesian Food Technologiest

Jurnal Ilmu dan Teknologi Pangan [Food Technology and Science Journal] 1(1): 34-39(1996)

Abstract:
Yoghurt was prepared by using the extracts of sweet potato (I. batatas) and kidney beans (P. vulgaris), added with 5% skim and 3% glucose and then fermented by 2% mixed culture of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. Two percent starter cultures of Propionibacterium freudebrechii was then inoculated after 24 hours incubation at 37oC with the lactic acid bacteria. Analysis using atomic absorption spectrophotometer showed that the extracts contained cobalt which is important to form the vitamin B12, but vitamin B12 was not detected by microbiological assay. The combination of fermentation process with P. freudebrechii could increased the vitamin B12 content, lowered the pH, and increased the titratable lactic acid. The products contained latic acid bacteria in the range of 1.e8 CFU/ml - 1.e9 CFU/ml which idicated a good quality of yoghurt.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 106705

Sugar content evaluation of Indonesian sweet potato germplasm collection
Evaluasi kandungan gula koleksi plasma nutfah ubi jalar Indonesia

Renwarin, J.; Hartana, A.
Faculty of Agriculture; Cendrawasih University; Irian Jaya; Indonesia

Jurnal Ilmu Pertanian Indonesia [Indonesian Agricultural Science Journal] 5(2): 109-111(1995)

Abstract:
Sweet potatoes will become more popular in the future as staple food and processing material in the tropical area. Sugar content is one of the tuber quality that has to be considered for those purposes. Several thousand, of indigenous sweet potato cultivars could be found in Indonesia of which most have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluated the sugar content in the flour of raw tubers of 94 local sweet potato clones from Sumatera, Java and Irian Jaya. The variability of the total and reducing sugars ranged from 14.7-439.4 mg/g to 0.6-106.2 mg/g raw tubers, respectively. However, most clones had total sugars less than 100 mg/g and 4 clones were found to have reducing sugar less than 2 mg/g. There was no correlation between total and reducing sugars. The great variability of the germplasm showed the existance of promising materials for breeding non sweet-sweet potato (staple type) as well as sweet-sweet potato (table type).

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 107174

Trial test on processing technology of cassava, banana and sweet potato in transmigration area
Uji coba teknologi proses pengolahan singkong, pisang dan ubi jalar di daerah transmigrasi

Kasmawarni; Erdiyati; Zafrullah; Minarsih; Nawawi; Nurdin L., M.
Uji coba Teknologi Proses Pengolahan Singkong, Pisang dan Ubi Jalar di daerah Transmigrasi [Try Test on Processing Technology of Cassava, Banana and Sweet Potato in Transmigration Area]; Balitbang Industri; Banda Aceh; 1995; 23p

Availability :
Central Institute for Research and Development of Agro-based Industry; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 107287

Study of some chemical characteristics of some species of tubers during fermentation by yeast
Kajian beberapa sifat kimia selama fermentasi beberapa jenis umbian oleh ragi

Hanafiah, A.
Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Yogyakarta Agricultural College; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Yogyakarta Agricultural College; 1992; 82p

Availability :
Yogyakarta Agricultural College; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 107317

Physico-chemical characteristics of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) during fermentation process of 'tape'
Sifat fisik dan kimiawi ubijalar (Ipomoea batatas L.) selama proses fermentasi tape

Fatmawati, Y.
Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Yogyakarta Agricultural College; Yogyakarta; Indonesia

Thesis; Yogyakarta; Faculty of Agricultural Technology; Yogyakarta Agricultural College; 1993; 170p

Availability :
Library; Yogyakarta Agricultural College; Yogyakarta; Indonesia




NO. 107424

Evaluation of technology cultivation of sweet potato at production center area
Evaluasi teknologi budidaya ubi jalar di daerah sentra produksi

Widodo, Yudi; Hartojo, Koes; Rahayuningsih, St.A.
Malang Research Institute for Pulses and Tubers; East Java; Indonesia

Teknologi Untuk Meningkatkan Produktivitas Tanaman Pangan; Edisi Khusus Balitkabi [Technology to Increase Food Crops Productivity; 'Balitkabi' Special Edition] (1): 116-121(1995)

Abstract:
Three packages of production technique for sweet potato were tested and compared to farmers existing method, in Jembrana and in Blitar. In each site, five farmers were involved for evaluating those technique. Each package of production technique was planted in an area of 0.15 ha, thus each farmer cooperator planted 0.60 ha, including farmers existing method. Among the three packages those were evaluated, the sweet potato + peanut intercropping was the most profitable and preferred by farmers in Blitar. Practicing this package farmer was able to obtain sweet potato tuber yield of 15.1 t/ha, and peanut dry pod yield of 0.7 t/ha, equaled of cash income of Rp.1, 212, 400 per ha. In Bali farmers refered to grow sweet potato in a solecropping, due to the high labour cost. Improved production technique for sweet potato in Bali was able to increase tuber yield by 5.6 t/ha, or equal to an additional cash income of Rp.325, 000/ha higher to that of the existing production method technology.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 107426

Evaluation of the important pest and diseases on sweet potato clone in Pacet, Mojokerto
Evaluasi hama dan penyakit penting pada klon ubi jalar di Pacet, Mojokerto

Rahayuningsih, St.A.; Supriyatin; Sumartini
Malang Research Institute for Pulses and Tubers; East Java; Indonesia

Teknologi Untuk Meningkatkan Produktivitas Tanaman Pangan; Edisi Khusus Balitkabi [Technology to Increase Food Crops Productivity; 'Balitkabi' Special Edition] (1): 128-138(1995)

Abstract:
Pacet is one of the sweet potato producing area in East Java. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the status of pest and diseases accurence and to assess the importance of the agronomic traits of sweet potato determining farmers preferences, in Pacet, Mojokerto. The experiment was conducted from December 1993 until April 1994, and it was designed due to Split Plot Design with three replications. Pest and disease management were considered as the mainplots, consisted of (A) Untreated as check plot, (B) Using Furadan insecticide as soil treatment, (C) Sprayed with Benlate fungicide, and (D) Using Furadan and Benlate. Nine sweet potato cultivars were sub plots. Each cultivar was planted with 100 cm x 25 cm plant spacing and fertilized with 100 urea + 100 kg/ha KCl. There was four different fungal diseases infected sweet potato in Pacet. Among those diseases, scab disease caused by Spaceloma batatas was considered the most important. The highest disease intensity of 38% was found on cultivar Taiwan/395-6, in the control plots. All cultivars tested were infected by scab disease, although it was in low intensity. The lowest infection intensity was found on local Kedu cultivar. Leaf spot by Phylosticta batatas was relatively low. The highest intensity was 17%. Taiwan/395-6 cultivar was free of leaf spot disease infection. The other leaf spot disease occured in the field was caused by Cercospora epomoeae and Alternaria spp., but the incidence was very low. All of the sweet potato cultivars tested were infested by Cylas formicarius. Genjah Sawo exhibited the highest infestation rate, of 22%, while Bestak and Daya had the lowest infestation. Among the cultivars, Genjah Sawo was the most prefered by farmers, due to its high yield, good root shape and goos canopy (semi compact). This cultivar could be planted in Pacet, as long as the cylas problem can be minimized.

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 107669

Productivity of sweet potato cultivar in some locations in Mojokerto
Produktivitas varietas ubi jalar pada beberapa lokasi di Mojokerto

Sumartono
Majalah Ilmiah Pembangunan [Foundation Scientific Journal] (UPN Veteran Jatim) 5(8): 147-153(1995)

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to know the difference between variety on several locations and several factors which influence productivity. The results showed that the highest productivity were consecutively cultivars of IR, Senggreng, Krempel and Broi. Upland Pacet was more productive than that of lowland Pacet. Lowland Trawas was more productive than that of upland Trawas. Use of labours and urea fertilizer did not show any influence. The use of seeds, cultivar, distance of farm location on main road gave influence significantly on productivity. The application of TSP fertilizer did not influence significantly, compared to Trawas. The implication, productivity was not the only one purpose. Product value was more important. The most important thing was information in order to support this purpose.

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 107684

Effect of storage on quality of paste from a formulation of wheat, sweet potato and soybean flours
Pengaruh penyimpanan terhadap mutu pasta dari campuran terigu, ubi jalar dan tepung kedelai

Pangloli, Ph.
Majalah BPPT [Journal of the Agency for Technological Study and Application] (LXVII): 126-145(1995)

Abstract:
The effect of some storage conditions on some quality attributes of paste was investigated during storage. Paste as prepared from a formulation in which a portion of wheat flour was replaced with 10% defatted soybean flour in combination with 10% sweet potato flour or 15% sweet potato puree based on baker's percentage. Dried paste was packaged under vacuum and air and stored at 4.4 and 22-30oC for six months. Colour, moisture, Beta-carotene content, and sensory characteristics were analyzed every two months. Packaging atmospher had minor effect on colour and had no effect on other quality attributes. During storage, paste became lighter, less red, and yellower; the changes were greater for the paste stored at 22-30oC. Beta-carotene content of paste decreased during storage; the loss, however was greater for the past stored at ambient temperature; Storage conditions influenced moisture and acceptablility scores to a minor degree. Paste was stored successfully under air in plastic bags with greater quality retention at 4.4oC.

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 107964

Selection on yield, tuber quality, resistance on diseases and stability of clone in sweet potatoes breeding
Seleksi daya hasil, kualitas umbi, ketahanan penyakit kudis dan kestabilan klon dalam pemuliaan ubi jalar

Renwarin, Y.
S2 Thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Post Graduate; Bogor Agricultural University; 1997; 152p

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 39729

Effects of species diversity on weevil infestation and yield of sweet potato


Gacayan, AM
Tarlac College of Agriculture; Camiling; Tarlac

TCA Graduate Journal 5(2): 61-68; 1992

Abstract:
An experiment to determine the effects on the species diversity on the sweet potato weevil infestation and on the yield of sweet potato was conducted at the farmer's field in Paniqui, Tarlac from October 1989 to March 1990. Foliage and marketable tube yield of sweet potato was favored when intercropped with mungbean but not with corn, tomato, and okra. Weevil infestation was not affected by crop diversity while severity of infestation was slightly decreased. Lowest rating was observed when sweet potato was intercropped with corn. Economic analysis showed that the combination of sweet potato and mungbean gave the highest monetary advantage.

Availability :
Library; Tarlac College of Agriculture; Camiling; Tarlac




NO. 39863

Identification, bioassay, and evaluation of mycorrhiza for utilization in cassava and sweet potato production


Palomar, MK; Loreo, FL
Dept. of Plant Protection; ViSCA; Baybay; Leyte

Philippine Phytopathology 28 : 61; 1992

Abstract:
Survey and collection trips were conducted to determine the prevalence of mycorrhiza and to identify the mycorrhizal species associated with agricultural crops. The survey showed that mycorrhizal fungi present in many areas in Leyte were found in vegetable and plantation crops including cassava and sweet potato. Local mycorrhizal species belonging to Gigaspora and Glomus were commonly isolated. In the bioassay test of local mycorrhizal species to cassava (Golden Yellow) and sweet potato (BNAS-51), higher infection was observed on the former than on the latter. The isolates obtained from CIAT (Colombia) were infective on sweet potato with Gigaspora and Glomus were commonly isolated. Laboratory and screenhouse techniques of inoculating mycorrhiza were evaluated. The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) could be isolated in pure culture in agar media. The most suitable ages of the sweet potato and cassava for inoculation with VAM were 2 and 3 weeks after planting, respectively. In sweet potato, root-mycorrhizal association was observed 6 weeks after inoculation while in cassava 4 weeks after inoculation. The use of rhizosphere soil mixed with mycorrhizal spores as inoculum resulted in higher root infection than with the use of spores (in paper) and infected roots. Six mycorrhizal isolates were assessed for their ability to influence growth of either cassava or sweet potato in sterilized and unsterilized soil. It was found that treatments with G. versiforme were consistently high in vine length, tuber yield and herbage weights. Plants treated with Glomus occultum and G. manihotis were found as next best, followed by Acaulospora foveata and Gigaspora margaria. The uninoculated control plants exhibited inferiority relative to the inoculated plants based on the same parameters.

Availability :
Main library; U.P. Los Banos; College; Los Banos; Laguna




NO. 91485

The effect of sweet potato meal on the growth and performance of broilers


Banciles, HK
Quirino State College; Diffun; Quirino

QSC Research Journal 2(1): 53-63; 1994

Abstract:
This study was conducted to determine the growth and performance of broilers fed with the different levels of sweet potato mixed with B-meg feeds. There were four treatments used including the control with four replications in each treatment. The treatments were as follows: Treatment 1, control, fed with pure commercial feeds, Treatment 2, 5% sweet potato mixed with commercial feeds, Treatment 3, 15% sweet potato meal plus commercial feeds and Treatment 4, 25% sweet potato meal mixed with commercial feeds. The final weight of the birds in the different treatments showed highly significant differences. Their average gain in weight during the study were as follows: T1- 1.67 kg., T2- 1.70 kg., T3 - 1.52 kg., then T4 - 1.42 kilograms respectively.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 7917

Economy of lowland tropical vegetables: Some notes on farming and marketing
Ekonomi sayuran dataran rendah: Berbagai catatan usahatani dan tataniaga

Arief, B
Faculty of Agriculture; University of Brawijaya; Malang; Indonesia

Hasil dan Kumpulan Makalah Kursus Singkat Tanaman Sayuran Tropis Dataran Rendah [Compilation of papers for the Short Course in Lowland Tropical Vegetables]; Malang; Unibraw; 1986; p483-513

Availability :
Research Institute for Vegetables Library




NO. 8072

The release of some new superior varieties of rice,kangkong and amaranth
Pelepasan beberapa varietas unggul baru padi,kangkung dan bayam

Banjarbaru Institute for Agricultural Information; South Kalimantan; Indonesia

Buletin Informasi Pertanian Banjarbaru [Banjarbaru Agricultural Information Bulletin] (2): 5-6 (1984/1985)

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 20833

Information on leafy vegetables
Maklumat sayur-sayuran jenis daun

Extension Branch; Department of Agriculture; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

Bingkisan Pertanian [Agricultural News] No.27f; 1984

Availability :
Department of Agriculture; Lundang; Kota Bahru; Kelantan; Malaysia




NO. 20858

A guide to ethnobotanical collection with reference to Malaysia


Chin, SC
Botany Department; University of Malaya; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia

The Sarawak Museum Journal 29 (50): 229-238 (1981)

Availability :
Ministry of Agriculture; Kuala Lumpur; Malaysia




NO. 22823

The tidal swamp resources as a food supplier in South Kalimantan


Supardi; Mohd.Nor
Faculty of Agriculture; Lambung Mangkurat University; Kalimantan; Indonesia

Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Tropical Ecology: Tropical Ecology and Development, 16-21 April 1979, Kuala Lumpur; Furtado, JI (ed.); p1065-1070

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 23121

Diseases of vegetables in Malaysia
Penyakit sayur-sayuran di Malaysia

Kiew, KL
School of Biological Sciences; Science University of Malaysia; Penang

Buletin Penyelidikan Pusat Pengajian Sains Kajihayat (1990)

Availability :
Science University of Malaysia; Penang




NO. 30169

Competitive effects of Ipomoea triloba with six corn varieties


Cadag, MRT
College; Laguna; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; 1978; 24p

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines at Los Banos; College; Laguna




NO. 33764

Evaluation of Cinch 84 EC for the control of weeds associated to soybean


Quilantang, JR
CLSU [Central Luzon State University] Scientific Journal 8 (1): 1-4 (1987)

Availability :
Publication House; Central Luzon State University; Munoz; Nueva Ecija; Philippines




NO. 36788

Inhibitory activities of sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers.) plant parts on selected crops and weeds


Kim, SY; Robles, RP; De datta, SK
University of the Philippines at Los Banos; Laguna

Abstracts of papers presented at the 24th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Pest Management Council of the Philippines Inc., Cebu City, May 4-7, 1993; p

Abstract:
The allelopathic nature of sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) has been reported by several authors. The study specially determined the effect of water extract of different plant parts of the sorghum plant on rice, maize, wheat, raddish, Echinocloa colona, Ipomoea triloba and Rottboellia cochinchinensis. The study also determined the effects of mulch using rice, raddish and E. colona as test plants. The inhibitory property of sorghum plant species is specific, and depending on source and concentration. The stem extract was the most inhibitory and 5% (W/V stem/ml water) inhibited completely the germination of raddish. Among the plant species tested, raddish showed the most inhibition followed by wheat and rice. For the weed species, I. triloba was not inhibited followed by E. colona and R. cochinchinensis. As mulch, sorghum stem residue significantly inhibited seedling growth in E. colona and raddish, but not in rice.

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines; Los Banos, laguna




NO. 65735

Productivity test of several lines of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk)
Uji daya hasil beberapa galur ubi jalar (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk) introduksi

Sulistijorini
S1 thesis; Bogor; Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; 1986; 74p

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 66030

Propagation of breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis)
Perbanyakan tanaman sukun

West Kalimantan Agricultural Information Service 6: ?p (1990)

Availability :
Agricultural Human Resources Development Management Center




NO. 104701

Effect of planting medium on heavy metal content of lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd), and chromium (Cr) contained in spinach (Amaranthus sp) and kangkong (Ipomoea reptans Poir)
Mempelajari pengaruh media tanam terhadap kandungan logam berat timah hitam (Pb), kadmium (Cd) dan Kromium (Cr) pada bayam cabut (Amaranthus sp) dan kangkung darat (Ipomoea reptans Poir)

Lumbantobing,Rose Mery; Anwar,Faisal; Sulaeman,Ahmad
Faculty of Agriculture; Bogor Agricultural University; Bogor; Indonesia

Media Gizi dan Keluarga [Nutrition and Family Media] 19(1):103-112(1995

Abstract:
The analysis of heavy metals content in Amaranthus sp. and Ipomoea reptans planted at Bogor Compost, Jakarta compost and BIOTROP soil gave result that planting medium have no significant effect on Pb content but have significant effect on Cd (p<= 0.05) and Cr (p<= 0.01) contents. The Cd concentration was highest when crops planted at Bogor Compost and Cr was highest when crop planted at Jakarta Compost. Observation Cr concentration in crop, found that crop planted at compost medium from city waste was not save to consume.

Availability :
Bogor Agricultural University, Central Library




NO. 106361

Back to nature a getting more impressive habit
Kembali ke alam yang makin diminati

Ria A
Trubus 27 (315): 4-7 (1996)

Availability :
Research and Development Centre for Biology (RDCB); Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 5978

Effects of intercropping of cabbage with tagetes, chilli, coriander and kangkong on the infestation of Plutella maculipennis C. and Crocidolomia binotalis Z. pests
Pengaruh tanaman sela tagetes,lombok,ketumbar dan kangkung pada tanaman kubis terhadap serangan hama Plutella maculipennis C. dan Crocidolomia binotalis Z.

Yunikanti, T.R
Thesis; Jakarta; Faculty of Biology; National University; 1987; 72p

Availability :
PROSEA Indonesia Country Office; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 10995

Vegetables as medicinal herbs
Phuetphak thichai nai ngae samunphrai

Chaimongkon, N
Maejo Institute of Agricultural Technology; Chiang Mai; Thailand

Warasarn Maejo [Maejo Journal] 6 (2): 27-30 (1981)

Availability :
Kasetsart University, Central Library




NO. 8144

Experiment on compound determination of various chemical groups in plants as an effort to prepare determination in practical work on phytochemistry
Percobaan penentuan kandungan berbagai golongan zat kimia dalam tanaman sebagai usaha menyusun penentuan praktikum fitokimia

Brachim, R
Thesis; Depok; Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; University of Indonesia; 1981; 90p

Availability :
Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences; University of Indonesia; Depok; West Java; Indonesia




NO. 92023

Soil conservation and agroforestry in sloping ares of Bukidnon


Pava, H.M
Greenfields __ (2): 32-33 (1995)

Abstract:
The article recommends a pattern of planting various crops and forest trees to prevent soil erosion on maximize use of sloping farm lands.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library; Los Ba¤os; Laguna; Philippines




NO. 33455

Medicinal plants
Mga halamang panlunas

Quijano,JF
Bulletin of the Nutrition Foundation of the Philippines 23(4):7,9(1983)

Availability :
Library;College of Medicine;University of the Philippines;Ermita;Manila




NO. 93152

Comparative anti-diabetic activities of some medicinal plants


Villasenor, IM; Cabrera, MA; Merneses, KB; Rivera, VRR; Villasenora, RC
Philippine Journal of Science 127 (4): 261-266 (1998)

Abstract:
The methanolic and aqueous extracts from popular, abundant and relative shape sources such as banana flower, pipino fruits, and leaves of ampalaya, kangkong, kamote, makopa, and tanglad were tested for their comparative anti-diabetic activities using albino mice as test animals. The blood glucose levels were determined using haemogluco-test strips. The result of the bioassay of the aqueous showed that the most potent anti-diabetic plant is flower while the comparative anti-diabetic potencies of the other plants are: tangland leaves> pipino fruits> kangkong leaves> makopa leaves> ampalaya leaves> kamote leaves. An infusion from mango leaves did not exhibit anti-diabetic activity. The organic extract of makopa leaves is the most anti-diabetic followed by kangkong and mango leaves. The organic extract of banana flowers and kamote, ampalaya and tangland leaves exhibited low antidiabetic potentials.

Availability :
Library; University of the Philippines; Los Ba¤os; College; Laguna




NO. 91641

Adaptability of different field crops under lahar-laden soils


Suyat, MN; Lacson, RT; Bayot, AJ
Central Luzon State University (CLSU), Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, 3120 Philippines

Adaptability of different field crops under lahar-laden soils; Proceedings 1993; Research, Extension and Traiining; Central Luzon State University; 279 p

Abstract:
Among the tested crops, sweet potato, cassava, mungbean, peanut, cowpea, pigeon pea, corn, sorghum, soybean, sesame, and leguminous cover crops appear to be the most suitable for lahar. Although the growth and yield of these entries are not as superior as when grown under normal conditions, these crops showed better seedling vigour, uniform emergence, high percentage of survival, uniform crop and reasonable yield. These characteristics of the crops under strange environment made them suitable or adaptable to the prevailing situation in the lahar-laden areas.

Availability :
Research, Extension and Training; Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium
Email: clarrdec@ne_link.net




NO. 92956

Adaptability of different field crops under lahar-laden soils


Suyat, MW; Lacson, RT; Bayot, AJ
The Philippine Journal of Plant Industry 57 (3-40: 1-34 (1992)

Abstract:
Seventeen different annual field crops were tested on a formerly lowland rice irrigated area totally covered with lahar at a depth 1.5 to 2.0 meters primarily to determine and identify which crop can be grown suitably and successfully after the rainy season wherein the danger of lahar flow is extremely low. This study was conducted at Barangay San Antonio, Bacolor, Pampanga from November, 1991 to July, 1992. The agronomic and yield responses of the test crops were the parameters used as basis in assessing their adaptability to lahar. The test crops were critically observed under two growing scenarios (i.e. fertilized based on the recommended rate under normal condition and unfertilized). After 3 to 8 months of growth, results showed that plant growth and yield depend largely on the kind of crops and cultural and management inputs given to the. Studied growth was very evident on all test crops grown without fertilizer due to the inadequacy of nutrients present in the lahar that is necessary for the sustenance for a normal inadequacy of nutrients presents in the lahar that is necessary for the sustenance for a normal growth. Laboratory analysis of the lahar deposits in the test site revealed that it contained 0.12% total N, 0.13% total P2O5, 0.38% total K2O,0.09 S, 0.30% total Fe and 7.96 pH value. However, when applied with the recommended rate of complete fertilizer 914-14-14), there was a great manifestation that some crops could thrive and performs well in lahar.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 93013

Reaction of different corn, legume and root-crop varieties to the rice root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne graminicola golden and birch-field


Zamora, OB; Gapasin, RM; Lim, JL
Philippine Phytopathology 33 (1): 37-44 (1997)

Abstract:
This study conducted to determine the resistance/susceptibility of different corn, legume and root-crop varieties to the rice root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne graminicola and determine the inoculum density of the nematode that can affect their growth. All the corn, peanut and sweet-potato varieties evaluated were resistant to the rice root-knot nematode. No galls were developed on these varieties suggesting that they were non-host of the nematode. The mungbean variety, Taiwan green and the taro variety PSB-VG 2 (Iniito) were found moderately resistant while Mg-9 and GO-049 varieties of mungbean and taro, respectively, were found susceptible. The rest of the varieties were moderately susceptible. Pathogenicity test using different inoculum densities of M. graminicola on mungbean variety Mg-9 showed no significant effect on plant height, herbage yield and number of pods except on the weight of roots and pods. Likewise, no significant effects was observed on plant height, length of petiole and number of leaves except on top and root weights of taro variety GO-049.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 93513

Root crops in developing countries - An economic appraisal


Horton, D; Lynam, J; Knipscheer, H
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.); p9-39

Abstract:
Recent developing country patterns and trends in production and use of cassava, potato, sweet potato, yam and taro are documented and analyzed. Production costs for these crops are estimated and related to their marketing and uses. The roles of these crops in different ecological zones and farming systems are discussed. Research and development programs are reviewed. Some tentative projections of root and tuber crops production and use are made to the year 2000.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 94326

The treatment of diabetes mellitus by the use of the different Philippine medicinal plants and the preliminary report on the use of plantisul


HERDIN Database 001196-PC890826; Proceedings; 8th Pas Science Congress IV-A; 1945

Abstract:
Out of the 39 antidiabetic Philippine plants 34 were discarded for lack of merit and only 5 were considered for the choice of the best antidiabetic plants. These five are Biophytum sensitivum, Catharanthus roseus, Syzygium cumini, Ipomoea batatas and Lagerstroemia speciosa. After considering the merits of each, with regards to the available data on hypoglycemic properties on fasting normal animals and in diabetics Lagerstroemia was chosen for having fully established the rationale of its use in diabetes mellitus. The part of banaba that are good to use are the old leaves and ripe fruits. In their absence, the young leaves (including the mature leaves) can be used as substitute, as the tests on diabetes in the North General Hospital fully established the rationale of their use in diabetes mellitus. The results of the tests with the use of young fruits were unsatisfactory and consequently not recommended for employment. The dose of 125 grams of dried young banaba leaves daily administered by mouth in the form of direction and calculated using data obtained and published in Acta Medica Philippina in 1941 for young leaves as 4.9 units/100 cc of 20 % decoction, to be equal to 30.6 units produced practically a similar rate of reduction of blood sugar to the rate of blood sugar reduction obtained after daily injection of 30 units of potamin zinc insulin. The results of tests with the use of plantisul capsules and solution was encouraging but not yet conclusive. They have tended to lower blood sugar of diabetic with large doses and if these offices can be repeated or improved in future tests of diabetics, attempt to produce a suitable preparation for life long treatment of diabetes mellitus may soon be realized. The word plantisul was introduced, which is a contraction of combined words plant insulin. The name will designate the pharmaceutical expresses in units as determined by biological assay, similar to insulin obtained from animals.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology
Email: pchrd@pchrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 94517

Genetic resources and development on root crops


Villamayor, FG
The Radix 9 (2): 1-7 (1987)

Abstract:
Root crops particularly cassava sweet potato, potato gabi and ubi are important carbohydrate sources in the tropics. Cassava and sweet potato are especially important in marginal areas where other crops like cereals will fail. At present, the Philippine government through ViSCA and the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) maintains a large collection of root crops except potato in the field gene-bank. It is imperative that root crops genetic resources be maintained safely so that it can be used especially by future generation. Once lost it will be very difficult to retrieve them. It may infest be lost forever.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 93620

Physiological indices of perishability


Tranggono; Suhardi
Proceedings of the International Seminar on Conservation of Agricultural Produce Through Postharvest Science and Technology Manila, Philippines; November 10-16, 1995; pp.17-30

Abstract:
The study was conducted on some Indonesian horticultural crops in order to determine an appropriate index that will correlate well with perishability. Results of laboratory studies showed that respiration rate might be one of the best physiological indices of respiration rate might be one of the best physiological indives of perishability for some horticultural produce such s snake fruit (Salacca edulis REINW cutivar Pondoh), apple (Malus sylvestris Mill cultivars Manalagi), sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L.), potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. cultivars Granola), guava (Psidium guajava L.) , rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L.), longan (Dim °Carpus longan Lour), plantain (Musa sp.),shallot (Allium ascalonicum L.), cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.), aster (Cellistephase chinensis), dahlia (Dahlia variabilis), tuberose (Poliantus tuberosa) and gladiolus (Gladiolus L.) However, in some cases, other indices such as ethylene production and chemical changes including starch-sugar transformations, total solids, total acidity, pectic substance as well as tannin concentration should also be considered.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library
Email: vga@library.upb.edu.ph




NO. 38788

Utilization of sweet potato germplasm by plant breeders


Villareal, RL; Lo, HF
Crop Science Society of the Philippines; c/o Institute of Plant Breeding; College; Laguna; Philippines

The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 8(3): 113-118 (1983)

Abstract:
The major existing collections of sweet potato germplasm at different institutions all over the world are listed. The problems that beset the wider utilization of sweet potato germplasm are (a) constitutional, such as lack of funds and technical manpower and (b) technical, such as narrow genetic base, mutations, distribution and flowering. Significant results have been achieved in improving disease and pest resistance and beta-carotene content of sweet potato. The AVRDC sweet potato breeding program is discussed.

Availability :
Institute of Plant Breeding, Library; University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 25012

DNA fingerprinting and isozyme polymorphism studies of underutilized local crops


Suhaimi, N
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

UPM Research Report; 1993

Abstract:
Protocols for the isolation and purification of total genomic DNA from several varieties of sweet potato (Ipomea) and chilli have been established. Results showed that the DNA samples isolated were of high molecular weight and upon CsCI gradient purification, all DNA samples can be digested to completion. Random oligonucleotides and ribosomal RNA probes will be used in the next phase of the study to develop genetic fingerprints for major varieties of each crop.

Availability :
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor




NO. 25009

Cryopreservation of vegetative buds for conservation of genetic resources


Hor, YL
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

UPM Research Report; 1993

Abstract:
Protocols are being developed for cryopreservation of shoot tips of field-grown sweet potato and of axenic seedlings of sago palm and princess palm. In the first phase of the study, suitable size of explant and in vitro culture procedures were determined. The effect of low temperature (to -400 C) and toxicity of various cryoprotectants on the shoot tips were also tested. Numerous cryoprotectant treatments and freezing protocols (to - 196'C) are now being systematically tested to try to determine a suitable method to maintain viability after freezing. Post-thaw culture medium modifications will also be investigated to improve growth cryopreserved shoot tips.

Availability :
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor




NO. 25021

Genetic resources and variabilities in sweet potato from Malaysia


Mohd Said, S
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

UPM Research Report; 1993

Abstract:
Collection, conservation, evaluation and utilization of sweet potato germplasm from within the country were started in 1984 with the collection of 99 accessions from Sabah and Sarawak. In 1989, a total of 123 sweet potato varieties were collected from Penisular Malaysia. The accessions were characterized and evaluated from 1989 until 199 1. The objective was to determine the potential of the local. sweet potato germplasm as a source material for sweet potato breeding in the country. A total of 16 characters including plant type, growth, vine characters, leaf characters, protein and dry matter contents were evaluated. The results showed the presence of wide variability in morphological and nutritional characters. Most of the characters showed the presence of more than 20% coefficients of variation (CV). The CV values for yield, tuber number and mean tuber weight were more than 50%. The yield (experimental) ranged from 0 to 60 tons per hectare. The ranges, means and CV values were bigger among the polycross progenies than the original germplasm collections. The polycross progenies were obtained from 16 randomly chosen accessions planted in a polyeross block. The CVs value for yield, tuber number and mean tuber weight for the polycross progenies were more than 80%. Higher CV values were also obtained within the polycross progenies for morphological characters than in original population. Cluster analyses done on both the original germplasm collection and the polycross progenies showed the presence of new genotypes.

Availability :
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor




NO. 25022

Combining ability and heterosis in sweet potato


Mohd Said, S
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

UPM Research Report; 1993

Abstract:
Our previous studies showed that some degree of divergence has taken place within the local sweet potato germplasm due to the process of adaptation to the local environment. Thus, hybridization within the local germplasm is important in order to exploit its potential. Theoretically, diverse genes when put together will result in various degree of heterosis expression. Six sweet potato clones randomly chosen from the local germplasm with various degrees of divergence were crossed in all possible combinations. The results showed that, in general, two moderately diverse parents tend to give better progenies than parents with higher or lower diversity. Results from combining ability analyses indicated that both additive and non-additive gene actions are important in sweet potato as indicated by the significant GCA and SCA variance. However, the SCA was more prevalent in tuber number and plant type indicating that non additive gene action is predominant in the expression of these characters. On the other hand, for yield and mean tuber weight, GCA was more important, indicating that both characters are controlled more by additive genes. In conclusion, hybridization between selected parents with good combining ability and moderate divergence is recommended for sweet potato breeding in the country. Besides combining the different desirable characters it might also lead to new gene combinations and interactions. This surely will result in the formation of some superior genotypes.

Availability :
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor




NO. 25301

Growth enhancement of sweet potato through application of Azospirillum and IAA-producing Rhizobacteria


Radziah, O; Zulkifli, S; Matior, MR; Lusi, M
Faculty of Agriculture; Universiti Putra Malaysia; 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

UPM Research Report 1998;Volume 2

Abstract:
A study to determine the effect of Azosprillum spp. And IAA –producing rhizobacterial isolates on growth and yield of sweet potato on sandy tailing was conducted. Inoculation of sandy tailings with Azospirillum and IAA –producing isolates increased sweet potato growth and tuber yield.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 25303

Transmission and serological screening of viral infection in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) Lam


Inon, S; Zakaria, S; Yaakob, D
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

UPM Research Report 1998;Volume 2

Abstract:
A study was conducted to identify the casual agent of virus disease on three sweet potato cultivars that showed different symptoms through transmission and serological screening. Based on the symptoms on the indicator plant, it can be concluded that the virus present was sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) which belongs to a potyvirus group.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 25295

Continuous production of sweet potato on an acidic soil


Anuar, AR; Jamal, T
Department of Land Management; Faculty of Agriculture; Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

UPM Research Report 1998;Volume 2

Abstract:
A research programme on fertiliser programme and soil management for continuos planting of sweet potato to increase its yield potential has been undertaken. Effective micro-organisms (EM) were applied to soils together with fertiliser. Fertilisation improved soil aggregate stability from an average of 0.38 to 1.06 stability index and EM inoculation further enhanced this property. Results obtained revealed that treatments with organic fertiliser were able to sustain yield of sweet potato but treatments with inorganic fertiliser tend to be reduced on a continuous growing seasons. Continuous planting of sweet potato on highly weathered acid soils can be achieved through the addition of organic fertiliser and EM as part of the fertilisation programme.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 94749

Processing of catsup from sweet potato


Den, TV; dela Rosa, LS; Fementira, GB; Bangbog, L
The Radix 10(1&2): 4-5(1988)

Abstract:
Sweet potato is a potential material for catsup processing. It is rich in carotene, on cheaper than tomato or banana. A technology on catsup processing using sweetpotato instead of the usual raw material was developed by ViSCA, particularly its Department of Agriculture Chemistry and Food Science.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94750

Bibliography on root crops


Miranda, LK
The Radix 9(1): 13-18(1987)

Abstract:
The Philippine Root Crops Information Service (PRIS), a joint project of the Visayas State College of Agriculture (ViSCA) Library and the PRCRTC has already collected a member of bibliography dealing on root crops. Partial list of this are presented.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 91056

The alkaloids of Ipomoea muricata (L.) Jacq. (Convolvulaceae)


Guevarra, BQ
Acta Manilana 37: 51-58;1988

Abstract:
The mature seeds of Ipomoea muricata (L.) Jacq. cultivated in the Philippines yielded the indolizidine alkaloids ipomine 3, ipalbidine 1, ipalbine 2 and ipalbinium 8. The structures were verified by chemical analysis and spectroscopic methods.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 91057

The effects of Ipomoea hederacea (LINN.) on developing toad embryos


Simeon, EC; Minikis, LA
Acta Manilana 37: 71-79;1988

Abstract:
The effects of the medicinal seed, Ipomoea hederacea (Linn.) Jacq. on embryo was determined using toad embryos, Rhacophosus leucomystax (Boie) as test animals. Several seed dose-levels (0.03, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08 and 0.12 g) were evaluated on different groups of toad embryos at varying developmental stages: cleavage, blastula, gastrula, naurula, 3 mm, 5 mm and 7 mm embryonic stages. Results showed that the seed was anti-mitotic to cleavage cells, cytolytic to embryonic cells, inhibitory to the development of embryonic organs but acceleratory to the growth of the later developing embryos. The teratogenecity of the seed was also manifested when treated embryos developed abnormalities such as exogastrulae, ectodermal blebs, macrocephaly, microcephaly, crooked tails and body lumps. These observed effects vary with the seed dosages and with the stage of development of the test embryos.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 92035

New potato clones for the lowlands


Andres, RE
Greenfields 23 (6): 50 (1995)

Abstract:
Three potato clones, 385130.5 (FLS-4), 385130.11 (FLS-5) and 385130.77 (FLS-7) have been found suitable for planting under lowland conditions. The tuber have creamy white, smooth to rough skin and creamy flesh. Clone 385130.77 are table potatoes while the other two are excellent for chips.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Library




NO. 92048

Sluggish camote industry needs incentives


Urbanes, PO Jr
Animal Husbandry and Agricultural Journal: p.08; October 1997

Abstract:
The new study on sweet potato showed that any marginal increase in sweet potato yield would result in a huge price drop and would geopardize profits for small farmers.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Library




NO. 92099

Two new products from cassava and sweet potato


Mangahas, LC (ed)
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Press Release (Oct-Dec 1997)

Manila Times: B.23; October 10, 1997

Abstract:
Researchers at the Visayas State College of Agriculture have developed two new products from cassava and sweetpotato-the kabkab and kamoreal. Kamoreal is a flat, rectangular shaped sweetpotato mixed with ground peanuts to make kamoreal candies. Kabkab on the other hand, is a traditional puff product from cassava which are spread and flattened using a battle or rolling pin that can produce up to 80 shoots an hour. Hand spreading can only produce 14 and a half sheet in hour.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Library




NO. 92307

Kamote tops (Ipomoea batatas) can be a substitute for chlorthiazide as a diuretic and saluretic in hypertension


Garcia, EY; Say, LC
Philippine Scientific Journal 13(10-11): 11-12,42 (1971) Nov-Dec (1972) Feb; HERDIN Database; PC911606; MFN 007434

Abstract:
In resume, the lowly camote-tops are no longer the poor man's vegetable in his diet. This time, they have ascended to the level of medicinal plants, and for certain, they will grace the tables of the hypertensive rich very often. Why so? Because they have been found to possess diuretic and saluretic activities in hypertensive individuals. The active substances in the camote tops which are responsible for these medicinal effects have been identified as the polysacharides mannitol and sorbitol which are present in adequate amounts in this plant. They can induce diuresis and moderate excretions of sodium cation in combination with chlorides in the hypertensive kidneys. The diuretic effect is due to the increased osmotic pressures brought by the mannitol and sorbitol in the urine filtrate while still in the proximal convoluted tubules. Simultaneously, the increased osmotic pressures in the tubules can directly or indirectly depress the tubular cells in their secretions of carbonic anhydrase; thus, the small amount of the latter will also result in small amount of sodium as sodium bicarbonate reabsorbed into the tubular walls. This is the way their saluretic activity is accomplished. Compared these activities of the camote tops with those of the benzthiazide, both have been found equally efficient in their diuretic actions and the rate of fall of the patients' blood pressures. However, in their saluretic activities, that benzthiazide is more than one-half that of the camote tops. But the harmlessness of the camote tops can counterbalance this particular advantage of benzthiazide because in the treatment of any disease, the ideal medicine is one which helps the tissues regenerate rather than degenerate.

Availability :
University of the Philippines Manila-College of Medicine




NO. 92504

An herbal remedy against skin ailments - a rationale approach


Journal of Philippine Medical Association. v.58(7): p. 268-276, Feb-Mar 1983.MFN 000440

Abstract:
Some 86 plants reputedly used as folk remedy for skin ailments were screened for antimicrobial activity. Ipomoea muricata (L.) Jacq. was found to show promising results as an antimicrobial.The seeds of I. muricata have long been used againts various types of skin ailment including burns. The following studies give some basis for this practice. The extract of the seeds was found to inhibit gram positive (S. aureus) and (B.subtilis); at a minimum concentration of 500 ug/ml, the extract was bactericidal to S. aureus. The extract showed relatively a low toxicity in mice, the LD50 being 1100 mg/kg body weight. Analgesic effect was observed in mice. Alkaloids and steroids were detected in the extract by the use of thin-layer chromatography. Preliminary clinical trials of the 10 percent ointment, prepared from the crude extract, showed a high efficiency for some type of skin ailments particularly of the allergic type of dermatitis, open wounds, burns and boils. Analgesic effect was also reported.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Resources and Development; UST-RCNS; UST España




NO. 92506

Microbiological studies of Ipomoea muricata (L.) Jacq. (Convolvulaceae) - part I


Acta Manila (30): 1-11, Jun 1981. MFN 000445

Abstract:
The alcohol extract of the seeds of I.muricata showed antibacterial effect against (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923) and (Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633). Extracts of the seeds harvested in different regions of the Philippines showed similar biological activity, the activity diminishing with length of storage. The extract was thermostable when heated even up to 120 C. The extract of 500 ug/ml was found to be bactericidal against S. aureus. A concentration of 60,000 ug/ml of the extract was found to have the approximate potency of 2.5 ug/ml of Tetracycline hydrochloride; the partially purified extract, a potency equivalent to 10 ug/ml. Preliminary studies show that the extract inhibits gram positive clinical isolates.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Resources and Development; UST-RCNS; UST España




NO. 92514

Two antibacterial compounds from Ipomoea muricata (L.) Jacq.(Convolvulaceae)


Acta Manila. v. (35): p. 7-14, Dec (1986).MFN 000460

Abstract:
Two compounds active against (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923), (Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and (Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19165) were isolated from the acidic fraction of the seeds of Ipomoea muricata by chromatographic methods. The compounds were identified by chemical and spectroscopic methods as (ethyl 3,4-dihydroxycinnamate) and (11-0-(4)-0-L-rhamnopyranoside- hexadecanoic acid).

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Resources and Development; UST-RCNS; UST España




NO. 92516

Preliminary biological studies of the seeds of Ipomoea muricata (L.) Jacq. (Convolvulaceae)


Acta Manila. v. 19(29): p. 3-19, (1980).MFN 000462

Abstract:
The oil extract of the seeds of I. muricata has been used by our Dominican missionaries against skin ailments like chronic and gangrenous wounds, cuts and blisters due to burns and is said to relieve stomach pain and earache. Our studies on the reddish-brown seeds of I. muricata grown in the University of Santo Tomas Botanic Garden and identified by Dr. Van Oostroom of Rijksherbarium of Leiden, Netherlands show that the ethyl alcohol extract has strong antibacterial effect particularly against (Bacillus subtilis), (Micrococcus var. pyogenes aureus) and (Mycobacterium tuberculosis 607), as well as possessing analgesic effect. The intraperitonial LD50 of the ethyl alcohol extract in mice was found to be 1100 mg/kg body weight with a 95 percent confidence limits of 493.2 - 2453 mg/kg body weight. The per orem LD50 in mice was also found to be 7810 mg/kg body weight with a 95 percent confidence limits of 7639.5 -7963.8 mg/kg body weight. Preliminary clinical trials of the 10 percent ethyl alcohol extract ointment prepared show a high efficacy for some skin ailments particularly of the allergic type of (dermatitis), (open wounds) and (burns).

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Resources and Development; UST-RCNS; UST España




NO. 92519

Clinical trial of Ipomoea muricata (L.) CMPG-10 in the local treatment of otitis externa


Sto. Tomas Journal of Medicine, Philippines. v. 36(2): p. 61-66, May-Jul (1987).MFN 000465

Abstract:
The objectives of this study are to find a cheap, effective and readily available medication for the local treatment of otitis externa; and to determine the in-vivo and in-vitro effectiveness of the I. muricata seed extract in the local treatment of otitis externa caused by gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. A double-blind clinical trial was performed. A total of 16 patients with otitis externa were included in the study. A swab of the external auditory canal of the patient was taken for gram-staining and culture and sensitivity tests with Ipomoea muricata (CMPG-10). Eight patients received CMPG-10 as a local otic drop and another 8 patients received placebo. All of the patients who received CMPG-10 were cured after an average of 7.8 days. Seven of those who received placebo were not cured even after more than 12 days and only one showed recovery on the 12th day. Statistical analysis revealed that there is a highly significant association between treatment with CMPG-10 and cure of otitis externa. Invitro studies showed that CMPG-10 is a good otic antibiotic against gram-negative bacteria but showed outstanding result against gram-positive microorganisms which are the more common etiologic agents in otitis externa. Cost comparison reveals that commercially prepared otic antibiotic drops are ten times more expensive than I. muricata seed extract.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Resources and Development; UST-RCNS; UST España




NO. 92548

Preliminary phytochemical, microbiological and pharmacological studies of Calonyction muricatum Linn (Convolvulaceae)


Guevarra, BQ; Solevilla, RC; Ochoa, YB; Santiago, AT; Chua, JA
Acta Manilana, Philippines. Ser A 17(27): 20-39, Jun (1978)|HERDIN Database. P890439.MFN 001152

Abstract:
C. muricatum, a smooth climbing vine grown in the UST Botanic Garden, was found to have antifungal and antibacterial property as well as analgesic and tranquilizing effect. The biologically active constituents were found more concentrated in the seeds which also contained alkaloids and sterols. Intraperitoneal LD50 of the ethyl alcohol extract, in mice was 1288 +-156 mg/kg. body weight. The crude secondary/tertiary and quarternary alkaloid fractions exhibited strong anti-microbial activity. Intraperitoneal LD50 of the crude secondary/tertiary alkaloids in mice was 490 +- 29 mg/kg. body weight.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Resources and Development; UST-RCNS; UST España




NO. 92667

Choice of selection environment for root yield in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.)


Thanh Binhi, N; Carpena, AL
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21 (1 & 2): 28-33 (1996)

Abstract:
Selection for root yield at 20% selection intensity was carried out in 81 sweet potato clones generated from random open-pollinated seeds at three locations representing areas of two different soil types and two elevation/ temperature levels. Selected clones from the three locations were combined and again evaluated for root yield at each of these locations. Combined analysis of variance of data from the three locations showed highly significant genotype x environment interaction for root yield. Some clones, however, performed well in all environments indicating that stable genotypes of sweet potato can be found. The environments (locations) used in the study turned out to differ not only in soil type and elevation/temperature level but in many other environmental factors that the comparison became more of that between high stress and low stress environments rather than between clay and sandy soil types or between high and low elevations. Results indicated that a high stress environment could better discriminate among sweet potato genotypes for root yield than a low stress environment.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 92668

Asymmetric protoplasm fusion between sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) and African Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.)


Belarmino, MM; Sasahara, T
The Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21 (1 & 2): 19-27 (1996)

Abstract:
Protoplasts isolated from stem and petiole of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and leaf of African marigold (Tagetes erecta) were fused by polyethyleneglycol. Prior to fusion treatment, protoplasts of I. batatas were inactivated with iodoacetamide to inhibit cell division. Protoplasts of T. erecta do not divide in the culture medium used in this study. Therefore, fusion-derived calli could be tentatively selected as somatic hybrid cell lines. Among a hundred microcolonies, nine calli proliferated rapidly and exhibited characteristics of both parents as indicated by peroxidase isozyme analysis and Southern blot hybridisation. The hybrid nature of this vigorous calli was also confirmed by chromosome counts. The potential of this selection strategy for the production of wide somatic hybrids from I. batatas and T. erecta is discussed.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 92704

Evaluation of nutritional and sensory quality attributes of sweet potato chips


Maina, GW; Del Mundo, AM
The Philippine Agriculturist 78(2): 225-231(1995)

Abstract:
Yellow-orange sweet potato were processed and formulated into chips as a snack product providing high beta-carotene and energy content. Three chip formulations using flour from sulphite and soaked sweet potato, and boiled mashed sweet potato were made. Nutrient analysis revealed that among the three treatments, chips from boiled then mashed sweet potato had the highest beta carotene and protein content but contained the lowest energy value. Similarly, this treatment even after three months of storage was the most acceptable and preferred as evaluated by pre-school children and adult sensory panellist.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 92737

Mutation induction through irradiation of the leaf-base initial cell of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. Poir)


Marbella, LJ; Santos, IS
NSTA/NSDB Technology Journal 10(4): 11-16(1985)

Abstract:
The effect of gamma radiation on tuber yield and other agronomic characters of the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. Poir) variety Kinastanyas was studied. The sweet potato cut-leaves were exposed to the following Co-60 gamma ray doses: 0.5, 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0 kR. Compared to that of the Control (0 kR), the weight yield of tuber of the 0.5 kR treatment was increased by about 48%. Percentage of tuber by weight was increased from 20.2 to 32.4%. The latter resulted also from the decrease in the shoot yield of the 0.5 kR treatment

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Library




NO. 92754

Tomato and pepper production and its problems in Liberia


A-As-Saqui, M
Tomato and Pepper Production in the Tropics; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Integrated Management Practices; Tainan, Taiwan; 21-26 March 1998; p504-507

Abstract:
Liberia is a humid tropical country in West Africa with climate and soils that are favourable for farming. Shifting cultivation is the dominant farming system throughout the country. Various tropical field crops are grown, such as cassava, sweet potato, cocoyam, yam, corn, cabbage, bitter ball, eggplant, soybean, mungbean, rice, peanut, and others. Tomato and hot pepper play significant roles in the farming systems and are widely grown and consumed as they are important vegetables in the diet of almost all Liberians. The susceptibility of the varieties grown to various diseased and pests (for example early and late blight, Fusarium wilt, Septoria leaf-spot, nematodes and viruses) lack of knowledge of adequate management practices, and inadequate supply of good quality seeds are major production constraints. To overcome these problems, the Central Agricultural Research Institute of the Ministry of Agriculture has initiated a research program on these crops with the objectives of increasing production and improving and developing appropriate management practices.

Availability :
Post Harvest Training and Research Center, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 92877

Histo-pathology of resistant and susceptible sweet potato cultivars infected with root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita)


Gapasin, RM
Philippine Phytopathology 30 (2): 74-80 (1994)

Abstract:
Histo-pathology of galled roots in susceptible sweet potato cv. Binicol showed the formation of multinucleated and thick-walled giants cells. Parenchyma cells around giant cells exhibited hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and cytoplasm within giant cells became granulated. Displacement or abnormal growth of vascular elements was evident due to the pressure exerted by the growth of the nematode and development of giants cells. In the resistant cultivar (cv. Jasper), hypersensitivity cell necroses, formation of "wound" periderm and "aborted" giant cells were evident. Where successful invasions occurred, smaller and fewer giant cell were observed at the sites of infection.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 92884

Utilization of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Linn. Poir) flour for other food purpose


Montais, EB; Ramirez, T
The Philippine Journal of Plant Industry 60 (1): 19-40 (1995)

Abstract:
Sweet potato tubers of the red-skin-white flesh variety were processed into flour and starch. Flour was produced by chopping pealed and un-peeled tubers and dried at 50 c in a dehydrator and at a solar simulator. Starch was likewise processed and subjected to various drying condition. The flour and starches were further determine for its physico-chemical and rheological characteristic. Preliminary preparation of polvoron using, 30, 40, and 50% sweet potato flour were highly acceptable, hence, the level of concentration was increased to 50, 65 and 80%. Sensory evolution results showed that the product using 80% sweet potato flour was the most acceptable as compared to the other treatment and the control which was 100% wheat flour. Brownies prepared from 50,65 and 80% levels were also acceptable.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 92927

The effect of NPK fertilizer on the growth and yield of sweet potato grown on oxisol


Molina, EC; Tipay, MV
Tarlac College of Agriculture Research Journal 19: 52-63 (1996-1997)

Abstract:
Two sweet-potato cultivars, UPLSP8 and Super Bureau, were tested for growth and yield performance when grown on oxisol with N, P, K fertilizers applied singly or in combination. A total of 30 polyethylene bags filled with 12 kg oxisols were used in the study and were laid out in a Split Plot Design with three replications. The different treatments were as follows: MAIN TREATMENTS - Sweet-potato varieties V1- UPL SP8, V2- Super Bureau; SUB-TREATMENTS - Sources and Rates of Fertilizer T1- Control, T2- N (20-0-0), T3- NP (16-20-0), T4- NPK (60-30-0), T5 - NPK (120-60-0). Results of the study revealed that UPL SP 8 and Super Bureau sweet-potato varieties showed almost similar varietal characteristics as evidence by the non-significant differences on the biomass yield per plant, number of storage roots actual yield and computed yield per hectare. The application of the different fertilizer materials gave significant differences on the biomass yield and number of storage roots per plant. Sweet-potato fertilized twice as much as the recommended rate produced significantly more than the other treatments. But on the computed yield per-hectare, sweet-potato plants applied with 16-30-0 kg NPK/ha gave more yields than the other treatments. No significant differences existed on the length and diameter of storage roots. There were no significant differences among the treatments and the interaction between the varieties of sweet-potato and fertilizer materials in terms of biomass yield and the number, length and diameter of storage roots. However, the computed yield per hectare, significant differences occurred. UPL SP8 gave the highest yield of 1.58 kg/plot when given NP fertilizer material while the Super Bureau sweet-potato variety gave the highest yield of 1.42 kg/plot when applied with nitrogen fertilizer only.

Availability :
Department of Research and Development; Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 92930

Protein-enrichment of sweet potato pulp using three species of fungi


Laoang, BB; Mapili, Jr, MC
Tarlac College of Agriculture Research Journal 19: 78-85 (1996- 1997)

Abstract:
Sweet potato pulp was fermented using Trichoderma harzianum, Volvariella volvacea and Pleurotus ostreatus. Through the fermentation, the pulp was protein-enriched, and the samples from the different treatments were compared with commercial fish feed using tilapia fingerlings. The rate of fermentation with T. harzianum was significantly (P<0.05) faster as compared to the other two fungi. Growth rate of tilapia fingerlings fed with pulp fermented by T. harzianum and P. astreatus were significantly (P<0.05) higher than those fed with pulp fermented by V. volvacea.

Availability :
Department of Research and Development; Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 92946

Sweet potato feathery mottle virus: Its association with "kamote kulot" and its effect on sweet potato yield


Villegas, LC; Pamulaklakin, GL; Beduya, EE; Bajet, NB
Philippine Phytopathology 32 (1): 35-40 (1996)

Abstract:
Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and graft transmission were used to detect sweet-potato feather mottle virus (SPFMV) in Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. on both symptomatic and symptomless samples of sweet-potato collected from the field. Using Elisa, SPFMV was detected in the leaf extracts of about 33, 53, 67 and 82 % of the samples from the provinces of Albay, Tarlac, Laguna, Pampaga, and Zambales, respectively. Grafting of the symptomatic and ELISA-positive samples onto stocks of l. setosa Ker, resulted in the development of vein clearing on leaves 22 days after grafting. Sweet-potato feathery mottle virus significantly affected the yield of sweet-potato. Root yield losses of 98.10, 97.28, 95.83 and 84.55 % were incurred on cultivar UPL-SP5, UPL-SP2, UPL-SP1, and Campbell respectively. Reduction in the number of the storage root was 50% in cultivars UPL-SP1 and Campbell while 66.67% in UPL-SP2 and 80% in UPL-SP2. The virus reduced sweet potato top weight by 92.0, 85.4, 86.3 and 83.5 % in UPL-SP5, UPL-SP2, UPL-SP5 and Campbell respectively.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93036

Studies on azospirillum as bio-fertilizer for potted sweet potato in volcanic ash-laden soil


Lopez, PJS; Santos, TS; Rasco, ET, Jr
The Philippine Journal of Biotechnology 7 (1): 35-48 (1996)

Abstract:
Studies on the various factors that can affect sweet potato response to Azospirillum inoculation shows the following trends: Isolates. BSs 202 and Sp7 are better than BSa8 and isolate XII. BSs 202 may be useful in less fertile soils such as in volcanic ash while Sp7 is probably suited to a wider range of soil conditions. Sweet potato varieties can be classified into three categories based on their response to the effective isolates BSs 202: strongly responsive, weakly responsive and unresponsive. Characteristics associated with each response are described and varieties falling under each category enumerated. UPLSP 1 and 88WS623 are classified as highly responsive. Method of inoculation. Both dipping of cutting in Azospirillum-carrier water suspension before planting and direct application of the Azospirillum-carrier to the soil are effective depending on the desired response and variety. Responses documented are interpreted as dosage effects with implications on modes of action of Azospirillum.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93044

Effects of maleic hydrazide on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Armones, NT; Aala, OG
Philippine Journal of Plant Industry 44-56 (1-3): 15-21 (1979-1991)

Abstract:
Sweet potato has the tendency to develop plenty of vines during the rainy season which can lead to low tuber production. Maleic hydrazide is a growth retardant which could inhibit vine development thus concentrating the photosynthates for tuber production. This study which was conducted at the La Granja National Crop Research and Development Centre, La Carlota City from 1988-1990 investigated the effect of maleic hydrazide on the tuber yield of sweet potato, evaluated the degree of vegetative growth prior to and after the application of maleic hydrazide, and determined the spraying time and recommended rate of maleic hydrazide application. Seventeen (17) treatments were used with 30, 45, 60 and 75 days after planting (DAP) as time of application and 0, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5 kg/ha maleic hydrazide as rates of application. Factorial in randomized complete block design was used. In this three (3) years study, marketable, non-marketable and total tuber yields were significantly affected by spraying time and rate of maleic hydrazide application. Likewise, vine length after maleic hydrazide application was significantly affected. Results indicated that a maximum yield of sweet potato could be produced by spraying the plants 60 days after planting at 4.5 kg/ha maleic hydrazide (60 DAP-4.5 kg/ha MH). A marginal rate of return (MRR) of 307.72% was obtained from this treatment. All treatments applied with maleic hydrazide were significantly higher in yield than the control.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93145

Effects of gamma radiation on buds of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Poir)


Soriano, JD
Natural and Applied Science Bulletin 24 (1-2): 41-51 (1972)

Abstract:
Apical shoots of sweet potato were exposed to 800-3200 r of gamma radiation and planted in nursery and field rows for data on vine length, bud survival, plants with damaged leaves and somatic mutations. The 50% reduction in vine growth was found at approximately 3000 r at 15 days and 2500 r at 30 days after treatment. The percentage of bud survival was reduced at 3200 r while the percentage of plants with a damaged leaf was increased at 2400 r. Somatic mutation frequency increased with increasing dose.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93179

A technique for making preparations of mitotic and meiotic chromosomes from Ipomoea species and hybrids


Oracion, MZ
Annals of Tropical Research 15 (1-4): 31-36 (1993)

Abstract:
A combination of feulgen and acetocarmine squash method of preparing mitotic and meitotic chromosomes of sweet-potato and related Ipomoea aspects and hybrids is presented. The method includes pre-treatment in 0.002 mol 8-hydroxyquinoline, fixation in modified Newcomer's solution, hydrolysis, staining of DNA by the Feulgen reaction, further chromosome staining with acetocarmine, and slide preparation by the standard squash technique. Some notes in preparing solutions for specific steps are also included.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93180

Plantlet regeneration from meristems of Philippine sweet-potato varieties


Acedo, VZ
Annals of Tropical Research 14 (1-4): 22-30 (1992)

Abstract:
The solidified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium added with gibberillic acid (GA3) induced direct organogenesis without any callus formation of the meristems of sweet-potato, varieties VSP-1, VSP-2 and VSP-3. The optimum GA3 concentration varied with variety. On the other hand, benzylaminopurine as medium supplement caused profuse callus growth on the basal portions of the meristem before shoots developed. Shoot growth of the meristems was much faster in liquid in solid MS medium supplemented with GA3. Rapid shoot and root development was induced when the cultures were transferred to the solid MS medium containing high sucrose level 1.5 months after.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93270

Monitoring population density of sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicaricus Fabr. using sex pheromone traps


Amalin, DM; Vander Zaag, P
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila,Philppines;1990;pp.104-

Abstract:
Population density of sweet potato weevil (SPW) was monitored using sexpheromone traps. Weekly trap catches were correlated with existing climatic conditions. Variation in weevil count was observed throughout the sampling period. Considerably higher SPW counts were recorded from March to early June. A decreased was observed from late June and onward. Variability in trap catches is ttributed to weather conditions. However, other variables aside from weather conditions influenced trap catches. Since trap catches cna be related to population density obtained from absolute sampling within plants, sex pheromone traps have a potential for monitoring SPW.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93271

Screening of synthetic 6x Ipomoea terifida clones for resistance to the sweet potato weevil (Cylas formicaricus Fabr.)


Amalin, DM; Chujoy, E; Ona, C; Ona, I
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila,Phiippines;1990;pp.99-103

Abstract:
Ipomoea trifida syntheric 6x were screened for resistance to the weevil under field conditions. Out of 35 clones, 13 clones were selected based on percentage hill infestation lower than 25% Differential stem reaction observed among I. trifida clones suggests certain degree of weevil resistance.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93272

Resistance of sweet potato weevil, Cyclas formicaricus Fabr. in Ipomoea batatas


Amalia, DM; Chujoy, E; Ona, C; Ona, IP
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila,Philppines;1990;pp.91-98

Abstract:
Laboratory asn field screenings of CIP sweet potato germplasm for resistance to the weevil, Cylas formicarius were conducted over a two-year period (1989-1990). Following laboratory screening, 26 clones out of 198 were classified to have certain level of resistance to the weevil. These laboratory selected clones are being screened for resistance under field conditions. Field screening was conducted in two trials of different sets of clones. In the first trial, 50 clones were selected out of 32 clones, whereas in the second trial 21 were selected out of the 32 clones. Teh selected clones exhibited differential reactions to weevil infestation suggesting certain degree of resistance. thus, the potential of sweet potato varietal resistance was observed.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93273

Shade tolerance in sweet potato varieties under intercrop with maize


Chujoy, E; Ona, I
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 ManilaPhiippines;1990;pp.80-90

Abstract:
Sweet potato clones were screened for shade tolerance resulting from an intercrop with maize. In one experiment maize and sweet potato were planted the same date and most shade occured between 85 to 120 days after planting(DAP). Plants under shade had drastic reduction in root yield and root size compared to full sunlight grown counterparts;root yield was reduces by 44 and and 59%, repectively. Several higher yielding coles under shade was identified. In a second experiment sweet potato was planted 30 days after maize. Most shade occured from 20 to 60 DAP. Foliage growth and storage root formation was severely limited by shade 12 out of 183 clones produced any yield. In a third experiment, clones selected for root yield were compared to the unselected ones. This result suggests that clones selected for yield under full sunlight may also be the best under shade.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93274

Sweet potato germplasm evaluation in the Philippines in 1990


Ona, I; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila,Philippines;1990;pp.67-79

Abstract:
Four experiments on sweet potato germplasm evaluation were conducted in Canlubang (150 m asl), Laguna from December 1989 to May 1990. The germplasm evaluated included clones from a local lowland and highlang germplasm collection and introduced clones from Papua New Guinea, Taiwan and USa. Results indicated a mean root yield increase of 57% to 122% when sweet potato were harvested at 120 days after planting (DAP) compared to those at 90 DAP. Similarly average root size increased by 32% to 191%. In general the biggest roots were produced by the highest yielding clones. Mean dry matter(DM) content ranged from 24.8 to 30.6% at 90 days and 25.7 to 29.4% at 120 days. Many of the clones gave more than 30% DM at both harvest dates. Several promising clones were identified for high yield and DM content.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93291

Morphological and yield characteristics associated with drougth resistance in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam)I. screening of sweet potato clones for drought resistance


Anslemo, BA; Bader, RF; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;pp.176-183

Abstract:
Fifty sweet potato clones were field screened for drought resistance from February, 1990to May,1991. The study aimed to identify the morphological and yield characters associated with drought resistance in sweet potato and to select parents for evaluation. Results indicated that number of leaves (40 DAP),vine number (55DAP),storage root yield (40,55 and 70 DAP),harvest index and canopy cover (40 DAP) were significantly associated with storage root yield at 90 DAP. Among the clones evaluated, V242 was the highest yielder followed by L063, N001, Kalibre, M1 and Miracle.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93293

Screening of sweet potato for leaf tips as vegetables


O¤a, CL; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;pp.194-204

Abstract:
A fast test was conducted to evaluate the eating quality of sweet potato leaf tips. Of 256 clones evaluated, only six clones were rated high and considered of best eating quality. Selection was based on the mean overall rating considering all the criteria (flavor,bitterness,crispiness and color) used for evaluation. Overall rating was significantly correlated with color (r=0.614), crispiness (r=0.499), flavor (r=0.436) and bitterness (r=0.257).

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93284

Efficacy of an entomogenous bacterium, Bacillus thurgiensis Berliner on sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius Fabr.


Amalin, DM; Aguda, R; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila, Philippines;1991;pp.112-115

Abstract:
A total of 23 strains of Bacillus thurgiensis Berliner were isolated from naturally infected sweet potato weevils (SPW). Characterization of the strains revealed five types of crystal protein, Cry 1A, Cry 1A/Cry 1B, Cry 1A/Cry 1D, Cry IIIX and SDSCPS. Test on the efficacy of 6 representative strains was done through dipasay. All representative B. t. strains had certain level of toxicity. The strain Cry 1A/Cry 1B type of crystal protein had the highest percent mortality followed by that with Cry 1A/Cry 1D for both larva and adult tests. Whereas, the strain with Cry 1A and Cry IIIX had the lowest percent mortality for larva and adult tests, respectively. Verification of the toxicity of the different strains will be done.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93285

Screening sweet potato for resistance to root-knot nematodes


Orolfo, EB
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila, Philippines;1991;pp.116-119

Abstract:
Eleven sweet potato clones were found resistant to root-knot nematode caused by Meloidogyne. Three types of resistance response were identified including a) repulsing the penetration of nematode juveniles into roots, b) juveniles entered the roots but failed to initiate the development of gallls, and c) certain degree of galling develops but eggmass development was limited.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93288

Response of sweet potato to shading during various growth stages


Ope¤a, GB; Gerpacio, MTL; Zaag, PV
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;pp.145-153

Abstract:
An experiment was conducted at 14 N latitude and 150 ml asl in the Philiippines to determine the effect of various time and duration of shade application on the growth and yield of sweet potato. Storage root yields of L020 and VSP-5 were significantly affected by time and duration of shading. Lowest yields were obtained at continuous 60% shading, followed by continuous 40% shading. Yield and yield compenents were little affected when shading occurred during early stage of plant growth to 30 days after planting (DAP). However, yield was significantly reduced when shade was applied at 30-60 DAP and 30-90 DAP. Methods of screening sweet potato germplasm for shade tolerance could involve applying shade during the most susceptible stage of plant growth.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93289

Studies on intercropping sweet potato with maize


Kim, H; Thy, NT; Binh, NT; Zaag, PV; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;pp.154-164

Abstract:
Intercropping sweet potato with maize is a popular pratice in the North Central Coast and the Red River Delta of Vitenam and has potential for adaption in the south. Four experiments on intercropping sweet potato with maize were conducted. Results indicated that (1) The optimum planting density of maize in intercrop with sweet potato was 20,000-20,800 plants/ha with two spacing of 2.5 m x 0.4 m or 1.2 m x 0.8 and 2 plants/hill. (2) Sweet potato varieties suitable for intercropping were HL4, CLT 13, VSP5, Norin 37, H84-4, H85-6, H86-1, VSP1, NO38 and Hoang Long. (3) Highest profit was obtained when maize was soon 7 days before to 7 days after planting sweet potato. (4) Intercrop at the density of 20,000 maize plants was the most profitable treatment. Also the intercrop had a higher efficiency than monocrop sweet potato or maize intercrop.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93286

Sweet potato germplasm evaluation in the Philippines in 1990-1991


Gerpacio, MTL; Chujoy, E and O¤a, IP
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila, Philippines;1991;pp.120-133

Abstract:
Two experiments on sweet potato germplasm evaluation were conducted at Canlubang, Laguna fromJune to November 1990 (wet season trial) and from December 1990 to April 1991 (dry season trial). Clones included Philippine local clones and introduced clones from Vietnam, Papua New Guinea, South Korea and the USA. Results indicate a wide diversity in terms of root yield, root number, root size and dry matter content exists in sweet poatoes evaluated. In general, a higher yield increased from DAP to 120 DAP was obtained in plants grown during the wet season. Average yield increase during the wet season trial was a high 157% compared to 65% during the dry season. ncrese in root number per plant and root size were also high during the wet season (41% and 57% respectively) than in the dry season (15% and 43 %, respectively). Seventeed clones from the wet season trial (yield greter than 350 g/plant) and twenty clones from the dry season trial (yield greater than 450 g/plant) were identified for high yield at 120 DAP.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93287

Screening for shade tolerance of sweet potato in an intercrop with corn in 1991


Chujoy, E; Ona, IP; Gerpacio, MTL
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila, Philippines;1991;pp.134-144.

Abstract:
Root yield reduction due to shade is a major constraint in sweet potato production in an intercropping system. the existence of genetically diverse sweet potato allows for the possibility of identifying shade tolerant clones. A total of 145 sweet potato clones were screened for shade tolerance in an intercrop with corn. Both crops were planted on the same date and moost shade occured between 40 to 78 days after planting (DAP). Results indicated that harvesting sweet potato at 120 days increased the percentage of clones producing roots from 78.6% at 90 days to 98.6% at 120 days; similarly mean root yield increased by 258%; mean number of roots by 21%; root size by 280% an; dry matter slightly increased by 7%. The high increase in root yield and root size appeared related to reduction in shade 78 days onwards as maize plants senesced. Eleven clones B008, Kinabakab, L002, BPI-SP2, B002, NCSU 1135, L072, PNG-18, PNG-3, PNG-135 and PNG-9 consistently had the highest yields at 90 and 120 DAP. A comparison with full sunlight grown sweet potato was made to determine the effect of shade on sweet potato plants in the intercrop with corn. T 90 DAP, root yield was reduced by 36% in the shded sweet potato; similarly root number per plant decreased by 31% and root size by 32%. At 120 DAP the root yield reduction in the shaded sweet potatowas only 6%. Root number per plant decreased by 41% however, root size root increased by 54%. The slight reduction in root yield and increase in root size were associated with the ability of rapid recovery of sweet potato when shade was reduced 78 DAP onwards.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93290

Growth and yield analysis of sweet potato cultivars under varying photoperiods


Gerpacio, MTL; Ope¤a, GB; Zaag, PV
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;pp.165-175

Abstract:
Sweet Potato was evaluated through growth analysis under 12-, 18- and 24-hour photoperiods. No significant differences on canopy cover were observed among plants grown under the different photoperiods. Vine was generally longer at higher photoperiods although the difference among photoperiods for vine length was not significant. Branch number was not significantly affected by photoperiod. Profuse flowering was observed in sweet potato plants exposed to 12 hours photoperiod. The effect of short photoperiod was highly evident on NCSU 925 and Bureau which produced the highest number of flowers throughout the growing season. No significant differences were also observed on dry matter production. However, harvest index (tuber dry matter/total dry matter) was significantly grown under longer photoperiods indicating that longer photoperiods favored dry matter accumulation in the vegetative parts than in the storage roots. Final storage root (SR) yield, average SR yield and SR number per plant were not significantly affected by the different photoperiods. Results indicate the extreme adaptability of sweet potato to a wide range of photoperiods without significantly reducing yield.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93292

Morphological and yield characters associated with drought resistance in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam) II. evaluation of parents and offsprings


Anselmo, BA; Bader, RF; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;pp.184-193

Abstract:
Twenty-one sweet potato clones and their respective open pollinated progenies were evaluated under irrigated and drought condition from December,1990 to April,1991. The objectives of the evaluation were to: identify characters associated with drought resistance, determine the relationship of parents and their offsprings under irrigated and drought conditions using rank correlation. Storage root yield at 120 DAP correlated significantly with number of storage roots (100 DAP), storage root diameter and yield (80 DAP), harvest index (80, 100 and 120 DAP),canopy cover (40,70 and 85 DAP) and stomatal count on upper leaf surface. Number of storage roots (100 DAP) had the highest heritability under drought condition . Storage root yield (80 DAP) had meduim heritability. Low heritable characters were percent dry matter content (120 DAP), storage root diameter (80 DAP), harvest index (80, 100 and 120 DAP), canopy cover (40, 70 an 85 DAP) and stomatal count on the upper leaf surface. Rank correltations for storage root yield, harvest index (100 and 120 DAP_ and canopy cover (40, 70 and 85 DAP) were significant. Significant association between the two environments may justify selection for characters even under irrigated condition.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93294

Increasing sweetpotato productivity:an on farm research approach


Amalin, DM; Ope¤a, GB; Chujoy, E; Zaag, PV
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;pp. 205-215

Abstract:
Traditional sweetpotato production by farmers in Tanauan, Batangas and Paniqui,Tarlac were jointly assessed by farmers and researchers. Alternatives were evaluated including introduction of new varieties, different fertilizer rates and weevil management. A total of 12 and 9 varieties were evaluated in 1989 and 1990, respectively. Selection of the introduced varieties were done based on quantitative and qualitative criteria. The men highly prioritized the quantitative criteria, whereas, the women greatly prioritized the qualitative characters. Women's choice is to be followed since they kmow what the consumers prefer. Soil fertility greatly affected sweet potato production. In Tanauan, application of nitrogen (N) alone with a rate of 460 kg/ha,which was 2 times the farmer's rate increased the yield of sweet potato. Another alternative for Tanauan farmers is that, they can reduce rate of N to half provided they will add P and K at arate of 51 and 96 kg/ha, respectively. Whereas, in Tarlac the use of complete fertilizer with a rate of 68-30-56 kg/ha N-P-K had the highest yield. The use of insecticide either as dipping agent or through sidedressing and the use of sex pheromone were found to considerably reduce sweet potato weeveil damage.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93299

Influence os soil moisture on sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) growth and yield


Demagante, AL; Ope¤a, GB; Zaag, PV
The Potato in SOutheast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1987;pp.131-144

Abstract:
Drought is a severe limitation in many tropical upland and lowland regions where sweet potatoes are grown. Detailed growth and yield analysis of 5 sweet potato cultivars under a range of soil moisture were evaluated in a hot tropical location of the Philippines to gain a better understanding of the response to water stress. Sweet potato genotypes varied in their response to soil moisture. The traditional local varieties Sinuksuk and Miracle generally yielded lower at either extreme of soil moisture than the high yielding varieties VSP-3, VSP-4 and VSP-5. Vine growth was slightly reduced with lower soil moisture. Limited storage root dry matter production during the first 110 DAP Miracle and Sinuksuk was primarily due to a slow crop growth rate and late storage root initiation. The high storage root yield of VSP-4 at 160 mm water were due to its earliness to form storage roots, high bulking rate, high diversion of assimilates to the storage roots and high storage root'leaf and storage root/vine ratio. The results indicate that the sensitivity of sweet potato genotypes to water stress is only critical during the early crop growth stage when full crop cover has not been attained. High storage root yields under limited soil moisture depends more on crop growth, the earliness to form storage roots, sink strength (storage root number) and partitioning of assimilates to the storage roots than on the morphological characters (ie. leaf area and root growth).

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93303

Sweetpotato marketing in selected urban centers in the Philippines


Ameston, FJ; Roa, JR; Van Den, T
The Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1987;pp.173-195

Abstract:
Informal surveys were conducted to a) assess the consumption adn marketing systems of sweet potato in the cities of Tacloban,Cebu, Dagupan and Manila, b) assess the problems and potentials of sweet potato production in the identified areas where the crops has been grown for the target markets and identify existing food utilization of the commodity. The daily consumption of fresh sweet potato roots in the surveyed areas, except Dagupan City, is considerable with over a ton in Tacloban City, 2.5 tons in Cebu City and 5-8 tons in Manila. The geographic flows of sweet potato from the production site to the surveyed markets were identified. Areas where sweet potato has been grown for commercialization are Dulag (Leyte), Baloi (Iligan), Afga (Butuan), Paniqui (Tarlac), Lucban (Quezon Province) and Tagaytay (Cavite). Farmers and consumers are linked by chain assemblers and wholesalers who supply sweet potato roots to the retailers for the market. Prices vary with seasons, variety and root sizes and increase by 30-40% during summer months when the problem of weevil infestation is prevalent in the farms. Sweet potato varieties with slightly sweet and slighty dry or wet characteristics after boiling are apparently preferred by consumers. Roots are mainly consumed in fresh form as boiled , camote cue and traditional delicacies. Production of sweet potato can be increased by introduction of improved production technology and expansion of hectarages. However, the markets for fresh roots set the limit. It is obvious that potentials of swee potato would be fully explored with development of the processing industry.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93314

Plantlet regeneration from meristems of Philippine sweetpotato varieties


Acedo, VZ
Annals of Tropical Research 14(1-4): 22-30(1992)

Abstract:
The solidified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium added with gibberllic acid (GA3) induced direct organogenesis without any callus formation of the meristems of sweetpotato, varieties VSP-1, VSP-2 and VSP-3. The optimum GA3 concentration varied with variety. On the other hand, benzylaminnopurine as medium supplement caused profuse callus growth on the basal portions of the meristem before shoots developed. Shoot growth of the meristems was much faster in liquid in solid MS medium supplemented with GA3. Rapid shoot and root development was induced when the cultures were transferred to the solid MS medium containing high sucrose level 1.5 months after.

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University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93313

A technique for making preparations of mitotic and meitotic chromosomes from Ipomoea species and hybrids


Oracion, MZ
Annals of Tropical Research 15(1-4): 31-36(1993)

Abstract:
A combination of Feulgen and acetocarmine squash method of preparing mitotic and meitotic chromosomes of sweetpotato and related Ipomoea aspects and hybrids is presented. The method includes pretreatment in 0.002 mol 8-hydroxyquinoline, fixation in modified Newcomer's solution, hydrolysis, staining of DNA by the Feulgen reaction, further chromosome staining with acetocarmine, and slide preparation by the standard squash techique. Some notes in preparing solutions for specific steps are also included.

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University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93339

Survey and identification of plant parasitic nematodes associated with sweetpotato and cassava


Gapasin, RM
Annals of Tropical Research 1(2): 120-134(1979)

Abstract:
A survey of plant parasitic nematodes associated with sweetpotato and cassava was conducted during the dry and rainy season of 1977 in 30 municipalities in two provinces of Leyte,Philippines. A total of 430 and 275 soil samples were gathered froms sweet potato and cassava fields,respectively. Thirteen genera and 22 species of nematodes were identified to be associated with potato; 12 genera and 17 species were associated with cassava. Rotylenchulus,Meloidogyme ansd Helicotylenchus were the most prevalent and widely distributed genera. Species of Meloidogme were identified mainly by the perineal patterns of egg-laying females. Other nematodes were identified by thier size, position of the vulva, number of lip annules and head tail region of adult females. In both sweet potato and cassava, the population density and distribution of the different nematode genera varied considerably from one locality to another. The differences may be attributed to such factors as soil type, soil moisture and cropping pattern in the area.

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University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93315

Effects of ipil-ipil and ammonium sulfate as nitrogen sources of sweet potato


Urdaneta, LA; Javier, RR
Annals of Tropical Research 2(2): 122-128(1980)

Abstract:
Nitrogen appilications, either with the use of ammonium sulfate or ipil-ipil leaves, significantly improved the yield components of the three varieties of sweet potata,except in the number of non-marketable tubers. Among the varieties tested, BNAS-51 yielded the highest amount of marketable tibers with the average of 11.7 t/ha, followed by Bakabakahan and Bulacan with 8.03 and 6.6 t/ha, respectively. BNAS-51 and Bakabakahan produced more and heavier marketable tubers/plant, and longer and heavier fresh weight of vines/plants. BNAS-51 had fewer but heavier non-marketable tubers than the the other two varieties. Plants which receaved nitrogen (N) from ipil-ipil leaves produced more and heavier fresh vines/plant than those without N. A lower percentage of dry matter content was observed in N-fertilized plants. In terms of tuber yield,plants which recieved 60kg/ha,eigther from ipil-ipil leaves or ammonium sulfate,yield more with 3.0 and 6.0 t/ha, respectively, than those plants which did not recieve N. Despite the equal rates of Napplication,plants which were applied with inorganic N fertilizer (ammonium sulfate) produced significantly higher yields than which received organic fertilizer(ipil-ipil leaves).

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University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93320

Efficacy of Paecilomyces lilacinus isolates for the control of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and white) Chitwood)in sweetpotato


Galano, CD; Gapasin, RM; Lim, JL
Annnals Tropical Research 18: 12-23(1996)

Abstract:
The application of different Paecilomyces lilacinus isolates grown in water hyacinth substrate 50 days after Meloidgyne incognita egg inoculation increased fresh vine and ficbrous weights by 32.36.2%and 29.6-35.1%,respectively over the untreated control. On the other hand,chicken manure and ethoprop(Mocap)-treated plants had an increase of 37.9-430%and 18.6-29.9%,respectively. The mean number of root galls,egg masses produced and nematode population in fibrous roots and soil in plant applied with P.lilacinus isolates ranged from 27.8-42.0, 40.9-58.1, 8.4-11.5 and 392.0-800.8, respectively. The isolates evaluated for thier efficacy gave comparable effects since no significant differnces in effect were observe among them. Chiken manure-treated plants had a mean number of root galls of 28.8 and egg masses of 40.3 showing an egg mass reduction of 55.7%. Ethoprop gave the lowest number of galls (4.2) and eggs masses(6.2) among the treament. Percent reduction based on eggs masses produced was 93.2 relative to the untreated control. The overall results of the study showed that the efficacy of P.lilacinus in reducing root-knot galls,egg masses and nematode population was comparable to chicken manure but not with etoprop.

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University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93325

Root development sweetpotato stem cuttings as influenced by pre-planting, planting and post-planting practices


Pardales, JR, Jr; Esquibel, CB
Annals of Tropical Research 14(1): 56-65(1997)

Abstract:
The effect of selected cultural practices on the adventitious root development in the stem cuttings of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) was investigated through pot experiments. Storing apical stem cutting for at least 3days under ambient condition markedly increased the number and total length of the adventitious roots (ARs) and the number of the first order lateral roots (LRs)per plant. Variety had no significant influence on the number and elogation of the ARs except that VSP-4 produced notably more first order LRs than VSP-2. The number of nodes buried in the soil at planting did not have significant effect on the production and elogation of the ARs and first order LRs. However, the results showed that the fewer the numbers of nodes buried at planting the longer was the length of the ARs and the greater was the number of the first orders LRs. Application of fertilizer had no positive effect on the same root system components while water application markedly influenced only the elogation of first order LR formation than basal cuttings. Stem cuttings with leaves intact produced significantly greater number and length of ARs and number of first order LRs than cuttings in which the leaves were removed before planting.

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University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93327

Crop rotation of sweetpotato, cassava, and gabi with legumes as a cultural management system


Escasinas, AB; Escalda, RG
Annals of Tropical Research 6: 63-76(1984)

Abstract:
Mungbean, bushbean, soybean and peanut planted in rotation with sweet potato did not significantly affect the vine length and fresh weight of the vegetative parts of the root crop but increased its marketable and total tuber yield. However, only the plants rotated with mungbean showed a significant increrase in yield over the control. Rotating planting of cassava rwith leguminous crops did not affect its yield and yield components as well as the agronomic characters studied. Planting gabi in rotation with peanut significantly increased corm production compared with the mungbean and bushbean treatments. No pronounced effect of the other treatments on yield was noted. The weight of corms per plant and the corn yield per hectare of gabi showed similar response to the treatments while the number of runners per plant and plant height were not significantly affected by the treatments. Cost and return analysis showed that legumes used as rotation crops, peanut yielded the highest combined net return regardless of the root crop used. This manifests that peanut-root crop rotation is the most profitable cropping pattern.

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University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93328

Reaction of sweetpotato genotypes to Botrydiplodia theobromae Plat. and Macrophomina phaseolina Tassi


Sajise, CE; Palermo, C
Annals of Tropical Research 14(1): 11-21(1992)

Abstract:
Sweetpotato genotypes were screened for resistance to Botrydiplodia theobromae Plat. and Macrophomina phaseolina Tassi, the the two major postharvest pathogens found infecting sweetpotato roots during stroge in the Phillipines. The effect of different stages of maturity of sweetpotato plants on host resistance and the nature of postharvest disease development were also investigated. Assessment of 437 genotypes for resistance to B.theobtomae infection showed that 0.7% and 15% were highly resistant and resistant, respectively. Out of 434 genotypes evaluated for resistanceto M.phaseolina only 0.2% and 6% were noted to be highly resistant and resitant,respectively. Majority of the genotypes screened against both pathogens were found to be modeaterly susceptible to susceptible. Roots taken from 3 months old plants were more resistant to infection by either B.theobromae or M.phaseolina than those taken from 4 and 5 months old plants. The resistant, moderately resistant, and susceptible lesion types were categorized based on visual and histological examinations. Ipomeamarone was detected in inoculated resistant,moderately resistant and moderately susceptible sweetpotato roots but not in susceptible roots. No visible formulation of ipomeamarone was noted in healthy uninoculated roots.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93365

Aquatic crops vs. organic soil subsidence


Morton, JF; Snyder, GH
Proceedings;Eighty-ninth Annual Meeting;Florida State Horticultural Society;Miami Beach,Florida;2-4 November,1976: pp.125-129

Abstract:
South Lake of Okeechobee lies the largest contiguous expanse of organic soil in the world. This soil is being lost (subsiding) as a result of microbiological oxidation at the rate of 10 to 12 in (25-30 cm.) per decade. Much of the 700,000-acre (280,000-ha.) Everglades Agricultural Area gion will be unsuitable for conventional farming in 25 years. Adoption of aquatic and semi-aquatic crops extend the agricultural productivity of this and other similarly affected regions indefinitely. There is an existing demand and ready market for Asiatic vegetables such as water spinach (Ipomea aquatica) and Oriental water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis). Swamp fern (Ceratopteris thalictriodes) is a popular tropical vegetable well suited to the Florida climate. It may be possible to develop wild rice (Zizania aquatic) as a mechanized, high revenue crops, Jungle rice (Echinochloa colonum) could afford nourishing wetland pasture. Experimental culture of some of these and other soil-saving aquatics has been undertaken at AREC-Belle Glade.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93421

Intercroping potato with sweetpotato in warm coastal lowlands of Sri Lanka,1995-96 trial


Kuruppuarachchi, DSP
Selected Research Papers Volume 1: Potato: Rasco, Jr
Abstract:
A follow-up experiment was conducted to determine feasibility of potato inter-cropping under Kalpitiya condition and estimate the economic gains and losses of this combination against monocrop potato. The sweet-potato intercrop was planted four weeks ahead, four weeks later and simultaneously with potato. Planting sweet-potato simultaneously or four weeks later than potato increased the yield of potato. The yield increment ranged from 37-41%. On the other hand, the yield of potato was reduced when sweet-potato was planted four weeks ahead of potato. The yield of sweet-potato was reduced when it was planted four weeks ahead or simultaneously with potato but slightly increased when planted four weeks later than potato gave the highest computed income of Rs 300,800/ha. This amount is 72% higher than mono-culture potato or 429% higher than mono-culture sweet-potato.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93432

The disease disposition of tuber crops as compared to other annual crops


Delhey, R
Proceedings;Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops;Lima,Peru;21-26 February,1983;Shideler,FS and Rincon,H( eds.);pp.59-66

Abstract:
The pathological Index (PI) is introduced as a measure for the overall disease incidence of a crop species. Pi is calculated according of the formula:PI= No. of publications in Rev. P1. Pathol. No. publication in P1. Breed. Abs. x 100. Similarly, partial P1 values referring to fungal, bacterial, and virus disease incidence (P1f, PIB,PIV) can be calculated. The PI values of 45 annual crops have been determined, including 5 tuber crops. The overall disease incidence is high in yam, aroids, and potato, and moderate in cassava and sweeet potato. Also, virus disease incidence is higher in the three former species. Cassava is unique in having relatively low PIf and high PIB values. Tuber crops as a whole have a very high disease incidence as compared to cereals, medicinal fiber crops, and legumes. This is especially true withrespect to bacterial and virus diseases. Vegetative propagation is accompanied by a higher diseases incidence than propagation by true seed; this tendency is more pronounced with virus and bacterial tahn with fungal diseases.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93486

Stem resistance to the sweetpotato weevil (Cylas formicarius) in Ipomoea trifida


Chujoy, E; Amalin, D; Ona, C
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1989;pp.81-88

Abstract:
A total of 46 clones of synthetic hexaploid(2m=6x=90) Ipomoea trifida were screened for stem resistance to the sweet potato weesil, cylas formicarius. Screening was done under heavy infestation in the field at Canlubang (150 m asl). Philippines from July to December 1989. Twenty two clones were classified as resistant based on external stem damage (one insect hole in the stem observed) and internal stem damage (one tunnel observed); 15 were moderately resistant (2 to 3 holes and 2 to 3 tunnels ) and 9 were susceptible (more than 4 holes and 4 tunnels). The susceptible sweet potato cultivar BPI-SP2 had the heaveiest external and internal damage. Correlation coefficients between external and internal stem damage. 3 sampling dates were 0.84, 0.91 and 0.82, and indicated their consistency over sampling date. External, internal dammage and weevil count were found positively and highly correlated (r>0.82). Internal damage was considered to be a good criteria for selecting resistant genotypes. Weevil damage and thickness of the stem decreased from the segment proximal to the roots to the segment distal to it. Stem damage and weevil count had positive correlations with thickness of stem ranging from 0.53 to 0.69. The stem resistance of I.trifida could be used as a component in the breeding for resistance of the weevil. Further studies need to be conducted on the inheritance of stem resistance to the weevil in interspecific hybrids with sweet potato.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93491

Growth and yield analysis of 5 sweetpotato cultivars under different levels of shade


Demagante, AL; Ope¤a, GB; Vander Zaag, P
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1989;pp.119-130

Abstract:
Solar radiation is a limiting factor for sweet potatoes under shade crops as well as during the rainy season in the tropics. Five diverse sweet potato genotypes were analyzed through growth analysis under shading in the Philippines. Shading generally promoted vine growth but delayed storage root formation particularly for the traditional cultivars. All cultivars were sensitive to 70% shade as indicated by low dry matter accumulation due to shading was primarily attributed to the reduction in solar radiation for interception rather than the size of the crop cover. Assimilate partitioning to the storage roots decreased with increasing shade. This effect was more severe for Sinuknuk due to its delayed roots formation and its limited sink size (storage root number). Miracle and VSP.5 were less sensitive to 33% shade relativeto the other cultivars. With these cultivars less than 8 MJ/m2/day was detrimental to early growth and storage root formation. There were significant genotype x shade interactions for yield components. The late maturing cultivar Sinuknuk responded more adversely to shade than the other genotypes.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93517

A comparison of the volatile constituents and sugars of representative Asian, Central American, and North American sweet-potatoes


Kays, SJ; Horvat, RJ
Proceedings; Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops; Lima, Peru; 21-26 February 1983; Shideler, FS and Rincon, H (eds.); p577-586

Abstract:
The volatile profiles and sugars of three cultivars of baked sweet potatoes representing an Asian, Central American, and North American centre of selection were compared. Aromatic compounds were analuzed and identified by gas-liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Volatile components were identified from the North American cultivar Jewel and from the Central American cultivar Morado. The volatile profiles between the three cultivars were distinctly different as were the aromatic properties, measured subjectively. There were no qualitative differences in sugars between the cultivars. Maltose, sucrose, glucose and fructose is decreasing order of concentration were isolated and identified by high pressure liquid chromatography. Significant quantitative differences were found in the concentration of total sugars (Jewel>Tainung>Morado) and in the concentration of free hexose sugars (Jewel>Morado>Tainung 57) between the cultivars tested. We have proposed that the limited use of sweet potatoes as a preferred staple food for human consumption is due to a large extent to the intensity and dominance of the flavour (aromatic and taste) of the cooked product which minimizes its flexibility for use in cuisine's. Based upon the significant variation in both the volatile compounds and concentration of sugars that appear to be present in the sweet potato gene pool, the integration of an analytical measure of flavour into future sweet potato breeding programs would be highly desirable research approach.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93518

Progress in developing sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) cultivars for fuel alcohol production


Collins; WW
Proceedings;Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops;Lima,Peru;21-26 February,1983;Shideler,FS and Rincon,H(eds.);pp.571-575

Abstract:
The potential use of sweet potatoes for fuel alcohol production in the United States and the development of cultivars specifically for that purpose are discussed. Field and laboratory studies were conducted in 1981 on yield of dry matter and protein per hectare and on yield of 100% ethanol per hectare after fermentation. Selection for dry matter and protein content in early stages of a breeding program was also evaluated. "Pelican Processor',one of the older cultivars tested, produced the largest amounts of dry matter and protein per ha. Root yield ranged from 29.3 mt/ha to 54.7 mt/ha. Protein content was highest in the experimental clone WJ2 (6.9% dry weight basis) but because of the high dry matter content (30.7%) and high root yield, "Pelican Processor" yielded more protein per ha (0.3 mt/ha). Determination of dry matter content and protein content in seedlings were considered unreliable for estimating these values in mature plants. Correlations between seedlings and mature plants for these characters were significant but low and would not be useful unless severe selection pressure were used.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93519

Sweetpotato seed improvement on the farm


George Wilson, L; Collins, W
Proceedings;Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops;Lima,Peru;21-26 February,1983;Shideler,FS and Rincon,H(eds.);pp.553-557

Abstract:
A sweet potato seed improvement program sponsored by the Agricultural Extension Service has resulted in better quality. The purpose of this, statewide campaign, called "Yam Alert", has been to dray farmer's attention to the problems of mutations and diseases which occur as a result of poor on-farm seed management. The multi-media appraoch focuses on an illustrated pamphlet which concisely describes the problem and presents realistic solutions. The pamphlets was mailed to every sweet potato grower in North Carolina. The cover letter accompanying the pamphlet, and other timely grower, correspondences, are on specially designed "Yam Alert" stationery. Gowers' meetings feature an eight, two or one projector narrated slide presentation which is entertaining but educational. The "Yam Alert" message is reinforced at meetings by a colorful, table top display. Furhter reinforcement is provided by radio and television presentations plus timely articles in newspapers and magazines. On-farm tests demonstrate seed improvement principles, especially the importance of careful selection for orange flesh color. Results of grower seed source surveys reveal strengths and deficiencies of individual grower seed management systems.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93520

Fertilizer N use efficiency and associative N2-fixation of sweetpotato


Hill, WA; Bacon, P
Proceedings;Sixth Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops;Lima,Peru;21-26 February,1983;Shideler,FS and Rincon,H(eds.);pp.535-542

Abstract:
Experiments evaluated potential mechanisms for minimizing fertilizer N requirements of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). The response of four sweet potato cultivars to drip 'fertigation' (DF), drip irrigation + granular N (DI) and nonirrigation + granular N (NI) were compared. Method of N application significantly influenced yield, dry matter and N recovery. Isotopically labeled fertilizer at 18 kg N/ha was applied to 'Jewel' sweet potato at 3-week interval for 15 weeks. Three weeks after each application, roots and foliage were analyzed for fertilizer N recovered. Fertilizer N recovered in foliage and storage roots was greater when applied at 6 and 12 weeks after transplanting respectively. Nitrogenous activity of fibrous roots from six sweet potato cultivars was determined with acetylene reduction assay. Nitrogenous activity of fibrous roots ranged from 66 to 465 nmoles c2h4/h/g depending on the cultivar. Sixteen N2-fixing bacterial isolates with morphological characteristics similar to Azospirillum were isolated in vitro. Nitrogenase activities of single colonies ranged from 32 to 472 nmoles C2H4 per culture-h.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93542

Growth and yield analysis of sweetpotato cultivars under different light intensities


Opena, GB; Demagante, AL; Gerpacio, MTL; Vander Zaag, P
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila;Philippines;1990;pp.133-147

Abstract:
Solar radiation is a limiting factor for sweet potato under shade crops as well as during the rainy season in the tropics. two experiments to determine the critical level of intercepted solar radiation for sweet potato growth and yield were conducted. Shading delayed storage root initiation, reduced vine and storage root growth and reduced partitioning of assimilates to storage roots. This effect was more severe for Sinuksuk due to its delayed storage root formation and limited sink size. A total ISR of 850 MJ/m2 was inhibitory for growth and yield of all cultivars evaluated. Miracle and VSP-5 performed well even at 1300 MJ/m2 indicating their ability to be used for intercropping.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93543

Growth and yield analysis of 3 sweetpotato cultivars under varying photoperiods


Gerpacio, MTL; Demagante, AL; Opena, GB; Vander Zaag, P
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099Manila;Philippines;1990;pp.124-132

Abstract:
Three sweet potato cultivars were evaluated through growth analysis under 12-,18-, and 24-hour photoperiods. With increased photoperiod, Bureau and VSP-5 produced longer vines. The 12-hour photoperiod significantly promoted flowering for Bureau. Photoperiod had no effect on canopy cover, branching, both storage root and total dry weight. Harvest index was favored by shorter photoperiod indicating that shorter daylength promoted dry matter accumulation in the storage root rather than in the foliage. The results show that sweet potato can grow under a wide range of photoperiods without a significant reduction in yield.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93554

Physiological and agronomic comparisons between potato and sweet-potato in contrasting environments of the Philippines


Gabutan, J; Ganga, Z; Vander Zaag, P
The Potato in South-East Asia and the Pacific Region; The International Potato Center; South-East Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila, Philippines; 1988; p94-103

Abstract:
Sweet potato is a traditional crop in the lowland tropics while potato is well established in the highland tropics. Recent results indicate that the potato is also well suited to the lowland tropics. The major objective of this study was to compare these two crops in two lowland locations (Cagayan, 50 m asl, 18 N lat. and Canlubang, 150 m asl, 14 N lat.) and one highland location (Benguet, 1330 m asl, 16 N lat.) to determine which crop has the comparative advantage in producing food. Canopy size and duration of potatoes were significantly greater than for sweet potatoes in the cooler highlands while in Cagayan and Canlubang the potato developed a smaller canopy and senesced earlier than the sweet potato regardless of location. Improved soil fertility rates improved yields slightly for potatoes but did not improved sweet potatoes yields. The total intercepted solar radiation was positively correlated to total dry matter production and final fresh tuber yields at all locations. The slope was lowest for Canlubang, followed by Cagayan and highest for La Trinidad. This result suggests that the low conversion efficiency of both potatoes and sweet potatoes under higher temperature was due to higher respiration rates. The potato was as efficient in converting light to tuber yield than the sweet-potato. The potato had a much higher harvest index. Tuber yield ranged from 11.3 to 26.2 t/ha for potato and 1.2 to 23 t/ha for sweet potato for the 3 locations. Yields of potato were inversely correlated to air temperature. These results suggests that potatoes can be grown in the lowland tropics and can produce as much food per unit time per unit light as the sweet potato.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 93574

Inter-cropping potato with sweet-potato in warm coastal lowlands of Sri Lanka


Kuruppuarachchi, DSP
Selected Research Papers Volume 1: Potato, Rasco, Jr, ET and Aromin, FB (eds.); Asian Sweet potato and Potato Research and Development; Manila, Philippines; July 1994-June 1995; p143-146

Abstract:
The feasibility of potato + sweet-potato inter-cropping under Kalpitiya condition and the economic gains and losses of this crop combination against monocrop potato were evaluated. The sweet-potato intercrop was planted four weeks before, four weeks after and simultaneously with potato. Inter-cropping potato and sweet-potato reduced the yields of both crops. Significant yield reductions on potato was observed when sweet-potato was planted four weeks ahead or simultaneously with potato. On the other hand, the yield of sweet-potato was comparable to that of monoculture if planted ahead or simultaneously with potato, but was drastically reduced when planted four weeks later than potato. Studies to determine suitable sweet-potato varieties as intercrops, proper timing of planting the intercrop to reduce competition, and a more thorough cost/benefit analysis of the system are recommended for future evaluations.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños
Email: kfy@mudspring.uplb.edu.ph




NO. 94747

Some agronomic tips on how to minimize sweet potato weevil infestation


Villamayor, FG
The Radix 10(1&2): 10-11(1988)

Abstract:
This article presented warp of minimizing weevil infestation. The cultural practices include the use of terminal cutting as planting material, planting of resistant or tolerant varieties, planting on sandy soil planting at the onset of the rainy season, mulching, hilling up irrigation, timely harvesting, crop rotation and removal of plant hosts during crop rotation.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94748

Effect of planting location on the quality and storage life of sweet potato and cassava


Data, ES; Quevedo, MA
The Radix 10(1&2): 16(1988)

Abstract:
In this research various locations in the Philippines were selected as experiment site to determine the effect of location on the quality of root crops while in storage. Results revealed that planting location was found to effect the storage behavior and quality of root crops such as sweet potato and cassava.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94796

The use of sweet potato as partial substitute for commercial feeds in gestating sow


Adion, IM et al
Compilation of Abstracts 1993-1999;Vol. 1(1999);Department of Agriculture Central Luzon Integrated Agricultural Research Center (CLIARC) Sto. Ni¤o, Magalang, Pampanga

Abstract:
This study aimed to determine the effects of substituting 50% of the required commercial feed (breeder mash) with dried sweet potato chips during the last trimester of gestation period was conducted in ROSLD-Tarlac from March, 1994 to December 1995. Eight crossbreed sows of 2.5 parity, 24 months old with mean weights of 170 kg were grouped into two which represented the experimental group; those fed with dried sweet potato chips during the last trimester (T1) and the control group; those fed with breeder mash throughput the gestation period (T2). Results indicated that substituting 50% of the required breeder mash during the last trimester of gestation with dried sweet potato chips produce heavier piglets and higher net benefit. Sweet potato can therefore be used as partial substitute to breeder mash for gestating sow when chipped and dried.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 94826

Sweet potato in the upland agroecology of the Philippines


Villamayor, Jr, FG; Amante, VDR
Sweet Potato in Tropical Asia;Villamayor,FG Jr;Amante,VDR;Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD);Los Baños, Laguna;2000;p58-125

Abstract:
The chapter documents the prevailing practices in growing sweetpotato, specifically under agroecological conditions in the Philippines. Discussed in the chapter is the description of upland agroecology, technology packages in sweet potato, production management, processed food production and partial cost and return analysis.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94827

Microbiological studies of Ipomoea muricata (L.) Jacq. (Convolvulaceae), part I


Guevarra, BQ; Monato, MG; Solevilla, RC
Acta Manilana 20(30): 1-11(1981)

Abstract:
The alcohol extract of the seeds of I. muricata showed anti-bacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633. Extracts of the seeds harvested in different regions of the Philippines showed similar biological activity, the activity diminishing with length of storage. The extract was thermo stable when heated even up to 120 degrees celsius. The extract at 500 ug/ml was found to be bactericidal against S. aureus. A concentration of 60,000 ug/ml of the extract was found to have the approximate potency of 2.5 ug/ml of Tetracycline hydrochloride; the partially purified extract, a potency equivalent to 10 ug/ml. Preliminary studies show that the extract inhibits gram-positive clinical isolates.

Availability :
Rizal Library-Ateneo de Manila University; Katipunan road, Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 94927

Yield of kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsskal) in the Okoy River, southern Negros island, Philippines


Cabanban, AS; Luchavez, TF
Silliman Journal 36(2): 44-45(1993)

Abstract:
THis article present the following farming system, description, marketing and yeild and income of kangkong in Negros Island.

Availability :
International Rice Research Institute




NO. 94315

The effects of red camote tops and leaves for increasing the hemoglobin level


Drisa, R; Ecraela, J; Esguerra, R; Facelo, R; Ferrer, G; Fernandez, A; Flavier, A; Flores, J
HERDIN Database 023742-PC970901;Philippine Scientist Journal 29(1): 38-45(1996)

Abstract:
An experimental study which compares the effects of red camote tops and commercially prepared Ferrous sulfate on increasing hemoglobin level in 60 normal male and female subjects were undertaken. Subjects were randomly grouped equally into 3 namely: control, standard and experimental groups, respectively. Control group continued their normal diet. Standard group took additional commercially prepared Ferrous sulfate, one tablet a day and ; lastly, the experimental group took additionally one cup (15 grams) of red camote tops and leaves once a day. It was done for 28 days. Baseline hemoglobin was determined before the experiment started. Second determination of hemoglobin level was done on the 28th day. It was found out that red camote tops significantly increased the hemoglobin level similar to the commercially prepared Ferrous sulfate. Thus, it could serve as an alternative medication in case of anemia and the like.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Resources and Development; UST-RCNS; UST España




NO. 94481

An experimental study on the efficacy of red camote tops and leaves for increasing hemoglobin content


Manila Central University Filemon D. Tanchoco Medical Foundation

Inventory of Health Researches: 138(1994-1996)

Abstract:
The study was conducted at the Filemon D. Tanchoco Bldg., Manila Central University, Caloocan City from January 5 to January 30,1995, to find a readily available alternative to Ferrous Sulfate from increasing hemoglobin contents. Forty five persons were randomly divided into three groups-standard, experimental and control consisting of fifteen persons(eight males and seven females) per group as the control. Hemoglobin determination would be done before and after two weeks intake of the drug and plant. It was found out that camote tops and leaves increased hemoglobin level as high as the increases hemoglobin level as high as the increase brought about by ferrous sulfate.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 94515

Bushbeans (Vigna ungiculata x Vigna sesquipedalis) as rotation or green manure crop for sweet potato


Forio, AE; Villamayor, FG
The Radix 9(2): 13-15(1987)

Abstract:
This pot study was undertaken to compare the effects of green manuring and crop rotation on the yield of sweet potato. The study generally showed the beneficial effect of using bushbean either as a green manure or as a rotation crop for sweet potato.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94516

Storage performance of some newly developed sweet potato hybrids


Data, ES; Eronico, PS
The Radix 9(1): 3-5(1987)

Abstract:
The storage performance of the different sweet potato hybrids was then evaluated to identify which of the newly developed hybrids possess desirable storage characteristics and be retained for possible breeding. From among the 341 hybrids, 39 were initially identified to have good storage characteristic. Besides exhibiting low percentages of weight loss, they also showed high resistance to decay and shivelling. Sprouting incidence, however, was a little but high.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94518

Prospects of utilizing weevil-infested sweet potato root for animal feeds through microbial action


Tulin, EE
The Radix 9(2): 16-18(1987)

Abstract:
The findings only suggest that detoxification on the toxic components present in weevil infested roots through microbial action is highly possible. At present, screening of microorganisms which can degrade terpenoid compounds in weevil-infested sweet potato roots is on-going at Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center (PRCRTC). If this experiment is successful, then the prospect of utilizing microbially treated weevil-infested sweet potato roots as animal feed will be bright.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94520

Effect of shading on some root crops


Itong, RB; Villamayor, FG
The Radix 13(1): 8-9(1991)

Abstract:
The study was undertaken to determine the effect of shading on some root crops. Generally, the results indicated that cassava and sweet potato are less tolerant to shade while arrowroot and ginger were adaptable or shade-loving, hence, planting arrowroot and ginger under reduced light intensity is highly recommended.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94522

Meristem culture in sweet potato


Acedo, VZ
The Radix 13(2): 11-12(1991)

Abstract:
This paper presented some technologies of meristem culture in sweet potato. The culture media, explant preparation, dissection of meristems and culture preparation were discussed.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94523

Varietal response of sweet potato on storage of cutting


Villamayor, FG
The Radix 13(2): 14(1991)

Abstract:
A study was undertake to determine the varietal response of sweet potato on storage of cutting. Five varieties were used, namely:VSP-1, VSP-3, VSP-5, UPL-Spi and Kabiti. Cuttings cm long were placed in deep open basket for 5 days before planting except the control. The results showed that there were significant differences observed, only among the varieties storage of cutting had no significant effect on the root count, root yield and herbage yield although the stored cuttings showed numeral advantage over the control. There were also no interaction effects observed between variety and storage.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94524

Biochemical basis in screening for drought resistance in cassava and sweet potato


Spitzer, RJV; Godoy, CV
The Radix 13(2): 18(1991)

Abstract:
The physiological and biochemical changes of sweet potato and cassava under conditions of moisture stress were investigated under greenhouse conditions. Results revealed that the relative water content chlorophyll and proline were affected with proline implicated to be a useful indicator for drought resistance. However, proline alone cannot be reliably utilized to assess cultivar performance for this complex trait. A combination of characteristics must be used to assess plant performance under moisture stress.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94525

Vine orientation in sweet potato of yield determinant


Villamayor, FG
The Radix 13(2): 16(1991)

Abstract:
It is speculated that plants with vines hanging upward as in a plocross nursery will have a higher yield than those with vines hanging downward. it is further speculated that the yield of plants with the vines spreading horizontally will be in between the two vine orientation. To test these speculations 25-cm long sweet potato cuttings were planted in 34-cm diameter clay pots with variation in consideration to effect vine orientation. The plants with the vines hanging downwards had the shortest and lightest vine and the lowest number and weight of roots. In terms of the root yield figures. The data seemed to conform the speculation put forward earlier that the yield will be highest for hanging upward vine orientation, followed by vine spreading horizontally and last hanging downward.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94527

Improvement of nitrogen status of root crops through foliar fertilization


Bautista, AT; Zamora, LP
The Radix 13(1): 14(1991)

Abstract:
This study was undertaken to know the specific stage of crop growth wherein its response to added nitrogen decline. This is important so that timing of foliar application of N be synchronized to increase the production of photosynthates in the leaves. Fertilization greatly affected the weight of roots of sweet potato at 3 months after planting prior to the application of foliar sprays. Higher root weight were produced at F4 followed by F2, F1, F3 and control. However, no significant difference was observed on the effect of fertilizer on the weight of roots at 4th,5th and 6th month after planting although the fertilized plants produced significantly higher root weight as compared to the control.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94012

The identification of phenylpropanoids, phenylpropanoid glycosides and a phenylethanol diglucoside from Ipomoea muricata Jacq. Convolvulaceae


Ysrael, MC; Waterman, P; Nonato, MG
Inventory of Health Researches : 92(1997-1998)

Abstract:
In the course of isolating bioactive contituents from the seeds of the locally grown Ipomoea muricata (Jacq.). Convolvulaceae, phenylpropanoids, phenylpropanoid glycosides and a phenylethanol diglucosides were isolated. A combination of H to the power 1(H1) and C to the power of 13 (H13) (1D and 2D) nmr spectoscopy identified the compounds. The phenylpropanoids isolated were ethyl caffeate, caffeic acid and methyl p-coumarate. The phenylpropanoid glucosides identified were 6-0-(p-coumaroyl)-b-D-methylglucopyranoside and the phenylethanol diglucoside was identified as 2-{4-[0-b-Dylucopyranosyl1 (1-6)-b-D glucopyranosyl]phenyl} ethanol.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 94536

Post-harvest physiological disorders in root crops


Diamante, JC
The Radix 8 (2): 4-6 (1986)

Abstract:
Physiological disorders are disturbance in the normal operations or in the structural composition and wholeness of a produce. This paper has presented post-harvest physiological disorders of sweet potato, taro, yam, cassava and potato.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94537

Effect of leaf removal from cuttings on sweet potato yield


Villamayor, FG
The Radix 8(2): 1-2(1986)

Abstract:
Leaf removal from cuttings was conducted to determine whether sweet potato establish itself within a short period of time and how it affects the yield. Results of this experiment showed that the weight and number of both the marketable and total roots did not significantly differ between the fresh cuttings and the stored cuttings with intact leaves. On the other hand, the root number and root weight of the debladed stored cuttings were significantly lower than those of the other two treatments. No significant differences in herbage weight were observed among the treatments.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94541

Tillage practices in contorous hillside forming of root crops


Abenoja, EA; baterna, JP
The Radix 4(2): 9-11(1982)

Abstract:
The study aimed to identify the minimum tillage requirement of root crops planted on hillsides, compare different tillage practices for root crop production and make recommendations about tillage practices suitable for hillside root crop production. The study consisted of 3 experimental setups such as setup for cassava, sweet potato and gabi using six treatments for each setup. Generally tillage practices did not significantly influence the yield of cassava, sweet potato, and gabi. However, tuber yield in the tilled plots was slightly higher than in the untilled plots. The effect of tillage practices on soil erosion was not apparent probably due to rapid infiltration of rain water of the newly opened forest land.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94564

1994-1995 results of variety evaluation of sweetpotato under upland rainfed, open field condition


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, VdR(ed); Lopera, R
Selected Research Papers(July 1995-June 1995)2: 54-94(1996)

Abstract:
The focus of the project shifted from germplasm evaluation, demonstration of procedures and training of international cooperators, to breeding and selection of improved germplasm. Ten trials conducted over three seasons are presented in this report. A total of 225 entries were evaluated for agronomic performance in ten trials covering the first three evaluation stages in the SAPPRAD variety evaluation protocol .Results of germplasm evaluation show that the yield level even on the best entries grown during the most favorable season of the year are still predominantly lower than 20 t/ha, in spite of fertilizer application. During the wet season, yield dropped to a level lower than 10 t/ha. These results are consistent with that obtained from the previous three years. While the best yields are the least three times that of the average yield in the upland environment, further yield increases seem to be improbable with the materials available in our collection .When qualitative traits are considered in overall evaluation, very few clones could potentially exceed the performance of 13B Tres Colores, a selection we made from a locally popular variety. These results justify the shift in emphasis of our work to germplasm enhancement for yield and wet season adaptation and combining these with the desirable qualitative traits of local germplasm. We have argued in previous reports that the possibilities for utilization of sweet potato can be increased with the use of high yielding varieties that pass quality standards for processing or fresh market. Initial selections from open-pollinated seed constitute an intermediate stage in this long-term process.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94570

1994-95 results of variety evaluation of sweetpotato under post-rice and lahar conditions in Tarlac, Philippines


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, VdR(ed); Aromin, FB; Adion, I; Sebastian, A
Selected Research Papers(July 1994-June 1995)2: 31-43(1996)

Abstract:
For the second year in a row, evaluation of sweetpotato varieties and clones fro dry season adaptation, was continued in Tarlac Province. During the dry season of 1994-95, a total of 81 varieties and clones were screened in the replicated and observational trials conducted under post-rice and lahar conditions. In two separate sets of replicated trials involving a total of 18 varieties,88WS623 consistently demonstrated outstanding performance over the popular variety Super Bureau. In the towns of Paniqi and Concepcion ,the rootyield of this variety was 2x,andits roots uniformities were at par with, if not better than of Super Bureau. Likewise, it tend to be more resistant to FMV than the traditional variety. In the observational trials, four promising clones were selected for further evaluation. Recommendations for the continuing effort to select and introduce promising varieties to complement or replace Super Bureau are presented.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94565

Market research for sweetpotato flour and its products


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); amante, VdR(ed); Amano, VL
Selected Research Papers(July 1994-June 1995)2: 134-146(1996)

Abstract:
Eleven commercial users of flour were selected as cooperators to the study. They were given free sweetpotato flour to use in the preparation of selected cakes, cookies, bread and native products. The proportion of sweetpotato flour in combination with wheat flour and reduction in sugar used were noted. A product test questionnaire was used to get feedback from the cooperators. They were also required to give a copy of their recipes for the products they tested using the flour. The test result of sample products were returned to them as basis for further improvement of the product. Results revealed that the use of sweetpotato flour as main ingredient in selected bakery products was accepted by the cooperators. The reasons given by the cooperators are the following: less sugar is needed in the preparation, hence less costly; the final product can be sold at reduced price; SP flour to the cooperators is 8.00kg. There were no additional costs in maintaining the quality of the processed products where sweetpotato flour was used. Cost of production was reduced due to the reduction in sugar, wheat and cake flour. On the average, the yield of cupcakes increased by 47.5%.The average rate of reduction in sugar, wheat, flour, and cake flour were 13%,49% and 83%, respectively. The result also shows that sweetpotato flour is more accepted as cake flour and can be promoted as substitute for cake flour rather than all- purpose flour. One hundred percent substitution of sp flour in cup cakes gave an additional net return of P112.50/kg.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94566

Pilot production and processing of sweetpotato into flour and bakery products


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, VdR(ed); Orbase, BR; Autos, NB
Selected Research Papers(July 1994-June 1995)2: 167-178(1996)

Abstract:
The effect of using polyethylene bag, plastic sack and combined polyethylene and plastic sack as packaging materials on the storage quality of SP chips was evaluated. Chips from cv UPLSP 5 could be successfully stored for six months using polyethylene plastic bags (0.003 mils) without affecting the physical appearance and original crispiness. Using polyethylene plus muslin cloth, flour UPLSP 5 could be stored for six months without any increase in microbial count. Insect infestation was also checked with these materials. Regardless of flour variety used, the best packaging material for storing flour was polyethylene plus muslin cloth. The sensory attributes of cookies from flour stored for six months were comparable to those from fresh flour. Other bakery products were developed such as chiffon cake, pikam, and SP kisses from stored flour and the products were of good taste and quality .A total of 905.50 kg of SP flour was produced and distributed to cooperators in the market promotion studies.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94567

1994-95 results of variety evaluation under upland partially shaded condition


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, VdR(ed); Lopera, R
Selected Research Papers(July 1994-June 1995)2: 179-195(1996)

Abstract:
The three trials that are reported in this paper confirm previous years' results that there is no possibility for selecting varieties that are specifically adapted to partial shade conditions using existing clonal collections. Selections that were made were the same ones that performed well in the open field trials. However, the yield performance under shade was substantially inferior. There is a need to develop a new set of germplasm before further progress in selecting varieties can be achieved. Polycross seeds that are being produced at AES, Albay Philippines using highly constitute selected parents from diverse genetic backgrounds constitute the initial attempt to respond to this need. The first trial which was at the observational stage had 12 selections from 28 entries. The second and third trials at the replicated stage showed the advantage of improved varieties VSP 6 and 88WS623 over the other entries. However, their yields(5.0 and 4.9t/h, respectively) were very low by open-field standard.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94571

Field evaluation for sweetpotato scab for resistance: progress report


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, VdR(ed)
Selected Research Papers(July 1994-June 1995)2: 95-126(1996)

Abstract:
The scab disease caused by Sphaceloma batatas is a major and a very common problem in the sweetpotato growing areas of the Philippines. Yield loss of 27.8% was reported in plants infected at two weeks after planting and 4.4.% when infection occurred at eight weeks after planting (Wilson, et al, 1988). Sweetpotato varieties differ in their response to scab as demonstrated by several workers. Further scab infection vary among sweetpotato environments. This research projects aims to identify varieties with high resistance to scab for four sweetpotato agroecologies, and establish appropriate procedures for evaluation of scab resistance.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94572

Response of sweetpotato to organic and inorganic fertilizers


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, VdR(ed); Fortuno, ME; Catanay, MB; Grolfo, EB
Selected Research Papers(July 1995-June 1996)2: 44-54(1996)

Abstract:
Two field trials were conducted at the Albay Experiment station, Buang, Tabacco, Albay over two seasons in 1995 to evaluate the effect of different fertilizer treatments on the root yield of four sweetpotato varieties.UPLLSP5,VSP6,88WS623 and V37-151.During dry season, application of 2 tons chicken manure + 30-30-60 kg NPK per hectare gave the highest marketable yield of 28.84 t/ha. The same treatment gave the highest mean yield for total marketable roots of 13.56 t/ha during the wet season.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94568

Yield response of sweetpotato to fertilizer and pesticide application


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, VdR(ed); Fortuno, ME; Catanay, MB; Villamayor, FG, Jr
Selected Research Papers(July 1994-June 1995)2: 159-166(1996)

Abstract:
Two trials were conducted to determine the response of sweetpotato (cv.UPLSP1) to fertilizer and pesticide application. The first trial was conducted in an area previously planted to sweetpotato and corn and lasted for 131 days while the second was conducted in a newly opened cogonal area and harvested at 165 days. The treatments used were: control(A), application of 4t/ha chicken manure equivalent to 110-122-31 kg/ha of N-PO5-K2O (B), same as B plus weekly spraying with insecticide and fungicide(C), same as C plus 30 kg/ha inorganic N applied 30 days after planting (DAP)(D), and same as D plus spraying with Hoagland micronutrient solution 30 DAP (E).Significant differences were observed among the treatments. The marketable yield obtained in tons/ha for the two trials were:A-13.8 and 10.5;B-19.6 and 18.1;C-17.6 and 18.2; D-2.17 and 19.2 and E-24.1 and 21.5, respectively. Among the treatments, weekly spraying with pesticide appeared to be not beneficial at all. In terms of economic benefit, the best treatment to use is treatment E but without weekly spraying. The net income derived form E excluding spraying was about P79,000($3,115.14)for the first trial and P57,000($2,247.63) for the second.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94569

Response of super bureau to varying concentrations of two strains of Azospirillum in Tarlac, Philippines


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, VdR(ed); Aromin, FB; Adion, A; Sebastian, A
Selected Research Papers(July 1994-June 1995)2: 22-30(1996)

Abstract:
To verify initial findings on biofertilizers technology, on-farm trials were conducted for the second straight year to determine the effect of varying concentrations of two strains of Azospirillum(BSS 202 and SP-7) on the growth and yield of cv.super bureau under normal soil and lahar conditions in Tarlac. Super Bureau, the most popular variety in Tarlac at present, was previously reported as weekly responsive to Azospirillum. This study is a continuation of the series of trials on the effect of Azospirillum on sweetpotato production which was initiated in 1992.The growth and yield of Super Bureau was not significantly enhanced by the application of either strains of Azospirillum over the control. Likewise, Azospirillum concentration did not significantly influence these parameters. In all cases, application of inorganic fertilizer produced more vigorous plants and numerically higher yield than the application of Azospirillum, even at the highest concentration. Positive effects of Azospirillum was more visible under conditions of sufficient soil mositure. It was recommended that future trials on the use of Azospirillum should focus on responsive varieties, such as 88WS623,and only in irrigated fields.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94548

Preliminary studies on the physiology, pathology and biochemistry of postharvest deterioration of cassava and sweet potato


Data, ES; Uratani, I; Taniguchi, T; Hirose, S
The Radix 3(2): 8-10(1981)

Abstract:
This is a preliminary investigation on the physiology and biochemistry of postharvest deteriorate of Manihot esculenta and Ipomoea batatas.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94549

weevil infested sweet potato tubers as source of alcohol


Data, ES; Tulin, EE
The Radix 3(2): 5(1981)

Abstract:
This study was conducted to explore the possibility of using weevil infested sweet potato as substrate for alcohol production. Results revealed that tubers with 30-50% weevil infestation produced the highest percentage of soluble solids, followed by the non-infested or control. Tubers with more than 75% infestation gave the lowest value. Moreover, the highest alcohol content was obtained from tubers with 30-50% infestation and lowest in those with more 75% damage.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94551

Proper use of transport materials for root crops to minimize losses


Data, ES; Arrienda, FQ; Estebes, ES
The Radix 3(2): 7-8(1981)

Abstract:
An evaluation of different transport materials in order to minimize losses during transport was conducted. The experiment also aimed to investigate the effectivity of some locally existing materials in minimizing tuber damage during transport. Data on percentage of weight loss of tubers packed in the three containers revealed that the lowest was obtained when kaing was used as transport material, followed by crates and control tubers. Tubers place in sacks exhibited the highest percentage of weight loss. The result indicated the importance of a good choice of transport materials. The use of appropriate transport materials will result in high marketability, long storage life and consequently high income for the farmers.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94552

Sweet potato:its classification and description


Bartolini, PU
Root Crops Digest 1(2): 1-4(1985)

Abstract:
This paper presented the classification and botanical description of sweet potato. Description includes its roots stem leaf, flower, fruit and seeds. This information is very important to understand better the characteristics and behavior of sweet potato.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94553

Optimum planting time for sweet potato under ViSCA conditions


Secreto, AC; Villamayor, FG
The Radix 3(2): 6-7(1985)

Abstract:
This paper focuses mainly on determining the best time to plant such that the data presented were averaged across methods of planting and population densities. Results show that January and February are the best months for planting sweet potato. However, the more interesting question is why sweet potato yields best when planted these months of the year. This is due to sufficient moisture throughout the growing sensor.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94554

Technology for sweet potato production in Southeast Asia


Villanueva, MR
The Radix 7(2): 8-12(1985)

Abstract:
this paper presented the technology for sweet potato production that includes land preparation, preparation of planting materials, planting weeding and cultivation, topping fertilization, crop protection, cropping system and harvesting.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94555

Control of sprout growth in sweet potato roots using diffused sunlight


Data, ES; barcelon, EG
The Radix 7(2): 5-6(1985)

Abstract:
The study aimed to determine whether or not diffused sunlight suppress sprout growth in stored sweet potato roots without adversely affecting quality. Low light intensities resulted in longer sprouts while high intensities suppressed the elongation of sweet root sprouts. The highest sprout growth reduction(99.1%) was noted in VSP-3 roots exposed to 1,430 lux of diffused light. Also, high percentages of sprout reduction were observed in VSP-1 and VSP-2 roots exposed to the highest intensity of diffused light at about 3,415 lux. On the other hand there was no reduction of sprout growth in roots exposed to the lowest light intensity(average of 40 lux).

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 94562

Development of improved field screening methodology for sweet potato scab


Rasco, ET, Jr(ed); Amante, JdR(ed); Gapasin, R; Perez, J
Selected Research Papers(July 1995-June 1996)2: 55-106(1996)

Abstract:
Fields trials in four locations and two years/season in the Philippines were conducted to study the response of sweetpotato varieties to scab disease in conjunction with development of methods for evaluating scab resistance. Analysis of area under the disease progress curve(AUDPC) of varieties common to all environments indicate that there is no variation in the scab pathogen. UDPC values obtained through several data gathering over a growing season were not consistently correlated to mid-and end of season scores for scab resistance. Thus, repeated scoring or scab resistance in a field trial is necessary. High correlation of adjusted scab scores(based on scores of neighboring spreader rows) and unadjusted scores were interpreted to mean that in a typical field with an appropriate spreader row, scab pathogen easily spreads uniformly. A trial was also conducted to test the hypothesis of varietal tolerance to scab, using fungicide sprays to later severity of scab in the trial field. The trial failed to show yield differences in severity of scab, suggesting that the varieties tested are tolerant to scab. The trials further give the following conclusions:1)ROS-DA in Albay Province is the most appropriate place for testing for scab resistance because of climatic conditions(primarily rainfall) that are favorable for scab throughout the year, 2)UPLSP5 is an ideal spreader variety because it is very susceptible to scab, yet continues to grow and produce new leaves even when severely infected.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94607

The uptake of 131I by some hydroponically grown crops


Asprer, GA; Lansangan, LM; dela Paz, LR
The Nucleus 20(1): 90-93(1982)

Abstract:
Biologically labeled vegetables which include kangkong and sweet potato tops were grown hydroponically in a modified Hoagland-Arnon nutrient solution containing radioiodine with 0.5% non-radioactive Nal solution as the medium. The crops considered in this study are commonly eaten y Filipinos. The concentration of the solution as well as the uptake in the plant system were determined at various time intervals. The extent of radioiodine uptake through air-water-plant pathway is one of the parameters needed for calculating the dose that the general populace could be exposed to, due to radioactivity in the environment.

Availability :
Scientific Library and Documentation Center; Philippine Nuclear Research Institute; Commonwealth Avenue




NO. 94627

Variation in plant hormone system


Alejar, AA; Erasga, AB; Fanlue, MB
NCRP (National Research Council of the Philippines) Research Bulletin 40(1): 268-298(1985)

Abstract:
This report presents some preliminary investigation on the levels of ingenous hormone(s) in selected species known to exhibit different ability withstand stress. Analysis of abscisic acid (ABA) and indole acetic acid were carried out on leaves of rice, tobacco and coconut seedlings. Buds from potato tuber with various degree of dormancy was also determined for abscisic acid, indole acetic , gibberellic acid (GA) and cytokinin (CK). Higher levels of abscisic was associated with cultivars of salt rice, drought susceptible tobacco and drought susceptible coconut. There was no difference in the amount of ABA in tungro-susceptible or tungro-resistant rice cultivars. Analysis of IAA showed no definite trend related to or tungro-tolerance in rice. When tissues of rice were exposed to salt or disease stress ABA was observed for the susceptible varieties whilst increased IAA was only observed in the tungro-infected susceptible cultivar. Buds taken from potato tubers 21 days after lifting showed no difference in the ABA and GA content among the different cultivars. However, these value form buds from the two representative short-dormancy-period could contain the least amount of GA and ABA. This same group was also contain the highest IAA content. On the other hand, the long dormancy period gave the highest CK level whilst the medium dormancy period contain the lowest amount of IAA and CK.

Availability :
Ateneo de Manila University




NO. 94648

Protoplast fusion between sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) and African marigold (Tagetes erecta L.)


Belarmino, MM; Sasahara, T
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21(sup. 1): 25 (1996)

Abstract:
Protoplast fusion was conducted between sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) and African Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) to transfer the useful traits of African marigold (e.g. nematode resistance) into sweetpotato. Fusion of stem And petiole protoplast of African marigold was mediated by high molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000). The inter-familiar hybrid characteristic of fusion-derived calli was confirmed by isozyme and DNA analyses. The possibility of using African marigold as a donor of resistance genes for sweetpotato improvement will be presented.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 94661

Kangkong production guide


Maghirang, RG; Rodulfo, GS; Acedera, JL
Kangkong Production Guide Information Bulletin: 159(2000)

Abstract:
The information bulletin contains relevant facts on kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.). Information include uses and nutritional value, production management which discusses varieties, climatic and soil requirements, land preparation, propagation and planting, fertilization, irrigation, pest and disease management, harvesting and seed production.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 94655

Performance of camote (Ipomoea batatas) and gabi (Colocasia esculenta) as alley crops in agroforestry farming system


Baya, WA
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21(sup. 1): 33 (1996)

Abstract:
The growth and yield of camote (Ipomoea batatas) and gabi (Colocasia esculenta) including changes in soil fertility were monitored for a period of three years (1989-92) under alley cropping scheme of agroforestry farming system involving selected multipurpose tree species (MPTS) as hedgerows. The trees used as hedgerows were Flemingia congesta, Gliricidia sepium and Sesbania sesban. The study was conducted at the grassland portion of the University of Eastern Philippines, Catarman, Northern Samar. The split-plot design in RCBD in three replicates was used in laying out the field experiment. Results showed that the species of trees used as hedgerows did not significantly affect the growth and yield of gabi and camote in the first in terms of influence to the growth and yield of gabi and camote. This is followed in descending order by Gliricidia and Sesbania. The significant contribution of each hedgerow species to the nutrient content of the soil particularly OM, P and K is the main reason why each hedgerow had significantly enhanced the growth and yield performance of both the alley crops and the hedgerows themselves mainly through nitrogen fixation and nutrient cycling. Gliricidia exhibited the highest overall fresh weight herbage yield at 84.87 t/ha which did not differ significantly with Flemingia's 81.28 t/ha. Sesbania has 47.66 t/ha. In terms of dry weight herbage yield, Flemingia's 28.58 t/ha significantly outyielded Gliricidia's 21.22 t/ha which in turn significantly differed with Sesbania's 14.30 t/ha.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 94658

Genetic conservation and sustainability of rootcrop production systems in Batanes traditional methods and practices (Progress Report)


Dayo, HF; Labios, JD; Wagan, AM
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21(sup. 1): 44 (1996)

Abstract:
The geophysical and meteorological characteristics of Batanes dictate the kind of crops to be planted, the methods and practices associated with the crops and its implication to sustainability of such production systems. The inhabitants of Batanes are engaged in the production of rootcrops like ubi (Dioscorea alata), tugui (Dioscorea esculenta) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) as their primary crops. Their system of production and utilization of these rootcrops would be of great importance in the development of methods for conservation of biodiversity. The indigenous practices indicate apparent concern and awareness for sustainability and conservation of their genetic resources. Their practice of fallow period is long enough to rejuvenate their resource base. The planting of several varieties in one parcel is another means of conservation and maintenance for their food, feeds for animals and source of planting materials. These practices, thus, promote stability, productivity and sustainability.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 94699

Preliminary phytochemical, microbiological and pharmacological studies of Calonyction muricatum Linn. (Convolvulaceae)


Guevarra, BQ; Solevilla, RC; Ochoa, YO; Santiago, AT; Chuar, JA
Acta Manilana 17(27): 20-35(1978)

Abstract:
Calonyction muricatum, a smooth climbing vine grown in the UST Botanic Garden was found to have anti-fungal and anti-bacterial property as well as analgesic and tranquilizing effect. The biologically active constituents were found more concentrated in the seeds which also contained alkaloids and sterols. Intraperitoneal LD50 of the ethyl alcohol extract, in mice was 1288 +- 156 mg/kg body weight. The crude secondary alkaloid fractions exhibited strong anti-microbial activity. Intraperitoneal LD50 of the crude secondary/tertiary alkaloids in mice was also 490+- 29 mg/kg body weight.

Availability :
Rizal Library-Ateneo de Manila University; Katipunan road, Quezon City; Philippines




NO. 94704

Characterization of sweetpotato feathery mottle virus strains


Palomar, MK; Barsalote, EB; Colis, HSV
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21(sup. 1): 58 (1996)

Abstract:
Two strains of sweetpotato feathery mottle virus (SFMV) found to infect sweetpotato plants in Visayas State College of Agriculture (ViSCA) were characterized based on the following properties: symptoms, transmission, host range, dilution end-point (DIP), thermal inactivation point (TIP), and ageing. The two strains have similar reactions in transmissions studies, TIP, DIP and ageing, but differences were observed in host range studies. Strain # 1 was confirmed to infect only Convolvulaceae, whereas Strain #2 was observed to infect Convolvulaceae and Chenopodiaceae. Symptoms also varied in different hosts when inoculated with two strains of SFMV.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 94709

Variability of early bulking in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam)


Tandang, LL; Carpena, AL; Villareal, RL
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21(sup. 1): 7 (1996)

Abstract:
Parental clones and F1s of a 5x5 diallel cross were evaluated for earliness in root bulking measured as root yield increments at different times of harvest namely 60,90,120 and 150 days after planting (DAP) at Benguet State University (BSU) and the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB)_ during the 1994 WS and 1994-1995 DS. Storage root bulking in sweetpotato carried among the 15 genotypes evaluated in all environments (location-season combination). All of them exhibited high yield increment from 60 to 90 DAP. In BSU, bulking was early and fast during the WS but became slower during the DS probably due to lower temperature and insufficient amount of water available to the plant during the season. In UPLB faster and early bulking was detected during the DS because of high temperature and long exposure of the plant to solar radiation. Higher total root yield during the WS than the DS was produced in BSU while the reverse was observed in UPLB. Binicol, NPSP 48 and UPLSP 1 can be among 15 genotypes evaluated indicates the presence of significant genetic effects.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 94712

Promising potato clones for the hot lowlands


Malab, BS; Bacnat, N
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21(sup. 1): 5 (1996)

Abstract:
Potato can be cultivated in several thousand hectares in the lowlands of the Ilocos Region during the cool dry months. Cultivation in the past, however, was dependent on the quality of seeds tubers produced in the highlands. Lowland farmers tried to produce seeds stored under diffused light at ambient temperature for eight months after harvest in rustic facilities because of lack of appropriate seed cold storage. However, the currently recommended potato varieties for the lowlands are not suited to this type of storage. As part of a strategy to provide alternative sources of seeds, new lowland potato clones and cultivars were evaluated and developed at the MMSU in collaboration with CIP. The evaluation process was done on station and on-farm from 1991-1995. Farmers, researchers from MMSU and CIP, agricultural technologist of DA and other government officials participated in the selection of the clones. The most promising clones were CIP 385130.5, CIP 385130.6, CIP385130.11, CIP385130.77, and CIP385383.1. These clones mature in 75 to 85 days and produce 19.9-21.1 t/ha1- medium to large size tubers. Their tubers have good eating quality and can be process into chips, particularly those of CIP 385130.5 and CIP385130.11. These clones produced higher yields than varieties recommended for the lowlands such as Cosima, Berolina and kenebec. The seeds can be stored in diffused light storage for eight months following farmers rustic condition practices. Collectively, these promising potato clones can be sustain the seed requirements of the lowlands. A new hope for the commercialization of the potato technology in the lowlands is now visible.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 94717

Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi for the control of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in sweetpotato


Gapasin, RM
Philippine Journal of Crop Science 21(sup. 1): 60 (1996)

Abstract:
the inoculation of different concentration of VAM generally increased top weight of sweetpotato which were comparable to those treated with Nemacur ranging from 1.88 - 35.28% over the uninoculated control. Top weight however, was slightly reduced when root-knot nematode (RKN) was added to plants inoculated with VAM. The different treatments did not significantly affect root weight. As VAM concentration was increased, corresponding increase in VAM recovered from roots was observed. However, there was a low recovery of RKN and low number of galls produced from plants as the concentration of VAM was increased. The population density of RKN in roots and the number of galls were lowest in Nemacur-treated plants (1.60 and 10.20, respectively). No significant differences were observed, however. Percent control ranged from 72.82 - 88.64% with Nemacur causing the highest control but was not significantly different from VAM-treated plants.

Availability :
PROSEA Philippines Country Office




NO. 94742

Testing of root crops in special location


Villamayor, FG; Hong, RB
The Radix 8(1): 7-8(1991)

Abstract:
The article aimed to test the performance of recommended varieties of root crops, increase the accessibility of recommended root crops and promote better linkage on root crops research between Philippine Root Crops Research and Training Center (PRCRTC) and other Non-Government Organization's (NGO's). The different varieties of root crops particularly sweet potato performed differently in the different stations and in different years. Positive and significant correlations were observed between the yield of cassava under limed and unlimed conditions. While no significant correlation was observed between cassava grown under open conditions and under coconut and between cassava grown area, irrigated and unirrigated.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 94744

Effect of mixed planting of various parts of the sweet potato vine on yield


Villamayor, FG; Perez, RD
The Radix 10(1&2): 7-9(1988)

Abstract:
The study aimed to determine the effect of pure and mixed planting terminal basal and middle cuttings on the yield of sweet potato. This study confirms the general knowledge that it is best to use terminal cuttings for planting. It recommends, however, that when there is death of apical shoot, the middle or basal cuttings of young or mature plants can be planted alternately in a row.

Availability :
Visayas Coordinated Agricultural Research Program-Leyte State University




NO. 93936

Determinants of productivity among sweet potato farmers in Ifugao


Guimpatan, JA
The Upland Farm Journal 8(1): 24-30(1997)

Abstract:
The demographic determinants to level of productivity are: land use and number of cropping per year. The social determinant include the following: the number of times the respondent listens/reads mass media, assistance of male and female children, doer or first clearing, doer of planting, doer of transport, carrying of produce and doer of marketing the economic determinant is the classification of harvested tubers. Farm practices determinants are: reasons for producing sweet potato, technical assistance, decisions on selection of planting materials and manner of controlling weeds. Tribal determinants include decision making on: what variety to plant, basis for choice of planting materials and manner of preparing land for planting. These predictor variables bear significant relationships to level of productivity but are of low to marked substantial of relationships.

Availability :
Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium; Benguet State University




NO. 93963

Cytotoxic and antitumor screening of Philippine plants (i.e.Barringtonia asiatica and plants collected from alkaloid field survey)


Buenafe, ME
Inventory of Health Researches : 122(1993-1994)

Abstract:
The crude extracts of 32 Philippine plants were subjected to Brine Shrimp Bioassay to test their etiologic activities. LC50 of the extracts were determined. The Brine Shrimp Bioassay was rapid reliable, inexpensive and convinient. The extract found to exhibit biologic activities (Cytotoxic) were Melochia umbellata, Prosopis vidaliana, Ipomoea muricata, Uvaria alba, Commersonia bartronia, Alstonia macrophylla, B. purpura and C. capsularis. Antitumor activity was assayed by the use of Potato Disc bioassay method. Eight (8) out of 27 extacts showed significant tumor inhibiting property. Extracts found to have antitumor activities weere Melochia umbellata, Prosopis vidaliana, Ipomea muricata, Uvaria alba, Commersonia bartronia, Alstonia macrophylla, Caesaria trivalvis and Pandanus pacificus.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 93974

Biological studies of Ipomoea muricata, Convolvulaceae


Ysrael, MC
Inventory of Health Researches : 120(1993-1994)

Abstract:
Reputed anti-inflammatory and antiseptic effects of the seeds prompted an investigation of the anti-inflammatory and antifungal properties of the plant material. The crude extract of the seeds (400 mg/kg BW p.o.) produce a slight inhibition of the carrageenan-induced rat paw-edema in male Sparague-Dawley rats. Over the 6 hour period, the crude extract showed 30% inhibition of area under the time course curve. The phenylpropanoids (including the phenylpropanoid glycosides) were tested against the growth of the plant pathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum. Of the compounds tested, the ethyl ester of caffeic acid and the methyl ester of pcoumaric acid showed activity against the plant fungus with the minimum inhibitory dose of 5 ug. Both compounds also showed activity against the plant pathogenic fungi. Phythium ultimum, Thanatepharus cumeris and Trichoderma viride by the radial growth assay. this is the first antifungal activity to be reported on the plant.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 94038

Sweetpotato and fruit-blended tamarind candy


Almanzor, AS; Tangonan, JG
University of Southern Mindanao R&D Journal 7(1): 24-19(1999)

Abstract:
There were five treatments used in this study: Treatment 1 (1 cup tamarind: 1 cup sweetpotato: 3 cups white sugar: 1 cup native guava puree); Treatment 2 (1 cup tamarind: 1 cup sweetpotato: 3 cups white sugar: 1 cup pineapple puree); Tamarind 3 ( 1 cup tamarind: 1 cup sweetpotato: 3 cups white sugar; 1 cup mango puree); Treatment 5 (1 cup tamarind: 1 cup sweetpotato: 3 cups white sugar: 1 cup muskmelon puree). Twenty selected faculty members and students of the University of Southern Mindanao and Kabacan Pilot Central School were chosen as evaluators. Samples of the product were evaluated according to flavor, taste, and general acceptability. In terms of flavor, Treatment 5 was rated as most pleasing; as for taste, Treatment 4 was rated as very palatable, as to general acceptability, Treatment 5 was rated as most acceptable among all treatments. However, based on the results of the Friedman Two-Way Analysis of Variance, all treatments did not vary significantly.

Availability :
Scientific Literature Services; Research, Extension and Training; Central Luzon State University




NO. 94078

An in vitro study on the antifungal property of kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsskal) on Trichophyton mentagrophyte


Oporto, KC; Pamugas, RL; Patriarca, GAS; Pattugalan, MTM
Inventory of Health Researches : 141-142(1994-1996)

Abstract:
This is an in vitro study on the antifungal properties of Ipomoea aquatica (kangkong) on Trichophyton mentagrophyte. Extracts from the different parts of the plant (buds,stalks,roots and leaves) were obtained using standard extraction procedures. Varying concentrations of the extract (100%,75%,50%,25%) were prepared using ethanol and water as solvents. Miconazole with a 96% potency was used as positive control and Normal Saline Solution was used as negative control. The Agar Disk Diffusion assay was employed to test growth inhibition of Trichophyton mentagrophyte cultures on Saborauds Dextrose Agar and the results showed that Ipomoea aquatica extracts were not effective in inhibiting the growth of Trichophyton mentagrophyte.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 93608

Green manure and NPK effects on the yield of sweetpotato in eroded soil


Sales, CG; Javier, RR
Annals of Tropical Research 2(4): 213-218(1980)

Abstract:
Green manure did not cause any significant effect on most of the yield and yield components of sweetpotato variety BNAS-51, a significant decrease in the number of non-marketable tubers was observed. Highly significant differences among fertilizer treatments were obtained for yields of marketable tubers, total tuber yields, and fresh and dry weights of vines, but not for the number of marketable and non-marketable tubers, total number of tubers per plot and harvest index of sweet potato. The response of tuber and vine yields was attributed to N application. Higher tuber and vine yields were obtained when 60 kg of N with 30 to 60 kg of P and K were applied.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93613

Development of sweetpotato-based fermented beverage


Tan, JD; Forio, EE
Annals of Tropical Research 19(1): 86-100(1997)

Abstract:
The optimum time for fermentation and suitable fermenting container was established for the production of sweetpotato-based fermented beverage. Evaluation of the beverage was done through physicochemical and sensory analyses by trained panelists. The acceptability score in terms of flavor and general acceptability of 8-day fermented beverage was the same as the beverage produced in 12 and 16 days. The beverage that was fermented in glass jars had a fair to good blend of sweet, sour and alcohol taste compared with the beverages fermented in clay and plastic jars. There were comparable amounts of sweetness in flavored and unflavored fermented beverages. In general, the acceptability scores for flavored and unflavored beverages in terms of alcohol amount, sourness, sweetness, flavor and general acceptability were the same. The use of either natural fruit or artificial fruit flavorings or both did not cause any significant differences in the quantification of tastes and their corresponding acceptability scores. Orange-flavored and pineapple-flavored were the most expensive and cheapest fermented beverage, respectively. Unflavored beverage was the cheapest of all the fermented beverages produced.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93614

Development and improvement of sweetpotato pickles


Tan, JD; Forio, EE
Annals of Tropical Research 19(1): 66-77(1997)

Abstract:
The suitability of sweetpotato for pickling was investigated. The use of low salt (LS) and high salt (H) was tried in the curing process. LS was found to be an effective method for curing sweetpotato. This process was further improved by heat and chemical treatments and reduction of curing time from 11 weeks to 6 days was realized. Blanching was found to contribute a profound improvement on the quality of sweetpotato. The starchiness of pickle was greatly reduced through heat treatment before curing. The reduction of curing time still favored the production of relatively higher amount of acid which is necessary for the souring process. The sweet-type Jamaica sweet-mixed and Spread Relish pickles were found to be more acceptable than the sour-type Genuine Dill pickles.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93615

Identification bioassay and evaluation of mycorrhiza for utilization in cassava and sweetpotato production


Palomar, MK; Loreto, FL; Gloria, RP
Annals of Tropical Research 15(1-4): 1-7(1993)

Abstract:
The mycorrhizal fungi observed in various places in Leyte were found in cassava, sweetpotato, legume, vegetable and plantation crops, Gigaspora and Glomus were the most commonly isolated local mycorrhizal genera. Higher infection was noted in cassava (Golden Yellow) than in sweetpotato (BNAS-51). Isolates obtained from cassava cultivar (Colombia) were infective on sweetpotato, with Gigaspora sp. causing the highest infection. The most suitable age of sweetpotato and cassava for inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) was found to be 2 and 3 weeks after planting, respectively. In sweetpotato, root-mycorrhizal association was observed 6 weeks after inoculation while in cassava, it was 4 weeks after inoculation. The use of rhizosphere soil mixed with mycorrhizal spores as inoculum resulted in higher root infection than with the use of spores (in paper) and infected roots.

Availability :
University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Main Library




NO. 93632

Greening for the most virulent Bacillus thuringiensis (berliner) strain against Cylas formicarius Fabr.


Amalin, DM; Aguda, R
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center Southeast Asian and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1992;pp.110-115

Abstract:
An entomogenous bacterium BAcillus thruingiensis Berliner was isolated from weakened sweet potato weevils. Twenty three B.t. strains were further isolated from the liquid suspension of the infected insect sapmles. Out of 23 strains, five crystals protein types were identified such - 1A, Cry IIIX, Cry 1A/Cry ID,Cry 1A/Cry 1B and SDSCPS. Six representative strains containing the five crystal protien types and two other crystal protein types, cry IIIA + Cry IIIX2 , isolated from other insect were tested and compared for virulence level. The bioassay was done in two different tests, dip assay using leaves and chips. The eight strains differed significantly in insecticidal activity. In both assays, crystal protein types SDSCPS1, SDSCPS2, Cry 1A and Cry IIIXI isolated from sweet potato weevil had the least LC values suggesting high level of virulence in SPW as compared to the strains isolated from other insect.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93629

Sweet potato germplasm evaluation in the Philippines in 1991-1992


Gerpacio, MTL; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeaast Asia and the Pacific Region; The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1992;pp.79-89

Abstract:
Sweet potato clones and open pollinated progenies were evaluated at Batac,Ilocos Norte (5 m asl) for root yield, earliness, root dry matter content and shade tolerance. Early high yielding, clones from a trial including 51 clones were NC234 and 440067 (IITA -TIS 3290) at 90 DAP. Seven clones had yields of more than 400 g/palnt at 120 DAP and included 440067 (IITA - TIS 3290) , 44001 (Resisto), VSP-5 (local check), 440087 (NC2395), CL 946-25 440059 (IITA- TIS 1487) and 440092 (NC1525). In a study of shade tolerasnces, BPI-SP2 a local clone namely B002, Lo89. L002, B024, N052, N044, B005, NC628, B012, M014, PNG-134 and NC1135 had more than 100 g/plant yield . Among 32 open pollinated and hydrid progenies evaluated, 490041 (TIS-9101 OP) had the highest yieldat 120 DAP with 558 g/plant Lo36 OP, 490080 (Lanhan OP) , NO20 OP and 490045 (TIS-82/0405 OP ) yielded more than 400 g/plant at 120 DAP. Among introduced clones, seven sweet potato clones had high dry matter content (DM>35%) at 120 DAP and included 440092 (NC1525), PNG-318 420025 (Camote Yuca, BO19 (Chin Mi). B009 (Nuong N-13), 420028 (unknown), NC1508, and NC1135. Sweet potato clones with high dry matter content under shade were L089, N044, M014 N020, Waveto, D-3, L066, L098, and DC-6 with more than 30% dry matter while among the progenies, 490041 (TIS-9101 OP), L036 OP, 490080 (Lanhan OP), N020 OP, N044 OP, 490028 (TIS- 9265 OP), L081 OP, L033 OP, Kinakabakab OP, 490087 (Lafalafa OP). CL-946-25, CN 1306 OP, and L032 OP had high dry matter content.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93633

Genetic variation in two local population of the sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius fabr. (coleoptera:curculaionidae)


De castro, MC; BArrion, AA; Baculod, PA; Amalin, DM
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center Southeast Asia and the Pacific Reginal Office;1099 Manila Philippines;1992;pp.116-125

Abstract:
Investigation of karyotpe and 3 enzymes, ie. esterase (est), acid phosphatase (AcPh) and alkaline phosphate (AlPh) of sweet potato weevils collected in two different locations, Batac, Ilocos NOrte and Los Baños Laguna revealed that the two populations had similar karyotype formula although some differences were detected in chromosomal behavior during diakinesis. The enzymes est and AcPh were found dimorphic with 3 phenotypes. Differences in frequency of occurrence of phenotypes in both populations was found to be significant at 5% level for AlPh but not for est, indicating that genetic differentation may have occured in both populations.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93630

Heritability estimates in sweet potatoes


Gerpacio, MTL; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1992;pp.90-101

Abstract:
Local sweet potato clones and their respective open pollinated offspring were evaluated in 5 experiments over a period of 3 years to estimate correlations and hertabilities (h2) of root characters: yields, number , size and dry matter and root damage by the weevil (Cylas formicarius). Correlations between root size and root yield were positive and significant, ranging from 0.376 to 0.934; whereas root dry matter content was negatively correlated with root yield with correlations ranging from -0.242 to -0.384. Significant rank correlations for root yield between parents and offspring were found and these ranged from 0.47 to 0.63. narrow sense heritabilitiesranged from 0.113 to 0.750 for root yield: 0.029 to 0.723 for root number per plant ; 0.037 to 0.746 for root size and; 0.259 to 0.490 for root dry matter content. Heritabilities for root damage were 0.271 and 0.393 (by number and by weight) in the selected weevil resistant clones and lower in the randomly chosen clones (h2= 0.130 +- 119 and 0.065 +-120 respectively). Higher heritabilities may be the result of high frequency of genes controlling resistance. The results indicates that progress in selection for weevill resistance, dry matter content, root yild may be possible where selected sweet potatoes for the haracteristic involved are utilized in breeding.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93631

Determination of dry matter content in sweet potato storage root


O¤a, CL; Chujoy, E
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia And the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1992;pp.102-109

Abstract:
Results indicated no significant difference in dry matter (DM) of root samples obtained from either longitudinal or transversal cuts. Using the transversal cut, the root was divided in to proximal, middle and distal portions. Although DM was lower in the middle portion and no significant difference in DM was observed berween the proximal and distal portions of the transversal cut, the standard errors for the three portions of the transversal cut, the standard errors for the three portions were of comparable magnitude. For easiness to handle large of roots, slices from from the middle portion transversal cut could be utilized in sampling and DM results should be comparable to that obtained using slices from the middle of a longitudinal cut. Both the 50 and 100 g samples had compared standadr errors across varieties and could be alternatively utilized in sampling. The small 10 g sample size was not satisfactory because the large standard errorassociated with it A comparison of standard error indicates that longitudinal cut and 100 g sample followed by transversal cut and 100 g sample can be considered the best methods in determining the dry matter content of sweet potato roots. Significant in root DM content were observe among five sweet potato varieties. The highest DM was found in the yellow flesh variety Miracle-Dingras (ranging from 34.7 to 35.4%); followed by the cream flesh, Bureau (29.6 to 29.8%); the white flesh,BPI-SP2 (22.2 to 22.6%); the pale yellow flesh, VSP-6 (20.4 to 20.6%) and the least by the orange flesh VSP-1 (19.26 to 20.4%).

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93634

Selection for resistance to the sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius fabr.


Amalin, DM; Chujoy, E; Gerpacio, MTL
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office;1099 Manila,Philippines;1992;pp.126-138

Abstract:
A scheme to screen sweet potato germplasm for resistanse to the weevil Cylas formicarius consisted of four steps. Step I or initial elimination is a field screening of test clones in observation plots with no replications. Step II or second elimination trial involves a no choice test, of clones selected in step I, either under laboratory or greenhouse conditions, arranged in an experimental design with replications. Step III or the advanced trial is the field screening of clones selected inStep II. WE find this scheme to be fast and a cheaper way to screen a large number of clones. Morover ,in Step III a relatively large number of replications can be accommodated such that incosistency of resistance result among replications or among plots can be checked. To avoid pseudo-resistances a standard evaluation of resistance is very necessary, specifically in a multilocational trial. The resistance rating procedure must be flexible to check the effect of the varying levels of the insect pest populations. This could be done by using a correction factor in the rating scale, such as the standard deviation.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 94222

Promising potato clones for the lowlands


Malab, BS; Atis, MI; Malab, SC; Muyco, R; Chujoy, E
Agriculture in the Ilocos 1: 51-62(1999)

Abstract:
As a part of strategy to provide alternative sources of seeds, new lowland potato clones were evaluated and developed at the Mariano Marcos State University in collaboration with the International Potato Center. The most promising clones were CIP 385130.5,CIP385130.6,CIP385130.11,CIP385130.77 and CIP385383.1.These clones mature in 75 to 85 days and produce 19.9-21.1 h ha-1 medium to large size tubers. Their tubers have good eating quality and could be processed into chips, particularly those of CIP 385130.5 and CIP385130.11.These clones produce higher yields than the varieties recommended for the lowlands such as Cosima, Berolusa and Kenebec. The seeds can be stored in diffused light storage for eight months following farmers rustic storage practices. Collectively, these promising potato clones can sustain the seed requirements of the lowlands.

Availability :
Ilocos Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Mariano Marcos State University




NO. 94246

An antibacterial and analgesic drug material from tonkin


Exconde, NC; Guevara, BQ; Lerma, JV; Nonato, MG; Sibulo, M; Slevilla, RC; Songco, LV
Inventory of Health Researches : 109(1992-1993)

Abstract:
Tonkin seeds are obtained from a plant botanically identified as Ipomoea muricata L. Jacq.(Convolvulaceae). Our studies on the seeds were aimed at a scientific rationalization of its reputed use as an antibacterial and analgesic; and to develop this drug material into an acceptable product that, hopefully will be available as an over-the-counter drug preparation, affordable to the vast majority of our people. Two antibacterial agents were isolated from the ethyl soluble fraction of the seed extract. The indolizidine alkaloidal ipomine,ipalbidine,ipalbine and ipalbinium were also isolated from the seeds. Ipalbidine has also been isolated from I.harowikii by Liu et al. Microbiological studies show that the crude ethanol extract of I. muricata seeds were active against S.aureus, B.subtilis and Myobacterium 607. Basic toxicological and pharmacological studies show that the crude ethanolic extract of the seed has an LD50 of 1100 mg/kg body weight of mice when administered intraperitoneally. The LD30 of the orally given drug was 7810mg/kg body weight. Analgesia was observe at dose levels of 630 and 2500 mg/kg body weight. The crude ethanolic extract of the seeds was found to be antimutagenic to mice at dose levels of 50-250 mg/kg body weight but could be mutagenic at 500 and 2500 mg/kg body weight following the micronucleus test. Different drug formulations of the seed extract were prepared for limited clinical trials. A glycerol preparation of the ethanolic extract was found to be effective against bacterial pharyngitis. Studies on the 10% ointment preparation indicated this to be highly effective against some skin ailments particularly those of the allergic type of dermatitis, open wounds, burns and boils. The coconut oil preparation from the ground seeds, as well as used traditionally for skin ailments and burns, as found to be just as effective and acceptable as the ointment. In effect, the above studies show that Tonkin seeds gave antibacterial and analgesic principles for therapeutic use.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Health Research and Development; Department of Science and Technology




NO. 95145

The feeding value of camote (Ipomoea batatas (Linn)Poir) for early weaned pigs


Kartiarso; Alcantara, PF
Proceedings; Philippine Society of Animal Science 17th Annual Convention; Philippine International Convention Center, Manila; 21-22 November 1980; The Philippine Society of Animal Science, College, Laguna; 1980; Alcantara PF, Arga¤osa VG; Oliveros BA, Zamora RG (eds) p.11

Abstract:
Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the feeding value of camote for early weaned pigs. Experiment 1 used 20 crossbred weanling pigs weaned at 21 days old. The pigs were randomly alloted into four treatments in a completely randomized design. The energy in treatment 1 (control) was provided by corn whereas those in treatments 2, 3 and 4 were provided by cooked camote, dried camote and enzyme predigested camote respectively. Results of the experiment indicated no significant differences between treatments in feed efficiency, feed intake and daily gain in weight of pigs indicating that camote can replace corn in the diet of early weaned pigs.

Availability :
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 95161

Extruded mixture of sweet potato and copra meal as partial direct replacement of corn in swine diet


Roxas, DB; ES, Luis; Agbisit, AM, Jr.; Ramos, SM; Navida, JA; Baconawa, ET; Baladad, AE
Proceedings; Philippine Society of Animal Science 35th Annual Convention; Recent Developments in Animal Production - 1998; Philippine International Convention Center, Manila; 15-16 October 1998; The Philippine Society of Animal Science, College, Laguna; 1998; Sarabia AS, Lihat TS(eds) p.91

Abstract:
A total of 18 growing pigs (Landrace X Yolkshire cross) were fed starter diet from weaning (12kg) to 20 kg, and grower diet from 20-40kg. Thereafter, the pigs were housed in individual pens and dsitributed at random to three treatments, following a completely randomized design. The treatments were: Tr 1-grower and finisher diets without extruded mixture of sweet potato and copra meal (ESPCM) (control); Tr 2-grower and finisher diets with 20% of corn replaced with ESPCM. The pigs were fed with grower diets from 40-60 kg, and finisher diets from 60-80kg for 50 days. Results indicate that ESPCM can replace up to 30% of corn in grower diets without significant depression in feed intake, live weight gain and feed efficiency. Feed efficiency was slightly better on pigs recieving the highest amount of ESPCM. The dressing percentage was not affected by feeding of ESPCM to swine. The backfat thickness and loin eye area did not differ among the treatments considered. In terms of general acceptability, the meat were all rated favorable.

Availability :
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 95325

New sweet potato variety


Abaquita; Aala
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PACRRD) Highlights '98; PCARRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; 1999; Joven, JEA(ed); p.13

Abstract:
The NSIC released for commercial planting, PSB Sp20 locally known as LG 19A-10. This new variety was developed through polycross technique. The variety has a mean root yield of 11.08 t/ha across the nine NCT locations throughout the country. The long elliptic roots have red skin and light yellow flesh with dry matter yield of 31.95%, 51.80% starch, 4.20% protein, 6.13% sugar (dry weight basis), and a moderate taste acceptability rating of 7.20.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 95256

New products from cassava and sweet potato


Palomar, LS; Abit, MEM; Atok, DD; Fontanosa, EV
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights ' 96; Lorica, MV; Cabangbang, MVDF (eds); Los Baños, Laguna, PCARRD, 1997; p 21-23

Abstract:
New products from cassava and sweetpotato. Palomar et al. (VISCA) developed two new products from cassava and sweetpotato. The technology is recommended to all interested bakeries/processors which have access to raw materials such as cassava flour or fresh cassava and sweetpotato.|These products are the, "kabkab" and "kamoreal". Kabkab is a traditonal puff production from cassava which is cream to light brown and is usually eaten with syrup as topping. It can be enriched with 10% peanut or mungbean without affecting its sensory qualities. Also, protein content can be increased from 3% to 6%. Kabkab can be processed by using a bottle or rolling pin in spreading and flattening. This method can produce 79 to 80 sheets per hour, while hand spreading can only produce 14.5 sheets per hour. The fabricated steamer can cook 104 sheets per hour, while traditional balancing can produce only 47 sheets per hour. Drying of steamed sheets of kabkab is shorter than those cooked by blanching.|Another new product is kamoreal, a flat/rectangular-shaped sweetpotato candy mixed with ground peanuts. This improved form of stick candles reduces packing time from the wrapping of individual sticks to those of small blocks.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 95516

Response of two varieties of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) to agrowell fertilization


Dagulo, ER; Franje, HM
CMU Journal of Science 7(1): 100-101(1994)

Abstract:
The study was conducted to find out the effect of Agrowell foliar fertilizer on the growth and yield performance of sweet potato, to evaluate which variety of sweet potato would respond to Agrowell foliar fertilization, to compare the effect of two sources of fertilizers on the production cost of sweet potato and to determine which treatment would give the least production cost but maximum net return per peso invested. The experiment was set-up in a Randomized Complete Block Desigb in split-plot arrangement with variety as the main plot and agro-well fertilization as the sub-plot. There were four replications. The results revealed a significant response of the two varieties of sweet potato to Agro-well fertilization. A highly significant differences in the number of days to flower was exhibited by the two varieties. VSP3 significantly flowered very early (55.62 DAP) when compared to VSP6 (61.62 DAP). The results also showed that F3 significantly influenced early date to flower (52.50 DAP), while the application of Agrowell yellow (F2) significantly delayed flowering.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 95515

Comparative study of progressive and single harvesting methods on the agronomic traits, yield components and yield of three sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [Poir]) varieties


Talle, FS; Pava, HM
CMU Journal of Science 7(1): 99(1994)

Abstract:
The study was conducted with the following objectives: a)to compare the effect of two methods of harvesting on the agronomic traits, yield components and yield of three sweet potato varieties (C-No.7-21, VSP1 and RD-1382-6); b) to determine the yield components and yield of three sweet potato varieties employing the two methods of harvesting; c)to determine which of the three varieties of sweet potatoes will fit in both methods of harvesting; and C0to analyze the cost and return of two methods of harvesting and the three sweet potato varieties. The results revelaed that the two methods of harvsting sweet potato did not vary significantly on the avearge length and diameter of roots, average weight of non-marketable roots and percent roots infested by weevils. On the other hand, progressive harvesting was statistically higher than single harvesting on the average length of vines, average number and weight og marketable roots and average roots infested by weevils. Progressive harvesting obtained a mean yield of 27.15 tons per hectare while single harvesting had 17.26 tons per hectare in a period of six months and 23 days.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 95528

Evaluation of ten varieties of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) against the Root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood)


Carandang, JA; Alovera, RB
CMU Journal of Science 7(1): 110-111(1994)

Abstract:
The response of ten sweet potato cultivars were tested against root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne incognita in field and laboratory conditions. The different cultivars used were: 20-944, RD-13-82-6, 15-70, ACC#35,UPL-Sp1,ACC#30,ACC#9,ACC#32,VSP-6 and C-No.5. Highly significant differences among varieties were observed as indicated by the number of galls and egg masses produced. RD-13-82-6 showed a highly resistant reaction to M.incognita. The other entires were moderately susceptible. A significant interaction between varieties and treatments was noted on marketable tubers. However, no significant difference was observed on non-marketable tubers. The mean neamtode population did not bvary statistically among varieties,.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 95493

Influence of legume intercrops on the production of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Poi.)


Carandang, JJA; Curayag, LJ
CMU Journal of Science 7(1): 79-80(1994)

Abstract:
The specific objectives of the study were the following: 1) compare the agronomic traits of bush sitao and soybean under different intercropping patterns with sweet potato; 2) to evaluate the performance of sweet potato grown under pure and mixed cropping patterns and 3) to determine the appropriate pattern of intercropping legumes with sweet potato. This experiment was conducted by using a simple Randomized Complete Block Design. The five treatments were arranged at random in each block. The results revealed that the agronomic performance of the legume intercrop planted under single and double rows between the rows of sweet potato did not vary signficantly in terms of plant height at harvest, air-dry matter yield and grain yield except for the air-dry matter yield of bush sitao. The double row planting of bush sitao between rows of sweet potato obtained a signficantly higher air-dry matter yield compred to those of the single row planting. The agronomic performance of sweet potato showed that the length of the vines and the number of non-marketable and marketable roots under the different cropping systems did not vary signficantly. The yield performance of the main crop, however, suggested that double row planting of either bush sitao or soybean intercrop tended to affect root production in sweet potato.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 95607

New rootcrops varieties/cultivars


National Seed Institute Council (formerly Philippine Seedboard)

Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights '97;PCARRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines;1998;167p.;Malicsi, LC and Joven, JEA (eds);pp.24-26

Abstract:
One variety of yam or ubi and two varieties each of white potato, cassava and sweet potato wer recommended and approved for release by the NSIC technical committee in 1997 after several trials across different regions. These are the following:1)White Potato - BSU-Po3(LBR1-5) and BSU-Po4 (1-1085);2)Sweet Potato - UPL Sp-10 (G46-1a) and LG 19A-10; 3) Cassava -PSB Cv-13 (CMP 62-15) and PSB cv (CMP 21-15); and 4)Greater yam (ubi) - PSB Vu-5 (LA-153).

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 93269

Evaluation of screening methodologies for resistance to sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicaricus Fabr.


Amalia, DM; Vander Zaag, P
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila,Philppines;1990;pp.109-114

Abstract:
This research was conducted to determine the best screening methodology for evaluating resistance to C. formicarius for sweet potato storage roots. Three different media: no soil,dru soil adn wet soil were evaluated with four cultivars of sweet potato. There was a signinficant difference in weevil counts and damage were recorded in the no soil technique and least in wet soil treatment. The reaction of the different cultivars to weevil attack was also significantly different. The cultivar performance could be ranked as follows: Sinuksuk+Miracle
Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 93283

Control of sweet potato weevil; an integrated pest management approach


Amalin, DM; O¤a, CL; Chujoy, E.
The Potato and Sweet Potato in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Region;The International Potato Center;Southeast Asia and the Pacific Regional Office; 1099 Manila, Philippines;1991;pp.108-111

Abstract:
Among fourteen treatments designed to control the sweet potato weevil in field tests; four were selected ie. insecticide application; insecticide, biocontrol, hilling-up and sex phermone. They resulted in the least weevil damage in the roots of sweet potato. Additional experiment will be conducted based on the four selected treatments.

Availability :
Postharvest Horticulture Training and Research Center Library, University of the Philippines at Los Baños




NO. 95784

Studies on Azospirillium as bio-fertilizer for potted sweet potato in volcanic ash-laden soil


Lopez, PJS; Santos, TS; Rasco, ET, Jr.
Philippine Journal of Biotechnology 7(1): 35-48(1996)

Abstract:
Studies on the various factors that can affect sweet potato response to Azospirillium inoculation show the following trends: Isolates. BSs 202 and Sp7 are better than BSs8 and isolate XII. BSs 202 may be useful in less fertile soils such as in volcanic ash while Sp7 is probably suited to a wider range of soil conditions. Variety. Sweet potato varieties can be classified into three categories based on their response to the effective isolate BSs 202: strongly responsive, weakly responsive and unresponsive. Characteristics associated with each response are described and varieties falling under each category enumerated. UPLSP 1 and 88WS623 are classified as highly responsive. Method of inoculation. Both dipping of cutting in Azospirillium-carrier water suspension before planting and direct application of the Azospirillium-carrier to the soil are effective depending on the desired response and variety. Responses documented are interpreted as dosage effects with implications on modes of action of Azospirillium.

Availability :
Forest Products Research and Development Institute, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 95792

Socio-economic characterization of farm cooperators for CARP-ISF community-based agroforestry livelihood r & d project in Region XI


Balmocena, BJ
Abstracts of Researches on Environment and Natural Resources in Region XI; Ecosystems Research and Development Service, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region XI, Davao City; 1999,pp.18-19

Abstract:
Seventy-three (73) farmer cooperators of the CARP-ISF Community-based Agroforestry Livelihood R & D Project were interviewed. Fifty % (50%) of the farmer cooperators belongs to 40-59 years old, while 38.36% belongs to 20-39 years old. AS to the number of years of farm occupancy, 45% had occupied the area from 1-10 years. These farmers are Leyte¤o, Mandaya, Cebuano, Boholano, Ilongo, Surigaonon, Bawa, Diangan and Bagobo. The biggest group is Cebuano comprising 47%. The main source of income is farming. Other sources of income include labor,sales from tuba, carpentry, firewood gathering amd broom making. Major crops planted in the farm include coffee, coconut, banana corn cassava, cacao, gabi, camote, peanuts and vegetables. Farmers conduct plowing harrowing on soil tillage as a land preparation prior to planting of agricultural crops. Drought occurs in the project site which resulted to high mortality of seedlings. Landslide occurs in farms along gullies devoid of vegetation. The best means of communication for the sites is thru radio.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 96617

Evaluation of sweet potato AVRDC varieties under Philippine condition


Eusebio, DE
The Southern Tagalog Agriculture Journal 3: 2-9 (1985)

Abstract:
Four studies were conducted at Economic Garden as follows: 1) Sweet potato germplasm collection, one hundred sixty (160) local and foreign sweet potato cultivars/accessions and lines are maintained in the station. For PYT (Set I), only one entry (CI 946-30) among 16 entries planted with marketable yield of 7.4 tons/ha surpassed the yield of BNAS (check) with 7.2 t/ha but was not significantly different. On the other hand, PYT (Set II) with 23 entries showed seven promising entries namely: CI 693-9, CI 949-1, CI 951-6 and CI-690-18 showed no significant differences at 5% and 1% over BNAS (check) in terms of marketable root yield. It is noteworthy that the highest yielder (CI 693-9) which consistently performed well in the regional trial was approved by the Philippine Seed Board in June 1985 and named BPI-Sp2 for release in commercial production. Lastly, under weevil resistance study, ten varieties significantly outyielded the BNAS (check). However, only one of these ten proved to be moderately resistant to weevil. The rest are all susceptible.

Availability :
Bureau of Plant Industry-Los Baños National Crop Research and Development Center (BPI-LBNCRDC), Reading Room; Economic Garden, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines




NO. 95976

Effects of vegetative cover on runoff and soil loss in Benguet


Colting, RD
Abstract of Research on Environment and Natural Resources in the Cordillera Region; Department of Environment and Natural Resources,Cordillera Administrative Region; Ramos,HC(ed); (undated); La Trinidad,Benguet,Philippines; pp.21

Abstract:
Effects of vegetative cover on runoff and soil loss were studied at the MSAC-PTRI experimental area in La Trinidad, Benguet using the following covercrops:winged bean, stylo, centro, star grass, para grass, para grasss + stylo mixture and sweet potato. There were ten treatments including the control. Results showed that percent vegetative cover is inversely related to soil loss. It was alo observed that sweet potato is the most effective among the vegetative covers tested in preventing runoff and soil loss.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau; Forestry Campus




NO. 25594

Production of high fructose syrup from 'Gendut' Sweet Potato starch


Hasnah, H; Mamot, S; Osman, H; Hanif, MJ
School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology; University Kebangsaan Malaysia; Bangi; Selangor

Proceedings of 12th. National Biotechnology Seminar; Perak; 12-15 November 2000; p403-405

Abstract:
The present study is to explore the possibility of converting Gendut sweet potato starch to high fructuse syrup and also to determine the physicochemical properties of the starch in Gendut. Gendut sweet potato starch contains the same chemical compositions and physical properties as those of other varieties of sweet potatoes. Gendut starch has shown potential as an alternative raw material for HFS production.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 25893

Characterisation of the local sweet potato starch for pharmaceutical application


Widodo, RT; Hashim, H
Department of Pharmacy;Faculty of Medicine;University of Malaya; 50603 Kuala Lumpur

Towards Modernisation of Research and Technology in Herbal Industries; Proceedings of the Seminar on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants; 24-25 July 2001; p227

Abstract:
Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a creeping plant of the family Convolvulaceae. It is cultivated in more than 90 countries and is mainly consumed as food and animal feed. In some countries such as Japan, Korea and Indonesia, sweet potato starch is used as the raw material for the production of alcohol. The utilisation of sweet potato starch for pharmaceutical application, particularly in tablet manufacture, has not been widely investigated. This paper discusses the potential of the local sweet potatom as a tablet excipient. Starch from the local sweet potato tuber was extracted, isolated, pregelatinised and dried. Experimental tests such as microscopic analysis, acidity, loss on drying, gelatinisation temperature, bulk density, true density,porosity,mean particle diameter, flow rate,angle of repose and swelling properties were conducted to characterise its physicochemical properties. It was found that sweet potato starch, pregelatinised at 40ºC, showed increase in swelling properties thus,presenting a better disintegrant activity compared to its original form.

Availability :
Forest Research Institute Malaysia




NO. 96403

Extruded mixture of sweetpotato and copra meal (ESPCM) as substitute for corn in swine diet


Faylon, PS; Lanting, EF; Joven, JEA
R&D Milestones: Livestock 2 43-44 (2002)

Abstract:
In the Philippines, sweetpotato and copra meal are easily available and abundant, unlike corn which feedmillers import. Local raisers adopt corn-based diets for swine feeding. But due to high cost of feeds in the market, locally available feedstuffs like sweetpotato and copra meal must be tapped as substitute for corn. The use of ESPCM as partial direct replacement of corn in swine diet had been proven technically and economically feasible.|Extrusion is a mechanical/thermal energy method of cooking and expanding raw material into more digestible and palatable feed ingridient. Extrusion is done to provide optimum nutritional benefits. ESPCM is composed of 70% sweetpotato and 30% copra meal that can partially replace 20-30% of corn in the ration.|The proximate analysis of ESPCM is 91.14% dry matter, 7.95% crude protein, 6.65% crude fiber, and 6.78% ether extract. Mineral analysis shows 0.24% calcium and 0.26% phosphorus.|The technology can be used especially in areas where copra and sweetpotato are abundant.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Library




NO. 96379

Protein-enrichment of sweetpotato for broiler feed


Demo-os, RA; Valdez, MTSJ; Mapili, Jr, MC
CLARRDEC Best R&D Papers 1999-2001 [Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium] 31-45 (2002)

Abstract:
In terms of hectarage and production figures, sweetpotato and cassava are the most widely produced root crops in the Philippines. There is no problem in the utilization of the edible portions of these root crops for foods or for feeds because of excellent product development. In fact, their use as animal feed is now being widely recognized because the roots may either be fed to farm animals raw or cooked.|In the processing of these root crops, however, waste products such as pulp or fiber are generated. The disposal of these wastes presents a problem to processors as these pose pollution risk to the environment. Moreover they are very low in digestible nutrients and therefore, their use even as feed to animals is limited.|Dr. C.B. Pham of BIOTECH, UPLB pioneered the development of a technology on protein enrichment of cassava and cassava by-products, banana peelings and other agricultural wastes for utlization as animal feed. Results of his team's research were very promising, as protein in fermented cassava increased to 28-30% (dry weight) and the amino acid profile showed an increase in both the essential and non-essential amino acids particularly lysine and methionine. They observed an increase of these amino acids from 12.6 and 3.0 mg/100 g in raw cassava meat to 198.51 and 76.17 mg/100 in fermented cassava meat, respectively. The technology, however, was developed on a laboratory scale.|This research was conceived to look into the farm level application of the technology using sweetpotato pulp. If the potential problems in the adoption of the technology at farm level can be identified, the eventual commercialization of the process will be hastened and, therefore the waste disposal problem of starch processing plants in the country will be minimized if not totally eliminated. Moreover, the availability of an inexpensive high-protein feedstuff would result in marked reduction of feed costs.

Availability :
Consortia Operations Office, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 96380

Production and utilization of pathogen-tested sweetpotato seedpieces


Laranang, LB; Navarro, TE
CLARRDEC Best R&D Papers 1999-2001 [Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium] 45-59 (2002)

Abstract:
In the Philippine Medium Term Plan Agricultural Development Plan of the Department of Agriculture, sweetpotato fails under the Key Commercial Crop Development Program (KCCDP) and is a priority crop in four regions, among which is Central Luzon. One of the major components of the program is the production and distribution of quality planting materials.|While Central Luzon is traditionally the main sweetpotato supplier in Metro Manila, recently added demand has come from the sweetpotato starch factories in Pangasinan with combined daily requirement of 170 tons of storage roots. However, productive potential of this crop is limited by the scarcity of good quality planting materials and the incidence of a serious disease locally known as "camote kulot". This disease which was identified by Jayasinghe and Laranang (1999) as a virus complex is one big concern of the industry in the region. The disease has been causing yield losses of more than 50% due to the use of infected planting materials (Villamayor, 1996; Bajet and Pamulaklakin, 1995). The disease has been reported to be present in almost all sweetpotato fields in Central Luzon. Healthy looking plants sampled in Paniqui, Tarlac were serologically tested positive of the virus (Bajet and Villegas, 1992). This clearly illustrates masking of symptoms of the disease further complicates the problem on selection of disease-free planting materials in the field.|Since the outbreak of the disease in 1991, farmers from Tarlac are hesitant to propagate their own planting materials and they had to depend from the nearby province of Bataan for their planting material requirements (Data et al 1997). While planting materials from Bataan are perceived by farmers to be of good quality, resulting plants are infected by the disease as early as the first week after planting (Laranang, 1999). Therefore, clean planting materilas should be used to avoid perpetuation of the disease and improve the productivity of the crop. To assure the availability of clean sweetpotato planting materials to the farmers is one of the major concerns of the project.

Availability :
Consortia Operations Office, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 96428

Pathogen-tested sweetpotato planting materials


Faylon, PS; Lopez, EL; Joven, JEA
R & D Milestones: Crops 3: 148-149 (2002)

Abstract:
Central Luzon is the main supplier of sweetpotato in Metro Manila. However, the incidence of a serious disease commonly known as 'kamote kulot' limited the production of the crop . His virus complex was reported to be present in almost all sweetpotato fields in Central Luzon and resulted in yield losses of more than 50% due to the use of infected planting materials.|To increase the yield and income of farmers by reducing the incidence and severity of 'kamote kulot' disease, a procedure for the production of pathogen-tested tissue-cultured (PTTC) sweetpotato seedpieces was established. The technology involves a combination of thermotherapy and meristem culture, tissue culture, and rapid multiplication in net houses and multiplication farms to produce PTTC sweetpotato. Following the procedure, PTTC sweetpotato seedpieces from VSP6 or super bureau variety were produced.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Library




NO. 96471

On-farm verification of the POTs for sweetpotato in lahar-and-ash-laden areas


Valdez, JA; Baquiran, JM; Navarro, TE; Molina, EC
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 22: 26-41 (2000-2001)

Abstract:
Due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, the agricultural lands around its vicinity became unproductive. For this, several researches were conducted to restore the productivity of the soil. These researches were fortunate to obtain good results on several crops especially rootcrops.|Rootcrops are priority crops of Region 3 and of great commercial value in terms of their starch content. Cultural practices found to be effective under ash and lahar-laden areas need to be verified and constraints that maybe possible in the adoption of the technologies should be identified so as to develop alternative ways. Very few attemps have been made to generate rootcrop production technologies in ash-/lahar-laden areas due to financial constraints. Efforts aimed at packaging production technologies in lahar and ash-laden areas for new rootcrop varieties should therefore be adequately supported. Hence, this project.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96478

Sweetpotato starch production in Central Luzon


Aguilar, CJ
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 20: 20-25 (1997-1998)

Abstract:
Industrial processing of sweetpotato has been developed in Central Luzon. Two Korean starch plants were established in Pangasinan utilizing sweetpotato roots for noodles production and for export to Korea. These processing plants served as a new market venue for sweetpotato farmers in Tarlac. Capacity of the plants ranged from 10-20 tons per day requiring around 3800-5000 heactres planted with sweetpotato with an expected yield of 15-18 tons per hectare to supply its regular yearly operation.|Prices of sweetpotato varied significantly from the fresh market. Guaranteed price offered by one of the starch plants ranged from P1.50-P2.00 per kg. while the other is from P2.0-P6.0/kg. During the peak season, the prices offered are higher.|Supply of sweetpotato during this processing season mainly came from cooperatives in Tarlac via the Pangasinan Federation of Cooperatives being the official facilitator of supply to the starch plants. Production per hectare ranged from only 10-15 tons per hectare which can not cope with the demand of the two plants as well as the fresh market.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96474

Production of high-protein broiler feeds from root crops through microbial fermentation


Valdez, MTSJ; Tandoc, MG
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 21: 25-33 (1998-1999)

Abstract:
This research work was conducted to produce and evaluate the nutrient composition of fermented sweet potato, taro and cassava as broiler feeds; assess the growth performance and feed conversion efficiency of broilers fed with 10 per cent fermented rootcrop; and evaluate the cost efficiency of using these high-protein feeds.|Dried sweetpotato and cassava tubers and taro corms were separately ground and mized with a nutrient solution composed of urea, ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulfate, sucrose and vinegar to obtain the fermentable substrate. This substrate was sterilized in an autoclave, allowed to cool, and inoculated with either of two strains of fungi namely Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oligosporus. Inoculated substrates were allowed to ferment for two weeks, after which they were harvested and sundried to eliminate the odorous gaseous metabolites. Samples were taken and subjected to proximate analysis at the Animal Nutrition Analytical Service Laboratory, UPLB. The fermented or protein-enriched rootcrops were incorporated in broiler rations as 10 per cent replacements and test-fed using 84 seven-week old chicks. Broiler performance was evaluated in terms of weight gain and feed conversions efficiency. The feed cost per kilogram of broiler produced was also calculated.|Results of the study showed that the poor feeding values of sweetpotato, cassava and taro were significantly improved by fermentation using either A.niger or R.oligosporus. Increases in crude protein contents were as much as twelve-folds. Likewise, improvement in crude fat or ether extract, and ash were also noted. On the other hand, crude fiber and nitrogen-free extract decreased after fermentation. The suitability of utilizing the high-protein feeds in broiler rations was evidenced by the fact that broilers on test diets performed comparably well as those in the control lot. They exhibited similar weight responses and efficiency of feed utilization. Utilization of the high-protein fermented feeds proved more cost-efficient resulting in some amount of savings on feed costs.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96481

The effect of NPK fertilizer on the growth and yield of sweetpotato grown on oxisol


Molina, EC; Tipay, MV
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 19: 52-63 (1997)

Abstract:
Two sweetpotato cultivars, UPL SP8 and Super BUreau, were tested fro growth and yield performance when grown on oxisol with N, P, K fertilizers applied singly or in combination.|A total of 30 plyethylene bags filled with 12 kg oxisols were used in the study and were laid out in a Split Plot Design with three replications. The different treatments were as follows:|MAIN TREATMENTS-Sweetpotato Varieties V1-UPL SP8; V2-Super Bureau|SUB-TREATMENTS-Sources and Rates of Fertilizer T1-Control; T2-N (20-0-0); T3-NP (16-20-0); T4 NPK (60-30-0); T5-NPK (120-60-0)|Results of the study revealed that UPL SP 8 and Super Bureau sweetpotato varieties showed almost similar varietal characteristics as evidence by the non-significant differences on the biomass yield per plant, number of storage roots, actually yield and computed yield per hectare.|The application of the different fertilizer materials gave significant differences on the biomass yield and number of storage roots per plant. Sweetpotato fertilized twice as much as the recommended rate produced significantly more than the other treatments. But on the computed yield per hectare, sweetpotato plants applied with 16-30-0 NPK/ha gave more yield than the other treatments. No significant differences existed on the length and diameter of storage roots.|There were no significant differences among the treatments and the interaction between the varieties of sweetpotato and fertilizer materials in terms of biomass yield and the number, length and diameter of storage roots. However, on the computed yield per hectare, significant differences occurred. UPL SP8 gave the highest yield of 1.58 kg/plt when given NP fertilizer material while the Super Bureau sweetpotato variety gave the highest yield of 1.42 kg/plt when applied with nitrogen fertilizer only.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96482

Protein-enrichment of sweetpotato pulp using three species of fungi


Mapili, MC, Jr; Laoang, BB
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 19: 78-85 (1997)

Abstract:
Sweetpotato pulp was fermented using Trichoderma harzianum, Volvariella volvacea and Pleurotus ostreatus. Through the fermentation, the pulp was protein-enriched, and the samples from the different treatments were compared with commercial fish feed using tilapia fingerlings.|The rate of fermentation with T.harzianum was significantly (P<0.05) faster as compared to the other two fungi. Growth rate of tilapia fingerlings fed with pulp fermented by T.harzianum and P.ostreatus were significantly (P<0.05) higher than those fed with pulp fermented by V.volvacea.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96496

Effects of ipil-ipil leaves applied as green manure combined with different rates of potassium on the growth and yield of sweetpotato


Raroque, CB; Collante, AL
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 9 (1): 113-121 (1987)

Abstract:
Soil incorporation of fresh ipil-ipil leaves during the final harrowing at the rate of 2 tons per hectare significantly improved the root yield of sweet potato. However, application of additional potassium to plots applied with ipil-ipil leaves failed to improve the root yield.|Moreover, plants grown in plots with ipil-ipil leaves alone gave the highest monetary advantage of P 2.92 return per peso cost.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96511

Growth performance of native goats fed with pasture and silage with different supplements


Caberto, EB; Primero, R
TCA [Tarlac College of Agriculture] Research Journal 5 (3): 78-81 (1982)

Abstract:
A completely randomized experiment was conducted to determine the growth performance of goats fed with free pasture and pasture/silage supplemented with different carbohydrates. The different carbohydrate supplements were rice bran, ground yellow corn and camote gapleg.|Results of the study showed that the rate of growth was fast which peaked on the 16th week and began to decline at the end of the study. The weight data were significantly affected by the type pf diet given. The height of the experimental animals at the end of the study was not significantly affected by carbohydrate supplementation.

Availability :
Tarlac College of Agriculture




NO. 96460

Biological study of tea mosquito bug, Helopellis sp. (Miridae hemiptera) on cashew


Adoro, LC; Fernandez, PC
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University (RMTU) Research Journal (1): 25-30 (2002)

Abstract:
The biology of tea mosquitobug, Helopeltis sp. under laboratory conditions was studied from November 1997 to May 1999. Results showed that the total developmental period ranged from 12-20 days with an average o 178 days. Incubation period ranged from 5-7 days with an average of 5.68 days. Longevity of the male ranged from 1-8 days while the femalelinved from 1-22 days. A single female laid from 6-133 eggs with an average of 37. Aside from cashew, the insect was found to feed on Psidium guajava, Mangifera indica, Ipomoea batatas, and Hamelia patens.

Availability :
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University (RMTU) Library; Iba, Zambales, Philippines




NO. 26056

Analyses of heavy metals in selected vegetables
Analisis logam berat dalam sayur-sayuran terpilih

Roselillywaty, O
School of Science and Technology; University Malaysia Sabah; Kota Kinabalu; Sabah

BSc Thesis; Sabah; University Malaysia Sabah; 2000

Abstract:
Analyses of heavy metals namely cadmium. lead, copper, zinc. manganese and ferrous in selected vegetables which were tomato, cucumber, spinach, kangkung carrot and potato samples were carried out. Prior to determination of these metals with Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer, all samples were digested in concentrated nitric acid (70%, v/v). The results show that all samples contained high concentrations of ferrous, between 48.78 to 463.00 ug/g. The concentration of copper were 2.50 to 14.75 ug/g. For manganese were 2.25 to 49.75 ug/g, respectively 17.25 to 29.25 ug/g for zinc. For all- concentrations of ferrous, copper, manganese and zinc were not exceeding the maximum permissible limit by the Food Act 1983 and Food Regulation 1985. But, it was different results for concentrations cadmium and lead. The concentrations of cadmium were 2.58 to 6.13 ug/g and 6.50 to 14.50 ug/g for lead. It was found that the concentrations of cadmium and lead are relatively higher or exceeding the maximum permissible limit.

Availability :
University Malaysia Sabah




NO. 26137

The concentrations of heavy metals in vegetables cultivated on sand tailings


Ho, WM; Maimon, A; Ang, LH
Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM); Kepong; 52109 Kuala Lumpur

Malaysian Science & Technology Congress 2000 (Symp.A)& Asia Pacific Symposium on Food Science & Nutrition 2000; 18-20 September 2000; Kota Kinabalu; Sabah

Abstract:
Some vegetables cultivated on sand tailings were found to contain heavy metals. The leaf of sweet potato, pods of long bean and okra were sampled. The edible parts of the plant samples from each species were prepared into two composite samples. The composite samples were then digested using the AOAC method (1990). Soil samples from the root zones of the plants and idle soil were sampled and digested according to the HMSO method (1986). All the samples were analyzed for heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Zn, Pb, Hg and As) using atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS). The range of heavy metal concentrations in vegetables were 0.33 - 2.33-mg Cd kg ,0.01 - 2.33 mg Ni kg ,6.00 - 101.47 mg Zn kg , 1.32 - 11.61 mg Pb kg ,0.004- 0.064 mg Hg kg and 0.14 - 2.39 mg As kg . All the vegetables analyzed contained Pb concentrations above maximum permissible limits stipulated by the Food Act 1983. The concentrations of Cd, Zn, Hg and As of some vegetables had also exceeded the permissible limits. However, Ni concentrations in all plant samples were far below the limit. The analysis of soil sample showed that idle soil had higher heavy metal concentrations than cultivated soil except for Zn and As. The differences were probably due to agricultural practices where heavy metals concentrations were reduced by plant uptake or added through the application of pesticides or fertilizers.

Availability :
Mohd Zaki Abdullah




NO. 96574

Biodiversity and nutritional value of some indigenous leafy vegetables in CLSU


Mateo, IG; Cacho, DR; Bala, AF
Abstracts of completed and on-going R&D projects 2001. Research, Extension and Training; Central Luzon State University (CLSU); Science City of Mu¤oz, Nueva Ecija; Philippines; (no pagination)

Abstract:
A survey inside the Central Luzon State University reservation area was conducted to document the presence of indigenous leafy vegetables. Based on the survey, more than ten species/groups were identified growing in the reservation area. Among the species being cultivated or grown commercially are the upland Kangkong, sweet potato and gabi. Some species are growing in the wild.|The nutritional value of some indigenous leafy vegetables were taken from available references in the library and from the web site. It is interesting to note that the nutritional value of these vegetables are far higher than the traditionally cultivated species.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 96542

Utilization of sweet potato roots for development of processed products


Estera, TB; Pascual, MT
Abstracts of Completed and Ongoing R & D Projects: A Compilation. Research, Extension and Training, Central Luzon State University, Science City of Mu¤oz, (2000); Compiled by Porciuncula, FL: Dela Cruz, NE; Estera, TB; Pascual, MT; Antalan, RV, Trimor, BP (no pagination)

Abstract:
The study was conducted to determine the viability of the use of sweet potato roots especially in the baking industry. The roots were processed into flour. The produced flour was used in the preparation of brownies, chiffon cake and banana cake for sensory evaluation procedures. Different formulations for brownies, chiffon cake, banana cake, carrot cake and cookies were tried and tested to come up with a standard formulation. The standard recipe without sweet potato flour was used in determining the acceptability of the products developed. Different substitution levels were tested to determine the acceptable level of sweet potato flour in baked products. There were three treatments used: T1 (50% sweet potato flour, 50% wheat flour); T2 (75% sweet potato flour, 25% wheat flour); T3 (100% sweet potato flour). Control (100% wheat flour) was designated as T0. Sensory evaluajtion was done. Likewise, other sweet potato products such as pastillas and brownies were subjected to shelf stability test. The products were stored inside a cabinet at room temperature for a period of time. Shelf-life srudy revealed that sweet potato flour could be stored for 3-4 months without any chnage in quality. The levels of substitution of sweet potato flour significantly affected the appearance, flavor and general acceptability of brownies and banana cake. Results of sensory evaluation of brownies and banana cake revealed that 50% sweet potato flour and 50% wheat flour combination was the most acceptable. Storage study revealed that brownies, banana cake and carrot cake could be stored for 3 days at room temparature without any change in flavor and appearance.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 96543

An anlysis of the sustainability of sweet potato enterprise in the livelihood system in Central Luzon, Philippines


Adion, IM; Aganon, CP; Aguilar, CH; Estera, TB; Galindez, JL; Ingal, C; Laranang, LB; Mondala, R; Nieves, MC
Abstracts of Completed and Ongoing R & D Projects 2000: A Compilation. Research, Extension and Training, Central Luzon State University, Science City of Mu¤oz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines (2000); Compiled by Porciuncula, FL; Dela Cruz, NE; Estera, TB; Pascual, MT; Antalan, RV; Trimor, BP (no pagination)

Abstract:
The project aimed to describe the existing sweet potato seed systems, root production and distribution and household utilization in the provinces of Tarlac, Bataan and Pangasinan, and how the institutional, agro-ecological, socio-economic and political factors influence each system. It also aimed to ascertain the contribution of sweet potato to the livelihood of farm households. Sweet potato seed system is characterized by varietal conservation practices. Farmers used sets of criteria in the selection of sweet potato seed pieces. Seedpieces provide additional income aside from the roots which are dominantly for trade. harvesting of roots are generally staggered to prevent market glut. In Bataan, marketing of both seed pieces and roots pass through several channels starting from growers, tipsers, agents, hailers, traders, wholesalers and retailers. The income from the marketing of sweet potato seed pieces ranged from P400 to P15,000 per hectare and P4,000 to P23,000/ha for roots. Traders control the price of roots. "Kulot" is a serious disease problem in all provinces studied. Sweet potato production contributed to the livelihood of stcokholders. The contribution of sweet potato depended on the time spent and the role participated in. A farm laborer earns as low as P200/day and the grower earns up to P23,000/ha. Lack of quality and clean seed pieces, lack of knowledge and skills about the production and post production aspects, inefficient market and poor infrastructural support were among the problems bessting the industry in Central Luzon region.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 96636

Evaluation of nutritional and sensory quality attributes of sweet potato chips


Maina, GW; del Mundo, AM
The Philippine Agriculturist 78 (2): 225-231 (1995)

Abstract:
Yellow-orange sweet potato were processed and formulated into chips as a snack product providing high beta-carotene and energy content. Three chip formulations using flour from sulfited and soaked sweet potato, and boiled mashed sweet potato were made. Nutrient analysis revealed that among the three treatments, chips from boiled the then mashed sweet potato had the highest beta-carotene and protein content but contained the lowest energy value. Similarly, this treatment even after three months of storage was the most acceptable and preferred as evaluated by pre-school children and adult sensory panelist.

Availability :
Bureau of Plant Industry-Los Baños National Crop Research and Development Center (BPI-LBNCRDC), Reading Room; Economic Garden, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines




NO. 96571

Field evaluation of three lobe morning glory (Ipomoea triloba L.) extract against eggplant fruitborer (Leucinodes orbonales Guenee)


Quilantang, JR; Trinanes, R; Juico, CR; Dela Cruz, QD; Santiago, DR Gajete, LB
Abstracts of Completed and on-going R&D projects 2001. Research, Extension and Training; Central Luzon State University (CLSU); Science City of Mu¤oz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines; (no pagination)

Abstract:
This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of different rates of Ipomoea triloba extract in controlling eggplant fruitborer (L. orbonales) and compare it with farmers practice (Decis + Lorsban and alternate application of Ascend and Decis) and to determine the cost and return analysis using this extracts.|Percent fruitborer damage was significantly lower in plants treated with TLMG extract at the rate of 70 ml/16L water averaging 21.65 percent. Application of Decis + Lorsban (tank mixed) obtained 25.78 percent while the alternate application of Ascend and Decis exhibited 28.01 percent.|The yield (11,820 kg/ha) was higher on plants applied with alternate application of Ascend and Decis (Treatment 5) followed by application of Decis + Lorsban (tank mixed) with 8,603.33 kg/ha and TLMG extract at 70 ml/16 L water (treatment 3) with 6,100 kg/ha.|The cost and return analysis showed that treatment 5 had the highest gross income of P295, 500/ha, treatment 4 with P215,083.32 and treatment 3 with P152,000/ha. The above treatment correspond to a net income of P245,201/ha, P170, 196/ha and P114,853/ha, respectively. Treatment 5 had the highest return of investment (ROI) of 487% while TLMG extract at 70 cc/16L water had 309.17 percent.|Based on the results of this study, there is an indication that TLMG extract at 70 cc/167 L water can provide better control of fruitborer on eggplant, however, further study should be conducted to obtain a more conclusive result.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 96573

Yield responses to N application of different vegetables grown in two Philippine soils


Aganon, CP; Hua, MC; Romero, ES: Mercado, A; Burleigh, JR
Abstracts of completed and on-going R&D projects 2001. Research, Extension and Training; Central Luzon State University (CLSU); Science City of Mu¤oz, Nueva Ecija; Philippines; (no pagination)

Abstract:
Vegetables particularly kangkong, radish and pak-choi are among the crops that provide high income to vegetable growers. These are widely grown in the provinces of Nueva Ecija and Bulacan in Central Luzon and in Laguna, Cavite and Quezon in Region IV. Being a short maturing crops, they must be provided with adequate amount of nutrients at the early age. Unfortunately, record shows that among the three major nutrient elements, only nitrogen is discriminately applied to these crops and usually in very high rates without scientific basis. This indiscriminate use of nitrogen may not only pose health hazards due to groundwater contamination but likewise due to high nitrate content of the edible plant parts.|Simultaneous field experiments in two soils namely: Maligaya clay loam and Quingua silty clay loam were conducted to establish the nitrogen requirement of kangkong, radish and pak-choi and compare the yields derived from farmers' practice of N application with the optimum rate.|Yield responses of crops varied with soils used. Kangkong exhibited two kinds of response curves. When grown in Maligaya clay loam soil, the response to N application is linear from application rates of 0 to 240 kg/ha. This is described by the equation Y=58.76 + 0.3394X - 0.0007X2 with r2=0.92**. The low yields in both soils were due to increase in rotting incidence particularly at high rates of N application.

Availability :
One-Stop-Information-Shop, Central Luzon Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium, Central Luzon State University




NO. 96631

Development and chracterization of vegetable health drink from red sweet potato leaves, squash and carrots


Pabaca, VTD
The Philippine Journal of Plant Industry 44-56 (1-3): 84-99 (1991)

Abstract:
An attempt to prepare a Vitamin A-rich vegetable drink was done in red sweet potato leaves (Ipomoea batata), carrots (Daucus carota), and squash (Cucurbita maxima) with calamanis syrup as the acidulant to all the three preparations. The preliminary findings show that the carrot, squash and red sweet potato leaves (RSPL) preparations contain 49 mcg., 18.5 mcg and 15 mcg. Beta carotene respectively. It also showed that in nutrient loss, the general trend was less in tin cans. During the six-month storage time, the B-carotene loss was highest in RSPL in both the glass jars and tin cans. A ready to-drink (RTD) preparation with a ratio of one (1) part of the concentrate with two (2) parts water for RSPL and squash with three (3) parts water for carrot was preferred. Comparing the three preparations, the RSPL was most acceptable.

Availability :
Bureau of Plant Industry-Los Baños National Crop Research and Development Center (BPI-LBNCRDC), Reading Room; Economic Garden, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines




NO. 96634

Evaluation of potato varieties/lines against potato cyst nematode (Globodera spp.)


Khayad, T
Plant Industry Bulletin 12 (2): 20-27 (1995)

Abstract:
The study was conducted from 1989-1993 in the months of February and May. The field screening was conducted at Abatan, Buguias and the bioassay under pot experiment at the Baguio Experiment Station. Among 39 potato variety/line tested Berolina, Granola, Monzo, and Marijke were found to have resistant reactions but failed to maintain the same level after 2-3 croppings and later were categorized as susceptible. Similarly, Sante, Anosta, Diamant and Morene were described as relatively resistant; to susceptible were Kondor, Aula, Ilona, Gigant and Alpha. Varieties/lines that were consistently resistant were Kenebec, Baraka, Draga, 65-2A-5, Hertha, Cardinal, Famosa, 89-158-4, Agria and Irene. The changes of some lines/varieties in their reactions against the pest is attributed to the presence of now pathotypes other than pathotype A. On yield, data gathered shows that Baraka, Kenebec and Agria gave the highest yields of 25.39, 20.96 and 21.35 tons/ha, respectively. The same lines/varieties were recently approved as varieties by the Philippine Seed Board.

Availability :
Bureau of Plant Industry-Los Baños National Crop Research and Development Center (BPI-LBNCRDC), Reading Room; Economic Garden, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines




NO. 96629

Effects of maleic hydrazide on the growth and yield of sweet potato


Armones, NT; Aala, OG
The Philippine Journal of Plant Industry 44-56 (1-3): 15-21 (1991)

Abstract:
Sweet potato has a tendency to develop plenty of vines during the rainy season which can lead to low tuber production. Maleic hydrazide is a growth retardant which could inhibit vine development thus concentrating the photosynthates for tuber production. This study which was conducted at the La Granja National Crop Research and Development Center, La Carlota City from 1988 to 1990 investigated the effect of maleic hydrazide on the tuber yield of sweet potato, evaluated the degree of vegetative growth prior to and after the application of maleic hydrazide application. Seventeen (17) treatments were used with 30, 45, 60 and 75 days after planting (DAP) as time of application and 0. 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5 kg maleic hydrazide/ha as rates of application Factorial in randomized complete block design was used. In these three (3) years study, marketable, non-marketable and total tuber yields were significantly affected by spraying time and rate of maleic hydrazude application. Likewise, vine length after maleic hydrazide application was significantly affected. Results indicated that a maximum yield of sweet potato could be produced by spraying the plants 60 days after planting at 4.5 kg maleic hydrazide/ha (60 DAP-4.5 kg MH/ha). A marginal rate of return (MRR) of 307.72% was obtained from this treatment. All treatments applied with maleic hydrazide were significantly higher in yield than the control.

Availability :
Bureau of Plant Industry-Los Baños National Crop Research and Development Center (BPI-LBNCRDC), Reading Room; Economic Garden, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines




NO. 26227

Genetic variability and inheritance for nutiritional character of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L) Lam.)


Mohamad Bahagia, AG
CS Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

MSc Thesis; University Putra Malaysia; 1997; p92

Abstract:
A total of 198 sweetpotato accessions from Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, Sarawak and A VRDC was evaluated and their nutritional contents were measured using NIRS. With the exception of starch (6.7%) and dry matter content (12.1%), other characters showed more than 20% CV values. Mean values for all characters were similar to those reported by other researchers. The mean values for dry matter, starch, protein, sugar, fiber and ash were 21.1%, 74.8%, 3.5%, 14.4%, 3.1% and 1.4%, respectively. This study also showed from Kelantan and Terengganu were similar. This was probably due to the fact varieties from these two states were from the same source. The Ward's Cluster Analysis grouped the 198 sweet potato accessions into 5 groups. Group 2, the majority group, contained 112 accessions and comprised these accessions with moderate value for all nutritional characters. While group 5, the minority groups (6 accessions) had high starch content more than 85%. Group 4 contained the highest nutritive value while group 3 the lowest. The result showed that the varieties planted by farmers in Malaysia had low nutritional quality. Estimate of heritability showed that all nutritional characters studied had moderate values of around 50%, except for ash and starch content with the values of 26.0% and 38.11 %, respectively. Correlation analysis showed that increase in dry matter content will also increase the fiber content but will reduce the value of protein and sugar. However starch was affected at a slightly lesser rate. There was not much correlation between nutritional character and morphological character. Protein content correlated negatively with the length. Negative correlation was also shown between starch and flesh colour and yield. This study indicated that the local variety of sweet potatoes have high nutritional genetic variability. However most of the varieties studied showed poor quality in nutritional content.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 96712

Off-season vegetable production


Virtucio,AA; Rosales, NR; Alonzon, AM; Penuncio, AS
Proceedings 15th STARRDEC Regional Symposium on Research and Development Highlights, Cavite State University, Indang, Cavite, Philippines. 15 August 2002

Abstract:
Leafy vegetables and tomatoes are economically and nutritionally important on the country, however the supplies of these crops are highly seasonal. This paper presents the results of the study aiming to have a year round supply of safe and clean leafy vegetables and reduce seasonality on tomatoes. Improved varieties and crop management practices developed by AVRDC scientist were tested at Philippine conditions.

Availability :
Southern Tagalog Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium One Stop Information Shop




NO. 26234

Variability, divergence, heterosis, combining ability and yield components studies in sweet potatoes ( Ipomoea batatas (L) Lam) from Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia


Mohd Said, S
Universiti Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

PhD Thesis; University Putra Malaysia; 1993; p165

Abstract:
Studies were conducted to examine the breeding potential of the Malaysian indigenous sweet potato germplasm. A total of 99 sweet potato accessions was collected from five different regions in the states of Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia. A total of 220 polycross progenies was obtained from sixteen randomly chosen accessions planted in a polycross block. The 99 accessions and their 220 progenies were evaluated in the field and 16 characters were measured. With the exception of plant type and vine thickness, other characters showed more than 20% CV values. The CV values for yield, tuber number and mean tuber weight were 76%, 57% and 48%, respectively. The means and CV's were similar for all characters between the regions indicating the presence of similar sweet potato type in all the regions. Cluster analysis showed the presence of three main groups of sweet potatoes in the states. Group 1 comprised cultivars with low yield. Cultivars in Group 2 were high yielding with spreading plant type. The third group comprised only six cultivars with orange flesh colour, big leaves, semi-compact plant type and slightly lower yield. The mean, range and CV values for all characters studied were much larger for the polycross progenies as compared to the parents. Cluster analysis showed the presence of seven groups among the progenies indicating the formation of new genotypes as a result of outcrossing. Gene interactions in the new genotypes probably have led to the presence of larger means and ranges of many characters. Analysis on diallel cross among six sweet potato accessions with different 02 -value showed the presence of more than 40% heterosis from many cross combinations for yield characters. With a few exceptions, most crosses showed less than 20% heterosis for morphological characters. The heterosis expressions for both yield and morphological characters showed no clear relation with 02 -values (divergence), differences between parental values, physical distance (km), longitude and latitude. The results indicated that heterosis expression did not depend on overall genetic divergence and different genes probably had different divergence levels depending on their response to eco-geographical variables. The results of combining ability analyses showed significant GCA and SCA for yield, tuber number and mean tuber weight indicating the importance of both additive and non-additive gene actions for these characters. However, the GCA variances for yield and mean tuber weight were much larger than their respective SCA variances, whereas the SCA variance for tuber number was six times larger than it's GCA variance. Plant type, growth rate, internode length, vine thickness, leaf lobbing and petiole thickness showed significant difference only for SCA but not GCA. Significant difference for GCA was found for leaf size only but not for both GCA and SCA for petiole length. The results revealed that GCA was more prevalent in yield, mean tuber weight and leaf size. SCA was more important for tuber number, plant type, growth rate, internode length and leaf lobbing. Correlation studies failed to relate yield with other agronomic characters. Regression analysis showed that leaf lobbing was the third important yield contributing character besides tuber number and mean tuber weight. Number of tubers per plant and mean tuber weight were the two main components of yield. Yield in sweet potatoes was determined by the following formula, Yield = -0.387 + 2.684 mean tuber weight + 0.159 tuber number -0.032 leaf lobing. The findings showed that a substantial amount of genetic variability and genetic divergence occurred in the local sweet potatoes. Exploitation of heterosis through biparental crossing between selected parents is a good approach for breeding this crop. Selection of parents, however, should not base solely on the divergence of the two parents but their combining ability should also be considered.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 26241

Some physiological studies on ornamental Ipomoea batatas as a groundcover species


Noriah, O
University Putra Malaysia [UPM]; Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

MSc Thesis; University Putra Malaysia; 1991; p127

Abstract:
The morphological development and some physiological aspects were studied on two cultivars of sweet potato, which are normally used as an ornamental plant. Among the studies undertaken were those on the botanical characteristics of the plants, effects of shade and fertilizer and nutrient uptake. The cultivar examined were Imelda and an unnamed 'variegated' type. The effects of shading and fertilizer levels showed growth of the 'variegated' cultivar were severely reduced in heavy shading (70% and 80%). Increasing shade levels increased leaf area ratio (LAR) and leaf area to leaf weight (LALW), but decreased dry matter production, visible quality, chlorophyll content and elemental composition in the leaf tissue. However, fertilizer levels were less effective than shade in altering the parameters above. As shade levels increased, the content of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium in the leaves increased. Shade levels significantly affected light compensation point (LCP) in both cultivars. Increasing shade levels decreased LCP. LCP of cv. 'variegated' is lower than cv. Imelda, suggesting that cv. 'variegated' is more adaptable to a moderate shade. Studies on the nutrient uptake of both cultivars using hydroponic techniques showed that the highest element in the leavest stem and root was potassium and followed in descending order by nitrogent calciumt phosphorus and magnesium. However, instead of calcium, phosphorus was higher in the root. In general, both cultivars are suitable as groundcover plants with the 'variegated' cultivar more adaptable to shade than cv. Imelda.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 96655

The indigenous rice extenders/substitutes and food seasoners in the hinterlands of Marinduque


Regio, VR; Merlin, MM
Marinduque State College Journal of Research and Innovation 2 (2): 29-31 (1999-2000)

Abstract:
Five species of wild rootcrops under family Dioscoreaceae and two species of food seasoners were documented in this study. Four were directly boiled as source of carbohydrates or kisa for rice and one was processed in different ways to remove the toxic material present before using as food or kisa to rice. The two studied seasoners are eaten as additives to cooked fish, shrimp and meat for their sour flavor.

Availability :
Southern Tagalog Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium One Stop Information Shop




NO. 26426

In vitro slow growth of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) using paraffin oils, mannitol and acetylsalicylic


Yip, KL
Faculty of Agriculture; Universiti Putra Malaysia; 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

BSc Thesis; University Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor; 2001; p71

Abstract:
Sweet potato is a member of the family Convolvulaceae. It ranks seventh in the total production among the world's food crops and has played a very important role as food source for human and animals. However sweet potato is a high genetic diversity crop and its cross pollination win cause the segregation of genotype. Efforts to preserve sweet potato germplasm in the field will consume a high cost. In vitro propagation will be an alternative to solve the problem. Protocols that slowdown the in vitro growth of sweet potato are used to hold the planting stock of clones at minimum cost (save time, human energy and culture medium) by maximizing the time between transfer (subculture) of the in vitro plantlet. Less space is needed for the preservation of this plant. The study was conducted to test the effect of paraffin oils, different concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and mannitol as the slow growth agents for the five varieties in the study. Parameter of this study are the height of the explant and the percentage of explant surviving. From the experiment, it was observed that mannitol 4 %, paraffin oils and ASA 50u M were the most suitable slow growth agents for the five varieties which were tested in this study. However, the effectiveness of the different slow growth agent was variety dependent.

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 26552

Nitrate and nitrite content of Malaysian vegetables


Berry, SK; Augustine, MA; Heng, LK
Department of Food Science; University Pertanian Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

Proceedings of the Symposium on Vegetables and Ornamentals in the Tropics; UPM; 27-28 October 1982; p223

Abstract:
Nitrates and nitrites widely occur in plants and their toxicity is known to man. Malaysian vegetables, e.g. amaranthus, bitter-gourd, broccoli leaves, cabbage, Chinese cabbage, egg-plant, kangkung, radish and mustard leaves (choy- sam and kai-choy) were analysed and were found to contain, 2,146, 426, 4,550,146, 2,331, 334, 2,031, 1,935, 2, 875, and 2, 729 ppm nitrate, respectively . The nitrite content of these vegetables was insignificant (1 ppm).

Availability :
University Putra Malaysia




NO. 26664

Physical and chemical characterization of 21 sweet potato cultivars


Joko, SU; Yaakob, BM; Russly, AR; Saad, MS
University Putra Malaysia [UPM]; Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

Agriculture Congress 2004; University Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor; 4-7 October 2004; p193-196

Abstract:
The objective of this research was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of cooked tubers and starch.

Availability :
Azarudin




NO. 26681

Effect of Glomus mosseae inoculum level on yield of sweet potato under glasshouse condition


Yassin, MA; Radziah, O; Azizah, H; Saad, MS
Department of Land Management, Faculty of Agriculture, University Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor

Agriculture Congress 2004; University Putra Malaysia; Serdang; Selangor; 4-7 October 2004; p269-272

Abstract:
A pot experiment was conducted under glasshouse condition to determine the effect of different levels of AM (Glomus mosseae) inoculum on yield of sweet potato using unsterilized mineral soil. Four levels of AM inoculum used were O. 20. 40, 80 g/plant. Plants were grown for 12 weeks and plant biomass. storage root yield and AM colonization were determined. The results showed no significant influence of G. mosseae AM inoculum levels on yield of sweetpotato. However there were significant increases in the root colonization and spore number of inoculated plants.

Availability :
Azarudin




NO. 26719

Genetic relationship in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) Germplasm from Malaysia and Indonesia using RAPD markers.


Ramisah, MS; Saad, MS; Yunus, AG; Nor Aini, AS
Institute of Bioscience; University Putra Malaysia; 43400 UPM Serdang; Selangor

Proceedings of the 4th. National Congress on Genetics; 26-28 Sept. 2000; Genting Highlands; Pahang; p49-59

Abstract:
Ninety-two accessions of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) germplasm from different regions were assessed to determine the variation using RAPD with five random primers. From the 5-decamer random primers used, 194 bands were amplified, of which 192 (98.9%) were polymorphic and 2 (1.03%) were monomorphic. The bands sizes ranging from 117bp -3240bp. The level of polymorphism among the accessions was very high. The similarity estimates among 92 sweetpotato accessions were quantified using a simple matching coefficient and the values ranged from 0.5888 to 0.9206. The degree of polymorphism in the sweetpotato collection was very large, indicating a high level of genetic variability. The dendrogram constructed showed the grouping of the accessions into 3 large main groups, which generally separated the accessions from Malaysia and Indonesia (Irian Jaya and Java). Several accessions clustered together based on their geographic source. But there were accessions from Malaysia, Java and Irian Jaya grouped in the same cluster. RAPD appears to be useful for discerning variation within crop germplasm and to assess the genetic relationship among sweetpotato germplasm from Malaysia and Indonesia.

Availability :
Salwana




NO. 26739

Application of molecular markers (RAPD) in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) germplasm rationalization.


Sow, H
P.O. BOX 11974, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 50764 Kuala Lumpur

Proceedings of the fifth National Genetics Congress; 25-27 March 2003; Kuala Lumpur; p58-59

Abstract:
Rationalization of germplasm could facilitate easier access to the germplasm collection and enhance it use. The rationalization should consist of characterization elimination duplicate, and establishment core collection by the fact that a sample of accessions that represent the range of variability within the germplasm collection with minimum redundancies. To select a core collection of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) species, a subset of 134 accessions from the six countries maintained at the University Putra Malaysia germplasm was characterized by molecular technique RAPD and was evaluated for quantitative and qualitative traits during field growth. These 134 accessions representing the entire collection was screened with a set of five primers (OPB 07; OPC 10; OPG 14; OPD 01, and OPD 06) by RAPD -PCR in order to determine the genetic identities, estimate genetic diversities, and to identify genetic relationships among these accessions. First sweetpotato accessions were grouped by clusters analysis with an NTSYS - pc computer program for data analysis using Jaccard's coefficient of similarity as a base for dendrogram construction via the UPGMA method. The Jaccard's similarity value ranged from 0.02 to 1.00 showing high level of genetic variability among sweetpotato accessions. The cluster analysis separated these geographical accessions into 14 different groups; some of the accessions were clustered based on their geographical source. The accessions were selected for the core collection based on molecular characterization data using stratified non-overlapping sampling procedure. The number of accessions that were allocated to the core subset was determined using a proportional method adjusted by the relative importance of geographical region followed by random selection of entries within each cluster for designating the core collection. The percentage of 25 per cluster was selected for each cluster. Accessions were chosen within a cluster to represent the greatest diversity in geographical region, eliminating the duplicate based on the percentage of similarity . The multivariate pattern of morphological variation was defined within each of these geographical regions by independent principal component analysis. Thus, five quantitative data were used to run the principal component analysis. The results of the principal component analysis showed the accessions grouping by country. This confirmed the grouping obtained by classification (UPGMA cluster analysis) where there were the accessions tended to group on the basis of geographical origin. The selected core collection of 37 accessions was validated by comparing with entire collection using twelve qualitative characters. Thus, only two classes representing 2.5% were missed to include in the core collection over 99 classes evaluated. Regarding class 5 i.e. green with purple vein on the upper surface in the character immature leaf color and class 6 i.e. green with purple stripes in the character petiole color. The collection was found to represent the variability of the germplasm collection. Therefore, this core collection may be an appropriate entry point for researchers who wish to utilize the genetic diversity of this germplasm more efficiently. Since this study and the last hand demonstrated that RAPD molecular markers is powerful for assessing genetic variation and determining genetic relationships among accessions, it can be concluded that RAPD markers is a potential useful methods for rationalizing a germplasm collection.

Availability :
Salwana




NO. 96036

A comparative study of the influence of the leaves and young shoots of centrosema, ipil and sweet potato as green feed on the growth of the chicks


Dingayan, AB; Fronda, FM
Abstract on Leucaena; Forest Research Institute Reference Series No. 8; Forest Research Institute; Ministry of Natural Resources; Halos, HC (ed.); College, Laguna, Philippines; (undated); p. 25

Abstract:
Of the three green feeds tested, ipil-ipil leaves and young shoots produced the heaviest chicks, followed closely by centrosema. The chicks given sweet potato leaves and young shoots were the smallest. They were thus even inferior to those that received no green feed at all.|The chicks raised most economically were those that received ipil-ipil leaves and young shoots; those that received centrosema leaves and young shoots were nest. The most expensive chicks were those that received sweet potato leaves and young shoots as green feed.|The percentage of mortality was highest in the lot fed with young shoots; the lowest, in the lot fed with ipil-ipil leaves and young shoots.|Either finely cut green leaves and young shoots of ipil-ipil and centrosema are much better than sweet potato leaves and young shoots as green feed for growing chickens.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 96074

Verification of POT for sweet potato production in Ilocos Norte


Sugui, FP; Alcoy, AB
Ilocos Research Abstracts 1986-1987; Mariano Marcos State University, Batac, Ilocos Norte; 1987; Dy, MEY (ed.); Ilocos Norte; Philippines; p. 45

Abstract:
The study verified the recommended production technology of sweetpotato in Ilocos Norte during the 1986-87 dry season. The package of technology was compared with the Ilocos Norte farmers' production practices, using variety as test factor.|Results showed that the POT developed by the PRCRTC at VISCA, Baybay, Leyte produced tuber yield and marketable tubers higher than those produced by the farmers' existing practice.|A high yielding variety, VSP 3, planted by using the farmers' cultural practice gave higher tubers/plant, tuber yield and weight of marketable tubers than the local farmers' variety. Planting the farmers' variety under improved cultural management practices also gave comparable results.|The recommended POT gave a net return on ivestment (ROI) of 367%, higher than that of the farmers' practice (153%). The use of the farmers' practices for the variety VSP 3 resulted to an ROI of 326%, higher than the 210% obtained from using the POT in planting the farmers' variety.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños




NO. 96127

Integrating sweetpotato with multipurpose tree species (MPTS)


Baya
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights ' 96; Lorica, MV; Cabangbang, MVDF (eds); Los Baños, Laguna, PCARRD, 1997; p 91

Abstract:
Baya (UEP) used MPTS as hedgerows and sweetpotato as alley crop in an agroforestry system.|The growth and yield of sweetpotato under different MPTS hedgerows significantly increase as compared with the growth and yield of the same without hedgerows. Soil chemical properties such as K,P, and OM significantly improved.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 96257

Regional trial on sweet potato, 1998


Gonzales, IC; Perez, JC
Benguet State University Research Journal 27: 32-43 (1999)

Abstract:
This study was to evaluate different sweetpotato cultivars for yield adaptability and acceptability and to recommend sweetpotato selections to the Philippine Seed Board. Results of the trial showed that PSB SP 17 (check) yielded the highest followed by SG 91-25-01, SG 94-13-03 with yields of 11.5 t/ha, 11.12 t/ha and 10/85 t/ha, respectively. Most entries were observed to be resistant to sweetpotato weevil. Dacol and Tres Colores were highly accepted by the test panelists. Dry matter content ranged from 28.5 to 39.5% while PSBSP 17 (check) gave the least dry matter content of 28.5%. The root skin color of the eleven entries tested varied from pink, yellowish, pink to purple. Flesh color varied from white, cream yellow to purple white.

Availability :
One Stop Information Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 96269

Promotion of sweetpotato cultivars in earthquake rehabilitation program (ERP) sites, 1999


Gonzales, IC; Badol, EO; Diccion, TC; Botangen, ET; Quindara, HL; Dalang, PA
Benguet State University Research Journal 27: 12-31 (1999)

Abstract:
Promising sweetpotato cultivars were introduced in the Earthquake Rehabilitated Programme (ERP) sites: Kabayan, Benguet; Cayapa Central and Aritao, Nueva Vizcaya.During a consultative meeting, farmers expressed their preferences for early maturing sweetpotato varieties and their interest to learn some of the appropriate cultural management and utilization techniques on sweetpotato. Their varietal preferences for sweetpotato were considered on the conduct of the on-farm variety promotional trials. Farmer cooperators were also selected during the meeting.Among the six sweetpotato cultivars, VSP-6 produced the highest root yield (2.45 t/ha) in Kayapa Central, Nueva Vizcaya, closely followed by Tocano with root yields of 2.15 t/ha). In Aritao, Nueva Vizcaya, VSP-6, Tocano, Monglo and Karumbasa were highly acceptable. The major pests encountered in these areas were weevils and rodents.In Kabayan, Benguet, sweetpotato cultivar Dakol and Monglo produced high yields with 4.8 t/ha and 4.5 t/ha. The majority of the farmers preferred Tocano, TN 67, Karumbasa and Monglo because it has yellow flesh, sweet to slightly sweet taste, 'egg taste' characteristics. The major pest observed was rodents.The training component gave awareness to housewives and some of the alternative ways of cooking sweetpotato aside from boiling and frying. Fifteen housewives enjoyed hands-on training in sweetpotato candy, puto, yema and juice processing.

Availability :
One Stop Information Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 96285

Farmer-led variety evaluation and selection of sweetpotatoes for post-rice planting in the Philippine highlands


Ganga, ZN; Anselmo, BA; Badol, EO
Benguet State University Research Journal 26: 8-16 (1998)

Abstract:
Traditional breeding confines initial selection at the researcher-managed fields. Farmer's participation comes in only during the on-farm or promotional trials. In the Philippines, before a variety is officially recommended, it has to pass through an official trial, conducted at different locations for several seasons. Hence, a variety should have a wide adaptation for greater chance of selection during the process. The limited farmer participation during evaluation have some significant effect on the final adoption of a variety. Farmers tend to adopt new technologies which they have personally tested and proved effective and feasible.This paper discusses the participatory approach followed in the evaluation and selection process for location and use-specific sweetpotato varieties for post-rice planting. Farmer's criteria and reasons for variety selection are presented. The location production and post-harvest methods and utilization practices are discussed as they influenced selection and adoption processes.

Availability :
One Stop Information Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 96204

Sweetpotato yoghurt processing


Lauzon; Ametoso; Gamotin; Modina
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights '98; PCARRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; 1999; 120p.; Joven, JEA(ed); p.57

Abstract:
Lauzon, Amestoso, Gamotin and Modina (ViSCA) developed a simple process to make yoghurt using sweetpotato roots. The end product is brownish purpple which can be produced at household level as well as by small-medium-and-large-scale enterprise. The process can be adapted using locally available materilas and equipments.|SP Roots-peeling-washing-cutting into chunks-steaming [Starter milk]-homogenization-straining[starter culture]-mixing-incubation-filling in the plastic caps-sealing-cooling-refrigerated storage.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 96187

Extruded mixture of sweetpotato and copra meal (ESPCM) as partial direct replacement of corn in broiler and layer diets


Roxas, DB; Luis, ES; Ramos, SM; Agbisit, EM, Jr; Navida, JA; Baconawa, ET; Baladad, AE
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights '98; PCARRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; 1999; 120p.; Joven, JEA (ed); p.72

Abstract:
A total of 180 broiler chicks and 54 layer pullets were randomly distributed to three treatments. Treatment 1 served as the control while treatments 2 and consisted of diets with 20% and 30% ESPCM, respectively (Roxas, Luis, Ramos, Bautista, Perez, Baconawa and Balalad [(UPLB]).|ESPCM can replace up to 20% of corn in layer diets and 30% of corn in the broiler diets without significant depression in feed intake, egg production and egg weight in layers and live weight gain and feed efficiency in broilers.|In broilers, dressing percentage was likewise not affected; the only noticeable difference was the color of the meat. Corn-fed chickens had cream colored meat, while ESPCM had flesh-colored meat.|In layers, feed efficiency (feed per no. of egg and per egg weight) was markedly affected even only with 20% ESPCM. At 30% level, egg efficiency dropped by 8%.|Replacing corn with ESPCM affected (P<.05) the yolk color at 30% level, but not at 20%.|Using ESPCM to replace corn lowers the cost of production due to high cost of corn feeds. Likewise, ESPCM can be the answer to the recurring shortage of corn.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 96191

Extruded mixture of sweetpotato and copra meal (ESPCM) as partial direct replacement of corn in swine diet


Roxas; Luis; Agbisit; Ramos; Navida; Baconawa; Balalad
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) Highlights '98; PCARRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines; 1999; 120p.; Joven, JEA (ed); p.81

Abstract:
Roxas, Luis, Agbisit, Ramos, Navida, Baconawa and Balalad (UPLB) conducted a study on ESPCM as replacement of corn in swine diet. A total of 18 grwoing pigs (Landrace x Yorkshire cross) were fed starter diet from weaning (12kg) to 20 kg and grower diet from 20-40 kg. The treatments, following a completely randomized design. The ESPCM is composed of 70% sweet potato meal and 30% copra meal that partially replaced 20% and 30% of corn in the ration.|ESPCM can replace up to 30% of corn in the grower diets without significant depression in fee intake, live weight gain and feed efficiency. Feed efficiency was slightly better in pigs recieving the highest amount of ESPCM. ESPCM was equally palatable to the animals as the yellow corn as shown by their similar feed intake in the different treatments. The dressing percentage was not affected by feeding ESPCM. Even the backfat thickness and lion eye area did not differ among the treatments considered.

Availability :
Crops Research Division, Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development




NO. 96287

Evaluation of tolerance to excess soil moisture in sweetpotato


Jan-Win Yoon; Kyung-ha Yoon; Do-Chul Chung
Benguet State University Research Journal 26: 24-26 (1998)

Abstract:
Flooding at three or seven weeks after planting affected leaf growth and storage root formation of leaf cuttings. At three weeks after planting, flooding was more crucial than seven weeks after planting in accelerating leaf senescence and inhibiting storage root initiation. However, flooding at seven weeks after planting was more effective in impeding storage root enlargement. There were clonal differences in leaf senescence and survival of leaf cutting after flooding treatments. CN 1489-89 had the slowest rate of leaf chlorosis and the highest survival rate (>80%) during the 63-day growth duration with flooding at three or seven weeks after planting. Other clones, 1392, 1444, TN66 and TN67 also had more than 50% survival rates after flooding. In general, TN66, CN1108-13 and CN1489-89 produced higher storage root yields than other clones under flooding conditions. In a screening of 214 unimproved entries, 1100, 1358, 1381, 1405 and 1932 produced reasonable storage roots when the leaf cuttings were exposed to excess soil moisture three weeks after planting.

Availability :
One Stop Information Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 96297

Sweetpotato adaptatin trial in Aringay, La Union


Gonzales, IC; Sim, JM; Simongo, DK; Backian, GS; Gayao, BT
Benguet State University Research Journal 29: 19-38 (2000)

Abstract:
A sweetpotato variety adaptation trial was conducted in the riverbank and talon (post-rice) of San Juan East and San Juan West, Aringay, La Union from November 1999 to February 2000. Eight sweetpotato selections from Sagubo, Kapangan, and three local varieties in Aringay were evaluated. PSBSP 17 was used as check variety. Results showed that three months after planting, Peke Negro, Tagalog, PSBSP 17 and Meslisa significantly gave the highest yield ranging from 10.99 to 17.33 tons/ha at three months after planting. These top four varieties were early maturing. Meslisa was less infected with pests and diseases. Peke Negro had the highest yield both in riverbank and in talon. Tagalog was second highest yielder in riverbank, and Meslisa in talon. Most varieties changed in plant type. In Aringay, La Union, Peke Negro had long elliptic roots when planted in riverbank and had elliptic roots in talon. Roots of Tagalog were ovate in Kapangan but became long elliptic in the riverbank of Aringay. When planted in talon (Aringay) Tagalog had elliptic roots. Tagalog was pink in riverbank and lighter pink in talon. Peke Negro was dark in riverbank and lighter purple in talon.

Availability :
One Stop Information Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 96308

Promising sweetpotato cultivars for the highlands


Gonzales, IC; Simongo, DK; Botangen, ET; Balog-as, FS
Benguet State University Research Journal 30: 76-95 (2001)

Abstract:
Results of on-station and on-farm trials showed that 'Tagalog' and 'Kawitan' are promising cultivars for the highlands because of their good eating and processing quality. From among the twenty cultivars evaluated, 'Tagalog' yielded 12.34 t/ha followed by VSP 6 - 9.80t/ha, and 'Mestisa' had 6.7 and 6.3 rating described as like slightly. In terms of dry matter content, 'Mestisa' had the highest with 34.42% while 'Tagalog' had 29.28%. and VSP 6, 28.07%. At Abatan, Buguias, 'Tagalog' and 'Kawitan' performed well with yields of 26.60t/ha and 23.10t/ha, respectively. 'Tagalog' gave the highest eating quality of 8.0 - like very much and 'Kawitan' had 7.0 - like moderately. 'Tagalog' showed no symptom of scab infection. In Gambang, Bakun, Benguet, 'Tagalog' and 'Kawitan' were still high yielders (37.92 tons/ha and 26.10tons/ha, respectively). Eating quality ranged from 6.5 to 6.75. The regional trials for the wet season revealed that SG 96-35-03, SG 96-10-01, and SG 93-13-03 (check) had high yields. However, the latter showed to be less acceptable because it had malformed roots. The dry season trials showed that 'Tagalog' yielded 31.79 t/ha followed by SG-96-10-01 with 23.75t/ha and SG 96-35-03 with 22.41t/ha, 'Tagalog' gave the highest eating quality of 7.6 - like very much.

Availability :
One Stop Information Shop, Highland Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium




NO. 96310

Response of four varieties of sweetpotato to increased plant density


Amante, VdR; Reyes, M; Rasco, ET, Jr.
Southeast Asia Program for Potato Research and Development Selected Research 2: 116-121 (1993-1994)

Abstract:
It is common for semi-subsistence farmers to use two or more cuttings per hill in planting sweetpotato, a practice which can be wasteful. Working on the theory that the number of cuttings required per hill is variety-dependent, four varieties with contrasting traits were used in a trial where number of cuttings per hill was altered. Three of the varieties are traditionally used and popular in the trial site. Interaction effects between variety and plant density were generally not significant. The difference in yield of root and shoot was also not significant between the two plant densities used, though there was a slight tendency for double density planting to give a higher shoot weight than single density. In contrast, single density planting tend to give a higher root yield, which is the opposite of farmer's expectations. Furthermore, there was a larger percentage of large and medium roots with single density than double density planting. The use of single density planting is advantageous because of savings in the cost of preparing the cuttings.Among varieties, the improved variety 88WS623 produced a yield exceeding 10 t/ha. Which is approximately twice that of the leading local variety. However, its market acceptability was rated low because of its pink skin and irregular shape.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center, Library




NO. 96311

Agronomic evaluation of sweetpotato varieties


Catanay, MB
Southeast Asia Program for Potato Research and Development Selected Research 2: 132-135 (1993-1994)

Abstract:
Twenty-one varieties of sweetpotato were evaluated for agronomic performance at the Albay Experiment Station, Buang, Tabaco, Albay, Philippines from March to July 1993. Pest incidence was generally low and it has not been possible to measure significant differences in varietal resistance, except for resistance to gall mites. Introduced varieties tend to have less damage caused by gall mites than the traditional varieties Binoras and Tres Colores, Significant differences were obtained in shoot and marketable root yield. PNGL 390 gave the highest shoot yield of 23.68 t/ha. G88 produced the highest total marketable roots of 26.25 t/ha followed by OPS 37 and V37-151 with yields of 24.45 and 22.88 t/ha, respectively. All traits considered, G88 has the best chance of being accepted by farmers.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center, Library




NO. 96312

Response of sweetpotato to inorganic and micronutrients


Fortuno, ME; Catanay, MB; Villamayor, F, Jr.
Southeast Asia Program for Potato Research and Development Selected Research 2: 136-140 (1993-1994)

Abstract:
Four levels of inorganic fertilizer applied singly and in combination with micronutrients were evaluated for their effects on the growth and yield of sweetpotato var. UPLSP 5. All of the fertilizer treatments significantly increases shoot and root yields. The highest shoot yield of 25.55 t/ha was obtained from the application of 150-60-90 kg NPK/ha plus micronutrient spray. The highest marketable root yield (14.22 t/ha) was obtained from 90-60-90 kg NPK/ha plus micronut5rient spray. The control (not provided with supplementary fertilizer and micronutrient) gave the lowest yield of 5.52 t/ha. Micronutrient sprays consistently enhanced the effect of inorganic fertilizer, but yield improvement was highest at the lowest level of inorganic fertilizer. The application of 90-60-90 kg NPK/ha plus micronutrients gave the highest net benefit of P55,850/ha and a marginal rate of return of 5997 percent.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center, Library




NO. 96313

Studies on Azospirillium as biofertilizer for sweetpotato in volcanic ash-laden soil


Lopez, PJS; Santos, TS; Rasco, ET, Jr.
Southeast Asia Program for Potato Research and Development Selected Research 2: 19-34 (1993-1994)

Abstract:
Studies on various factors that can affect sweetpotato response to Azospirillum inoculation show the following trends: Isolates. BSs 202 and Sp 7 are better than BSs 8 and isolate XII. There seems to be no advantage in using combined isolates against single isolates in the inoculum. Observation of various mixtures of isolates suggests that BSs 202 may be useful in less fertile soils such as in volcanic ash, while Sp 7 is probably suited to a wider range of soil conditions. Variety. Sweetpotato varieties can be classified into three categories based on their response to the effective isolate BSs 202: Strongly response, weakly responsive, and unresponsive. Characteristics associated with each response are described and varieties falling into each category enumerated. UPLSP 1 and 88WS623 are classified as highly responsive. Method of inoculation. Both dripping of cuttings in Azospirillum-carrier water suspension before planting and direct application of the Azospirillum-carrier to the soil are effective depending on the desired response and variety. Responses documented in the trial are interpreted as dosage effects with implications on modes of action of Azospirillum.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center, Library




NO. 96314

Evaluation of strains of tres colores under improved production practices and subsistence farming


Amante, VdR; Reyes, M; Rasco, ET, Jr.
Southeast Asia Program for Potato Research and Development Selected Research 2: 146-149 (1993-1994)

Abstract:
Tres Colores is a cosmopolitan variety on the Bicol Peninsula of the Philippines. As an old variety, there are several "strains" found in the farmers' fields. Six of these were collected and evaluated on the basis of their agronomic performance under improved and subsistence methods of cultivation.Among the six strains, Adams 1, Adams 3 and 13b Tres Colores excelled in overall performance. The latter was judged to be the best because it has a higher percent of medium sized roots than Adams 1 and 3. Root uniformity and pest resistances of these strains were uniformly high.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center, Library




NO. 96315

Variety evaluation of sweetpotato under upland rainfed partially shaded condition


Amante, VdR; Rasco, ET, Jr.; Zipagan, M
Southeast Asia Program for Potato Research and Development Selected Research 2: 150-175 (1993-1994)

Abstract:
Four variety evaluation trails were conducted over two seasons under upland rainfed partially shaded conditions during 1993-94 in Albay, Philippines. The trials were established between coconut trees which provided an estimated 60% shading. The wet season suffered from excess moisture during the first four months of the five-month season. On the other hand, the dry season trial suffered from lack of moisture during the first two months and excess moisture during the last three months. Weed competition was a serious stress factor during both seasons. Insect pests (leaf folder and katydid) and scab disease were observed to be prevalent during the dry season. Their occurrence during the wet season was moderate and barely sufficient to allow detection of differences in varietal resistance.Among 81 entries in the dry season observational trial, 21 were selected on the basis of their root qualities and apparent yield. Twelve of these were chosen for their potential as processing varieties while 9 were selected for the fresh market. In the wet season advanced observational trial, seven among 39 entries were selected on the basis of their yield and root qualities.In replicated yield trials conducted over two seasons, VSP6 (Bataan) and 88WS623 were consistently selected on the basis of their overall agronomic performance. Their marketable yields exceeded that of 13B Tres Colores and 23 Binoras, the popular local varieties by a factor of 3 to 5. However, their roots are less acceptable in the local market because of pale red skin color. The local market prefers dark red skin. They were also more susceptible to scab and leaf folders, tend to lose more weight in storage, and have lower dry matter than the local varieties. VSP 6 had a significantly higher starch, and lower fiber and crude protein compared to 88WS623.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center, Library




NO. 96316

Effect of Azospirillium on the performance of sweetpotato cv. kinabakab


Callueng, MP; Cruz dela, A
Southeast Asia Program for Potato Research and Development Selected Research 2: 185-187 (1993-1994)

Abstract:
The effect of three isolates of Azospirillum applied singly and all their combination were evaluated on the sweetpotato cv. Kinabakab in a field trial in the river flood plains of Cagayan, Philippines. Significant positive effects of Azospirillum inoculation were obtained in plant survival and non-marketable yield. Positive effects were likewise observed in marketable yield and vine weight, but treated plots were not statistically different from the control. Isolates Sp 7 and BSs 202 were better than BSs 8 and there seems to be no benefit in using mixed isolates for inoculation.

Availability :
Northern Philippines Root Crops Research and Training Center, Library




NO. 96317

Sweetpotato observational trials in the river flood plains of Cagayan


Callueng, MP; Valdez, ET; Cruz dela, AA
Southeast Asia Program for Potato Research and Development Sele